Klook entrepreneur says LinkedIn helped him find start-up co-founder

Gnock Fah was then a 26-year-old Hong Kong-based investment analyst with big plans to shake-up the travel industry. He already had a co-founder in fellow financier and long-time friend Ethan Lin, but the pair had one major problem: They needed a tech brain to execute their vision. “I didn’t know anything about tech back then from my finance background,” Gnock Fah told CNBC Make It. “I probably read through at least 500 profiles,” said the Klook co-founder, who used the language as an initial fil


Gnock Fah was then a 26-year-old Hong Kong-based investment analyst with big plans to shake-up the travel industry. He already had a co-founder in fellow financier and long-time friend Ethan Lin, but the pair had one major problem: They needed a tech brain to execute their vision. “I didn’t know anything about tech back then from my finance background,” Gnock Fah told CNBC Make It. “I probably read through at least 500 profiles,” said the Klook co-founder, who used the language as an initial fil
Klook entrepreneur says LinkedIn helped him find start-up co-founder Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -eric gnock fah, co-founder, chief operations officer of klook, -craig dixon, program manager at accelerating asia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startup, told, language, cofounder, gnock, linkedin, way, wanted, tech, helped, profiles, klook, friend, entrepreneur, fah


Klook entrepreneur says LinkedIn helped him find start-up co-founder

Gnock Fah was then a 26-year-old Hong Kong-based investment analyst with big plans to shake-up the travel industry. He already had a co-founder in fellow financier and long-time friend Ethan Lin, but the pair had one major problem: They needed a tech brain to execute their vision.

“I didn’t know anything about tech back then from my finance background,” Gnock Fah told CNBC Make It.

Not one to let that stand in his way, Gnock Fah consulted a U.S. tech friend to find out the most useful coding language — which, in 2014, he was told, was PHP — and got stalking.

“I probably read through at least 500 profiles,” said the Klook co-founder, who used the language as an initial filter. He then honed in on the most built-out profiles, reasoning that they would be most likely to respond.

“It was determination, I would say. We knew we wanted to be (a) tech-plus-travel (business).”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -eric gnock fah, co-founder, chief operations officer of klook, -craig dixon, program manager at accelerating asia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startup, told, language, cofounder, gnock, linkedin, way, wanted, tech, helped, profiles, klook, friend, entrepreneur, fah


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Iddris Sandu – Bridging the gap between technology and minorities

Now 21, the self-made entrepreneur and California native has made quite a name for himself in the worlds of technology and entertainment. Private consultant, software engineer, and technologist are just a few hats Sandu wears – though, he prefers the title architect. According to Sandu, he was offered admissions to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology twice, but he declined in order to be a change agent for African-American culture. Back in 2009, a Steve Jobs podcast served as the spark for


Now 21, the self-made entrepreneur and California native has made quite a name for himself in the worlds of technology and entertainment. Private consultant, software engineer, and technologist are just a few hats Sandu wears – though, he prefers the title architect. According to Sandu, he was offered admissions to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology twice, but he declined in order to be a change agent for African-American culture. Back in 2009, a Steve Jobs podcast served as the spark for
Iddris Sandu – Bridging the gap between technology and minorities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: falyn page, source, justin wu, -iddris sandu, technology entrepreneur
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, wunderkind, iddris, tech, entrepreneur, worlds, minorities, library, designer, gap, sandu, bridging, young, written


Iddris Sandu - Bridging the gap between technology and minorities

While other kids were at home watching television, a 13-year-old named Iddris Sandu spent most of his childhood in the library, reading texts about the theory of relativity and studying the German industrial designer Dieter Rams.

Now 21, the self-made entrepreneur and California native has made quite a name for himself in the worlds of technology and entertainment.

With a passion for tech and culture, Sandu has written algorithms and code for tech giants like Uber, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat, received the Presidental Scholar Award from President Barack Obama.

His “wunderkind” reputation has allowed him to have boldface names like NBA star Steph Curry and Tesla CEO Elon Musk on speed dial.

Private consultant, software engineer, and technologist are just a few hats Sandu wears – though, he prefers the title architect. According to Sandu, he was offered admissions to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology twice, but he declined in order to be a change agent for African-American culture.

“Most people can see, but not everyone has vision,” Sandu told CNBC in a recent interview, summarizing his life’s philosophy and entrepreneurial drive.

Back in 2009, a Steve Jobs podcast served as the spark for Sandu’s desire to learn more about the technology world. As a teenager, the child of Ghanaian parents had a a fateful encounter in a library with a designer from Google. Shortly thereafter, he landed his first internship with the tech behemoth.

Since then, the young entrepreneur has been broadening his horizons by partnering with some very prominent entertainers. Sandu recently partnered with Kanye West and Jaden Smith on a few future businesses, clothing lines and disaster relief projects that are set to launch in 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: falyn page, source, justin wu, -iddris sandu, technology entrepreneur
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, wunderkind, iddris, tech, entrepreneur, worlds, minorities, library, designer, gap, sandu, bridging, young, written


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Driving in a new gear: How Danica Patrick is reinventing herself as an entrepreneur

For Danica Patrick, it was never really about the thrill of racing NASCAR or Indy cars at more than 200 miles per hour. Now that she’s hung up her helmet and fire suit for her next chapter as an entrepreneur, she said she doesn’t miss the track. It’s a very different life than racing, and she’s building new muscles as an entrepreneur and letting go of some old ones. Her leadership approach is the same, regardless of whether she’s racing cars or designing clothes. I don’t need the answer to be, ‘


For Danica Patrick, it was never really about the thrill of racing NASCAR or Indy cars at more than 200 miles per hour. Now that she’s hung up her helmet and fire suit for her next chapter as an entrepreneur, she said she doesn’t miss the track. It’s a very different life than racing, and she’s building new muscles as an entrepreneur and letting go of some old ones. Her leadership approach is the same, regardless of whether she’s racing cars or designing clothes. I don’t need the answer to be, ‘
Driving in a new gear: How Danica Patrick is reinventing herself as an entrepreneur Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-02  Authors: adam bryant
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, need, entrepreneur, gear, job, theyre, patrick, reinventing, shes, danica, approach, racing, dont, work, driving


Driving in a new gear: How Danica Patrick is reinventing herself as an entrepreneur

For Danica Patrick, it was never really about the thrill of racing NASCAR or Indy cars at more than 200 miles per hour. Now that she’s hung up her helmet and fire suit for her next chapter as an entrepreneur, she said she doesn’t miss the track. That wasn’t the point in the first place.

“For me it was about setting goals and accomplishing them,” she said during our conversation on ‘The Art of Leading.’ “I’m a very big believer in setting goals.”

She’s now focused on building her portfolio of businesses: Somnium, her Napa vineyard; Warrior by Danica Patrick, her athleisure clothing line; promoting her health and fitness book, “Pretty Intense,” and serving as the spokesperson for GoDaddy, which made her the face of 13 Super Bowl commercials.

It’s a very different life than racing, and she’s building new muscles as an entrepreneur and letting go of some old ones.

“I’m having to take more of a hands-on approach now,” she said. “With racing, I drove the car, but I couldn’t set it up. None of that other stuff was part of me. I had people who planned all my schedules for everything, so there were very few details that I had to worry about. I just had to be sharp. I had to be present, and I had to deliver when the time came. So my switch was very on-off for the jobs that I had to do.”

Her new career as an entrepreneur requires a very different approach. “I feel like I’m having to be a little more detail-oriented, and follow up and ask a lot of questions and educate myself. They’re new companies and it’s an important part of the process right now.”

But some things don’t change. Her leadership approach is the same, regardless of whether she’s racing cars or designing clothes.

“It’s about trying to figure out how to get people to work hard for you. Everybody’s a little bit different, so you need that attentiveness from a human standpoint,” she said. “It was about talking to people and building a relationship so that they want to work hard for you because they’re invested in your life and the results. You can apply that approach to just about anything. You can get people to work for you out of fear, but they’re not going to do their best work for you out of fear. That only comes out of love and passion and care.”

What quality does she look for most when she’s interviewing job candidates?

“You’re always looking for confidence,” she said. “When you look at them and talk to them, you feel like they can handle things. Because at the end of the day, that’s why you’re hiring them. You need someone to do a job for you and you can’t do all of them yourself. So you want someone who doesn’t need their hand held every step of the way.”

And what if she could only ask somebody one question in a job interview?

“I think the most valuable question is, ‘What would you do if you could do anything in the world?’ I don’t need the answer to be, ‘Work for you.’ In fact, if they answered like that, I’d probably be thinking they just want this job. If they don’t have an answer, that would tell me a lot. Everyone should have an answer for that, because how else are you going to get there?”

Adam Bryant is a CNBC contributor and managing director of Merryck & Co., a senior leadership development and executive mentoring firm. A veteran journalist, Bryant interviewed more than 500 leaders for the “Corner Office” feature he created at the New York Times. Parts of this interview were edited for clarity and space.

WATCH: Danica Patrick on NASCAR’s business model


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-02  Authors: adam bryant
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, need, entrepreneur, gear, job, theyre, patrick, reinventing, shes, danica, approach, racing, dont, work, driving


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Kevin O’Leary: If you want to get rich, start working 25 hours a day, 7 days a week

“You’re going to work 25 hours a day, seven days a week, forever. You’re going to be competing with tons of determined people who “want to kick your ass. For his part, O’Leary is an expert at hustle and hard work. He typically wakes up at around 4:30 a.m. and juggles his many ventures, from managing his “Shark Tank” investments to lecturing at universities to running a number of his own businesses. “The biggest myth of being an entrepreneur is that you’re going to get rich overnight,” O’Leary sa


“You’re going to work 25 hours a day, seven days a week, forever. You’re going to be competing with tons of determined people who “want to kick your ass. For his part, O’Leary is an expert at hustle and hard work. He typically wakes up at around 4:30 a.m. and juggles his many ventures, from managing his “Shark Tank” investments to lecturing at universities to running a number of his own businesses. “The biggest myth of being an entrepreneur is that you’re going to get rich overnight,” O’Leary sa
Kevin O’Leary: If you want to get rich, start working 25 hours a day, 7 days a week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hard, working, week, oleary, shark, 25, thats, money, entrepreneur, going, start, day, hours, work, youre, tank, kevin, rich, days


Kevin O'Leary: If you want to get rich, start working 25 hours a day, 7 days a week

Everybody seems to be striving for work-life balance. But if you want to be an entrepreneur, especially one who’s rich and successful, that’s not an option — you have to be prepared to work very hard, says financial expert and star of ABC’s “Shark Tank” Kevin O’Leary.

“If I have to give one piece of advice to someone who’s thinking about starting a business, I tell them this: Forget about balance,” O’Leary tells CNBC’s Make It. “You’re going to work 25 hours a day, seven days a week, forever.

“That’s what it takes to be successful.”

You’re going to be competing with tons of determined people who “want to kick your ass. It’s a job 24-7,” he continues.

“Get over it, and get ready for it.”

O’Leary isn’t the only money mogul to recommend a rigorous work schedule. Self-made millionaire Grant Cardone has said that while most people work 9 to 5, he works 95 hours per week, and if you ever want to be a millionaire, you need to do the same.

For his part, O’Leary is an expert at hustle and hard work. He typically wakes up at around 4:30 a.m. and juggles his many ventures, from managing his “Shark Tank” investments to lecturing at universities to running a number of his own businesses.

When it comes to investing in other entrepreneurs, he doles hundreds of thousands of dollars on “Shark Tank” each season, but only when he’s convinced they’ll work extremely hard to be successful.

“The biggest myth of being an entrepreneur is that you’re going to get rich overnight,” O’Leary says. “It practically never happens. Most people slog it out for years, and sometimes even decades.”

Still, O’Leary also says that when it comes to entrepreneurship, money shouldn’t be the motivating factor. What should keep you going through those long weeks and rough patches is the pursuit of personal freedom. And that’s what you should focus on.

“It’s a long, hard journey, but it’s worth it,” O’Leary says. “It’s not about the greed of money, it’s about the pursuit of personal freedom. If you’re successful as an entrepreneur, you will set yourself free, and that’s worth fighting for.”

Don’t miss: Here’s the mental trick this introverted Duolingo exec uses to lead effectively

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hard, working, week, oleary, shark, 25, thats, money, entrepreneur, going, start, day, hours, work, youre, tank, kevin, rich, days


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Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


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Women Mean Business: Entrepreneur Devika Wood on standing up to sexual harassment

U.K.-based health care firm Vida Care has raised millions since 2016. “When I started to raise investment, I was put in sexually compromised positions by some shareholders, and sexual harassment. I was told that if I took somebody’s money, that I could take it, if I did something in return. And sadly, this happens far too often,” Devika Wood, co-founder of Vida, told an audience last week. Her comments during The Telegraph’s “Women Mean Business” event in London drew audible gasps from the crowd


U.K.-based health care firm Vida Care has raised millions since 2016. “When I started to raise investment, I was put in sexually compromised positions by some shareholders, and sexual harassment. I was told that if I took somebody’s money, that I could take it, if I did something in return. And sadly, this happens far too often,” Devika Wood, co-founder of Vida, told an audience last week. Her comments during The Telegraph’s “Women Mean Business” event in London drew audible gasps from the crowd
Women Mean Business: Entrepreneur Devika Wood on standing up to sexual harassment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: alexandra gibbs, courtesy of the telegraph
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, entrepreneur, told, women, vida, harassment, mean, standing, wood, business, raised, cofounder, dont, sexual, positions, devika, money, female


Women Mean Business: Entrepreneur Devika Wood on standing up to sexual harassment

U.K.-based health care firm Vida Care has raised millions since 2016. On the way to establishing the business however, its co-founder was put in positions that she wasn’t comfortable with — and now she wants to make sure that others don’t have to go through what she did.

“When I started to raise investment, I was put in sexually compromised positions by some shareholders, and sexual harassment. I was told that if I took somebody’s money, that I could take it, if I did something in return. And sadly, this happens far too often,” Devika Wood, co-founder of Vida, told an audience last week. Her comments during The Telegraph’s “Women Mean Business” event in London drew audible gasps from the crowd.

“I have a load of female founders, friends, who are on the same journey as me who have been through the exact same situation. And sometimes we just don’t know who to go to and who to talk to about it — because we don’t have an option.”

Wood recalled that the majority of money raised for Vida had come from men — which she was thankful for, yet added that she would’ve liked more female investors involved, as she felt like she’d “have a better voice to be heard.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: alexandra gibbs, courtesy of the telegraph
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, entrepreneur, told, women, vida, harassment, mean, standing, wood, business, raised, cofounder, dont, sexual, positions, devika, money, female


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Sports entrepreneur Michael Rubin sees ‘nothing but growth opportunity in China’

On Rubin’s most recent visit to China, where he’ll soon be launching Fanatics, a sports merchandise retailer and CNBC Disruptor 50 company, he said the excitement around basketball was something “you had to see … to believe.” “We had 45 million people watch our pre-season basketball game,” Rubin said. “That’s like half of a Super Bowl rating. That’s how rabid the basketball fans are in China. So, for me, I think we have nothing but growth opportunity in China.”


On Rubin’s most recent visit to China, where he’ll soon be launching Fanatics, a sports merchandise retailer and CNBC Disruptor 50 company, he said the excitement around basketball was something “you had to see … to believe.” “We had 45 million people watch our pre-season basketball game,” Rubin said. “That’s like half of a Super Bowl rating. That’s how rabid the basketball fans are in China. So, for me, I think we have nothing but growth opportunity in China.”
Sports entrepreneur Michael Rubin sees ‘nothing but growth opportunity in China’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-24  Authors: elizabeth gurdus, george kavallines, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, scott mlyn, michael phillips, gus ruelas, zach gibson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fanatics, opportunity, entrepreneur, retailer, merchandise, growth, michael, soon, public, china, sees, basketball, rubin, disruptor, thats


Sports entrepreneur Michael Rubin sees 'nothing but growth opportunity in China'

On Rubin’s most recent visit to China, where he’ll soon be launching Fanatics, a sports merchandise retailer and CNBC Disruptor 50 company, he said the excitement around basketball was something “you had to see … to believe.”

“We had 45 million people watch our pre-season basketball game,” Rubin said. “That’s like half of a Super Bowl rating. That’s how rabid the basketball fans are in China. So, for me, I think we have nothing but growth opportunity in China.”

More from CNBC Disruptor 50:

Cloud software company Qualtrics plans to follow rival SurveyMonkey to the public markets

These are the tech start-ups worth billions that are expected to go public next year

The ‘Netflix of fitness’ looks to become a publicly traded stock as soon as next year

For Fanatics, a $4.5 billion direct-to-consumer manufacturer and retailer of licensed sports merchandise like jerseys, that opportunity could be in the billions of dollars, Rubin, who serves as Fanatics’ executive chairman, told Cramer.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-24  Authors: elizabeth gurdus, george kavallines, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, scott mlyn, michael phillips, gus ruelas, zach gibson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fanatics, opportunity, entrepreneur, retailer, merchandise, growth, michael, soon, public, china, sees, basketball, rubin, disruptor, thats


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The billionaire LA Times owner calls social media the ‘cancer of our time’

Platforms such as Facebook’s News Feed have revolutionized how people consume media and how news organizations deliver content. Soon-Shiong, a former surgeon turned entrepreneur, told “Squawk Alley” that “I say it’s the cancer of our time and social media is a form of metastasis of news. Soon-Shiong, born in South Africa and currently living in Los Angeles, is not the only high-level entrepreneur to publicly criticize social media. Late last year, ex-Facebook executive Chamath Palihapitiya said


Platforms such as Facebook’s News Feed have revolutionized how people consume media and how news organizations deliver content. Soon-Shiong, a former surgeon turned entrepreneur, told “Squawk Alley” that “I say it’s the cancer of our time and social media is a form of metastasis of news. Soon-Shiong, born in South Africa and currently living in Los Angeles, is not the only high-level entrepreneur to publicly criticize social media. Late last year, ex-Facebook executive Chamath Palihapitiya said
The billionaire LA Times owner calls social media the ‘cancer of our time’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-26  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images, cnbc, erin black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, owner, la, took, bezos, entrepreneur, media, social, fake, turned, calls, billionaire, washington, cancer, million, times, truthsoonshiong


The billionaire LA Times owner calls social media the 'cancer of our time'

Platforms such as Facebook’s News Feed have revolutionized how people consume media and how news organizations deliver content. But they have also been criticized for spreading so-called fake news and misinformation.

Soon-Shiong, a former surgeon turned entrepreneur, told “Squawk Alley” that “I say it’s the cancer of our time and social media is a form of metastasis of news. We need to change that.”

He described Facebook as a “advertising facing” organization, and therefore people cannot differentiate from “fake news,” “real news” or “opinion news.”

Soon-Shiong, born in South Africa and currently living in Los Angeles, is not the only high-level entrepreneur to publicly criticize social media.

Late last year, ex-Facebook executive Chamath Palihapitiya said on CNBC that social media is creating a society that confuses “popularity” with “truth.”

Soon-Shiong took control of the LA Times for $500 million in June. He joins the ranks of billionaires Marc Benioff and Jeff Bezos, who have also purchased media companies.

Benioff just bought Time magazine for $190 million in cash from Meredith Corp. Bezos owns The Washington Post.

WATCH: The man who “invented” the #hashtag and how it changed social media


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-26  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images, cnbc, erin black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, owner, la, took, bezos, entrepreneur, media, social, fake, turned, calls, billionaire, washington, cancer, million, times, truthsoonshiong


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Budsies toy entrepreneur mixed love of children and art on Shark Tank

This Shark Tank entrepreneur will turn your artwork into a plush toy 10:43 AM ET Fri, 21 Sept 2018 | 01:14They say life imitates art, which is why Budsies has no problem making a name for itself in the toy industry. Furmansky said the awareness and recognition of his product, thanks to being on “Shark Tank”, is unparalleled. His landlord is even proud to have a “Shark Tank” company in his complex. “At this point, we’ve produced nearly 70,000 unique designs and established ourselves as the #1 cus


This Shark Tank entrepreneur will turn your artwork into a plush toy 10:43 AM ET Fri, 21 Sept 2018 | 01:14They say life imitates art, which is why Budsies has no problem making a name for itself in the toy industry. Furmansky said the awareness and recognition of his product, thanks to being on “Shark Tank”, is unparalleled. His landlord is even proud to have a “Shark Tank” company in his complex. “At this point, we’ve produced nearly 70,000 unique designs and established ourselves as the #1 cus
Budsies toy entrepreneur mixed love of children and art on Shark Tank Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-23  Authors: sophia fraioli, claire rodgers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, budsies, company, children, furmansky, mixed, shark, tank, turn, entrepreneur, art, proud, artwork, toy, plush, love


Budsies toy entrepreneur mixed love of children and art on Shark Tank

This Shark Tank entrepreneur will turn your artwork into a plush toy 10:43 AM ET Fri, 21 Sept 2018 | 01:14

They say life imitates art, which is why Budsies has no problem making a name for itself in the toy industry. This South Florida-based company lets customers turn their original artwork into a plush toy.

Alex Furmansky, Founder and CEO of Budsies, pitched the heartwarming concept to the panel on “Shark Tank,”

He told the sharks: “Children have the most amazing minds. Their imagination inspires them to create the most fantastic artwork. So, rather than let their artwork take over our fridge, or get lost in piles in attics or basements gone forever — how can we treasure it?” he asked.

“Imagine if we could magically transform your child’s artwork into something real? Something tangible. Something…huggable,” he added.

On the show, Furmansky asked for $100,000 in exchange for a 5 percent stake in his company. While the outcome wasn’t exactly what they were expecting, Furmansky walked away feeling confident in his decision.

Furmansky said the awareness and recognition of his product, thanks to being on “Shark Tank”, is unparalleled. Being on the show has helped his business secure everything from partnerships to even a great office lease. His landlord is even proud to have a “Shark Tank” company in his complex.

The future of Budsies looks exceptionally bright, as the company has been on a high growth trajectory for the last 5 years with plans to expand. “At this point, we’ve produced nearly 70,000 unique designs and established ourselves as the #1 custom plush company worldwide,” Furmansky said.

Above all, Furmansky said that he’s most proud of his incredible team in Boynton Beach, Florida.

“Everyone is sharp, hungry for growth, and aligned with our mission.” He added: “In fact, we are wrapping up our 2018 Budsies Pals Program…where over 50 strong children facing tough struggles will receive free Budsies to bring them strength and comfort.”

Don’t miss Furmansky pitch Budsies on “Shark Tank” tonight at 9P ET on CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-23  Authors: sophia fraioli, claire rodgers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, budsies, company, children, furmansky, mixed, shark, tank, turn, entrepreneur, art, proud, artwork, toy, plush, love


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Kicking a common habit could help boost your career, says Estonia’s youngest-ever inventor

If you want to have a successful career, it can be tempting to try to be all things to all people. But, instead, you should know where to draw the line and be unashamed about saying no. However, it’s a lesson she learned the hard way: When Hindricks founded her first business at 16 — a line of reflective accessories for pedestrians — she became Estonia’s youngest-ever inventor and found herself suddenly in high demand. “With my first business, I became so famous so fast,” said Hindricks, whose y


If you want to have a successful career, it can be tempting to try to be all things to all people. But, instead, you should know where to draw the line and be unashamed about saying no. However, it’s a lesson she learned the hard way: When Hindricks founded her first business at 16 — a line of reflective accessories for pedestrians — she became Estonia’s youngest-ever inventor and found herself suddenly in high demand. “With my first business, I became so famous so fast,” said Hindricks, whose y
Kicking a common habit could help boost your career, says Estonia’s youngest-ever inventor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, try, kicking, common, estonias, career, success, unashamed, young, inventor, habit, hindricks, business, help, boost, way, line, entrepreneur, youngestever


Kicking a common habit could help boost your career, says Estonia's youngest-ever inventor

If you want to have a successful career, it can be tempting to try to be all things to all people. But, instead, you should know where to draw the line and be unashamed about saying no.

That’s according to Karoli Hindricks, who, with a resume of accolades including serial entrepreneur, European Parliament speaker and MTV’s youngest-ever CEO, is a success story by any standards.

However, it’s a lesson she learned the hard way: When Hindricks founded her first business at 16 — a line of reflective accessories for pedestrians — she became Estonia’s youngest-ever inventor and found herself suddenly in high demand.

“With my first business, I became so famous so fast,” said Hindricks, whose young success saw her invited to speak at countless schools and entrepreneur forums.

“I ended up spending more time talking about my business than running it,” Hindricks told CNBC Make It.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, try, kicking, common, estonias, career, success, unashamed, young, inventor, habit, hindricks, business, help, boost, way, line, entrepreneur, youngestever


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