Disney’s ESPN is caught in strategic limbo as the company moves slowly toward streaming

At the same time, Disney is betting its future on Disney+, its $6.99-a-month family-oriented streaming service, which goes live on Nov. 12. Disney has a separate sports streaming product, the nascent $4.99-per-month ESPN+, which has some live sports, including UFC, but airs zero NBA or NFL games. But it’s an non-factor for Disney+, the product by which investors will judge Bob Iger’s company going forward. And that means fewer ESPN subscribers. One plan to boost ESPN+ while keeping ESPN steady m


At the same time, Disney is betting its future on Disney+, its $6.99-a-month family-oriented streaming service, which goes live on Nov. 12.
Disney has a separate sports streaming product, the nascent $4.99-per-month ESPN+, which has some live sports, including UFC, but airs zero NBA or NFL games.
But it’s an non-factor for Disney+, the product by which investors will judge Bob Iger’s company going forward.
And that means fewer ESPN subscribers.
One plan to boost ESPN+ while keeping ESPN steady m
Disney’s ESPN is caught in strategic limbo as the company moves slowly toward streaming Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: alex sherman jabari young, alex sherman, jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slowly, caught, future, subscribers, disneys, strategic, live, moves, espns, espn, company, disney, ticket, product, limbo, rights, according, streaming


Disney's ESPN is caught in strategic limbo as the company moves slowly toward streaming

Quarterback Tom Brady #12 of the New England Patriots looks to pass against the Baltimore Ravens during the first quarter at M&T Bank Stadium on November 3, 2019 in Baltimore, Maryland.

The future of Disney is streaming, and the past is linear cable television. But the present is a weird mix of the two.

Disney’s high-profile asset ESPN is awkwardly caught in the middle.

The Disney-owned sports network has been a profit engine for decades, earning billions of dollars each year from advertising and cable affiliate fees. At the same time, Disney is betting its future on Disney+, its $6.99-a-month family-oriented streaming service, which goes live on Nov. 12. It will include a nearly full library of old Disney and Pixar movies, “Star Wars” and Marvel films, original programming, library episodes of shows like “The Simpsons” and quite a bit more.

What consumers won’t find in Disney+ is sports.

Disney has a separate sports streaming product, the nascent $4.99-per-month ESPN+, which has some live sports, including UFC, but airs zero NBA or NFL games. ESPN+ has only 2.4 million subscribers after launching in April 2018. By way of comparison, Disney+ will probably have about 2 million subscribers after just one day on the market, according to LightShed analyst Rich Greenfield (in part because Verizon wireless subscribers will get a year of Disney+ for free).

The result puts Disney in a bit of a dilemma when it comes to ESPN. The sports network is an economic juggernaut that generates about $10.3 billion in annual revenue, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence. But it’s an non-factor for Disney+, the product by which investors will judge Bob Iger’s company going forward.

Iger’s plan seems to be to thread the needle, preparing for a day when ESPN+ is a stronger product with popular sports rights, while not rocking the boat on ESPN’s value for the next few years. He’s basically been forced into this strategy, as rights for nearly every major U.S. sports league are tied up until 2021 or 2022. It’s also a good strategy: ESPN continues to be able to raise affiliate fees and advertising rates as it becomes more and more essential to the cable bundle with its event-driven live programming. Nevertheless, UBS estimates more than 12 million American households will ditch traditional pay-TV by the end of next year. And that means fewer ESPN subscribers.

One plan to boost ESPN+ while keeping ESPN steady may involve the NFL Sunday Ticket, which shows every out-of-market NFL game each Sunday. Several Disney executives covet Sunday Ticket and would like to own the rights to it, bundling it with ESPN+, according to people familiar with the matter. This could happen in 2022 if Sunday Ticket ends its deal with AT&T’s DirecTV, which currently charges more than $300 for the annual product to help offset the cost — about $1.5 billion per year for 8 years.

Meanwhile, Disney is juggling two opposing viewpoints internally about ESPN’s future as a linear TV network, according to people familiar with the matter. The first camp, which includes longtime TV executive Norby Williamson, favors focusing on sports highlights — a “back to the future” play centered around “SportsCenter.” The second, which includes executive producer Erik Rydholm, believes riskier and edgier shows are necessary to draw younger and more diverse audiences.

Complicating the scene further, a slew of new entrants could bid for live sports rights in the coming years, including Amazon, Google and Apple. This would give the leagues more choice in terms of potential partners, which could heighten ESPN’s aversion to say anything about controversial topics like China’s relationship with the NBA, the NFL’s problems addressing concussions or political issues such as Colin Kaepernick’s kneeling during the National Anthem. “SportsCenter” may be ESPN’s most non-controversial programming.

Disney reports its fourth-quarter earnings after Thursday’s market close. Analysts estimate the company will generate revenue of about $19 billion for the quarter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: alex sherman jabari young, alex sherman, jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slowly, caught, future, subscribers, disneys, strategic, live, moves, espns, espn, company, disney, ticket, product, limbo, rights, according, streaming


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AT&T, Disney and Comcast have very different plans for the streaming wars — here’s what they’re doing and why

But examining the streaming products of AT&T’s WarnerMedia, Disney and Comcast’s NBCUniversal in isolation, a different concept reveals itself. As much as the old media giants might envy Wall Street’s years-long love affair with Netflix, the cable bundle still rules. The three most significant new streaming services from legacy media companies are WarnerMedia’s HBO Max, Disney+ and Comcast’s Peacock. The question is how many of today’s 89 million cable subscribers would actually pay to subscribe


But examining the streaming products of AT&T’s WarnerMedia, Disney and Comcast’s NBCUniversal in isolation, a different concept reveals itself.
As much as the old media giants might envy Wall Street’s years-long love affair with Netflix, the cable bundle still rules.
The three most significant new streaming services from legacy media companies are WarnerMedia’s HBO Max, Disney+ and Comcast’s Peacock.
The question is how many of today’s 89 million cable subscribers would actually pay to subscribe
AT&T, Disney and Comcast have very different plans for the streaming wars — here’s what they’re doing and why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-27  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cable, disney, doing, theyre, different, att, max, espn, streaming, plans, comcast, warnermedia, bundle, heres, hbo, wars, month, million


AT&T, Disney and Comcast have very different plans for the streaming wars -- here's what they're doing and why

Bob Iger, CEO, The Walt Disney Company Scott Mlyn | CNBC

It might seem like media companies are finally embracing the future as nearly every major programmer is launching a streaming service. But examining the streaming products of AT&T’s WarnerMedia, Disney and Comcast’s NBCUniversal in isolation, a different concept reveals itself. The giants of media are tailoring their offerings around their relative strength in traditional pay-TV. The pricing and roll-out strategies of streaming services are linked to how much media companies have to gain, or lose, if consumers start relying on streaming video in lieu of cable TV. As much as the old media giants might envy Wall Street’s years-long love affair with Netflix, the cable bundle still rules. This chart explains the situation clearly. It shows approximately how much each media company currently generates from the cable networks it owns within the standard bundle. Pricing estimates come from SNL Kagan, a research arm of S&P Global Market Intelligence. For example, for Disney, that’s ESPN and all of the associated ESPNs (ESPN2, ESPNU, etc.) plus the Disney channels, FX, National Geographic and its other owned networks (not including ABC, for which it gets additional broadcast retransmission fees). For that entire bundle, Disney makes more than $16 per cable subscriber per month. In other words, if you pay for a standard cable package, $16 of what you’re paying per month goes to Disney. AT&T’s WarnerMedia networks, led by TNT, CNN and TBS, bring in about $6.50 per cable customer per month. Comcast’s NBCUniversal networks — which include CNBC, as well as USA, Bravo, MSNBC, and others — earn a little less than $6 per person. The chart doesn’t include regional sports networks, many of which are owned by Comcast, or a la carte offerings like CBS’s Showtime or AT&T’s HBO, which aren’t part of a standard package. All of this is important because it helps explain the business considerations behind the streaming wars, which kick off in earnest this fall. The three most significant new streaming services from legacy media companies are WarnerMedia’s HBO Max, Disney+ and Comcast’s Peacock. Disney+ will be first out of the date, with a debut on Nov. 12. WarnerMedia will officially unveil HBO Max, its streaming offering, at an event in Burbank, California, on Oct. 29, and it’s going to be available in the first half of 2020. Peacock is coming out around the same time. Let’s take a look at these companies different strategies, ranked on a continuum from “most cool with your canceling cable” to “least cool with your canceling cable.”

Most cool with your canceling cable: HBO Max

AT&T has taken the most aggressive position with its streaming offering in terms of preparing for a world without traditional pay-TV. WarnerMedia already sells HBO outside the cable bundle, charging $14.99 (call it $15) a month. It has 35 million U.S. subscribers, most of whom watch as an add-on to a traditional pay TV package. Apart from that, the company brings in about $6.50 from all of its cable networks per month, Kagan estimates. While AT&T owns DirecTV, a national pay-TV distributor, that business is hemorrhaging subscribers. What AT&T really wants you to do is pay for AT&T wireless. In a few years, AT&T could also provide you with a 5G high-speed home broadband service, competing directly against cable companies. Realizing he doesn’t have as much to protect in the existing pay-TV bundle as Disney, WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey has decided to offer consumers a robust package of content with HBO Max. He’s spending billions on shows like “Friends” and “The Big Bang Theory” (even if sometimes the shows are owned by Warner Bros. themselves) to stream exclusively as part of the package. HBO Max will also include all HBO programming, shows and movies from the WarnerMedia library, new originals and, eventually, (likely several years from now) live programming from CNN, TNT and TBS, including sports, Stankey said in June. That’s a kitchen sink offering. WarnerMedia is preparing for a future where you aren’t paying for cable TV. Stankey told CNBC his goal was to get 70 million to 80 million subscribers for HBO Max. Of that, he wants 50 million U.S. susbcribers by 2025, Reuters reported Friday. How realistic is that? CNBC reported in June that WarnerMedia was pondering a price between $15-$18 per month for HBO Max. If AT&T prices HBO Max at the same $15 price as HBO (or lower), it will easily be able to transfer HBO’s existing 35 million subscribers to HBO Max. However, if it prices HBO Max at even a dollar or two more than HBO, it will need to convince current HBO subscribers to switch in addition to picking up new subscribers. WarnerMedia will announce its pricing of HBO Max at WarnerMedia Day on October 29, according to a person familiar with the matter. If Stankey can execute his vision, it will be great news for AT&T. 80 million people paying $15-$18 per month for HBO Max is a lot more money than 80 million paying WarnerMedia $6.50 per month for its cable channels (of which only 35 million are paying for HBO). That could vault AT&T closer to the Netflix-like multiples that investors crave. The question is how quickly will customers cancel traditional pay-TV for a streaming-only world? Without a significant flood of cord cutters, it’s dubious to suspect AT&T can add 15 million more HBO Max subscribers. If WarnerMedia’s original programming is strong enough, AT&T is well positioned to make a lot more money in a world where four or five streaming services supplant cable TV. But if all the “extra” with HBO Max doesn’t convince many new people to give HBO a try, AT&T risks falling severely short of its subscriber goal — especially when other streaming services are actively hampering the shift away from cable TV.

Eventually OK with your canceling cable: Disney

If Disney truly wanted to transition Americans away from the cable bundle and to a new era of streaming TV, it would offer a product that included all of its content, linear and on-demand. That would include all of ESPN’s content, such as “Monday Night Football” and live games from leagues including Major League Baseball and the National Basketball Association. CEO Bob Iger isn’t doing that. Of the $16.10 Disney earns per month from cable subscribers, ESPN and its associated networks take in about $9 for every person that subscribes to a cable bundle, Kagan estimates. Disney also collects billions each year in advertising revenue connected to live sports on ESPN — people have to watch ads when they can’t fast-forward. This setup is a wonderful deal for Disney. If you’re a cable subscriber, whether like sports or not, you’re paying Disney $9 per month for ESPN networks, and you’re paying more than $16 to Disney overall. So Disney is in no hurry to have you cancel cable. In fact, Disney offers a Hulu with Live TV product that’s basically cable — a bundle of channels for $44.99 per month. That’s why why Disney hasn’t made ESPN available as a separate streaming service yet. Instead, Disney’s streaming offerings are: Disney+, a $6.99-a-month ($5.83-a-month with an annual subscription) family-friendly streaming service that will almost certainly be wildly popular, showcasing old Disney movies, Star Wars films, “The Simpsons” TV shows, new originals and more

ESPN+, a $4.99-a-month sports streaming service that does not include most of ESPN’s most popular games or live sports.

Hulu, which features original shows and episodes of dramas and sitcoms that currently air on broadcast and cable TV, plus many popular shows that are now off air, such as “Seinfeld,” “How I Met Your Mother,” and “Modern Family.” (Hulu has been a joint venture between Disney and several other companies, including Comcast, but Disney plans to take complete ownership within the next five years.) “There’s a migration that’s not going to slow down, it’s going to speed up, to direct-to-consumer services,” said Iger in an interview with CNBC. “But ESPN the linear channel is still very valuable to us and distributors. Down the road you could see a shift [of programming] to some extent to ESPN+, but that’s at a time when we believe the shift from a consumer perspective will be significant enough to warrant that.” In other words, Disney knows people are going to keep canceling cable but is in no hurry to accelerate this shift. When Disney decides the time is right, a bundle of Hulu, Disney+ and ESPN is a compelling replacement product for traditional pay-TV. Hulu with ads is $6 per month. Disney+ is $6 or $7 per month. If Disney were to make a standalone ESPN service at $10 per month, it would earn $22-$23 a month from consumers. That’s more than the $16.10 it takes in today. The question is how many of today’s 89 million cable subscribers would actually pay to subscribe to ESPN streaming? Probably far less than 89 million. Moreover, cable providers know that ESPN’s exclusivity in the cable bundle helps keep a pay-TV bundle alive. That gives Disney leverage to keep boosting prices for ESPN. So Disney is taking the transition nice and slowly.

Least cool with your canceling cable: Comcast


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-27  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cable, disney, doing, theyre, different, att, max, espn, streaming, plans, comcast, warnermedia, bundle, heres, hbo, wars, month, million


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Disney bans Netflix ads from all of its TV channels except ESPN

Disney is banning ads from competitor Netflix on all of its TV platforms except for ESPN. The news was first reported by The Wall Street Journal. Disney+ is ad free, but ads on other Disney properties, like ABC, wouldn’t be allowed to broadcast commercials for Netflix which could potentially take customers away from Disney+. The Wall Street Journal said that Disney originally considered banning ads for all Disney+ competitors. Disney will offer a bundle deal for Disney+ that includes access to E


Disney is banning ads from competitor Netflix on all of its TV platforms except for ESPN. The news was first reported by The Wall Street Journal. Disney+ is ad free, but ads on other Disney properties, like ABC, wouldn’t be allowed to broadcast commercials for Netflix which could potentially take customers away from Disney+. The Wall Street Journal said that Disney originally considered banning ads for all Disney+ competitors. Disney will offer a bundle deal for Disney+ that includes access to E
Disney bans Netflix ads from all of its TV channels except ESPN Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, journal, bans, street, amazon, offer, netflix, channels, report, ads, disney, espn, wall


Disney bans Netflix ads from all of its TV channels except ESPN

Disney is banning ads from competitor Netflix on all of its TV platforms except for ESPN.

The news was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

The decision comes ahead of the launch of Disney+, the company’s Netflix competitor that will cost $6.99 per month (or $69.99 for a full year) and will provide access to movies, original series and new content from Marvel and Star Wars franchises. Disney+ will launch on Nov. 12.

Disney+ is ad free, but ads on other Disney properties, like ABC, wouldn’t be allowed to broadcast commercials for Netflix which could potentially take customers away from Disney+.

Netflix declined to comment.

“The direct-to-consumer business has evolved, with many more entrants looking to advertise in traditional television, and across our portfolio of networks,” a Disney spokesperson told CNBC. “While the initial decision was strictly advertising based, we reevaluated our strategy to reflect the comprehensive business relationships we have with many of these companies, as direct-to-consumer is one element.”

The Wall Street Journal said that Disney originally considered banning ads for all Disney+ competitors. That could have included services such as Amazon Prime Video. Disney will offer a bundle deal for Disney+ that includes access to ESPN+ and Hulu. Disney took over full control of Hulu in May.

The news follows a similar report from The Wall Street Journal on Thursday that said Amazon and Disney are also fighting over terms that would allow Amazon to buy “a substantial percentage of the ad space” on Disney apps. According to The Wall Street Journal, Amazon is not currently planning to offer support for Disney+ on the Amazon Fire TV platform, which is available from Amazon Fire TV sticks and through partners who build smart TVs with Amazon’s software built-in.

Read the full report from The Wall Street Journal.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, journal, bans, street, amazon, offer, netflix, channels, report, ads, disney, espn, wall


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This fantasy football start-up thinks it can beat ESPN and Yahoo by catering to women and casual fans

And yet, Yen is the director of product design at a 16-person San Francisco fantasy football start-up called Sleeper. Appealing to women, casual fans and first-time fantasy players is critical to Sleeper’s strategy. In fantasy sports parlance, a “sleeper” is an under-the-radar player that has the potential to outperform his more established counterparts. “We feel like we’re that breakthrough talent,” Wang said. Even our icon is half cute, half sporty.”


And yet, Yen is the director of product design at a 16-person San Francisco fantasy football start-up called Sleeper. Appealing to women, casual fans and first-time fantasy players is critical to Sleeper’s strategy. In fantasy sports parlance, a “sleeper” is an under-the-radar player that has the potential to outperform his more established counterparts. “We feel like we’re that breakthrough talent,” Wang said. Even our icon is half cute, half sporty.”
This fantasy football start-up thinks it can beat ESPN and Yahoo by catering to women and casual fans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-25  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fans, casual, half, talent, yen, thinks, women, feel, beat, espn, thats, catering, startup, sleeper, football, wang, fantasy


This fantasy football start-up thinks it can beat ESPN and Yahoo by catering to women and casual fans

Sunny Yen isn’t a big sports fan.

She’s always happy to attend Super Bowl parties, but that’s about it. And yet, Yen is the director of product design at a 16-person San Francisco fantasy football start-up called Sleeper.

“I look at Yahoo and ESPN, and I realized that even though I don’t know about it, this is for hardcore fans only,” Yen said. “I feel like they build a wall to keep the woman, female audience out.”

That’s why Nan Wang, the CEO of Sleeper, hired Yen and her all-female team to design the look and feel of his company’s website and app. Appealing to women, casual fans and first-time fantasy players is critical to Sleeper’s strategy.

This more inclusive approach has informed features that Sleeper hopes set it apart, including the color coding of player stats and a simplified league set-up process that can be done in 30 seconds.

“The only way you can do that is to think outside of the box,” said Wang, highlighting that nearly half of his employees are women and most of the employees don’t really watch sports. “We consciously made that hiring decision.”

In fantasy sports parlance, a “sleeper” is an under-the-radar player that has the potential to outperform his more established counterparts. That’s how the start-up sees itself in taking on Yahoo and ESPN.

“We feel like we’re that breakthrough talent,” Wang said. “We’re the underdogs in this space competing against some big names, but we have the right talent to do so.”

The start-up also chose the name because it was gender neutral and welcoming, Wang said.

“We saw a lot of other sports companies come out of the gate with names like ‘Draft Monster,'” Wang said. “We thought a lot about inclusivity. Even our icon is half cute, half sporty.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-25  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fans, casual, half, talent, yen, thinks, women, feel, beat, espn, thats, catering, startup, sleeper, football, wang, fantasy


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Disney’s bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost $12.99 per month

Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month. On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be able to get Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu for under $15 a month. Iger said the bundle will be available when Disney+ launches on Nov. 12. “And that bundle that we’re creating, that $12.99 bundle where you can buy all three, offers consumers tremendous volume, tremendous quality and tremendous variety — for a good pri


Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month. On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be able to get Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu for under $15 a month. Iger said the bundle will be available when Disney+ launches on Nov. 12. “And that bundle that we’re creating, that $12.99 bundle where you can buy all three, offers consumers tremendous volume, tremendous quality and tremendous variety — for a good pri
Disney’s bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost $12.99 per month Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, entertainment, adsupported, 1299, streaming, service, iger, bundle, disney, available, prime, espn, disneys, tremendous, hulu, night, cost


Disney's bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost $12.99 per month

Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month.

On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be able to get Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu for under $15 a month.

Iger said the bundle will be available when Disney+ launches on Nov. 12.

“Our play… is to have general entertainment, we’ll call it Hulu, more family-like entertainment which is Disney+ and sports.,” Iger said on the call. “And that bundle that we’re creating, that $12.99 bundle where you can buy all three, offers consumers tremendous volume, tremendous quality and tremendous variety — for a good price.”

The Disney+ video streaming service will draw on Disney’s deep catalog of content and offer up new shows featuring favorite characters from “Toy Story” and “Monsters Inc.” to Marvel and “Star Wars.”

Also, with the Fox acquisition now closed, Disney will put all episodes of “The Simpsons” on the service on day one as well as “The Sound of Music,” “The Princess Bride” and “Malcolm in the Middle.”

“We’re also focused on leveraging Fox’s vast library of great titles to further enrich the content mix on our DTC platforms. For example, reimagining ‘Home Alone,” “Night at the Museum,” “Cheaper by the Dozen” and “Diary of a Wimpy Kid,'” Iger said on the call.

All Disney films released in 2019 will also be available on Disney+ as soon as their theatrical and home entertainment windows have closed. “Frozen II” will also be available exclusively on the platform by the summer of 2020.

Disney+ on its own will cost users $6.99 a month, or $69.99 for a full year.

ESPN+ is part of Disney’s plan to revitalize the sports network. Viewership has been on the decline, relationships between cable operators and networks are tense, and the situation remains unstable as more people ditch cable for streaming services.

It has seen fast growth in the ESPN+ service since launching last year, adding more than 2 million subscribers.

Also, having a sports streaming service separates Disney from competitors like Netflix and Amazon Prime, which don’t have limited live sports programming. Prime does stream Thursday Night Football games.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, entertainment, adsupported, 1299, streaming, service, iger, bundle, disney, available, prime, espn, disneys, tremendous, hulu, night, cost


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North Korea’s Kim Jong Un says missile launches are warning to US, South Korea over drill

Disney’s bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost…Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month. On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be…Entertainmentread more


Disney’s bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost…Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month. On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be…Entertainmentread more
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, koreas, launches, month, hulu, finally, missile, streaming, iger, south, warning, kim, services, jong, north, going, espn, earnings, drill, disneys, korea


North Korea's Kim Jong Un says missile launches are warning to US, South Korea over drill

Disney’s bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost…

Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month. On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be…

Entertainment

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06
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Fortnite World Cup finals turned these teen gamers into millionaires

A teen phenom won $3 million at New York City’s Arthur Ashe tennis stadium over the weekend and he didn’t even have to pick up a racket. Those fans watched some of the world’s best gamers, many of them on summer break from high school, compete in the first-ever Fortnite World Cup with $30 million in total prizes on the line. The biggest winner at the event turned out to be Kyle Giersdorf, a 16-year-old from Pennsylvania, who triumphed in a field of 100 finalists to win the whopping $3 million gr


A teen phenom won $3 million at New York City’s Arthur Ashe tennis stadium over the weekend and he didn’t even have to pick up a racket. Those fans watched some of the world’s best gamers, many of them on summer break from high school, compete in the first-ever Fortnite World Cup with $30 million in total prizes on the line. The biggest winner at the event turned out to be Kyle Giersdorf, a 16-year-old from Pennsylvania, who triumphed in a field of 100 finalists to win the whopping $3 million gr
Fortnite World Cup finals turned these teen gamers into millionaires Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fortnite, gamers, teen, million, giersdorf, win, cup, worlds, turned, espn, millionaires, tennis, world, weekend, finals, winning


Fortnite World Cup finals turned these teen gamers into millionaires

A teen phenom won $3 million at New York City’s Arthur Ashe tennis stadium over the weekend and he didn’t even have to pick up a racket.

The stadium will host the world’s best tennis players at the U.S. Open in August, but this past weekend, the site was filled with thousands of fans of Fortnite, Epic Games’ massively popular online multi-player survival game. Those fans watched some of the world’s best gamers, many of them on summer break from high school, compete in the first-ever Fortnite World Cup with $30 million in total prizes on the line.

The biggest winner at the event turned out to be Kyle Giersdorf, a 16-year-old from Pennsylvania, who triumphed in a field of 100 finalists to win the whopping $3 million grand prize and become the first Fortnite World Cup singles champion. (By comparison, the male and female winners of this year’s tennis U.S. Open will each receive $3.85 million.)

“I know that this could pretty much change my life forever,” Giersdorf, who plays Fortnite under the name “Bugha,” told ESPN after winning the competition on Sunday. “It’s just absolutely unreal.”

It was undoubtedly a huge win for the teenager, whose fame appears to be on the rise after reportedly adding more than 100,000 followers to his Twitter account since winning the tournament. But Giersdorf, who is also set to appear on NBC’s “Tonight Show” with Jimmy Fallon on Monday night, has no plans to let his huge cash prize go to his head. In fact, he told ESPN that he plans to invest his winnings rather than putting it toward any major splurges.

“I’m just going to save the money and invest it and not do anything dumb with it,” he said in a streaming interview with ESPN.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fortnite, gamers, teen, million, giersdorf, win, cup, worlds, turned, espn, millionaires, tennis, world, weekend, finals, winning


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Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era

But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. There’s no impetus for Disney to change th


But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. There’s no impetus for Disney to change th
Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fees, cable, content, era, pay, disney, paytv, espn, network, talking, tv, networks, charter, streaming, carriage, outcome, valuable


Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era

The Walt Disney Company CEO, Robert Iger arrives for the World premiere of Marvel Studios’ ‘Avengers: Endgame’ at the Los Angeles Convention Center on April 22, 2019 in Los Angeles. VALERIE MACON | AFP | Getty Images

Disney is set to renew its multiyear carriage agreement with Charter, the second-largest U.S. pay TV provider, at the beginning of August, according to people familiar with the matter. So far, there are no signs the two sides will have a testy public renegotiation. That is par for the course for Disney, which usually hammers out a deal without fanfare. After all, pay-TV providers have never had the stomach to black out ESPN, Disney’s most valuable cable channel and by far the most expensive network in the pay-TV bundle. But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. That’s because Disney is about to transition to a new era of direct-to-consumer streaming. AT&T’s WarnerMedia and Comcast’s NBC Universal, the next largest media companies, will follow in its footsteps in early 2020. In the past, carriage disagreements almost always stemmed over the same thing: the network that makes or licenses the content wants the pay-TV operator — your cable or satellite company — to pay more money for that programming. The fee negotiations sometimes result in networks being blacked out on a pay-TV service for a period of time. Viacom has had a few extended carriage conflicts in recent years. Univision recently settled one with Dish. Jeremy Lin’s insane three-week stretch of National Basketball Association games while on the New York Knicks helped convince Time Warner Cable to reach a deal with MSG Network a few years ago. The distributor and the content company usually reach an agreement, because the traditional pay-TV ecosystem has long been symbiotic — operators need material for customers to watch, and the programmers need people to see their programs. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. Content providers who have long pushed for higher carriage fees could face severe pushback from pay-TV providers who say that linear networks aren’t as valuable because so much content is available online — not only at Netflix and Amazon, but now within the content companies’ own streaming products. Moreover, if customers do flee the pay-TV bundle for streaming services, pay-TV providers may want to cut content spending even more to keep costs down.

Saving the bundle

In November, Disney will start selling Disney+, a family-friend entertainment product, for $6.99 a month. This will include Disney movies and TV shows from Disney, Pixar, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, National Geographic and 20th Century Fox. Disney is also planning on bundling Disney+ with Hulu and ESPN+, its direct-to-consumer streaming service focused on sports, to make the suite of products more appealing to consumers. no current season As Disney makes its content available outside of the pay-TV ecosystem, the value of its pay-TV channels should decrease. In other words, if the only way your child can watch “The Lion Guard” is on the Disney Channel, which requires a pay-TV subscription, the Disney Channel is a valuable asset to the pay-TV bundle. But if your child can now get that show on Disney+, which doesn’t require a pay-TV subscription, the value of the Disney Channel should decrease. The more stuff that’s available outside the network, the less that network is worth. Disney is trying to store some of the value of Disney Channel by prohibiting current seasons of all Disney Channel shows from being available on Disney+, according to a person familiar with the matter.

ESPN vs. ESPN+

The Disney-Charter negotiations probably won’t get too contentious because more than any other programmer, Disney wants to protect the pay-TV ecosystem. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. It earns more than $9 for its suite of networks for every single customer that signs up for pay-TV, regardless of who is actually watching the networks. A lot of people watch “Monday Night Football” — it was the most-watched series on cable in 2018 for the second straight year. Pay TV customers would revolt if ESPN weren’t included in a standard cable package. So far, ESPN+ has only been an add-on product to ESPN. It hasn’t touched the network’s most valuable sports assets, which include “Monday Night Football,” NBA games, prime time college football, several tennis and golf grand slams and so on. There’s no impetus for Disney to change this arrangement because ESPN has successfully kept raising its carriage fee, unlike, say, Viacom’s cable networks. Still, Disney will almost certainly push for more flexibility in its renewal deal with Charter. Disney will want the option to make certain sports or games available for ESPN+ if consumers drastically change their viewing habits in the next few years, or if Wall Street starts valuing legacy media companies based on streaming customer growth, as they do with Netflix. Moreover, Disney wants pay-TV providers to integrate ESPN+ into their user interfaces, just as Comcast has done for Amazon and Netflix content, according to a person familiar with the matter. Then, a pay-TV operator could sell ESPN and ESPN+ together for an additional fee, and a consumer could watch all ESPN+ content as a network, just like ESPN. At this point, Disney isn’t asking to remove valuable assets from ESPN and shift them to ESPN+, two of the people said. That’s key. Charter isn’t going to want to lock in a rate increase for ESPN if the linear network could lose its exclusivity value in the coming years as Disney makes some events available to ESPN+. But Disney will likely want the ability to place particular games on ESPN+ and add other sweeteners to entice more consumers to sign up for the digital service. And those games probably would have lived on ESPN or one of its companion networks. Spokespeople for Disney and Charter declined to comment on specifics of the carriage talks between the companies. Terms in carriage fees are often applicable across pay-TV platforms thanks to so-called “most favored nation ” clauses. So the word will get out in the media ecosystem how Disney has structured its deal, and it will be held as a standard when WarnerMedia’s and NBC Universal’s big contracts come up for renewal. And while Disney may not want to rock the pay-TV bundle, WarnerMedia doesn’t have nearly the same incentive, because it doesn’t own particularly valuable linear networks (TBS, TNT and CNN are its strongest). Then again, AT&T owns DirecTV and WarnerMedia, and Comcast owns NBC Universal. So both media companies may decide to hedge their asks for the benefit of their parent companies, keeping the bundle alive and (relatively) well.

Does video even matter?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fees, cable, content, era, pay, disney, paytv, espn, network, talking, tv, networks, charter, streaming, carriage, outcome, valuable


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Alex Rodriguez drinks 9 cups of coffee a day—here’s the rest of his daily routine

Former MLB star Alex Rodriguez, who now runs an investment company, A-Rod Corp, and commentates for ESPN, works 80 to 100 hours a week. And he relies on a lot of caffeine to get through each day. His schedule is “filled with meetings and phone calls and lectures and TV appearances, with his weekends fully accounted for by his ESPN duties,” Ben Reiter reports in his Sport Illustrated cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod, who was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using performance-enhanc


Former MLB star Alex Rodriguez, who now runs an investment company, A-Rod Corp, and commentates for ESPN, works 80 to 100 hours a week. And he relies on a lot of caffeine to get through each day. His schedule is “filled with meetings and phone calls and lectures and TV appearances, with his weekends fully accounted for by his ESPN duties,” Ben Reiter reports in his Sport Illustrated cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod, who was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using performance-enhanc
Alex Rodriguez drinks 9 cups of coffee a day—here’s the rest of his daily routine Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rest, routine, drinks, espn, works, week, using, daily, corp, weekends, tv, coffee, rodriguez, dayheres, alex, reiter, work, arod, cups


Alex Rodriguez drinks 9 cups of coffee a day—here's the rest of his daily routine

Former MLB star Alex Rodriguez, who now runs an investment company, A-Rod Corp, and commentates for ESPN, works 80 to 100 hours a week. And he relies on a lot of caffeine to get through each day.

His schedule is “filled with meetings and phone calls and lectures and TV appearances, with his weekends fully accounted for by his ESPN duties,” Ben Reiter reports in his Sport Illustrated cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod, who was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using performance-enhancing drugs.

Rodriguez, now 43, also helps former athletes turn their finances around on CNBC’s show, “Back in the Game,” co-hosts the popular Barstool Sports podcast “The Corp” and is a father of two daughters.

Plus, he still makes time to work out, Reiter adds: “He’ll often hit the gym at one in the morning, fueled by one of the nine cups of coffee he can consume a day.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rest, routine, drinks, espn, works, week, using, daily, corp, weekends, tv, coffee, rodriguez, dayheres, alex, reiter, work, arod, cups


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Obama production company hires MTV, ESPN and FX Networks veterans for Netflix projects

More details are emerging about a production partnership between Netflix and Barack and Michelle Obama. The company, called Higher Ground Productions, is already staffed by veterans of MTV, ESPN and FX Networks and will produce projects that empower “new and diverse voices.” The Obamas announced last year they signed a multiyear deal with Netflix for scripted and unscripted films and series. They’re veterans in the industry. “Our goal isn’t just to make people think—we want to make people feel a


More details are emerging about a production partnership between Netflix and Barack and Michelle Obama. The company, called Higher Ground Productions, is already staffed by veterans of MTV, ESPN and FX Networks and will produce projects that empower “new and diverse voices.” The Obamas announced last year they signed a multiyear deal with Netflix for scripted and unscripted films and series. They’re veterans in the industry. “Our goal isn’t just to make people think—we want to make people feel a
Obama production company hires MTV, ESPN and FX Networks veterans for Netflix projects Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-26  Authors: sara salinas, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mtv, tonia, production, espn, obama, theyre, voices, hires, networks, team, michelle, fx, statement, netflix, projects, veterans


Obama production company hires MTV, ESPN and FX Networks veterans for Netflix projects

More details are emerging about a production partnership between Netflix and Barack and Michelle Obama.

The company, called Higher Ground Productions, is already staffed by veterans of MTV, ESPN and FX Networks and will produce projects that empower “new and diverse voices.” The Obamas announced last year they signed a multiyear deal with Netflix for scripted and unscripted films and series.

Priya Swaminathan and Tonia Davis will serve as co-heads of the company, joined by creative executive Qadriyyah “Q” Shamsid-Deen.

“They’re masterful storytellers. They’re veterans in the industry. And they not only bring their unique perspectives and life experiences to every project, but they’re committed to finding new voices who have their own stories to tell,” President Barack Obama said in a statement. “Michelle and I couldn’t be more excited about the team we’re assembling.”

“Our goal isn’t just to make people think—we want to make people feel and reach outside of their comfort zone,” Michelle Obama said in the statement. “With their thoughtfulness, creativity and empathy, we know that Priya, Tonia and Q will find the common thread within every story to inspire us to be something more. I’m thrilled about this team as professionals—and as people. They’re wonderful.”

WATCH: How streaming companies are battling for your living room


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-26  Authors: sara salinas, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mtv, tonia, production, espn, obama, theyre, voices, hires, networks, team, michelle, fx, statement, netflix, projects, veterans


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