Disney’s bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost $12.99 per month

Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month. On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be able to get Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu for under $15 a month. Iger said the bundle will be available when Disney+ launches on Nov. 12. “And that bundle that we’re creating, that $12.99 bundle where you can buy all three, offers consumers tremendous volume, tremendous quality and tremendous variety — for a good pri


Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month. On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be able to get Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu for under $15 a month. Iger said the bundle will be available when Disney+ launches on Nov. 12. “And that bundle that we’re creating, that $12.99 bundle where you can buy all three, offers consumers tremendous volume, tremendous quality and tremendous variety — for a good pri
Disney’s bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost $12.99 per month Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, entertainment, adsupported, 1299, streaming, service, iger, bundle, disney, available, prime, espn, disneys, tremendous, hulu, night, cost


Disney's bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost $12.99 per month

Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month.

On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be able to get Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu for under $15 a month.

Iger said the bundle will be available when Disney+ launches on Nov. 12.

“Our play… is to have general entertainment, we’ll call it Hulu, more family-like entertainment which is Disney+ and sports.,” Iger said on the call. “And that bundle that we’re creating, that $12.99 bundle where you can buy all three, offers consumers tremendous volume, tremendous quality and tremendous variety — for a good price.”

The Disney+ video streaming service will draw on Disney’s deep catalog of content and offer up new shows featuring favorite characters from “Toy Story” and “Monsters Inc.” to Marvel and “Star Wars.”

Also, with the Fox acquisition now closed, Disney will put all episodes of “The Simpsons” on the service on day one as well as “The Sound of Music,” “The Princess Bride” and “Malcolm in the Middle.”

“We’re also focused on leveraging Fox’s vast library of great titles to further enrich the content mix on our DTC platforms. For example, reimagining ‘Home Alone,” “Night at the Museum,” “Cheaper by the Dozen” and “Diary of a Wimpy Kid,'” Iger said on the call.

All Disney films released in 2019 will also be available on Disney+ as soon as their theatrical and home entertainment windows have closed. “Frozen II” will also be available exclusively on the platform by the summer of 2020.

Disney+ on its own will cost users $6.99 a month, or $69.99 for a full year.

ESPN+ is part of Disney’s plan to revitalize the sports network. Viewership has been on the decline, relationships between cable operators and networks are tense, and the situation remains unstable as more people ditch cable for streaming services.

It has seen fast growth in the ESPN+ service since launching last year, adding more than 2 million subscribers.

Also, having a sports streaming service separates Disney from competitors like Netflix and Amazon Prime, which don’t have limited live sports programming. Prime does stream Thursday Night Football games.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, entertainment, adsupported, 1299, streaming, service, iger, bundle, disney, available, prime, espn, disneys, tremendous, hulu, night, cost


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North Korea’s Kim Jong Un says missile launches are warning to US, South Korea over drill

Disney’s bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost…Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month. On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be…Entertainmentread more


Disney’s bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost…Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month. On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be…Entertainmentread more
North Korea’s Kim Jong Un says missile launches are warning to US, South Korea over drill Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, koreas, launches, month, hulu, finally, missile, streaming, iger, south, warning, kim, services, jong, north, going, espn, earnings, drill, disneys, korea


North Korea's Kim Jong Un says missile launches are warning to US, South Korea over drill

Disney’s bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu will cost…

Disney is finally bundling its three streaming services and it’s going to cost you $12.99 a month. On an earnings call Tuesday, CEO Bob Iger said that U.S. customers would be…

Entertainment

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06
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Fortnite World Cup finals turned these teen gamers into millionaires

A teen phenom won $3 million at New York City’s Arthur Ashe tennis stadium over the weekend and he didn’t even have to pick up a racket. Those fans watched some of the world’s best gamers, many of them on summer break from high school, compete in the first-ever Fortnite World Cup with $30 million in total prizes on the line. The biggest winner at the event turned out to be Kyle Giersdorf, a 16-year-old from Pennsylvania, who triumphed in a field of 100 finalists to win the whopping $3 million gr


A teen phenom won $3 million at New York City’s Arthur Ashe tennis stadium over the weekend and he didn’t even have to pick up a racket. Those fans watched some of the world’s best gamers, many of them on summer break from high school, compete in the first-ever Fortnite World Cup with $30 million in total prizes on the line. The biggest winner at the event turned out to be Kyle Giersdorf, a 16-year-old from Pennsylvania, who triumphed in a field of 100 finalists to win the whopping $3 million gr
Fortnite World Cup finals turned these teen gamers into millionaires Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fortnite, gamers, teen, million, giersdorf, win, cup, worlds, turned, espn, millionaires, tennis, world, weekend, finals, winning


Fortnite World Cup finals turned these teen gamers into millionaires

A teen phenom won $3 million at New York City’s Arthur Ashe tennis stadium over the weekend and he didn’t even have to pick up a racket.

The stadium will host the world’s best tennis players at the U.S. Open in August, but this past weekend, the site was filled with thousands of fans of Fortnite, Epic Games’ massively popular online multi-player survival game. Those fans watched some of the world’s best gamers, many of them on summer break from high school, compete in the first-ever Fortnite World Cup with $30 million in total prizes on the line.

The biggest winner at the event turned out to be Kyle Giersdorf, a 16-year-old from Pennsylvania, who triumphed in a field of 100 finalists to win the whopping $3 million grand prize and become the first Fortnite World Cup singles champion. (By comparison, the male and female winners of this year’s tennis U.S. Open will each receive $3.85 million.)

“I know that this could pretty much change my life forever,” Giersdorf, who plays Fortnite under the name “Bugha,” told ESPN after winning the competition on Sunday. “It’s just absolutely unreal.”

It was undoubtedly a huge win for the teenager, whose fame appears to be on the rise after reportedly adding more than 100,000 followers to his Twitter account since winning the tournament. But Giersdorf, who is also set to appear on NBC’s “Tonight Show” with Jimmy Fallon on Monday night, has no plans to let his huge cash prize go to his head. In fact, he told ESPN that he plans to invest his winnings rather than putting it toward any major splurges.

“I’m just going to save the money and invest it and not do anything dumb with it,” he said in a streaming interview with ESPN.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fortnite, gamers, teen, million, giersdorf, win, cup, worlds, turned, espn, millionaires, tennis, world, weekend, finals, winning


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Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era

But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. There’s no impetus for Disney to change th


But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. There’s no impetus for Disney to change th
Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fees, cable, content, era, pay, disney, paytv, espn, network, talking, tv, networks, charter, streaming, carriage, outcome, valuable


Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era

The Walt Disney Company CEO, Robert Iger arrives for the World premiere of Marvel Studios’ ‘Avengers: Endgame’ at the Los Angeles Convention Center on April 22, 2019 in Los Angeles. VALERIE MACON | AFP | Getty Images

Disney is set to renew its multiyear carriage agreement with Charter, the second-largest U.S. pay TV provider, at the beginning of August, according to people familiar with the matter. So far, there are no signs the two sides will have a testy public renegotiation. That is par for the course for Disney, which usually hammers out a deal without fanfare. After all, pay-TV providers have never had the stomach to black out ESPN, Disney’s most valuable cable channel and by far the most expensive network in the pay-TV bundle. But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. That’s because Disney is about to transition to a new era of direct-to-consumer streaming. AT&T’s WarnerMedia and Comcast’s NBC Universal, the next largest media companies, will follow in its footsteps in early 2020. In the past, carriage disagreements almost always stemmed over the same thing: the network that makes or licenses the content wants the pay-TV operator — your cable or satellite company — to pay more money for that programming. The fee negotiations sometimes result in networks being blacked out on a pay-TV service for a period of time. Viacom has had a few extended carriage conflicts in recent years. Univision recently settled one with Dish. Jeremy Lin’s insane three-week stretch of National Basketball Association games while on the New York Knicks helped convince Time Warner Cable to reach a deal with MSG Network a few years ago. The distributor and the content company usually reach an agreement, because the traditional pay-TV ecosystem has long been symbiotic — operators need material for customers to watch, and the programmers need people to see their programs. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. Content providers who have long pushed for higher carriage fees could face severe pushback from pay-TV providers who say that linear networks aren’t as valuable because so much content is available online — not only at Netflix and Amazon, but now within the content companies’ own streaming products. Moreover, if customers do flee the pay-TV bundle for streaming services, pay-TV providers may want to cut content spending even more to keep costs down.

Saving the bundle

In November, Disney will start selling Disney+, a family-friend entertainment product, for $6.99 a month. This will include Disney movies and TV shows from Disney, Pixar, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, National Geographic and 20th Century Fox. Disney is also planning on bundling Disney+ with Hulu and ESPN+, its direct-to-consumer streaming service focused on sports, to make the suite of products more appealing to consumers. no current season As Disney makes its content available outside of the pay-TV ecosystem, the value of its pay-TV channels should decrease. In other words, if the only way your child can watch “The Lion Guard” is on the Disney Channel, which requires a pay-TV subscription, the Disney Channel is a valuable asset to the pay-TV bundle. But if your child can now get that show on Disney+, which doesn’t require a pay-TV subscription, the value of the Disney Channel should decrease. The more stuff that’s available outside the network, the less that network is worth. Disney is trying to store some of the value of Disney Channel by prohibiting current seasons of all Disney Channel shows from being available on Disney+, according to a person familiar with the matter.

ESPN vs. ESPN+

The Disney-Charter negotiations probably won’t get too contentious because more than any other programmer, Disney wants to protect the pay-TV ecosystem. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. It earns more than $9 for its suite of networks for every single customer that signs up for pay-TV, regardless of who is actually watching the networks. A lot of people watch “Monday Night Football” — it was the most-watched series on cable in 2018 for the second straight year. Pay TV customers would revolt if ESPN weren’t included in a standard cable package. So far, ESPN+ has only been an add-on product to ESPN. It hasn’t touched the network’s most valuable sports assets, which include “Monday Night Football,” NBA games, prime time college football, several tennis and golf grand slams and so on. There’s no impetus for Disney to change this arrangement because ESPN has successfully kept raising its carriage fee, unlike, say, Viacom’s cable networks. Still, Disney will almost certainly push for more flexibility in its renewal deal with Charter. Disney will want the option to make certain sports or games available for ESPN+ if consumers drastically change their viewing habits in the next few years, or if Wall Street starts valuing legacy media companies based on streaming customer growth, as they do with Netflix. Moreover, Disney wants pay-TV providers to integrate ESPN+ into their user interfaces, just as Comcast has done for Amazon and Netflix content, according to a person familiar with the matter. Then, a pay-TV operator could sell ESPN and ESPN+ together for an additional fee, and a consumer could watch all ESPN+ content as a network, just like ESPN. At this point, Disney isn’t asking to remove valuable assets from ESPN and shift them to ESPN+, two of the people said. That’s key. Charter isn’t going to want to lock in a rate increase for ESPN if the linear network could lose its exclusivity value in the coming years as Disney makes some events available to ESPN+. But Disney will likely want the ability to place particular games on ESPN+ and add other sweeteners to entice more consumers to sign up for the digital service. And those games probably would have lived on ESPN or one of its companion networks. Spokespeople for Disney and Charter declined to comment on specifics of the carriage talks between the companies. Terms in carriage fees are often applicable across pay-TV platforms thanks to so-called “most favored nation ” clauses. So the word will get out in the media ecosystem how Disney has structured its deal, and it will be held as a standard when WarnerMedia’s and NBC Universal’s big contracts come up for renewal. And while Disney may not want to rock the pay-TV bundle, WarnerMedia doesn’t have nearly the same incentive, because it doesn’t own particularly valuable linear networks (TBS, TNT and CNN are its strongest). Then again, AT&T owns DirecTV and WarnerMedia, and Comcast owns NBC Universal. So both media companies may decide to hedge their asks for the benefit of their parent companies, keeping the bundle alive and (relatively) well.

Does video even matter?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fees, cable, content, era, pay, disney, paytv, espn, network, talking, tv, networks, charter, streaming, carriage, outcome, valuable


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Alex Rodriguez drinks 9 cups of coffee a day—here’s the rest of his daily routine

Former MLB star Alex Rodriguez, who now runs an investment company, A-Rod Corp, and commentates for ESPN, works 80 to 100 hours a week. And he relies on a lot of caffeine to get through each day. His schedule is “filled with meetings and phone calls and lectures and TV appearances, with his weekends fully accounted for by his ESPN duties,” Ben Reiter reports in his Sport Illustrated cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod, who was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using performance-enhanc


Former MLB star Alex Rodriguez, who now runs an investment company, A-Rod Corp, and commentates for ESPN, works 80 to 100 hours a week. And he relies on a lot of caffeine to get through each day. His schedule is “filled with meetings and phone calls and lectures and TV appearances, with his weekends fully accounted for by his ESPN duties,” Ben Reiter reports in his Sport Illustrated cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod, who was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using performance-enhanc
Alex Rodriguez drinks 9 cups of coffee a day—here’s the rest of his daily routine Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rest, routine, drinks, espn, works, week, using, daily, corp, weekends, tv, coffee, rodriguez, dayheres, alex, reiter, work, arod, cups


Alex Rodriguez drinks 9 cups of coffee a day—here's the rest of his daily routine

Former MLB star Alex Rodriguez, who now runs an investment company, A-Rod Corp, and commentates for ESPN, works 80 to 100 hours a week. And he relies on a lot of caffeine to get through each day.

His schedule is “filled with meetings and phone calls and lectures and TV appearances, with his weekends fully accounted for by his ESPN duties,” Ben Reiter reports in his Sport Illustrated cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod, who was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using performance-enhancing drugs.

Rodriguez, now 43, also helps former athletes turn their finances around on CNBC’s show, “Back in the Game,” co-hosts the popular Barstool Sports podcast “The Corp” and is a father of two daughters.

Plus, he still makes time to work out, Reiter adds: “He’ll often hit the gym at one in the morning, fueled by one of the nine cups of coffee he can consume a day.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rest, routine, drinks, espn, works, week, using, daily, corp, weekends, tv, coffee, rodriguez, dayheres, alex, reiter, work, arod, cups


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Obama production company hires MTV, ESPN and FX Networks veterans for Netflix projects

More details are emerging about a production partnership between Netflix and Barack and Michelle Obama. The company, called Higher Ground Productions, is already staffed by veterans of MTV, ESPN and FX Networks and will produce projects that empower “new and diverse voices.” The Obamas announced last year they signed a multiyear deal with Netflix for scripted and unscripted films and series. They’re veterans in the industry. “Our goal isn’t just to make people think—we want to make people feel a


More details are emerging about a production partnership between Netflix and Barack and Michelle Obama. The company, called Higher Ground Productions, is already staffed by veterans of MTV, ESPN and FX Networks and will produce projects that empower “new and diverse voices.” The Obamas announced last year they signed a multiyear deal with Netflix for scripted and unscripted films and series. They’re veterans in the industry. “Our goal isn’t just to make people think—we want to make people feel a
Obama production company hires MTV, ESPN and FX Networks veterans for Netflix projects Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-26  Authors: sara salinas, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mtv, tonia, production, espn, obama, theyre, voices, hires, networks, team, michelle, fx, statement, netflix, projects, veterans


Obama production company hires MTV, ESPN and FX Networks veterans for Netflix projects

More details are emerging about a production partnership between Netflix and Barack and Michelle Obama.

The company, called Higher Ground Productions, is already staffed by veterans of MTV, ESPN and FX Networks and will produce projects that empower “new and diverse voices.” The Obamas announced last year they signed a multiyear deal with Netflix for scripted and unscripted films and series.

Priya Swaminathan and Tonia Davis will serve as co-heads of the company, joined by creative executive Qadriyyah “Q” Shamsid-Deen.

“They’re masterful storytellers. They’re veterans in the industry. And they not only bring their unique perspectives and life experiences to every project, but they’re committed to finding new voices who have their own stories to tell,” President Barack Obama said in a statement. “Michelle and I couldn’t be more excited about the team we’re assembling.”

“Our goal isn’t just to make people think—we want to make people feel and reach outside of their comfort zone,” Michelle Obama said in the statement. “With their thoughtfulness, creativity and empathy, we know that Priya, Tonia and Q will find the common thread within every story to inspire us to be something more. I’m thrilled about this team as professionals—and as people. They’re wonderful.”

WATCH: How streaming companies are battling for your living room


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-26  Authors: sara salinas, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mtv, tonia, production, espn, obama, theyre, voices, hires, networks, team, michelle, fx, statement, netflix, projects, veterans


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Disney says ESPN+ has 2 million paid subscribers, but streaming is still losing money

Walt Disney Co. is luring users to its ESPN+ sports streaming service, but it’s coming at a steep cost. The company said in its fiscal first-quarter earnings report on Tuesday that ESPN+, which launched last year, has 2 million paying subscribers, double the number from five months ago. The company said that its direct-to-consumer and international segment lost $136 million in the quarter on revenue of $918 million. Hulu, the streaming entertainment service in which Disney owns a stake, is a big


Walt Disney Co. is luring users to its ESPN+ sports streaming service, but it’s coming at a steep cost. The company said in its fiscal first-quarter earnings report on Tuesday that ESPN+, which launched last year, has 2 million paying subscribers, double the number from five months ago. The company said that its direct-to-consumer and international segment lost $136 million in the quarter on revenue of $918 million. Hulu, the streaming entertainment service in which Disney owns a stake, is a big
Disney says ESPN+ has 2 million paid subscribers, but streaming is still losing money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: ari levy, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, espn, service, streaming, disney, months, losing, company, number, content, paid, iger, subscribers, million, money


Disney says ESPN+ has 2 million paid subscribers, but streaming is still losing money

Walt Disney Co. is luring users to its ESPN+ sports streaming service, but it’s coming at a steep cost.

The company said in its fiscal first-quarter earnings report on Tuesday that ESPN+, which launched last year, has 2 million paying subscribers, double the number from five months ago. For $5 a month, customers get a selection of live baseball, soccer and hockey games as well as UFC fights and original content like “30 for 30” documentaries.

“We expect the expansion of combat sports content on the streaming service to drive continued growth in the months ahead,” Disney CEO Bob Iger said on the earnings call with analysts.

However, streaming remains a money-losing business for Disney, which is experimenting with a number of ways to take on Netflix and the rest of the cord-cutting universe. The company said that its direct-to-consumer and international segment lost $136 million in the quarter on revenue of $918 million.

Hulu, the streaming entertainment service in which Disney owns a stake, is a big part of that business. Iger said “the goal is obviously to operate Hulu profitably,” but the company isn’t saying how long that will take. Later this year, Disney is rolling out its Disney+ service, providing subscribers with new shows, movies and animated content.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: ari levy, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, espn, service, streaming, disney, months, losing, company, number, content, paid, iger, subscribers, million, money


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Disney rises on earnings beat, posts $136 million operating loss in streaming business

The earnings report comes as the entertainment giant expands its direct-to-consumer offerings amid growing competition from Netflix and other streaming services. On the company’s post-earnings conference call, CEO Bob Iger said that its sports streaming service ESPN+ had doubled its subscribers to 2 million in the past five months, noting that direct-to-consumer “remains our number one priority.” The company launched ESPN+ last year and plans to launch Disney+, a streaming service of its movies


The earnings report comes as the entertainment giant expands its direct-to-consumer offerings amid growing competition from Netflix and other streaming services. On the company’s post-earnings conference call, CEO Bob Iger said that its sports streaming service ESPN+ had doubled its subscribers to 2 million in the past five months, noting that direct-to-consumer “remains our number one priority.” The company launched ESPN+ last year and plans to launch Disney+, a streaming service of its movies
Disney rises on earnings beat, posts $136 million operating loss in streaming business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: anjali robins, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images, handout, getty images entertainment
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, loss, company, service, directtoconsumer, million, rises, espn, beat, share, earnings, billion, business, operating, posts, disney, streaming


Disney rises on earnings beat, posts $136 million operating loss in streaming business

Walt Disney Co. shares rose 2 percent in extended trading Tuesday after the company reported earnings per share and revenue that topped analyst estimates, helped by sales increases in its media networks and theme parks businesses.

The earnings report comes as the entertainment giant expands its direct-to-consumer offerings amid growing competition from Netflix and other streaming services. On the company’s post-earnings conference call, CEO Bob Iger said that its sports streaming service ESPN+ had doubled its subscribers to 2 million in the past five months, noting that direct-to-consumer “remains our number one priority.”

Here are the results:

—Earnings: $1.84 per share, vs $1.55 per share expected, according to Refinitiv

—Revenue: $15.30 billion, versus $15.14 billion expected, according to Refinitiv

Revenue was down slightly from $15.35 billion a year ago while adjusted earnings per share fell 3 percent from $1.89 in the year-earlier period.

Disney, whose assets include cable networks such as ESPN and film studios like Marvel, is making a push into streaming services as more consumers drop their pay-TV package in favor of cheaper options that can be watched through an internet connection. The company launched ESPN+ last year and plans to launch Disney+, a streaming service of its movies and original programming, later this year.

The company said that its direct-to-consumer and international segment posted revenue of $918 million and an operating loss of $136 million in its first quarter ended Dec. 29. due to increased costs related to ESPN+ and the upcoming launch of Disney+.

On the earnings call, Disney said that it expects investment in those ventures to negatively impact the segment’s year-over-year operating income by $200 million in the second quarter.

Revenue in Disney’s media networks business, which includes ESPN, rose 7 percent to $5.92 billion in the quarter, compared to the year-earlier period, while its parks business was up 5 percent to $6.82 billion. Studio entertainment revenues fell 27 percent to $1.8 billion thanks to the strong performance of Star Wars: The Last Jedi and Thor: Ragnarok in the prior-year quarter compared to Mary Poppins Returns and The Nutcracker and the Four Realms this year.

The company expects its pending $71.3 billion acquisition of a majority of assets from Twenty-First Century Fox to aid that strategy. The deal is expected to provide Disney with additional media assets for its new streaming service and would also give Disney a larger stake in the streaming service Hulu.

But Disney’s direct-to-consumer push comes with risks: It’s hard to turn a profit on streaming services, which usually entail high content and technology costs but offer lower prices than traditional cable to attract consumers.

Disney said in a filing in January that its stake in Hulu and its ownership of BAMtech, the streaming technology that powers ESPN+, led to a loss of more than $1 billion in the 2018 fiscal year.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

Disclosure: Comcast, which owns CNBC parent NBCUniversal, is a co-owner of Hulu.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: anjali robins, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images, handout, getty images entertainment
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, loss, company, service, directtoconsumer, million, rises, espn, beat, share, earnings, billion, business, operating, posts, disney, streaming


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Disney ESPN+ streaming service: how much will it cost Disney?

Other streaming events were bundled with TV rights deals, making it hard to delineate how much everything costs. But ESPN+ is acquiring streaming rights to more mainstream sports, which can be costly. ESPN+ also got multiyear nonexclusive streaming rights for Riot Games’ popular video game “League of Legends,” which were previously held by BAMTech. “The content deals are also likely very expensive, as the content providers don’t want to risk failure of the service, and typically seek large guara


Other streaming events were bundled with TV rights deals, making it hard to delineate how much everything costs. But ESPN+ is acquiring streaming rights to more mainstream sports, which can be costly. ESPN+ also got multiyear nonexclusive streaming rights for Riot Games’ popular video game “League of Legends,” which were previously held by BAMTech. “The content deals are also likely very expensive, as the content providers don’t want to risk failure of the service, and typically seek large guara
Disney ESPN+ streaming service: how much will it cost Disney? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: michelle castillo, steve zak photography, filmmagic, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, events, rights, million, tv, streaming, service, knowledge, deal, disney, content, espn, deals, cost


Disney ESPN+ streaming service: how much will it cost Disney?

While ESPN had to pay for rights to the content at some point, many of the ESPN+ streaming sports rights were transferred from existing deals, according to analysts and one person who has knowledge of the negotiations.

Other streaming events were bundled with TV rights deals, making it hard to delineate how much everything costs.

ESPN is using the promise that sporting events could air on its TV channels to get additional digital rights for little to no cost, according to the person with knowledge of the negotiations. Outside the marquee events like college basketball and football and professional leagues like MLS, streaming rights to many of the smaller games and niche matches cost very little — no more than $1,000 per sports event, game or match.

But ESPN+ is acquiring streaming rights to more mainstream sports, which can be costly.

For instance, ESPN signed a five-year deal with the UFC in May to air 10 events on TV and stream 20 more a year. The total value of that deal was $150 million, according to USA Today.

Another league switched pay per view rights to ESPN+ in a deal worth $1.5 million, a source with knowledge of negotiations said.

ESPN+ also got multiyear nonexclusive streaming rights for Riot Games’ popular video game “League of Legends,” which were previously held by BAMTech. Terms of the new agreement were not discussed, but the original seven-year exclusive deal with BAMTech was worth $300 million.

Wedbush puts the committed content costs figure for the first year at $100 million to $200 million.

“The content deals are also likely very expensive, as the content providers don’t want to risk failure of the service, and typically seek large guarantees,” Pachter said. “The rest of their feed is primarily ESPN content already produced for broadcast, so the incremental cost is very low or zero.”

BTIG’s Greenfield estimates this year’s committed content costs are around $150 million due to the UFC deal, with additional “incremental” costs. But he said it will need to add another $300 million to $400 million in sports rights over the next 12 months to continue to supplement the service.

“Because they’ve added on so many sports rights, those losses are going to balloon if they don’t add more subscribers,” Greenfield said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: michelle castillo, steve zak photography, filmmagic, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, events, rights, million, tv, streaming, service, knowledge, deal, disney, content, espn, deals, cost


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Meet the first all-female broadcast team for NFL games

Kremer, currently a chief correspondent for the NFL Network, is a well-established voice in sports reporting. She’s worked more than 25 Super Bowl games, covered the NBA Finals and All-Star Games, Major League Baseball’s All-Star Games, college football tournaments and the PGA Championship, according to NFL.com. From there she went on to work at NFL Films and then ESPN, where she became the network’s first female correspondent. Now, as a correspondent for the NFL Network, she leads reporting on


Kremer, currently a chief correspondent for the NFL Network, is a well-established voice in sports reporting. She’s worked more than 25 Super Bowl games, covered the NBA Finals and All-Star Games, Major League Baseball’s All-Star Games, college football tournaments and the PGA Championship, according to NFL.com. From there she went on to work at NFL Films and then ESPN, where she became the network’s first female correspondent. Now, as a correspondent for the NFL Network, she leads reporting on
Meet the first all-female broadcast team for NFL games Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-26  Authors: courtney connley, george gojkovich, getty images, jim spellman, wireimage
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, broadcast, allfemale, team, nfl, storm, games, woman, work, voice, meet, covered, reporting, espn, kremer


Meet the first all-female broadcast team for NFL games

Storm and Kremer’s history-making news comes just one year after ESPN journalist Beth Mowins became the first woman in 30 years, and only the second woman ever, to be a play-by-play announcer for a regular season NFL game.

Kremer, currently a chief correspondent for the NFL Network, is a well-established voice in sports reporting. She’s worked more than 25 Super Bowl games, covered the NBA Finals and All-Star Games, Major League Baseball’s All-Star Games, college football tournaments and the PGA Championship, according to NFL.com.

After graduating cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania, Kremer started her career as a sports editor at the Main Line Chronicle in Pennsylvania in 1982. From there she went on to work at NFL Films and then ESPN, where she became the network’s first female correspondent. Between 2006 and 2012 she worked as a reporter for NBC Sports, where she covered the U.S. Olympics. Now, as a correspondent for the NFL Network, she leads reporting on the health and safety of professional sports.

“Growing up, it was very different back then,” 59-year-old Kremer told Philly Voice of watching sports in her childhood. “It never, ever crossed my mind for one minute that what I’m doing now is what my life’s work would be. It just didn’t cross my mind.”

Unlike Kremer, who tells Philly Voice she introduced her parents to sports, Storm grew up in a household where both of her parents were athletes and her dad was a sports executive. In an essay penned for ESPN, she writes about the difficulties of forging her own career path as a woman in sports.

“I was told everything from, ‘I’ll hire a woman to do sports over my dead body’ to ‘My audience will never accept a woman sportscaster’ to ‘Why don’t you just try feature reporting,'” wrote Storm. “I couldn’t even get an agent to take me on. Quite simply, almost no one wanted a woman, even someone with experience, to work in sports at their station.”

Determined to jumpstart her broadcasting career, Storm switched gears and pursued radio, which eventually led her to working as a weekend DJ and a weekday sportscaster for a station in Houston. That job, she says, was her first real job in sports and it prepared her for later jobs at NBC Sports, CBS and CNN, where she was the first female host of CNN Sports Tonight.

Now, as a journalist at ESPN, Storm anchors “SportsCenter,” and has covered high-profile sporting events including the ESPY Awards, the U.S. Open, the NBA Finals and the Super Bowl, according to ESPN Media Zone.

Both she and Kremer took to Twitter to express their excitement for their roles, which will bring a different perspective to Thursday Night Football.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-26  Authors: courtney connley, george gojkovich, getty images, jim spellman, wireimage
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, broadcast, allfemale, team, nfl, storm, games, woman, work, voice, meet, covered, reporting, espn, kremer


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