Here’s how to avoid accidentally disinheriting your kids after you remarry

“It’s emotional and hard to talk about, but the last thing you want to do is leave adult kids with a disaster.” You also could have family heirlooms or other belongings that you want to make sure end up with your children. Account beneficiariesOne easily overlooked item after people remarry is updating beneficiaries on retirement accounts, life insurance policies and the like. While you don’t necessarily need to go into dollar amounts, managing expectations can help avoid discord between your pa


“It’s emotional and hard to talk about, but the last thing you want to do is leave adult kids with a disaster.” You also could have family heirlooms or other belongings that you want to make sure end up with your children. Account beneficiariesOne easily overlooked item after people remarry is updating beneficiaries on retirement accounts, life insurance policies and the like. While you don’t necessarily need to go into dollar amounts, managing expectations can help avoid discord between your pa
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disinheriting, trust, remarry, beneficiary, spouse, money, assets, avoid, heres, accidentally, children, kids, dont, estate, vasileff


Here's how to avoid accidentally disinheriting your kids after you remarry

If you head down the aisle later in life, there’s another step you might want to take if you have adult children: Making sure you don’t accidentally disinherit them. While many people lack even a basic will, the stakes can be higher for those who remarry and do no estate planning but have assets they want to pass on to their kids. “A conversation about estate planning is absolutely critical in remarriages,” said certified financial planner Lili Vasileff, founder and president of Divorce and Money Matters in Greenwich, Connecticut. “It’s emotional and hard to talk about, but the last thing you want to do is leave adult kids with a disaster.”

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Roughly 17% of people remarry after their first marriage ends due to divorce or the death of a spouse, according to the latest data from the Census Bureau. And although the rate of remarriage has dropped over time for most age groups, it’s higher among the 55-and-older crowd: 57% in 2013, versus 42% in 1960. The older you are when you remarry, the more likely that you’re bringing assets into the marriage — retirement savings, life insurance policies, brokerage accounts, real estate and the like. You also could have family heirlooms or other belongings that you want to make sure end up with your children. This is when estate planning helps avoid family conflict, experts say. “When I talk with older couples who are remarrying, I ask them, ‘if you’re both on a boat and it goes down, can you trust the two sides of the families to get together and do what you wanted?'” Vasileff said.

If you die without a will — called dying intestate — the courts in your state will decide who gets what. That process is public and often messy if would-be heirs have competing priorities and conflicting notions of what is rightfully theirs. “You don’t want to leave it to the state,” said Melissa Brennan, a CFP and senior financial planner with CFO4Life in Richardson, Texas. “It can be a long drawn-out procedure that no one wants to go through.” While every situation is different and some can be more complex than others, here are some key things to consider when contemplating how to make sure your heirs end up with the assets you want them to.

Account beneficiaries

One easily overlooked item after people remarry is updating beneficiaries on retirement accounts, life insurance policies and the like. Whoever is listed as a beneficiary will get that money when you die. That designation supersedes any intention stated in your will. “No amount of estate planning can fix having the wrong beneficiary listed,” said CFP DeDe Jones, managing director at Innovative Financial in Lakewood, Colorado. In other words, if you named your ex-spouse as the beneficiary on your life insurance policy, guess who gets the money.

If you’re both on a boat and it goes down, can you trust the two sides of the families to get together and do what you wanted? Lili Vasileff Founder and president of Divorce and Money Matters

Additionally, 401(k) plans require that your current spouse is the beneficiary unless they legally agree otherwise. This means that if your husband is your listed beneficiary and you predecease him, those 401(k) assets become his to do with as he wants, which might not include passing on any money to your kids. Same goes for other accounts for which the spouse is the beneficiary and, typically, those on which they are a joint owner. For example, say someone has $500,000 in a non-retirement account and adds his new wife to his account with rights to full ownership upon his death. “If his intention was to leave part of that to his kids, he didn’t do that,” Brennan said.

Your house

Often, remarriage involves a jointly owned home. Depending on the laws of your state and how the property is titled, your desire for your children to inherit your share of it could be upended. In most states, if it is deeded as “joint tenancy with right of survivorship” or “tenancy by the entirety,” the property automatically belongs to the surviving spouse, no matter what your will says. If you own the house in “tenancy in common,” you can leave your share to someone other than your spouse if you choose. However, some states have different rules. Moreover, there can be other considerations when it comes to how a house is titled, including protection from potential creditors or for tax reasons later when the home is sold. That makes it important to consult with professionals before making a decision.

Your belongings

If you want your children to receive particular items when you pass away, it’s important to be as specific as possible in your will so there is no room for interpretation. “The more particular you are, the better,” Vasileff said.

Consider a trust

If you want your kids to receive money but don’t want to give a young adult — or one prone to poor money management — unfettered access to a sudden windfall, you can consider creating a trust to be the beneficiary of a particular asset. A trust holds assets on behalf of your beneficiary or beneficiaries, and is a legal entity dictated by the documents creating it. If you go that route, the assets go into the trust instead of directly to your heirs. They can only receive money according to how (or when) you’ve stipulated in the trust documents. “The trust distributes money based on any criteria you decide,” said Innovative Financial’s Jones. More from Personal Finance:

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Communicate

Experts often recommend discussing your goals with not only your spouse, but your children, as well. While you don’t necessarily need to go into dollar amounts, managing expectations can help avoid discord between your partner and your children. “If your kids or spouse don’t know what to expect when you die, there can be a lot of conflict,” Brennan said. “I’m a big believer in getting all the information out there.”

Other considerations


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disinheriting, trust, remarry, beneficiary, spouse, money, assets, avoid, heres, accidentally, children, kids, dont, estate, vasileff


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‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p


Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p
‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


'Million Dollar Listing' star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. But when it comes to his own money, he’s fairly conservative. He saves a lot, and he knows the value of a dollar. When it comes to investing, he sticks to a pretty simple strategy: Invest in what you know. Serhant recently sat down with the Grow team to discuss the most valuable investing advice he’s received, how he learned about money at a young age, and more. Here is his story, as told to senior reporter Sam Becker.

Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’

The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. Things you use. Things you could see yourself using; things you actually like. Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. So, I invest in things or products that I enjoy, use, or think are really interesting. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both physical products as well as software — [and] investing in real estate.

When it comes to real estate, I used to really think that to be a wise investor, you have to invest what you actually have to spend, so don’t spend more than you can afford. But I’ve found that to be incorrect. The best investments I’ve made are the ones that actually push me outside of my comfort level. Because you need to work more. You need to do more to actually get a return on this investment. And that’s worked really, really well for me.

‘The best investment I ever made’

The best investment I ever made: I invest in my business all the time. I invested in our YouTube vlog, and I think it’s funny because before I started the vlog on YouTube, everyone thought it was stupid and crazy. Including me. Actually, mostly me. I thought it was dumb. Just another form of social media. I was just sick and tired of it and I had no idea what it was going to do to our business. But it is a massive way of driving business and driving brand awareness. So, by investing the money that I did into the vlog, more people buy my book, more people buy the course, more people reach out to me to buy and sell homes.

Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. Ryan Serhant Real estate broker, author, and TV star

How being ‘broke’ led to his real estate career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
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What we might learn from Trump’s tax returns — if they’re released

Win McNamee | Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump’s personal and corporate tax returns could give the public an inside look at his finances — depending on which forms are released. A federal judge on Monday dismissed Trump’s lawsuit to block the release of his tax returns to Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. The DA is investigating the Trump Organization and had served a subpoena seeking eight years of tax returns. If those documents are made public, they could provide insight into the


Win McNamee | Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump’s personal and corporate tax returns could give the public an inside look at his finances — depending on which forms are released. A federal judge on Monday dismissed Trump’s lawsuit to block the release of his tax returns to Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. The DA is investigating the Trump Organization and had served a subpoena seeking eight years of tax returns. If those documents are made public, they could provide insight into the
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: darla mercado
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What we might learn from Trump's tax returns — if they're released

President Donald Trump announced that the U.S. has issued new sanctions on Iran’s central bank at the “highest level” while speaking in the Oval Office on September 20, 2019 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee | Getty Images

President Donald Trump’s personal and corporate tax returns could give the public an inside look at his finances — depending on which forms are released. A federal judge on Monday dismissed Trump’s lawsuit to block the release of his tax returns to Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. The DA is investigating the Trump Organization and had served a subpoena seeking eight years of tax returns. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit granted a temporary stay of enforcement of the subpoena, giving the president a reprieve. If those documents are made public, they could provide insight into the sources of Trump’s income — depending on which forms are released.

Just be warned, the tax forms themselves won’t tell you everything about a filer’s finances. Think of the Form 1040 as an important piece of the puzzle in a taxpayer’s financial condition. Combined with other documents, including a statement of net worth, it can provide a more complete picture of that person’s bottom line. “What you can see from the individual Form 1040 are the types and sources of income, including whether the taxpayer has capital gains or dividend income,” said Joshua D. Blank, professor of law at the University of California, Irvine. “What you can’t see is wealth,” he said. “We tax people based on annual income and not total wealth.”

Schedule A

Tomoji Hirakata | Getty Images

The first two pages of a Form 1040 are a summary of the taxable sources of income a filer is required to report. The attached schedules are what can shed light on the sources of income and the deductions a taxpayer takes. Deductions reduce taxable income based on your federal income tax bracket. Schedule A is the document taxpayers must fill out to calculate their itemized deductions, including any deductible medical expenses and state and local taxes paid. Take note: Starting in the 2018 tax year, the deduction for state and local taxes paid was capped at $10,000 for individual filers, so there’s a limit to the extent Trump — or anyone with a personal residence in a high-tax state like New York — could write off those property and income taxes. Keep a close eye on the “gifts to charity” portion of Schedule A. Donations that are more than $500 must be spelled out on Form 8283, the noncash charitable contribution form. Taxpayers must describe the donated property and provide a summary of its appraised fair market value, including art, real estate, cars and more.

Real estate income

A “For Rent”‘ sign is posted in front of a house in Richmond, California. Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

Whether your real estate empire is racking up losses or you’re getting income through a web of pass-through entities, Schedule E will have the details on residential, vacation and commercial property. Trump himself uses many limited liability companies to manage different aspects of his businesses. Line 3 spells out rents received for the property. “You can get an idea of business income, as you’d see that coming in through companies and pass-through entities, partnerships and LLCs,” said Jeffrey Levine, CPA and CEO of BluePrint Wealth Alliance. Keep a close eye on depreciation, which you can find on line 18. Depreciation is a tax deduction you can take each year to recover the cost of your real estate as you use it.

While Schedule E might share the name of a pass-through entity that’s providing income to the taxpayer, it may be difficult to learn the details of who ultimately owns it, said Christy Bastian, CPA and president of FVL Consultants. “You can sometimes follow through and trace entities,” Bastian said. “You’re looking for clues, but it doesn’t mean that every return will have it.” Similarly, members of a partnership aren’t always easy to identify, Blank said.

Small business

Interest and capital gains

ericsphotography | E+ | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: darla mercado
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‘I had sent my money to a thief’ — hackers are coming for homebuyers. This man lost $150,000

At a real estate auction, Ellerbe, who works in the petroleum industry, made the winning bid on the house: $150,050. The problem has become an epidemic for the real estate industry, experts say. “It started with just phishing corporations, but the real estate industry is more profitable as far as hackers go,” said Dorothy Haraminac, a certified fraud examiner. Hackers target homebuyers because they typically send large amounts of money and are not always the most savvy about cybersecurity. Just


At a real estate auction, Ellerbe, who works in the petroleum industry, made the winning bid on the house: $150,050. The problem has become an epidemic for the real estate industry, experts say. “It started with just phishing corporations, but the real estate industry is more profitable as far as hackers go,” said Dorothy Haraminac, a certified fraud examiner. Hackers target homebuyers because they typically send large amounts of money and are not always the most savvy about cybersecurity. Just
‘I had sent my money to a thief’ — hackers are coming for homebuyers. This man lost $150,000 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thief, titling, hackers, 150000, scams, email, private, money, estate, lost, shirley, man, ellerbe, homebuyers, coming, real, sent


'I had sent my money to a thief' — hackers are coming for homebuyers. This man lost $150,000

Prospective home buyers arrive to tour a house for sale in Dunlap, Illinois, U.S., on Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018. Daniel Acker | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Oliver Ellerbe thought he had found the perfect home for his aging parents. The brick house in Katy, Texas, near Houston, was just a five-minute drive from his own home. At the time, his mother and father lived more than an hour away, near the city of Conroe. The distance began to pose a serious problem when his father’s liver cancer spread through his body and left him unable to move about on his own. “It became very difficult,” Ellerbe, 44, said. “My wife and I were interested in bringing him closer to us.” At a real estate auction, Ellerbe, who works in the petroleum industry, made the winning bid on the house: $150,050. The moving plans began. A few days before the scheduled closing in February 2015, Ellerbe received an email, seemingly from his real estate agent at the firm Keller Williams, notifying him that the wiring instructions had changed. Soon after, he drove over to his bank and sent the $150,050 to the new bank address. Then he left for a hunting trip with clients. “Nothing felt off,” he said.

I had sent my money to a thief. Oliver Ellerbe

On the morning of the closing, Ellerbe received an email from someone at the titling company, Solutionstar Settlement Services. They asked him when he was going to send the money. He had already done so, he explained. He showed the emails as proof. The titling company representative told Ellerbe they hadn’t sent those emails. And the wiring instructions had never changed. “My heart sank,” Ellerbe said. “I had sent my money to a thief.” So-called business email compromise scams are on the rise, with more than $26 billion lost over the last three years, according to the FBI. The problem has become an epidemic for the real estate industry, experts say. “It started with just phishing corporations, but the real estate industry is more profitable as far as hackers go,” said Dorothy Haraminac, a certified fraud examiner. “It’s absolutely happening more.” Hackers target homebuyers because they typically send large amounts of money and are not always the most savvy about cybersecurity. What’s more, real estate and titling companies tend to have less robust security measures in place than other large corporations and often fail to warn consumers adequately about the rising threat. “Many small realty companies just have a family member who’s good with computers in charge of their system,” said John Shirley, a private investigator.

Just around half of real estate firms warn their clients about the dangers of wire fraud, according to new research by the National Association of Realtors. Around 10% of firms said they’d had an experience with the crime. “The mortgage brokers and agents do receive training on it, but they don’t communicate that to the consumer,” Haraminac said. Here’s how these scams usually go down: A thief hacks into a real estate or title company’s computer system and then studies the transactions, from the language used to the format of the wiring instructions. When the scammer strikes, he or she will often pose as someone from the real estate or titling company to instruct the buyer to wire funds to them. “The buyer doesn’t have reason to question the request since it’s coming from what appears to be a legitimate entity that is part of the buying process,” said Kathy Stokes, director of fraud prevention programs at AARP. Never heard of these scams? There’s a reason for that, Shirley said. “Business email compromise scams don’t get a lot of press, because usually the parties involved want to keep it as private as possible,” he said. Ellerbe hired Shirley to investigate his case. He said he did so because law enforcement let him down.

Business email compromise scams don’t get a lot of press, because usually the parties involved want to keep it as private as possible. John Shirley a private investigator


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thief, titling, hackers, 150000, scams, email, private, money, estate, lost, shirley, man, ellerbe, homebuyers, coming, real, sent


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‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: How I learned about money

Ryan Serhant visits Build Brunch to discuss “SELL IT LIKE SERHANT: How to Sell More, Earn more, and Become the Ultimate Sales Machine” at Build Studio on September 20, 2018, in New York City. Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell it Like Serhant,” sat down with Grow for the first installment of our new series in which we ask authors, TV personalities, CEOs, and more how they first learned about money. If we wanted money, we had to work for i


Ryan Serhant visits Build Brunch to discuss “SELL IT LIKE SERHANT: How to Sell More, Earn more, and Become the Ultimate Sales Machine” at Build Studio on September 20, 2018, in New York City. Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell it Like Serhant,” sat down with Grow for the first installment of our new series in which we ask authors, TV personalities, CEOs, and more how they first learned about money. If we wanted money, we had to work for i
‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: How I learned about money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: sam becker, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learned, serhant, dollar, million, star, wanted, thats, work, really, ryan, york, listing, money, sell, estate


'Million Dollar Listing' star Ryan Serhant: How I learned about money

Ryan Serhant visits Build Brunch to discuss “SELL IT LIKE SERHANT: How to Sell More, Earn more, and Become the Ultimate Sales Machine” at Build Studio on September 20, 2018, in New York City.

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell it Like Serhant,” sat down with Grow for the first installment of our new series in which we ask authors, TV personalities, CEOs, and more how they first learned about money. Here is Serhant’s story, as told to senior reporter Sam Becker.

My work ethic: ‘If you work harder, you get more money’

My parents were smart with us. They taught us the value of the dollar and the value of hard work. I think that was the most important thing that they wanted us to understand. We never got money for free. It always had to come with some type of work. And it wasn’t just chores: It was manual labor, outside. It was shoveling for neighbors when it would snow, for example. If we wanted money, we had to work for it. That was instilled into my brain for as long as I can remember. My brothers and sisters all say the same thing. Our parents really, really, really pushed on us that if you want money you have to work for it, and if you work harder, you get more money. That’s it. It’s not that hard. That’s how you make it happen. Then with that money you can go and buy things that you want, or you can invest it or you can save it. You can do whatever you want.

If we wanted money, we had to work for it. That was instilled into my brain for as long as I can remember. Ryan Serhant Real estate broker, author, and TV star

My earning strategy: ‘Be yourself, know your stuff’

I distinctly remember what it was like to be in New York City in the summer of 2008 with no money. I had no idea how I was going to pay my rent come September 1. I had no idea how I was going to buy groceries. I had no idea what I was going to do. And that is a terrifying, sickening, awful feeling. If you’ve ever been that broke — anywhere, but especially in New York City where everything is really expensive — I feel for you. You know what I’m talking about. That is really what pushed me to get into real estate. I had a friend who said, “Listen, it doesn’t cost anything, just get your real estate license, go out there, and start advising people and showing people rental apartments. You don’t have to buy anything. You don’t have to do anything. All you have to do is be yourself, know your stuff, and people will pay you a fee for showing them apartments.” And that’s what I did. And it worked. I got my first rental commission and it was like $500. I was like, “Yes, 500 bucks! Awesome!” And my next one was $700 and then $1,000, and it grew slowly from there.

My savings secret: ‘I always have a massive, massive rainy day fund’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: sam becker, ivana pino, myelle lansat
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These 4 mansions have backyard water parks and insane pools

The estate includes two mega-mansions that were combined to create a lavish residence with a special waterpark feature. This backyard water park has three water slides, a zip line and a lazy river. CNBCCeline Dion’s water worldWhen Celine Dion designed her seaside mansion on Jupiter Island in Florida, she built her children a massive private water park in the backyard. There are several bridges and three spots that simulate a shoreline like on a real beach — only in Dion’s pool there’s no sand.


The estate includes two mega-mansions that were combined to create a lavish residence with a special waterpark feature. This backyard water park has three water slides, a zip line and a lazy river. CNBCCeline Dion’s water worldWhen Celine Dion designed her seaside mansion on Jupiter Island in Florida, she built her children a massive private water park in the backyard. There are several bridges and three spots that simulate a shoreline like on a real beach — only in Dion’s pool there’s no sand.
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: erica wright ray parisi, erica wright, ray parisi
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These 4 mansions have backyard water parks and insane pools

These four mega-mansions all make a splash when it comes to outdoor living, from an over-the-top water slide, to a haunted water park, and even a luxurious water-filled resort built by pop music superstar Celine Dion. Take a look at these insane pools.

Wet, wild and spooky

This french-chateau style mansion in Dallas is a whopping 37,000 square feet.

The gated entrance to the $28 million Dallas estate. Source: Y+A Real Estate & Asset Management

The owner bought the mansion next door and connected the two homes to create a lavish mega-residence. It includes an indoor basketball court that can be turned into a nightclub.

The DJ booth above this indoor basketball court makes this second mega-mansion the ultimate party pad. Source: Y+A Real Estate & Asset Management

But outback is where you’ll find the estate’s most unusual feature: a giant water park that’s “haunted.”

The estate includes two mega-mansions that were combined to create a lavish residence with a special waterpark feature. Source: Y+A Real Estate & Asset Management

There’s a 750,000-gallon party pool with three giant waterslides, a lazy river and even a water canon station where you can soak your buddies.

This backyard water park has three water slides, a zip line and a lazy river. Source: Y+A Real Estate & Asset Management

There’s also a zip line that plunges you into the pool.

The pool features a zip line ride that drops you directly over the water. CNBC

But to see the scariest part of this backyard you have to float down the lazy river into the mouth of a menacing skull that leads you into a “haunted grotto,” complete with a sound system that pumps in creepy screams and scary sound effects.

The entrance to this ‘haunted lazy river’ ride includes a menacing giant skull. CNBC

As if that’s not scary enough, the owner filled the grotto with animatronic mummies, ghosts, bats and ghouls that can pop up and taunt you as you float your way through the spook-fest.

The ‘haunted grotto’ includes spooky animatronics that guide your way on the lazy river. CNBC

Celine Dion’s water world

When Celine Dion designed her seaside mansion on Jupiter Island in Florida, she built her children a massive private water park in the backyard.

Celine Dion’s massive beach-front estate on Jupiter Island located off the coast of Florida. Source: Robert Stevens Photography

The diva’s secluded 6-acre property has 486 feet of unspoiled beach-front with views of the Atlantic, but that’s tiny compared to the water world she built in the backyard.

Bird’s-eye view of Celine Dion’s massive water park that takes up most of her 6-acre estate. Source: Robert Stevens Photography

A full 460,000 gallons of water flows through Dion’s trés chic aquatic paradise.

Two slides converge into a lazy river in Celine Dion’s personal waterpark. Source: Robert Stevens Photography

It includes two slides, a swim-up bar,and a lazy river with currents that float you through the private paradise. There are several bridges and three spots that simulate a shoreline like on a real beach — only in Dion’s pool there’s no sand. There is also an outdoor fire pit in the center of the infinity pool.

Celine Dion’s firepit during sunset. Source: Robert Stevens Photography

The 18,000-square-foot main house includes an indoor/outdoor living room with walls that open to water-filled backyard.

The view from Celine Dion’s indoor-outdoor living room overlooking her pristine waterpark. Source: Robert Stevens Photography

The island retreat was originally listed for $72.5 million. After some time on the market with no offers, Dion dropped her asking price to $45.5 Million. It eventually sold for just $28 million.

Backyard ‘Atlantis’

This fancy 11,000-square-foot mansion in Boca Raton, Florida sits on 6.5 acres.

This residence in Boca Raton, Florida has a massive waterpark in the backyard. Source: Senada Adzem/Douglas Elliman

The moment you walk through the doors, its opulent entrance screams elegance, but the home has a wild side hidden outback.

The grand entrance to this $5.5 million home in Boca Raton, Florida. Source: Senada Adzem/Douglas Elliman

The owners of this estate spent $2.5 million to build a version of their favorite vacation spot in the Bahamas: The Atlantis Resort, in their own backyard. The massive undertaking took two years to complete.

The massive rock formation in this $2.5 Million backyard waterpark inspired by the Atlantis Resort in the Bahamas. Source: Senada Adzem/Douglas Elliman

And just like the Caribbean resort, their private resort has waterslides, and lazy river built into Mayan-style stone structures, with palm trees and cascading water falls.

This calming lazy river ride floats by giant Mayan-style stone structures. CNBC

The 170,000-gallon party pool even has a swim-up bar for sipping champagne.

The swim-up bar in this backyard oasis is built into a mayan-inspired rock structure. CNBC

Real estate broker Senada Adzem, who represented the owners, tells CNBC the home and mini Atlantis in the back sold for $5.5 million.

Bedroom waterslide

This 19,000-square-foot modern residence is located on Indian Creek in Miami Beach, Florida

Aerial view of Miami Beach mansion with a backyard oasis. CNBC

Built into the backyard is a giant pool and a $250,000 waterslide that goes from the master suite on the home’s second level straight into the pool below.

The pool area of this Miami mansion includes an 80ft infinity pool and jacuzzi. CNBC

The super-slide structure, which includes a glass staircase, weighs several tons and had to be shipped in by barge and craned into the backyard.

The $250,000 waterslide escape from the master bedroom of this Miami Beach mansion. CNBC

If you don’t feel like sliding out of bed into your pool, there’s also ground floor access from the living room, which has a wall of windows that slide away and open to the backyard oasis.

The separate entrance to the giant waterslide escape in this Miami Pine Tree home is a glass staircase custom built for the home. CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: erica wright ray parisi, erica wright, ray parisi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pool, estate, pools, mansions, includes, dions, mansion, insane, source, backyard, river, water, parks, lazy


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Gwen Stefani sold her Beverly Hills mansion for $21.65 million — take a look inside

Gwen Stefani, star of “The Voice” on NBC, sold her Beverly Hills, California estate for $21.65 million. Stefani first listed the home in 2017 for $35 million, according to Realtor.com, but reduced the price to $25 million earlier this year. Built in 1998 and renovated in 2003, the 15,018-square-foot estate has seven bedrooms and 10 full bathrooms. Stefani is known for her bold style, which can also be seen in the home. A black-and-white foyer leads to a living and dining room, separated in the c


Gwen Stefani, star of “The Voice” on NBC, sold her Beverly Hills, California estate for $21.65 million. Stefani first listed the home in 2017 for $35 million, according to Realtor.com, but reduced the price to $25 million earlier this year. Built in 1998 and renovated in 2003, the 15,018-square-foot estate has seven bedrooms and 10 full bathrooms. Stefani is known for her bold style, which can also be seen in the home. A black-and-white foyer leads to a living and dining room, separated in the c
Gwen Stefani sold her Beverly Hills mansion for $21.65 million — take a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stone, mansion, stefani, hills, 2165, style, million, seven, voice, sold, beverly, estate, visual, gwen, star, inside, look


Gwen Stefani sold her Beverly Hills mansion for $21.65 million — take a look inside

Gwen Stefani, star of “The Voice” on NBC, sold her Beverly Hills, California estate for $21.65 million.

Stefani first listed the home in 2017 for $35 million, according to Realtor.com, but reduced the price to $25 million earlier this year. She originally purchased the home with ex-husband Gavin Rossdale for $13.25 million in 2006.

Built in 1998 and renovated in 2003, the 15,018-square-foot estate has seven bedrooms and 10 full bathrooms.

Take a look inside.

Stefani is known for her bold style, which can also be seen in the home. “The entire style of the house is a visual delight,” the co-listing by Craig Knizek of The Agency and Jade Mills of Coldwell Banker Global Luxury, says. “It’s a cozy and homey Museum of Modern Art.”

A black-and-white foyer leads to a living and dining room, separated in the center by a floor-to-ceiling stone fireplace.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stone, mansion, stefani, hills, 2165, style, million, seven, voice, sold, beverly, estate, visual, gwen, star, inside, look


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Inside Gwen Stefani’s former Beverly Hills estate that just sold for $21.65 million

Inside Gwen Stefani’s former Beverly Hills estate that just sold for $21.65 million12 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. The 15,000-square-foot home has 7 bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, a home theater, gym, pool and tennis court.


Inside Gwen Stefani’s former Beverly Hills estate that just sold for $21.65 million12 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. The 15,000-square-foot home has 7 bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, a home theater, gym, pool and tennis court.
Inside Gwen Stefani’s former Beverly Hills estate that just sold for $21.65 million Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inside, flash, try, site, view, theater, 2165, million, sold, beverly, estate, enabled, gwen, tennis, browser, hills, stefanis


Inside Gwen Stefani's former Beverly Hills estate that just sold for $21.65 million

Inside Gwen Stefani’s former Beverly Hills estate that just sold for $21.65 million

12 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

The 15,000-square-foot home has 7 bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, a home theater, gym, pool and tennis court.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inside, flash, try, site, view, theater, 2165, million, sold, beverly, estate, enabled, gwen, tennis, browser, hills, stefanis


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Manhattan real estate prices take the biggest tumble since the financial crisis

Prices for Manhattan real estate took their biggest plunge since the 2008 financial crisis, according to a new report. The average sale price for a Manhattan apartment fell 14% in the third quarter, according to a report from Douglas Elliman and Miller Samuel. The average price of a Manhattan apartment is still not cheap — falling to $1.7 million. But brokers and real estate analysts say there is little sign of a bottom after nearly two years of declines. Some of the decline was due to the timin


Prices for Manhattan real estate took their biggest plunge since the 2008 financial crisis, according to a new report. The average sale price for a Manhattan apartment fell 14% in the third quarter, according to a report from Douglas Elliman and Miller Samuel. The average price of a Manhattan apartment is still not cheap — falling to $1.7 million. But brokers and real estate analysts say there is little sign of a bottom after nearly two years of declines. Some of the decline was due to the timin
Manhattan real estate prices take the biggest tumble since the financial crisis Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: robert frank
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, quarter, crisis, financial, manhattan, prices, tax, biggest, miller, real, tumble, nearly, rates, million, estate


Manhattan real estate prices take the biggest tumble since the financial crisis

Trump International Hotel & Tower New York building is seen from the balcony of an apartment unit in the AvalonBay Communities Inc. Park Loggia condominium at 15 West 61 Street in New York, May 15, 2019.

Prices for Manhattan real estate took their biggest plunge since the 2008 financial crisis, according to a new report.

The average sale price for a Manhattan apartment fell 14% in the third quarter, according to a report from Douglas Elliman and Miller Samuel. That was the steepest drop since 2010, when the city was still in the grips of the financial crisis, according to Jonathan Miller, CEO of Miller Samuel, the appraisal and research firm.

The average price of a Manhattan apartment is still not cheap — falling to $1.7 million. But brokers and real estate analysts say there is little sign of a bottom after nearly two years of declines.

“There is a lot of uncertainty in the air,” Miller said. “It’s going to be a slow grind over the next year or two.”

A continued drop in foreign buyers, changes in the federal tax laws that make it more expensive to live in high-tax states and a glut of high-priced condos have all converged to create the worst real estate market in Manhattan in a decade. Sales in the third quarter dropped by 14%.

Some of the decline was due to the timing of a new tax on high-priced Manhattan real estate. The so-called mansion tax on apartments over $2 million took effect July 1, so many buyers rushed to close on deals before the tax, effectively stealing demand from the third quarter.

Yet the number of apartments coming onto the market suggests a continued oversupply and softening prices — especially at the high end. The supply of luxury listings — or those in the top 10% by price — hit the highest level since data started being recorded 15 years ago, Miller said, with nearly 2,000 apartments listed for over $3 million. There is now nearly a two-year supply of luxury apartments.

One bright spot: lower mortgage rates. Typically, Manhattan doesn’t benefit much from lower rates since more than half of all purchases are done with cash. But in the third quarter, as mortgage rates fell, only 44% of deals were done with cash.

“Lower rates have mitigated the slowdown to a certain degree,” Miller said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: robert frank
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, quarter, crisis, financial, manhattan, prices, tax, biggest, miller, real, tumble, nearly, rates, million, estate


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Real estate is still the best investment you can make today, millionaires say—here’s why

Billionaire Andrew Carnegie famously said that 90% of millionaires got their wealth by investing in real estate. According to these nine advisors at The Oracles who made millions by investing in real estate, the answer is a resounding yes. “Investing in real estate is a great idea if you are in it for the long haul, not a quick return. “Real estate is real, and it’s always a good idea to put your money in real assets. —Daniel Lesniak, founder of Orange Line Living, broker at the Keri Shull Team,


Billionaire Andrew Carnegie famously said that 90% of millionaires got their wealth by investing in real estate. According to these nine advisors at The Oracles who made millions by investing in real estate, the answer is a resounding yes. “Investing in real estate is a great idea if you are in it for the long haul, not a quick return. “Real estate is real, and it’s always a good idea to put your money in real assets. —Daniel Lesniak, founder of Orange Line Living, broker at the Keri Shull Team,
Real estate is still the best investment you can make today, millionaires say—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, today, investment, buy, properties, tax, real, founder, sayheres, best, market, millionaires, money, estate, rent


Real estate is still the best investment you can make today, millionaires say—here's why

Billionaire Andrew Carnegie famously said that 90% of millionaires got their wealth by investing in real estate. We wanted to know: Is this still true? Is investing in real estate still a good idea? According to these nine advisors at The Oracles who made millions by investing in real estate, the answer is a resounding yes.

1. ‘Owning made me rich.’

“Buying real estate has made me rich — mostly through necessity, not by design. I bought my first itty-bitty studio after scraping together a few bucks because I needed to live somewhere anyway. A few years later, the studio doubled in value, giving me enough cash to plunk down 50% on a one-bedroom apartment. That soon rolled into a two-bedroom, then a three-bedroom, and finally landed me in my 10-room penthouse on Fifth Avenue in New York City. Buying that tiny studio was the most important decision I made because it got me in the game.” —Barbara Corcoran, founder of The Corcoran Group, podcast host of “Business Unusual,” judge on “Shark Tank”

2. ‘Residential properties can generate income year-round.’

“Investing in real estate is a great idea if you are in it for the long haul, not a quick return. Your best bet is investing in residential properties that produce rental income year-round. Just make sure you understand all of the associated legal fees and are prepared for unexpected costs.” —Bethenny Frankel, entrepreneur, philanthropist, founder of Skinnygirl and BStrong. Follow her on Instagram

3. ‘The right investment will continue to appreciate.’

“Real estate is real, and it’s always a good idea to put your money in real assets. But let me be clear: That doesn’t mean that all real estate is a good idea. I only buy certain types of properties, generally multifamily ones in upscale locations that provide consistent cash flow and great potential for future appreciation. I stay away from low-income areas and single-family homes. But even those assets are probably a better place to store your money than letting cash depreciate while sitting in the bank!” —Grant Cardone, sales expert, New York Times best-selling author. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube

4. ‘Buying is smarter than renting.’

“Most millionaires I know made more money from owning real estate than any other investment. Real estate consistently increases in value over time and outperforms other investments. Plus, it isn’t as vulnerable to short-term fluctuations as the stock market. You get a tangible, usable asset, whether you’re renting out an apartment or commercial building for income or buying a home. And there can also be tax benefits for investment properties. It’s always a good time to buy real estate. In fact, the real wealth is made by buying when everyone else is selling and vice versa. While many are talking about a recession, the market is strong, with increasing prices and transactions. Renting a one-bedroom apartment can cost $5,000 a month in certain neighborhoods today, yet you can buy a $1 million house with just $4,000 a month in mortgage payments. And the rate is fixed for 30 years — the best kind of rent control. So why would you rent? Besides, if you rent your property to someone else, you can cover your mortgage or better.” —Peter Hernandez, president of the Western Region at Douglas Elliman, founder and president of Teles Properties

5. ‘You get six-figure tax breaks.’

“Real estate has incredible tax benefits. In certain situations, you don’t have to pay taxes on your gains from investment properties. You can also get a $250,000 tax break as an individual and $500,000 as a married couple. The wealthiest people collect property the way they used to collect cars. Interest rates are low, prices have fallen, and you don’t have to tie up a lot of cash in the investment. At the same time, more people are choosing to rent instead of own. You can have a lucrative rental property using other peoples’ money to cover the mortgage, taxes, and upkeep. With sites like Vrbo and Airbnb, you can also find short-term renters to subsidize your overhead. While I suggest diversifying your investments, there is no better place to park your money than brick-and-mortar investments you can live in and enjoy. When you invest in your surroundings, you invest in yourself!” —Holly Parker, founder and CEO of The Holly Parker Team at Douglas Elliman, award-winning broker who made over $8 billion in sales. Follow her on LinkedIn and Instagram

6. ‘It doesn’t tie up a lot of cash.’

“Real estate is a bankable asset, so you can always leverage it. It also doesn’t tie up a lot of cash. You can put down as little as 10% and use banks’ money to grow your investment. With such low interest rates, that’s like free money. Unlike the stock market, where many factors are out of your control, your investment can’t disappear overnight. You can also build your wealth with excellent return rates and tax advantages. The only people who lose money in real estate are those who bought at the height of the market and sold at the wrong time or took too much equity out of their home, leaving no profit margin when they sold it. It often takes time to see big appreciations, but if you hold on to your investment, you will. —Dottie Herman, CEO of Douglas Elliman, a real estate brokerage empire with more than $27 billion in annual sales. Follow her on Facebook and Instagram

7. ‘Real estate offers unlimited options.’

“Real estate is always a great investment because you have more options than with other types of investments. If you invest in stocks, bonds, or a private offering, your success is completely dependent on factors outside of your control. At most, your options are to hold or sell. With real estate, you have unlimited options. You can buy a house with the intent of flipping it, then rent it if the market turns south. If you buy a rental that appreciates in value significantly, you can sell it. Real estate can be refinanced, rehabbed, and rezoned. You can develop it, lease it, subdivide it, or add parcels to it. These are just a few of your options. This flexibility is one of the reasons it has created more millionaires than any other asset class.” —Daniel Lesniak, founder of Orange Line Living, broker at the Keri Shull Team, co-founder of real estate coaching business HyperFast Agent, author of “The HyperLocal, HyperFast Real Estate Agent”

8. ‘People will always need a place to live.’

“There’s an opportunity for greater and more consistent returns with real estate than with other investments. When a property is built, it’s because a group of people see a population large enough to justify it. “The sheer number of new properties each year is a testament to the growing real estate market. Supply follows demand, and demand is continuing to rise. Populations almost never decrease, which is why the need for housing increases year over year. The market for multifamily apartments in particular is growing. As apartments become more attractive, people are less likely to buy houses. With multifamily apartments, you continue to generate increasing income over time. Once the property stabilizes, you can collect returns for your investors until you decide to sell. There’s also demand year-round wherever you go.” —Robert Martinez, founder and CEO of Rockstar Capital, a real estate investment firm with $335 million in assets under management and $71 million in investor capital, host of “The Apartment Rockstar” podcast. Follow him on YouTube and Instagram

9. ‘You can invest in land that produces income.’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, today, investment, buy, properties, tax, real, founder, sayheres, best, market, millionaires, money, estate, rent


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