Tesla begins Model 3 delivery in China ahead of schedule

Tesla announced Friday during an event in Beijing that it’s beginning delivery of the Model 3 in China, at least a week earlier than expected. Elon Musk’s electric car company said in January it planned to start deliveries of the vehicle in China in March. State-funded Chinese news site The Paper also reported Friday that a ship carrying more than 1,600 Model 3 vehicles had arrived in Shanghai. In January, Tesla broke ground on its factory in Shanghai and production is expected to begin in the s


Tesla announced Friday during an event in Beijing that it’s beginning delivery of the Model 3 in China, at least a week earlier than expected. Elon Musk’s electric car company said in January it planned to start deliveries of the vehicle in China in March. State-funded Chinese news site The Paper also reported Friday that a ship carrying more than 1,600 Model 3 vehicles had arrived in Shanghai. In January, Tesla broke ground on its factory in Shanghai and production is expected to begin in the s
Tesla begins Model 3 delivery in China ahead of schedule Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: evelyn cheng, mason trinca, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, schedule, model, ahead, worlds, electric, begins, vehicles, tesla, company, delivery, yearthe, week, chinese


Tesla begins Model 3 delivery in China ahead of schedule

Tesla announced Friday during an event in Beijing that it’s beginning delivery of the Model 3 in China, at least a week earlier than expected.

Elon Musk’s electric car company said in January it planned to start deliveries of the vehicle in China in March.

State-funded Chinese news site The Paper also reported Friday that a ship carrying more than 1,600 Model 3 vehicles had arrived in Shanghai.

In January, Tesla broke ground on its factory in Shanghai and production is expected to begin in the second half of this year.

The company has said manufacturing in the world’s largest market for electric cars would help reduce transport and tariff costs. The automaker said in October it operates at a 55 percent to 60 percent cost disadvantage compared with its Chinese peers.

Tesla’s revenues from China fell 13 percent last year to $1.8 billion, the company disclosed in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Feb. 19.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: evelyn cheng, mason trinca, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, schedule, model, ahead, worlds, electric, begins, vehicles, tesla, company, delivery, yearthe, week, chinese


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Tesla begins Model 3 delivery in China ahead of schedule

Tesla announced Friday during an event in Beijing that it’s beginning delivery of the Model 3 in China, at least a week earlier than expected. Elon Musk’s electric car company said in January it planned to start deliveries of the vehicle in China in March. State-funded Chinese news site The Paper also reported Friday that a ship carrying more than 1,600 Model 3 vehicles had arrived in Shanghai. In January, Tesla broke ground on its factory in Shanghai and production is expected to begin in the s


Tesla announced Friday during an event in Beijing that it’s beginning delivery of the Model 3 in China, at least a week earlier than expected. Elon Musk’s electric car company said in January it planned to start deliveries of the vehicle in China in March. State-funded Chinese news site The Paper also reported Friday that a ship carrying more than 1,600 Model 3 vehicles had arrived in Shanghai. In January, Tesla broke ground on its factory in Shanghai and production is expected to begin in the s
Tesla begins Model 3 delivery in China ahead of schedule Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: evelyn cheng, mason trinca, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, schedule, model, ahead, worlds, electric, begins, vehicles, tesla, company, delivery, yearthe, week, chinese


Tesla begins Model 3 delivery in China ahead of schedule

Tesla announced Friday during an event in Beijing that it’s beginning delivery of the Model 3 in China, at least a week earlier than expected.

Elon Musk’s electric car company said in January it planned to start deliveries of the vehicle in China in March.

State-funded Chinese news site The Paper also reported Friday that a ship carrying more than 1,600 Model 3 vehicles had arrived in Shanghai.

In January, Tesla broke ground on its factory in Shanghai and production is expected to begin in the second half of this year.

The company has said manufacturing in the world’s largest market for electric cars would help reduce transport and tariff costs. The automaker said in October it operates at a 55 percent to 60 percent cost disadvantage compared with its Chinese peers.

Tesla’s revenues from China fell 13 percent last year to $1.8 billion, the company disclosed in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Feb. 19.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: evelyn cheng, mason trinca, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, schedule, model, ahead, worlds, electric, begins, vehicles, tesla, company, delivery, yearthe, week, chinese


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Chinese tourism growth slows during the Lunar New Year holiday

Tourism growth in China slowed during this year’s major Spring Festival holiday, indicating overall sentiment around the economy has yet to turn around. Chinese New Year is typically spent visiting relatives, but as one of China’s few major public holiday seasons, it has increasingly become a popular time to travel. This year, the work holiday officially ran the first full week of February. The closely watched Chinese consumer has become a significant force in overseas travel. The auto sector —


Tourism growth in China slowed during this year’s major Spring Festival holiday, indicating overall sentiment around the economy has yet to turn around. Chinese New Year is typically spent visiting relatives, but as one of China’s few major public holiday seasons, it has increasingly become a popular time to travel. This year, the work holiday officially ran the first full week of February. The closely watched Chinese consumer has become a significant force in overseas travel. The auto sector —
Chinese tourism growth slows during the Lunar New Year holiday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: evelyn cheng, vcg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tourism, slows, work, chinese, willing, lunar, watched, week, major, china, holiday, economy, growth, overseas


Chinese tourism growth slows during the Lunar New Year holiday

Tourism growth in China slowed during this year’s major Spring Festival holiday, indicating overall sentiment around the economy has yet to turn around.

Chinese New Year is typically spent visiting relatives, but as one of China’s few major public holiday seasons, it has increasingly become a popular time to travel. This year, the work holiday officially ran the first full week of February. Tuesday, the 15th day from the start of the Lunar New Year, marked the traditional end of the celebrations.

The closely watched Chinese consumer has become a significant force in overseas travel.

An increasing number of merchants overseas have adopted Chinese mobile pay, while many retailers have employed Mandarin-speaking staff. Within China, economic slowdown and uncertainty around issues such as the U.S.-China trade tensions have already put some pause on big-ticket purchases.

Car sales fell for a seventh straight month in January, data this week showed. The auto sector — a major part of the Chinese economy — is watched as a barometer on how much consumers are willing to spend.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: evelyn cheng, vcg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tourism, slows, work, chinese, willing, lunar, watched, week, major, china, holiday, economy, growth, overseas


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Any new US tariffs ‘catastrophic’ for stocks: China state media

A Chinese state-run newspaper claimed in an editorial published late Tuesday that the U.S. faces greater pressure to resolve its ongoing trade war with China because failed negotiations would likely have major consequences for stocks worldwide. The current deadline before increased tariffs kick in is March 1, and the Chinese delegation is in Washington, D.C. this week for trade negotiations. “[Trump’s] words further stoked the stock markets of the US, which reached the highest in two months and


A Chinese state-run newspaper claimed in an editorial published late Tuesday that the U.S. faces greater pressure to resolve its ongoing trade war with China because failed negotiations would likely have major consequences for stocks worldwide. The current deadline before increased tariffs kick in is March 1, and the Chinese delegation is in Washington, D.C. this week for trade negotiations. “[Trump’s] words further stoked the stock markets of the US, which reached the highest in two months and
Any new US tariffs ‘catastrophic’ for stocks: China state media Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, catastrophic, trump, state, media, stock, chinese, markets, china, times, pressure, stocks, global, trade, tariffs


Any new US tariffs 'catastrophic' for stocks: China state media

A Chinese state-run newspaper claimed in an editorial published late Tuesday that the U.S. faces greater pressure to resolve its ongoing trade war with China because failed negotiations would likely have major consequences for stocks worldwide.

On Tuesday, the S&P 500 rose after U.S. President Donald Trump again indicated the world’s two largest economies might have more time to find a way to avoid raising tariffs. The current deadline before increased tariffs kick in is March 1, and the Chinese delegation is in Washington, D.C. this week for trade negotiations.

“[Trump’s] words further stoked the stock markets of the US, which reached the highest in two months and so increased pressure on the Trump administration to close the deal with China,” the Global Times said in the editorial.

Trump has frequently cited the U.S. stock market’s performance as a gauge of his success, although he has been quiet on the subject when shares are not performing well.

Citing unnamed analysts, the Global Times editorial added that if both sides can’t reach an agreement and the Trump team “imposes more tariffs on Chinese products while China responds with fiercer countermeasures,” then that would “be a catastrophic strike to global stock markets.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, catastrophic, trump, state, media, stock, chinese, markets, china, times, pressure, stocks, global, trade, tariffs


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

China state-run media: Any new US tariffs on Chinese goods will be ‘catastrophic’ for global stocks

A Chinese state-run newspaper claimed in an editorial published late Tuesday that the U.S. faces greater pressure to resolve its ongoing trade war with China because failed negotiations would likely have major consequences for stocks worldwide. The current deadline before increased tariffs kick in is March 1, and the Chinese delegation is in Washington, D.C. this week for trade negotiations. “[Trump’s] words further stoked the stock markets of the US, which reached the highest in two months and


A Chinese state-run newspaper claimed in an editorial published late Tuesday that the U.S. faces greater pressure to resolve its ongoing trade war with China because failed negotiations would likely have major consequences for stocks worldwide. The current deadline before increased tariffs kick in is March 1, and the Chinese delegation is in Washington, D.C. this week for trade negotiations. “[Trump’s] words further stoked the stock markets of the US, which reached the highest in two months and
China state-run media: Any new US tariffs on Chinese goods will be ‘catastrophic’ for global stocks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: evelyn cheng, fred dufour, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, media, times, china, pressure, catastrophic, staterun, tariffs, chinese, stocks, goods, trade, markets, stock, trump


China state-run media: Any new US tariffs on Chinese goods will be 'catastrophic' for global stocks

A Chinese state-run newspaper claimed in an editorial published late Tuesday that the U.S. faces greater pressure to resolve its ongoing trade war with China because failed negotiations would likely have major consequences for stocks worldwide.

On Tuesday, the S&P 500 rose after U.S. President Donald Trump again indicated the world’s two largest economies might have more time to find a way to avoid raising tariffs. The current deadline before increased tariffs kick in is March 1, and the Chinese delegation is in Washington, D.C. this week for trade negotiations.

“[Trump’s] words further stoked the stock markets of the US, which reached the highest in two months and so increased pressure on the Trump administration to close the deal with China,” the Global Times said in the editorial.

Trump has frequently cited the U.S. stock market’s performance as a gauge of his success, although he has been quiet on the subject when shares are not performing well.

Citing unnamed analysts, the Global Times editorial added that if both sides can’t reach an agreement and the Trump team “imposes more tariffs on Chinese products while China responds with fiercer countermeasures,” then that would “be a catastrophic strike to global stock markets.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: evelyn cheng, fred dufour, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, media, times, china, pressure, catastrophic, staterun, tariffs, chinese, stocks, goods, trade, markets, stock, trump


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Markets are now only hoping US-China tariffs don’t get worse on March 1, JP Morgan says

Markets have lowered their bar for what kind of U.S.-China trade headlines they’d cheer, a J.P. Morgan Asset Management global market strategist, Hannah Anderson, said Friday. Markets have been on edge for months about trade tensions between the world’s two largest economies. An American delegation led by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is meeting in Beijing this week with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He and his team. “I believe we have seen expectat


Markets have lowered their bar for what kind of U.S.-China trade headlines they’d cheer, a J.P. Morgan Asset Management global market strategist, Hannah Anderson, said Friday. Markets have been on edge for months about trade tensions between the world’s two largest economies. An American delegation led by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is meeting in Beijing this week with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He and his team. “I believe we have seen expectat
Markets are now only hoping US-China tariffs don’t get worse on March 1, JP Morgan says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: evelyn cheng, greg baker, afp, getty images, -hannah anderson, jp morgan asset management, global market strategist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, hoping, worse, china, assuming, morgan, week, uschina, anderson, washington, trade, jp, dont, tariffs, markets, headlines, yield


Markets are now only hoping US-China tariffs don't get worse on March 1, JP Morgan says

Markets have lowered their bar for what kind of U.S.-China trade headlines they’d cheer, a J.P. Morgan Asset Management global market strategist, Hannah Anderson, said Friday.

Markets have been on edge for months about trade tensions between the world’s two largest economies. An American delegation led by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is meeting in Beijing this week with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He and his team. Discussions are expected to conclude Friday.

While markets may have at one point hoped for those negotiations to yield a resolution to the ongoing trade war, investors will now be satisfied if Washington simply opts to push back its deadline for additional tariff penalties on China, Anderson said.

“I believe we have seen expectations move from assuming China and the U.S. will resolve their differences during this 90-day negotiating period to assuming that talks would be a success if the U.S. doesn’t raise or apply more tariffs on March 1,” she said. “This shift reflects how easy it would be for policymakers to move the goalpost and declare victory — and how eager markets, fatigued after a year of trade headlines, are to move trade issues to the back burner.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: evelyn cheng, greg baker, afp, getty images, -hannah anderson, jp morgan asset management, global market strategist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, hoping, worse, china, assuming, morgan, week, uschina, anderson, washington, trade, jp, dont, tariffs, markets, headlines, yield


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi to lay off 15% of its workforce

Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing is planning to lay off about 2,000 people, or 15 percent of its workforce, this year, a source familiar with the situation said Friday. That confirmed earlier Chinese media reports that Didi CEO Cheng Wei said in an internal meeting Friday that the company is preparing for difficult times. Didi is ultimately planning to hire about 2,500 employees this year in areas such as safety, technology and offline management operations, according to the source famili


Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing is planning to lay off about 2,000 people, or 15 percent of its workforce, this year, a source familiar with the situation said Friday. That confirmed earlier Chinese media reports that Didi CEO Cheng Wei said in an internal meeting Friday that the company is preparing for difficult times. Didi is ultimately planning to hire about 2,500 employees this year in areas such as safety, technology and offline management operations, according to the source famili
Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi to lay off 15% of its workforce Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: evelyn cheng, zhang peng, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ridehailing, lay, source, operations, familiar, internal, yuan, billion, companys, workforce, 15, didi, chinese, planning, giant


Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi to lay off 15% of its workforce

Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing is planning to lay off about 2,000 people, or 15 percent of its workforce, this year, a source familiar with the situation said Friday.

That confirmed earlier Chinese media reports that Didi CEO Cheng Wei said in an internal meeting Friday that the company is preparing for difficult times.

Didi declined to comment to CNBC.

Didi is ultimately planning to hire about 2,500 employees this year in areas such as safety, technology and offline management operations, according to the source familiar with the matter. That would bring the company’s 2019 year-end headcount to about 13,000, which would be on par with staffing at the end of 2018.

Didi is one of the most valuable start-ups in the world and bought Uber’s China operations in 2016.

On Wednesday, Chinese tech news site 36kr, citing leaked internal financial statements, said Didi lost 10.9 billion yuan ($1.6 billion) last year and spent 11.3 billion yuan on driver subsidies. That was a marked acceleration from the company’s 2017 loss of 2.5 billion yuan, according to the report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: evelyn cheng, zhang peng, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ridehailing, lay, source, operations, familiar, internal, yuan, billion, companys, workforce, 15, didi, chinese, planning, giant


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi to lay off 15% of its workforce

Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing is planning to lay off about 2,000 people, or 15 percent of its workforce, this year, a source familiar with the situation said Friday. That confirmed earlier Chinese media reports that Didi CEO Cheng Wei said in an internal meeting Friday that the company is preparing for difficult times. Didi is ultimately planning to hire about 2,500 employees this year in areas such as safety, technology and offline management operations, according to the source famili


Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing is planning to lay off about 2,000 people, or 15 percent of its workforce, this year, a source familiar with the situation said Friday. That confirmed earlier Chinese media reports that Didi CEO Cheng Wei said in an internal meeting Friday that the company is preparing for difficult times. Didi is ultimately planning to hire about 2,500 employees this year in areas such as safety, technology and offline management operations, according to the source famili
Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi to lay off 15% of its workforce Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: evelyn cheng, zhang peng, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ridehailing, lay, source, operations, familiar, internal, yuan, billion, companys, workforce, 15, didi, chinese, planning, giant


Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi to lay off 15% of its workforce

Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing is planning to lay off about 2,000 people, or 15 percent of its workforce, this year, a source familiar with the situation said Friday.

That confirmed earlier Chinese media reports that Didi CEO Cheng Wei said in an internal meeting Friday that the company is preparing for difficult times.

Didi declined to comment to CNBC.

Didi is ultimately planning to hire about 2,500 employees this year in areas such as safety, technology and offline management operations, according to the source familiar with the matter. That would bring the company’s 2019 year-end headcount to about 13,000, which would be on par with staffing at the end of 2018.

Didi is one of the most valuable start-ups in the world and bought Uber’s China operations in 2016.

On Wednesday, Chinese tech news site 36kr, citing leaked internal financial statements, said Didi lost 10.9 billion yuan ($1.6 billion) last year and spent 11.3 billion yuan on driver subsidies. That was a marked acceleration from the company’s 2017 loss of 2.5 billion yuan, according to the report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: evelyn cheng, zhang peng, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ridehailing, lay, source, operations, familiar, internal, yuan, billion, companys, workforce, 15, didi, chinese, planning, giant


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

China wants to boost loans to small businesses. Tech companies may be the answer

China’s push to encourage lending to smaller companies has created a business opportunity for large financial technology companies. The central bank has also freed up cash for lending in recent months, and eased rules to help small businesses obtain funds more easily. According to Tencent-backed online lender WeBank, roughly 80 percent of the nearly 90 million small and micro-sized enterprises in China don’t have a credit with a bank. That’s the kind of basic credit information many companies in


China’s push to encourage lending to smaller companies has created a business opportunity for large financial technology companies. The central bank has also freed up cash for lending in recent months, and eased rules to help small businesses obtain funds more easily. According to Tencent-backed online lender WeBank, roughly 80 percent of the nearly 90 million small and micro-sized enterprises in China don’t have a credit with a bank. That’s the kind of basic credit information many companies in
China wants to boost loans to small businesses. Tech companies may be the answer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: evelyn cheng, matthias doering, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, businesses, wants, webank, answer, companies, china, enterprises, loans, tencentbacked, support, smaller, growth, boost, small, business, stateowned, tech


China wants to boost loans to small businesses. Tech companies may be the answer

China’s push to encourage lending to smaller companies has created a business opportunity for large financial technology companies.

As Beijing struggles to balance a crackdown on high debt levels with maintaining growth, President Xi Jinping and Premier Li Keqiang have both publicly announced support for privately-run companies. The central bank has also freed up cash for lending in recent months, and eased rules to help small businesses obtain funds more easily.

Still, the business environment — particularly in financing — still favors state-owned companies, despite the fact that the private sector contributes to the majority of job creation and economic growth in the country.

But there’s money to be made for those willing to lend to smaller businesses, particularly if some of the risks can be mitigated. According to Tencent-backed online lender WeBank, roughly 80 percent of the nearly 90 million small and micro-sized enterprises in China don’t have a credit with a bank.

That’s where fintech can play a greater role.

Thanks to their close ties to Chinese technology giants, Alibaba-backed online lender MYbank and Tencent-backed WeBank can use hordes of payment information or social network data to ascertain the ability of a business to pay back its loans. That’s the kind of basic credit information many companies in the private sector have been unable to provide, and partly why traditional banks prefer to lend to large, state-owned enterprises instead.

Micro and small-sized enterprises do not get equal financial support relative to their contribution to China’s economic growth


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: evelyn cheng, matthias doering, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, businesses, wants, webank, answer, companies, china, enterprises, loans, tencentbacked, support, smaller, growth, boost, small, business, stateowned, tech


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Bing outage in China said to be technical error, not censors’ block

Search engine Bing’s outage in China last week was a technical error, rather than an intentional censorship block, a source familiar with the matter said, although Chinese authorities and Microsoft have not commented on the topic. From a technical perspective, a person at Microsoft told Reuters, the site appeared to have been blocked in a manner similar to sites blocked by the government. Starting from Thursday, Internet users in China attempting to access cn.bing.com, the search engine’s domest


Search engine Bing’s outage in China last week was a technical error, rather than an intentional censorship block, a source familiar with the matter said, although Chinese authorities and Microsoft have not commented on the topic. From a technical perspective, a person at Microsoft told Reuters, the site appeared to have been blocked in a manner similar to sites blocked by the government. Starting from Thursday, Internet users in China attempting to access cn.bing.com, the search engine’s domest
Bing outage in China said to be technical error, not censors’ block Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, bing, block, traffic, censors, sites, outage, week, internet, search, technical, users, blocked, error


Bing outage in China said to be technical error, not censors' block

Search engine Bing’s outage in China last week was a technical error, rather than an intentional censorship block, a source familiar with the matter said, although Chinese authorities and Microsoft have not commented on the topic.

From a technical perspective, a person at Microsoft told Reuters, the site appeared to have been blocked in a manner similar to sites blocked by the government.

But the company had received no prior notice from authorities, and the disruption was not intentional on the part of the government, added the person, who declined to be identified, citing the sensitivity of the matter.

Microsoft was not immediately available for comment on Monday. Last week, although it confirmed the outage, it declined to give details.

The Cyberspace Administration of China did not respond immediately to a faxed request from Reuters seeking comment.

Starting from Thursday, Internet users in China attempting to access cn.bing.com, the search engine’s domestic URL, found themselves directed to an error page.

Attempts to log on to Facebook, Google search, or other sites blocked by China’s Great Firewall, encountered the same fate.

Service had resumed by late on Friday, however.

Engineers at ExpressVPN, a provider of virtual private network (VPN) software allowing internet users in China to access censored websites, ran tests during the outage to determine its origin.

They found that rather than domain name service (DNS) poisoning, the most common means for blocking sites under the Great Firewall, Bing’s outage appeared to employ a technique known as “black-holing”.

With this method, rather than re-directing to a dummy server traffic headed for a specific website, the traffic is simply cut off en route, usually at the internet service provider (ISP) level.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, bing, block, traffic, censors, sites, outage, week, internet, search, technical, users, blocked, error


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post