25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in


Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in
25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Like a lot of kids, Myles Gage was into sneakers when he was growing up. But his mom suggested an unusual rule: For every pair of Nikes that Gage owned, he should own a share of Nike stock. Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. The platform makes a game out of the markets: Users get $10,000 fictitious dollars to buy and sell stocks, which helps them learn how the markets work and start to experience the excitement and potential benefit of investing. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future.

Learning early to be ‘financially literate’

Gage says his parents made a lot of financial mistakes and they wanted to make sure their kids didn’t follow in their footsteps: “They wanted us to be financially literate and in a position to make better decisions.” That’s partly why Gage’s mother, who worked for the Chicago Parks District, found a way to get him and his brother, Mario, into Ariel Community Academy, a specialized public school for students K-8 with a focus on financial education. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience investing in stocks. Attending Ariel made a huge difference in Gage’s life: “The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy,” he says.

The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy. Myles Gage CFO, Rapunzl Investments

That knowledge paid off: It helped Gage win a full-ride scholarship to the University of Chicago Laboratory School, a prestigious private high school. “I wrote an essay about how I planned to finance my college tuition. And the main point of that was that I was going to liquidate my stock portfolio,” he says. “I don’t think the judges were expecting a 14-year-old to be talking about liquidating a portfolio, let alone one from the south side of Chicago.”

The origins of Rapunzl

As a high school freshman in 2008, Gage immediately bonded with another student, Brian Curcio. While discussing the stock market and the budding financial crisis, the two came up with the idea of a stock market game, using fictional money, to teach people how the markets work. Over the next few years, the economy recovered. Some investors, who had money to buy stocks when the markets bottomed out, started to see strong returns. Average Americans, however, were often missing out. Gage didn’t think that profits should belong only to a select few, hidden away at the top of a tower like the character of Rapunzel in the 1812 Brothers Grimm fairy tale. Rapunzl the app, Gage and Curcio decided, would make investing accessible. It would give anybody the chance to learn, to figure out how the stock markets work. Then, when users were comfortable, they could actually start investing.

How the app got funded

Through their college years, the two met frequently to refine the concept for Rapunzl. They settled on an idea that would allow users to simulate a stock portfolio without risking real money. But to make their idea come to life, real money is exactly what the two young entrepreneurs needed. So, after graduating in 2016, they organized their ideas and started looking around for seed funding.

Myles Gage with Rapunzl cofounder Brian Curcio. Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC

“We put a mini-pitch deck together and shopped it around to our friends and family, and were able to muster up funds to develop a prototype,” Gage says. They hired a Canadian developer who created an early version of the app and made it available for download in April 2017. Around that time, Rapunzl also did another round of fundraising, which netted the company enough money to continue perfecting the platform. Several months later, the founders brought in a third partner, Chris Thomas, as the company’s CTO.

‘Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl’

To attract users and take aim at their mission of creating a new generation of confident, financially literate investors, Gage and the team headed back to school — literally. Rapunzl partnered with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and started sponsoring conferences, plus essay and investing competitions at schools around the Chicago area. The team also met with John Rogers, the chairman and CEO of Ariel Investments — which also funds and sponsors Ariel Community Academy — who agreed to sponsor the competitions and provide prize money. In 2018, Rapunzl was involved in competitions in more than 70 Chicago-area schools, comprising more than 2,000 students.

Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap. Arne Duncan Former U.S. Secretary of Education

Rapunzl is building on its success in Chicago schools by expanding. Last year, it sponsored competitions in Los Angeles, Boston, and New York, with plans for more cities next year, and colleges, too. It has even managed to catch the attention of former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap,” Duncan said, following an announcement about Rapunzl partnering with investing firm Wedbush. Duncan, who doesn’t have any current connection to the app, did play a role in developing the curriculum at Ariel Community Academy.

The app and its founders hope to make a difference

So far, the Rapunzl team has focused their efforts on generating interest in the platform and getting young users hooked on trading. The app doesn’t currently drive revenue, though, and Gage is hopeful that will change. He says at some point in 2020, the platform will be monetized through affiliate marketing and premium subscriptions.

Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


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Everyday conveniences will win over concerns about personal data collection: A.I. start-up SenseTime

On its own, tech cannot generate value: SenseTime 1:27 AM ET Wed, 28 Nov 2018 | 02:38The public will come to accept the applications of artificial intelligence in daily life and embrace conveniences such as facial recognition easing airport security lines, and virtual assistants in homes, according to a vice president at SenseTime — one of the most valuable AI start-ups in the world. While AI has prompted privacy concerns over possible abuses — such as government surveillance and invasion of pri


On its own, tech cannot generate value: SenseTime 1:27 AM ET Wed, 28 Nov 2018 | 02:38The public will come to accept the applications of artificial intelligence in daily life and embrace conveniences such as facial recognition easing airport security lines, and virtual assistants in homes, according to a vice president at SenseTime — one of the most valuable AI start-ups in the world. While AI has prompted privacy concerns over possible abuses — such as government surveillance and invasion of pri
Everyday conveniences will win over concerns about personal data collection: A.I. start-up SenseTime Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: andrew wong
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worldwhile, vicepresident, tech, virtual, startup, data, conveniences, concerns, ai, personal, everyday, win, privacy, collect, sensetime, west, collection


Everyday conveniences will win over concerns about personal data collection: A.I. start-up SenseTime

On its own, tech cannot generate value: SenseTime 1:27 AM ET Wed, 28 Nov 2018 | 02:38

The public will come to accept the applications of artificial intelligence in daily life and embrace conveniences such as facial recognition easing airport security lines, and virtual assistants in homes, according to a vice president at SenseTime — one of the most valuable AI start-ups in the world.

While AI has prompted privacy concerns over possible abuses — such as government surveillance and invasion of privacy, but SenseTime said it does not collect personal data indiscriminately.

“My point is that we don’t collect the data or use the data without the permission of users,” Leo Liu, group vice-president of SenseTime told CNBC at the East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-30  Authors: andrew wong
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worldwhile, vicepresident, tech, virtual, startup, data, conveniences, concerns, ai, personal, everyday, win, privacy, collect, sensetime, west, collection


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Walmart saves $200 million by changing its light bulbs and $20 million with a new floor wax

These are goods like travel services or maintenance supplies. One of those items, is floor wax for stores, which the world’s largest retailer recently changed. “That one change in floor wax will save us over $20 million a year.” Walmart’s founding principle is “everyday low price,4” which can only be achieved by everyday low cost. The more Walmart saves on the cost side, the more shoppers save at checkout.


These are goods like travel services or maintenance supplies. One of those items, is floor wax for stores, which the world’s largest retailer recently changed. “That one change in floor wax will save us over $20 million a year.” Walmart’s founding principle is “everyday low price,4” which can only be achieved by everyday low cost. The more Walmart saves on the cost side, the more shoppers save at checkout.
Walmart saves $200 million by changing its light bulbs and $20 million with a new floor wax Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: courtney reagan, jeffrey greenberg, uig, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stores, changing, 20, bulbs, million, walmart, saves, services, everyday, low, save, cost, goods, floor, light, wax, 200


Walmart saves $200 million by changing its light bulbs and $20 million with a new floor wax

Walmart will be able to mitigate a lot of the tariff issue, says former Walmart US CEO 10 Hours Ago | 03:44

In the U.S. alone, Walmart buys tens of billions of dollars’ worth of goods and services used for the business that aren’t sold in its stores, a category called “goods not for resale.” These are goods like travel services or maintenance supplies.

One of those items, is floor wax for stores, which the world’s largest retailer recently changed.

“Not only is the new wax cheaper, it’s also sturdier. It doesn’t need to be buffed as often, resulting in less spent on the actual buffing, as well as fuel for the machines,” Biggs said. “That one change in floor wax will save us over $20 million a year.”

It’s savings on a major scale.

Walmart’s founding principle is “everyday low price,4” which can only be achieved by everyday low cost. The more Walmart saves on the cost side, the more shoppers save at checkout.

Earlier Tuesday, Walmart cut its earnings outlook. As expected, profits were hurt due to the impact of its acquisition of Indian e-commerce company Flipkart.

WATCH: Walmart lowers forecast to reflect Flipkart deal


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: courtney reagan, jeffrey greenberg, uig, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stores, changing, 20, bulbs, million, walmart, saves, services, everyday, low, save, cost, goods, floor, light, wax, 200


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Leadership advice: Tips for building a successful business, TWG CEO

If you want to build a successful business, you’ve got to dream big. When he founded his luxury drinks business TWG Tea — The Wellbeing Group — in Singapore in 2008, his vision from the outset was to grow it into a global brand. Today, the CEO has achieved just that, establishing TWG Tea as an upscale tea chain with 70 salons and boutiques in major cities across North America, the Middle East, Europe and Asia Pacific. I wanted TWG Tea to be an Asian brand for the world and it is today” he said.


If you want to build a successful business, you’ve got to dream big. When he founded his luxury drinks business TWG Tea — The Wellbeing Group — in Singapore in 2008, his vision from the outset was to grow it into a global brand. Today, the CEO has achieved just that, establishing TWG Tea as an upscale tea chain with 70 salons and boutiques in major cities across North America, the Middle East, Europe and Asia Pacific. I wanted TWG Tea to be an Asian brand for the world and it is today” he said.
Leadership advice: Tips for building a successful business, TWG CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: harini v, twg tea, andrew chin, getty images, roslan rahman, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tips, ceo, luxury, bouqdib, building, everyday, twg, told, successful, tea, advice, group, business, leadership


Leadership advice: Tips for building a successful business, TWG CEO

If you want to build a successful business, you’ve got to dream big.

Fortunately for Taha Bouqdib, that was never an issue. When he founded his luxury drinks business TWG Tea — The Wellbeing Group — in Singapore in 2008, his vision from the outset was to grow it into a global brand.

“Even when we were just a group of five or six people working in an office, I told everyone ‘we are a luxury brand, you need to wear a tie everyday as if we are having a meeting everyday,'” Bouqdib told CNBC Make It.

Today, the CEO has achieved just that, establishing TWG Tea as an upscale tea chain with 70 salons and boutiques in major cities across North America, the Middle East, Europe and Asia Pacific. In addition, the company sells a range of accessories and tea-related cuisine.

“All the visions I have had since day one, I can see now in front of me. I wanted TWG Tea to be an Asian brand for the world and it is today” he said.

Of course the journey was not always easy. But it did teach Bouqdib some important lessons for building and maintaining a successful business. As TWG Tea celebrates its 10th anniversary, he shared those with CNBC Make It.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: harini v, twg tea, andrew chin, getty images, roslan rahman, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tips, ceo, luxury, bouqdib, building, everyday, twg, told, successful, tea, advice, group, business, leadership


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The top source of financial stress in California isn’t pricey housing

The median rent is nearly $3,000. Still, though they must contend with some of the most expensive real-estate prices in the country, Californians say their top financial stressor isn’t housing. Financial site GOBankingRates conducted a study of more than 2,000 people from every state and Washington, D.C., “to pinpoint what’s causing the worst financial fears and stress among Americans.” Respondents could choose one of the following options: “debt,” “education,” including things like college expe


The median rent is nearly $3,000. Still, though they must contend with some of the most expensive real-estate prices in the country, Californians say their top financial stressor isn’t housing. Financial site GOBankingRates conducted a study of more than 2,000 people from every state and Washington, D.C., “to pinpoint what’s causing the worst financial fears and stress among Americans.” Respondents could choose one of the following options: “debt,” “education,” including things like college expe
The top source of financial stress in California isn’t pricey housing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-23  Authors: shawn m carter, yiu yu hoi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rent, source, california, prices, including, stress, costs, housing, financial, everyday, pricey, isnt, median, cost, expensive


The top source of financial stress in California isn’t pricey housing

It’s no secret: California is expensive. The median price for a home there is more than $540,000. The median rent is nearly $3,000. That’s about twice the national average of $218,000 and $1,695, respectively.

And in some of the state’s most popular cities, like San Francisco, home and rent prices increase dramatically: It can cost more than $1.3 million to buy and $4,500 to rent.

Still, though they must contend with some of the most expensive real-estate prices in the country, Californians say their top financial stressor isn’t housing. It’s the cost of living overall.

Financial site GOBankingRates conducted a study of more than 2,000 people from every state and Washington, D.C., “to pinpoint what’s causing the worst financial fears and stress among Americans.” Respondents could choose one of the following options: “debt,” “education,” including things like college expenses, “everyday costs,” including groceries and utilities, “family,” including child care and divorce, “health care,” “housing,” or “taxes.”

Californians chose everyday costs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-23  Authors: shawn m carter, yiu yu hoi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rent, source, california, prices, including, stress, costs, housing, financial, everyday, pricey, isnt, median, cost, expensive


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Spending cryptocurrencies on everyday purchases is getting easier

One of the biggest criticisms of cryptocurrencies is that they’re trying to be something they’re not. None of them, after all, is as readily usable for day-to-day purchases as a currency. “Would you be willing to put bitcoin in your pocket and leave for a one-year trip, knowing you’re going to survive?” “Right now there’s no easy way to buy, send or spend cryptocurrencies,” said Nick Saponaro, co-founder of The Divi Project, which educates people on the digital tokens. That’s something Saponaro


One of the biggest criticisms of cryptocurrencies is that they’re trying to be something they’re not. None of them, after all, is as readily usable for day-to-day purchases as a currency. “Would you be willing to put bitcoin in your pocket and leave for a one-year trip, knowing you’re going to survive?” “Right now there’s no easy way to buy, send or spend cryptocurrencies,” said Nick Saponaro, co-founder of The Divi Project, which educates people on the digital tokens. That’s something Saponaro
Spending cryptocurrencies on everyday purchases is getting easier Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-02  Authors: annie nova, gillian flaccus, getty images, -aswath damodaran, nyu finance professor, -damodaran
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, willing, project, youre, easier, way, readily, spending, everyday, wider, purchases, theyre, cryptocurrencies, york, saponaro, getting


Spending cryptocurrencies on everyday purchases is getting easier

One of the biggest criticisms of cryptocurrencies is that they’re trying to be something they’re not. None of them, after all, is as readily usable for day-to-day purchases as a currency.

“Would you be willing to put bitcoin in your pocket and leave for a one-year trip, knowing you’re going to survive?” Aswath Damodaran, professor of finance at the Stern School of Business at New York University, asked during a CNBC interviewlast fall. “We’re nowhere near that comfort.”

Many cryptocurrency experts and developers argue that we don’t yet see the currencies readily used in say, the supermarket, because the technology is still in its early stages.

“Right now there’s no easy way to buy, send or spend cryptocurrencies,” said Nick Saponaro, co-founder of The Divi Project, which educates people on the digital tokens.

That’s something Saponaro hopes the project will change, leading to wider adoption of cryptocurrencies. Their goal: to make “the entire money-sending process more approachable to non-geek users.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-02  Authors: annie nova, gillian flaccus, getty images, -aswath damodaran, nyu finance professor, -damodaran
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, willing, project, youre, easier, way, readily, spending, everyday, wider, purchases, theyre, cryptocurrencies, york, saponaro, getting


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Wal-Mart saved $27 million by changing its plastic bags and shortening its receipts

To get to everyday low prices, you have to have everyday low costs. Wal-Mart touched on that point Tuesday as it met with the financial community in its hometown of Bentonville, Arkansas. In the midst of reviewing its forecasts and strategic plans for the next couple years, the world’s largest retailer noted how it has spent billions cleaning up and improving its store experience, lowering prices, paying employees more, and improving its e-commerce capability and efficiency. It’s also cutting co


To get to everyday low prices, you have to have everyday low costs. Wal-Mart touched on that point Tuesday as it met with the financial community in its hometown of Bentonville, Arkansas. In the midst of reviewing its forecasts and strategic plans for the next couple years, the world’s largest retailer noted how it has spent billions cleaning up and improving its store experience, lowering prices, paying employees more, and improving its e-commerce capability and efficiency. It’s also cutting co
Wal-Mart saved $27 million by changing its plastic bags and shortening its receipts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-10  Authors: courtney reagan, frank polich, bloomberg, getty images, rick wilking
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, store, bags, everyday, worlds, strategic, touched, reviewing, saved, walmart, plastic, 27, improving, spent, changing, shortening, prices, million, low, receipts


Wal-Mart saved $27 million by changing its plastic bags and shortening its receipts

To get to everyday low prices, you have to have everyday low costs.

Wal-Mart touched on that point Tuesday as it met with the financial community in its hometown of Bentonville, Arkansas.

In the midst of reviewing its forecasts and strategic plans for the next couple years, the world’s largest retailer noted how it has spent billions cleaning up and improving its store experience, lowering prices, paying employees more, and improving its e-commerce capability and efficiency.

It’s also cutting costs where it can too.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-10  Authors: courtney reagan, frank polich, bloomberg, getty images, rick wilking
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, store, bags, everyday, worlds, strategic, touched, reviewing, saved, walmart, plastic, 27, improving, spent, changing, shortening, prices, million, low, receipts


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SunTrust says ‘now is the time’ to buy this maker of everyday household products

SunTrust recommends investors buy shares of Newell Brands, acknowledging weak performance in the first half but highlighting its “highly attractive” valuation. “We believe now is the time to buy NWL shares with a highly attractive valuation and multiple catalysts on the horizon,” wrote SunTrust analyst William Chappell Jr. “We are now in the ‘prove it’ stage and believe that organic growth will meet, if not exceed, expectations.” “Additionally, we believe the company’s valuation has been held ba


SunTrust recommends investors buy shares of Newell Brands, acknowledging weak performance in the first half but highlighting its “highly attractive” valuation. “We believe now is the time to buy NWL shares with a highly attractive valuation and multiple catalysts on the horizon,” wrote SunTrust analyst William Chappell Jr. “We are now in the ‘prove it’ stage and believe that organic growth will meet, if not exceed, expectations.” “Additionally, we believe the company’s valuation has been held ba
SunTrust says ‘now is the time’ to buy this maker of everyday household products Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-09-05  Authors: thomas franck, akio kon, bloomberg, getty images, keith getter, hero images, richard carson, luke sharrett, kai pfaffenbach, allen j schaben
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, highly, believe, shares, buy, valuation, products, newell, everyday, maker, household, attractive, suntrust, high, brands


SunTrust says ‘now is the time’ to buy this maker of everyday household products

SunTrust recommends investors buy shares of Newell Brands, acknowledging weak performance in the first half but highlighting its “highly attractive” valuation.

“We believe now is the time to buy NWL shares with a highly attractive valuation and multiple catalysts on the horizon,” wrote SunTrust analyst William Chappell Jr. “We are now in the ‘prove it’ stage and believe that organic growth will meet, if not exceed, expectations.”

“Additionally, we believe the company’s valuation has been held back by the high relative leverage ratio, but that NWL’s high cash flow generation from September-December will mute that issue.”

Newell Brands produces, markets and sells a number of consumer and commercial products through brands such as Paper Mate, Sharpie, Elmer’s and Rubbermaid. After its acquisition of Jarden in April 2016, Newell Brands added both Yankee Candle and Jostens to its roster.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-09-05  Authors: thomas franck, akio kon, bloomberg, getty images, keith getter, hero images, richard carson, luke sharrett, kai pfaffenbach, allen j schaben
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, highly, believe, shares, buy, valuation, products, newell, everyday, maker, household, attractive, suntrust, high, brands


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