Cash, Debit, or Credit: Which should you use for everyday purchases?

Cash, debit or credit: Which should you use for everyday purchases? When to use credit cards But “credit cards aren’t for everyone” When to use debit cards When to use cash If you’re using a credit card for everyday purchases, consider this Bottom line1. When to use credit cardsWith all of their perks and rewards, using credit cards can be a financially sound decision. If you’re using a credit card for everyday purchases, consider thisIf you’re using a credit card to make all of your purchases,


Cash, debit or credit: Which should you use for everyday purchases?
When to use credit cards But “credit cards aren’t for everyone” When to use debit cards When to use cash If you’re using a credit card for everyday purchases, consider this Bottom line1.
When to use credit cardsWith all of their perks and rewards, using credit cards can be a financially sound decision.
If you’re using a credit card for everyday purchases, consider thisIf you’re using a credit card to make all of your purchases,
Cash, Debit, or Credit: Which should you use for everyday purchases? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-17  Authors: elizabeth gravier, alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, using, purchases, card, debit, cash, cards, credit, paying, griffin, youre, everyday


Cash, Debit, or Credit: Which should you use for everyday purchases?

When it comes to your daily expenses, such as groceries, gas and entertainment, you may not think twice about how you pay for them. Perhaps you swipe your Citi® Double Cash Card to earn 2% cash back, or your Chase Sapphire Reserve® to get 3X points on travel. But as with all things money, there is a rule of thumb for how you should pay — and it depends on a number of factors. Below, CNBC Select asked Rod Griffin, Experian’s senior director of consumer education and advocacy, for his advice on what you should use when paying for everyday purchases.

Cash, debit or credit: Which should you use for everyday purchases?

When to use credit cards But “credit cards aren’t for everyone” When to use debit cards When to use cash If you’re using a credit card for everyday purchases, consider this Bottom line

1. When to use credit cards

With all of their perks and rewards, using credit cards can be a financially sound decision. With credit, you can take advantage of some key benefits you don’t get with cash or debit cards. But using credit is also dependent on your ability to live within your means. “It’s a question of, ‘Are you using credit as an additional income source?’ or, ‘Are you using credit as a way to take advantage of other financial opportunities?'” Rod Griffin tells CNBC Select. For example, road warriors can maximize the points they can earn at gas stations with specific gas rewards credit cards. The PenFed Platinum Rewards Visa Signature® Card offers the highest rewards rate at gas stations with 5X points per dollar spent. And in addition to earning high rewards at gas stations, cardholders also benefit from unlimited 3X points at grocery stores. If you use a credit card next time you fill up your tank and make a run to the supermarket, then pay off the balance in full at the end of the month, you can enjoy the rewards. But if you’re not paying off the balance or you’re paying your bill late, you may end up paying a lot in fees and interest charges. No matter the type of credit card you have, how you use it really depends on you as an individual. “If you’re using credit as a financial tool and not taking on debt, it can be a financially advantageous decision.” As long as you are paying your credit balance in full each month (thus you’re not paying interest or additional fees), then you’re taking advantage of credit as a tool to help you be more financially healthy. “I have known people that use a credit card for every purchase — one card — and they make every purchase every month using that credit card, and then turn around and pay it in full because they take advantage of points for airline miles,” says Griffin. Credit cards also offer some advantages in terms of security and protection, which debit cards do not. “If traveling, I use a credit card almost exclusively because it helps provide additional protections against identity theft and fraud,” he says. You can also use your monthly statement as a budgeting tool, keeping track of your purchases so you have no problems paying your balance in full each month.

2. But “credit cards aren’t for everyone”

At the end of the day, your method of payment really does depend on you as an individual and how you want to spend money. As credit card bills have become the biggest source of debt for millennials (beating out student loan debt), it is important to know what you can and can’t afford before making any purchase. “I’ve always said that credit cards aren’t for everyone,” Griffin says. “It really does depend on your personality, the way that you manage money, your relationship with money and your ability to resist impulse buys.”

3. When to use debit cards

If you’re using a credit card to live beyond your means, or to pay for everyday purchases because you can’t otherwise afford them, you may be better served using a debit card. When you use a debit card you are effectively making a cash transaction, and so you don’t have the same issue of using a credit card to charge purchases you can’t really afford (if you aren’t thoughtful and deliberate in the way you use that credit account). Of course, you do need to make sure you don’t overdraft on your account, which can result in you paying high fees. For many, when it comes to using debit cards over cash or credit, it is really just a convenience issue. “I actually personally will use a debit card,” Griffin says. “If I go out to eat, for example, we tend to use a debit card, my wife and I, because we see it as ‘cash now’ and that’s our habit.”

4. When to use cash

Using cash has the same financial implications as using a debit card, but with cash you may spend less than you would swiping a card because it’s more tangible, and you can actually see the money go away. Credit or debit cards are so easy to use, that you can swaipe it without thinking about how much you’re actually spending. With cash, it’s easier to have a since of what you’re spending. “If you’re using cash in particular, real paper greenbacks, when your purse or wallet is empty you’re done, so you can limit your spending in that way,” Griffin says. For some people, being restricted to using only cash may be a better approach. If you still want to rack up credit card rewards, be deliberate in the way you use your card. Perhaps it is a mix of different methods that work for you. “You may use cash for buying dinner, but use a credit card for bigger purchases just because it suits your budget and your financial style better,” Griffin says. Learn more: Looking to make a big purchase? Here’s how the Chase Freedom Unlimited can help with that Not to mention, carrying cash as a back-up is a smart idea in case there is an everyday purchase you want to make where the vendor doesn’t accept credit. You may have been advised by your parents to always have cash on you. Despite the rising trend of Americans using cards over cash, Griffin points out that there is, in many cases, a generational difference when it comes to method of payment preferences. “As a more seasoned individual myself, there is a tendency to use cash,” Griffin says. “It’s a sort of trained response, if you will. It’s something that we’re so accustomed to doing.”

5. If you’re using a credit card for everyday purchases, consider this

If you’re using a credit card to make all of your purchases, you should also consider the future implications it has on your credit score. By using credit for every purchase, you can easily end up using a substantial portion of your available credit limit, which can have a negative impact on your credit score. “If, as a result of using your credit card to make purchases, you have a high utilization rate, that can drag down your credit score and that can be important in longer term decisions,” Griffin says. If you need to buy a new car or you want to apply for a mortgage loan in the future, this could impede that process, so there’s a longer term concern to consider when making smaller, everyday purchases. “We always recommend if you’re using credit, make sure you understand the implications for your credit history and your credit score,” Griffin says. “Check them regularly, and if you’re paying the balance in full that’s great and you’ll probably be fine.”

6. Bottom line

Next time you’re at the register, think again about your method of payment. Though there may not seem to be any reasoning for the form of currency you choose to use to complete a transaction, how you pay for general purchases can say a lot about your financial well-being. And if you are using a credit card or multiple cards for your everyday purchases, be aware that there are more implications to buying things on credit, both potentially positive and negative. But at the same time, if your balances aren’t too high, you’re paying them off in full at the end of each month and you’re taking advantages of things like additional security and rewards, using credit cards can be the right choice for you.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-17  Authors: elizabeth gravier, alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, using, purchases, card, debit, cash, cards, credit, paying, griffin, youre, everyday


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China leading the way on tech used in everyday life, Naspers CEO says

China leading the way on tech used in everyday life, Naspers CEO saysBob van Dijk, group CEO of Naspers and group CEO of Prosus, discusses the tech sector.


China leading the way on tech used in everyday life, Naspers CEO saysBob van Dijk, group CEO of Naspers and group CEO of Prosus, discusses the tech sector.
China leading the way on tech used in everyday life, Naspers CEO says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, used, naspers, group, saysbob, ceo, sector, life, china, prosus, everyday, leading, way, van, tech


China leading the way on tech used in everyday life, Naspers CEO says

China leading the way on tech used in everyday life, Naspers CEO says

Bob van Dijk, group CEO of Naspers and group CEO of Prosus, discusses the tech sector.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, used, naspers, group, saysbob, ceo, sector, life, china, prosus, everyday, leading, way, van, tech


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If you pay your bills on time, use cash back cards for everyday expenses

If you play your cards right, small everyday purchases put on plastic can add up to big savings over time. That’s thanks to increasingly generous credit card cash-back rewards programs — provided you pay your bills promptly — according to one credit-card comparison website. “Whatever you spend your money on, that’s how you should pick your credit cards,” said Ted Rossman, industry analyst at CreditCards.com. To maximize rewards, CreditCards.com recommends New Yorkers consider cards which offer t


If you play your cards right, small everyday purchases put on plastic can add up to big savings over time.
That’s thanks to increasingly generous credit card cash-back rewards programs — provided you pay your bills promptly — according to one credit-card comparison website.
“Whatever you spend your money on, that’s how you should pick your credit cards,” said Ted Rossman, industry analyst at CreditCards.com.
To maximize rewards, CreditCards.com recommends New Yorkers consider cards which offer t
If you pay your bills on time, use cash back cards for everyday expenses Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, card, everyday, cash, rewards, credit, expenses, cards, rossman, pay, contactless, creditcardscom, bills, spend, spending


If you pay your bills on time, use cash back cards for everyday expenses

If you play your cards right, small everyday purchases put on plastic can add up to big savings over time.

That’s thanks to increasingly generous credit card cash-back rewards programs — provided you pay your bills promptly — according to one credit-card comparison website. In addition, the right card for you likely depends on where and how you live.

Those are among the findings of a recent CreditCards.com analysis of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data on typical consumer spending in several large U.S. cities. The website then tried to recommend the best card matches for local residents.

“Whatever you spend your money on, that’s how you should pick your credit cards,” said Ted Rossman, industry analyst at CreditCards.com. “It was really interesting … how much spending varies by metro area.”

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New Yorkers, for example, spend 121% of the national average annually on public transportation, whether in cash or by credit or debit. (They also, unsurprisingly, spend 28.21% less at the gas pump.)

The Big Apple is rolling out a new contactless transit payment system dubbed “OMNY” that doesn’t just make it easier for commuters to fork over their $2.75 fares; it could also potentially earn them credit card rewards points every time they wave their smartphone or contactless card over a subway turnstile sensor.

To maximize rewards, CreditCards.com recommends New Yorkers consider cards which offer the most cash back on transit such as taxis, ride-share services, parking, tolls, buses, trains and more. Other public transit-reliant cities where commuters could benefit from a similar card include San Diego, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.

Los Angelenos, meanwhile, tend to drive more, spending $2,706 a year on gas — 28.31% above the national average. A good fit for them might be a card which offers 3% cash back on fuel, among other perks.

Transit, in fact, is on the rise as a rewards-generating category of spending, “especially as cities like New York and Chicago get deeper into contactless cards and being able to tap and go on the subway,” Rossman said.

Gasoline purchases, streaming service subscriptions and food bought both for home and at restaurants are also types of habitual spending that might be better put on a card.

“As long as you’re paying your bills in full each month and avoiding interest, I would suggest putting all the money you would have spent anyway on a credit card because it really does add up,” Rossman said. “I earned almost $2,500 in cash back last year and almost all of that was from regular spending.”

However, if you normally carry a monthly balance, it’s best you forget about cash back or travel perks. “It doesn’t make sense to pay 17%, 20%, 25% just to get 1%, 2% or 3% cash back,” he said.

Cash back rewards are, in fact, cardholders’ preferred loyalty perk, according to CreditCards.com. A recent study found that about two-thirds of cardholders choose cash over travel rewards like airline upgrades.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, card, everyday, cash, rewards, credit, expenses, cards, rossman, pay, contactless, creditcardscom, bills, spend, spending


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How to best use a paper day planner to help you meet your money goals, according to experts

If you’re hoping to get your finances on track in the New Year, start by getting organized on paper. Incorporating your budget to-dos with your everyday tasks in an old-school paper day planner can help you keep your financial goals at top of mind, organizational experts say — and actually achieve them. Even if you use a virtual calendar or spreadsheet, keeping a daily planner as well adds an extra layer of accountability. Here’s how to best use a day planner to reach your financial goals. Court


If you’re hoping to get your finances on track in the New Year, start by getting organized on paper.
Incorporating your budget to-dos with your everyday tasks in an old-school paper day planner can help you keep your financial goals at top of mind, organizational experts say — and actually achieve them.
Even if you use a virtual calendar or spreadsheet, keeping a daily planner as well adds an extra layer of accountability.
Here’s how to best use a day planner to reach your financial goals.
Court
How to best use a paper day planner to help you meet your money goals, according to experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, help, track, everyday, meet, experts, daily, planner, goals, paper, money, day, start, youre, financial, according, smith


How to best use a paper day planner to help you meet your money goals, according to experts

If you’re hoping to get your finances on track in the New Year, start by getting organized on paper. Incorporating your budget to-dos with your everyday tasks in an old-school paper day planner can help you keep your financial goals at top of mind, organizational experts say — and actually achieve them. From 2017 to 2018, U.S. consumers spent $210 billion on organizational systems and supplies like bullet journals and day planners, according to data from The NPD Group. Hashtags like #plannercommunity and planner-focused Instagram accounts like @passionplanner have grown in popularity, with members sharing tips on planner products and layouts. Even if you use a virtual calendar or spreadsheet, keeping a daily planner as well adds an extra layer of accountability. Plus, an elegant or colorful planner can make the process more enjoyable. “Finding a strategy that you enjoy when it comes to budgeting is a game changer,” says Kelly Smith of Freedom In A Budget. Here’s how to best use a day planner to reach your financial goals.

Factor financial tasks into everyday life

Keeping a budgeting spreadsheet is useful, but one way to factor your budgeting into your everyday life is to incorporate it into your daily planner. “I like to section off my planner into what’s on my to-do list,” says Smith. “Or a lot of times I’ll have a section in my planner where I can write down what I’m thankful for that day, and then having another section for expenses and different bills that I have to pay that day.” Schedule time within your week to revisit your budget and check in with yourself to figure out what needs to be added to your planner. “Make it part of your daily habit,” says Smith. “Set aside time every morning when you first wake up, or every night before bed to revisit your planner and update it or track your progress.”

Video by Courtney Stith

Take advantage of the planner format

It’s important to come up with a system that motivates you to want to use it, says Allison Strickland, the blogger behind Financial Flamingo. You might color-code your activities or expenses, use stickers to highlight bigger goals, or try out colored markers or pens. Check out Pinterest or Instagram for money planner layouts and doodles that could inspire you. “If I have a meeting it’s a certain color, or a training, it’s another color,” says Strickland. “I always try to do a little extra something that’s fun and will keep me organized.”

Courtesy Allison Strickland

Set goals and timelines

At the start of the year, and the start of each month, sit down and come up with a list of big and little financial goals for that period. Break up bigger or long-term projects into smaller steps. Mark down key to-dos and dates in your planner so that you’re reminded of the milestones you want to hit, and can track your progress toward them. For example, if you’re aiming to purchase your first home before the end of the year, set deadlines for yourself to help you achieve that goal. That might mean vowing to have paid off a debt by a specific date, aiming to have your credit score higher in six months or, by the end of the year, having saved up enough for a down payment. Setting goals and realistic timelines for yourself can keep you accountable to those goals.

Courtesy Allison Strickland

Track your progress


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, help, track, everyday, meet, experts, daily, planner, goals, paper, money, day, start, youre, financial, according, smith


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How it’s become cheaper and easier for everyday people to invest over the last 10 years

People have been buying and selling shares of companies in the U.S. for hundreds of years, but changes over the past 10 years especially have made it cheaper and easier than ever for ordinary people to invest in the stock market. Since the late 1700s, traders working at the New York Stock Exchange have executed trades on behalf of all types of customers. Peter Tuchman has had a front row seat to the more recent changes: He’s been buying and selling stocks at the New York Stock Exchange since the


People have been buying and selling shares of companies in the U.S. for hundreds of years, but changes over the past 10 years especially have made it cheaper and easier than ever for ordinary people to invest in the stock market.
Since the late 1700s, traders working at the New York Stock Exchange have executed trades on behalf of all types of customers.
Peter Tuchman has had a front row seat to the more recent changes: He’s been buying and selling stocks at the New York Stock Exchange since the
How it’s become cheaper and easier for everyday people to invest over the last 10 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: anna-louise jackson, elizabeth grace saunders
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, everyday, buying, funds, invest, easier, money, stock, exchange, investing, past, market, cheaper, selling


How it's become cheaper and easier for everyday people to invest over the last 10 years

People have been buying and selling shares of companies in the U.S. for hundreds of years, but changes over the past 10 years especially have made it cheaper and easier than ever for ordinary people to invest in the stock market. Since the late 1700s, traders working at the New York Stock Exchange have executed trades on behalf of all types of customers. By the 1970s, computers helped to revolutionize how stocks were bought and sold, and the Nasdaq exchange was founded as the world’s first electronic stock market. Peter Tuchman has had a front row seat to the more recent changes: He’s been buying and selling stocks at the New York Stock Exchange since the 1980s. He misses the old days when buying and selling was conducted by the individuals who worked at the exchanges. “I would much prefer to scream and yell,” Tuchman says. “I prefer the open outcry approach.” Nowadays, a vast majority of trading is executed electronically. And that’s been a huge shift for ordinary investors.

Video by David Fang Here are two key ways buying and selling stocks has changed in the last 10 years.

Investing is cheaper than ever

The price of just about everything, from coffee and airfare to big-ticket costs like education, child care, and health care, has gone up over the past decade. It’s rare that anything becomes cheaper over a 10-year span. Investing in the market is a major exception. Back in 2009, brokerages were charging anywhere from $9.99 to $19.95 per transaction to buy and sell stocks online. As of earlier this year, the cost of investing had effectively been eliminated. In the span of a few weeks, a handful of brokers announced that they would make it free to trade most U.S. stocks and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) online, matching some companies that were already at $0. The past decade has also seen robo-advisors flourish. These automated investment services are typically low-cost by nature, and they make it easy to get started investing with very little money. They’re also gaining in popularity. Between 2017 and 2019, the amount of money under management by robo-advisors worldwide has more than tripled, from about $240 billion to $980 billion, according to figures compiled by Statista. And the industry is projected to grow to more than $2 trillion by 2022. As a result, experts don’t see stock-trading costs going up again any time soon.

Index funds now rule the market

This year, for the first time ever, the amount of money invested in funds that track the market surpassed the amount managed by people who pick stocks, according to data from research firm Morningstar. Index funds have become so popular because they simplify investing by making it easy to invest in the broader market rather than in individual stocks. These funds track the performance of a particular market index, like the S&P 500, allowing investors to buy a lot of stocks at once and hold them for the long term — and for far less associated costs than buying each one individually. They’re also an easy way to add diversification to your portfolio.

Index funds, a form of passive investing, often include exchange-traded funds (ETFs). Accounting firm PwC estimates that, in 2018, 36% of money in the market was invested in such passive funds. And the number of ETFs has nearly tripled since 2009, according to figures from Statista.

What hasn’t changed about investing in stocks


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: anna-louise jackson, elizabeth grace saunders
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, everyday, buying, funds, invest, easier, money, stock, exchange, investing, past, market, cheaper, selling


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Blue Cash Everyday Card from American Express review: competitive no annual fee credit card with strong grocery rewards

The Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express ranks as the top no annual fee card for groceries on our lists for the best grocery rewards credit cards and the best no annual fee cash-back credit cards. CNBC Select calculated how many rewards the average American can earn if they optimize the way they use their Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express. FeesThe Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express has no annual fee (see rates and fees). For example, the Blue Cash Everyday® Car


The Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express ranks as the top no annual fee card for groceries on our lists for the best grocery rewards credit cards and the best no annual fee cash-back credit cards.
CNBC Select calculated how many rewards the average American can earn if they optimize the way they use their Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express.
FeesThe Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express has no annual fee (see rates and fees).
For example, the Blue Cash Everyday® Car
Blue Cash Everyday Card from American Express review: competitive no annual fee credit card with strong grocery rewards Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, purchases, grocery, rewards, blue, review, fee, cash, american, annual, strong, credit, everyday, express, card, competitive


Blue Cash Everyday Card from American Express review: competitive no annual fee credit card with strong grocery rewards

If you find yourself frequently filling your grocery cart while walking the aisles of your local supermarket, it can be a good idea to consider paying with a credit card that offers extra cash back on groceries. The Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express ranks as the top no annual fee card for groceries on our lists for the best grocery rewards credit cards and the best no annual fee cash-back credit cards. While cards that have an annual fee usually come with a wider range of benefits, consumers using the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express can still enjoy noteworthy perks, such as car rental loss and damage insurance and free two-day shipping with ShopRunner (see rates and fees). When CNBC Select crunched the numbers and analyzed over 200 credit cards, we found that consumers can earn competitive rewards with the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express over a five year period. (See our methodology for more information on how we choose the best cards.) Below, we break down the rewards, benefits and fees associated with the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express to help you decide if it’s the right card for you.

Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express review

Rewards

Additional benefits

Fees

Bottom line

Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express Apply Now Rewards 3% cash back at U.S. supermarkets (up to $6,000 per year in purchases, then 1%), 2% cash back at U.S. gas stations and select U.S. department stores, 1% cash back on other purchases

Welcome bonus Earn back $150 after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new card in your first 3 months from account opening

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% APR for the first 15 months on purchases and balance transfers (requested in the first 60 days from card membership)

Regular APR 14.49% to 25.49% variable

Balance transfer fee Either $5 or 3% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater

Foreign transaction fee 2.7%

Credit needed Excellent/Good

See rates and fees and our methodology, terms apply. Pros 3% cash back at U.S. supermarket spending (up to $6,000 a year, then 1%)

Unlimited 2% cash back at U.S. gas stations and select U.S. department stores

Amex Offers, which provide statement credits or opportunity to earn more rewards at select merchants

0% APR during the first 15 months on new purchases and balance transfers Cons 2.7% fee on purchases made abroad

Not great for people who don’t regularly go grocery shopping Estimated rewards earned after 1 year: $515

$515 Estimated rewards earned after 5 years: $1,973 Rewards totals incorporate the points earned from the welcome bonus read more Apply Now On American Express’s Secure Site

Rewards

This card offers a competitive 3% cash back at U.S. supermarkets (up to $6,000 per year in purchases, then 1%). You also earn 2% cash back at U.S. gas stations and select U.S. department stores and 1% cash back on all other purchases. Here’s an example of eligible spending in each category: U.S. supermarkets: Whole Foods, Stop and Shop and FreshDirect (excludes superstores, warehouse clubs and specialty stores)

Whole Foods, Stop and Shop and FreshDirect (excludes superstores, warehouse clubs and specialty stores) U.S. gas stations: Exxon, Shell and Murphy USA (excludes gas stations that are part of supermarkets or warehouse clubs)

Exxon, Shell and Murphy USA (excludes gas stations that are part of supermarkets or warehouse clubs) Department stores: Bloomingdale’s, Macy’s and Kohl’s New cardholders can also benefit from a $150 statement credit after you spend $1,000 on eligible purchases on your new card within the first three months from account opening. CNBC Select calculated how many rewards the average American can earn if they optimize the way they use their Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express. We worked with the location intelligence firm Esri, who provided us with a sample annual spending budget of $21,852. The budget includes six main categories: groceries ($5,019), gas ($2,394), dining out ($3,365), travel ($2,154), utilities ($4,959) and general purchases ($3,961). Here’s a breakdown of how much cash back you can earn in each category, annually: Groceries: $151

$151 Gas: $48

$48 Dining out: $34

$34 Travel: $22

$22 Utilities: $50

$50 General purchases: $60

$60 Total: $365 Cash back is received in the form of Blue Cash Reward Dollars, which can be redeemed for a statement credit (when your reward dollar balance is $25 or more), gift cards or merchandise. Based on the annual spending budget from Esri, the average American can earn an estimated $515 in the first year of card membership (if you earn the welcome bonus) and $1,973 over five years. This assumes that cardholders are redeeming cash back for a typical value of 1 cent each. Extreme optimizers might be able to achieve more value, and you may earn a higher or lower return depending on your spending habits.

Additional benefits

The Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express offers a variety of benefits that Amex cards are known for and that can save you money on merchandise, shipping and travel. Here are some ways you can save: Finance new purchases or pay off debt: You can benefit from a 0% APR for the first 15 months on purchases and balance transfers (then 14.49% to 25.49% variable APR). During the intro period, you can pay off new purchases or transfer debt without accruing interest. Just know, there’s a 3% balance transfer fee ($5 minimum) (see rates and fees).

You can benefit from a 0% APR for the first 15 months on purchases and balance transfers (then 14.49% to 25.49% variable APR). During the intro period, you can pay off new purchases or transfer debt without accruing interest. Just know, there’s a 3% balance transfer fee ($5 minimum) (see rates and fees). Amex Offers : Receive discounts at participating merchants, such as restaurants, clothing stores and hotels, when you meet spending requirements and other terms. Offers vary by location and change frequently.

Receive discounts at participating merchants, such as restaurants, clothing stores and hotels, when you meet spending requirements and other terms. Offers vary by location and change frequently. ShopRunner: Get free two-day shipping on eligible items at over 100 online stores.

Get free two-day shipping on eligible items at over 100 online stores. Entertainment access: Trying to score tickets to your favorite band or a Broadway show? Amex provides exclusive pre-sale access and preferred seating for concerts, plays, sporting events and more.

Trying to score tickets to your favorite band or a Broadway show? Amex provides exclusive pre-sale access and preferred seating for concerts, plays, sporting events and more. Travel insurance and protections: When cardholders pay for travel expenses with their card, they can benefit from car rental loss and damage insurance and a global assist hotline.

When cardholders pay for travel expenses with their card, they can benefit from car rental loss and damage insurance and a global assist hotline. Purchase protection: Merchandise purchased with your card may receive return protection, which helps if you try to return an eligible item within 90 days from the date of purchase and the merchant won’t take it back. Terms apply for all benefits.

Fees

The Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express has no annual fee (see rates and fees). That’s compared to the similar Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express, which has a $95 annual fee (see rates and fees). If you don’t want to pay for a credit card, no annual fee credit cards are a great alternative that can often provide many of the same perks as cards with annual fees. For example, the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express offers many of the same additional benefits as the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express, such as ShopRunner and travel insurance. This card has a typical APR at 14.49% to 25.49% variable on purchases and balance transfers. We recommend always paying on time and in full to avoid interest charges (see rates and fees).

Bottom line

If you often spend on groceries, but aren’t willing to fork over money for an annual fee, the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express is a great no annual fee alternative. You can earn an estimated $151 every year at U.S. supermarkets, which may cover the cost of groceries for a week or two. If you want to earn double the cash back on groceries and don’t mind paying a $95 annual fee, consider the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express (see rates and fees).

Our methodology

To determine which credit cards offer the best value, CNBC Select analyzed 234 of the most popular credit cards available in the U.S. We compared each card on a range of features, including rewards, welcome bonus, introductory and standard APR, balance transfer fee and foreign transaction fees, as well as factors such as required credit and customer reviews when available. We also considered additional perks, the application process and how easy it is for the consumer to redeem points. CNBC Select teamed up with location intelligence firm Esri. The company’s data development team provided the most up-to-date and comprehensive consumer spending data based on the 2018 Consumer Expenditure Surveys from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. You can read more about their methodology here. Esri’s data team created a sample annual budget of approximately $21,852 in retail spending. This budget is comprised of the most common spending categories, including groceries ($5,019), gas ($2,394), dining out ($3,365), travel ($2,154), utilities ($4,959) and general purchases ($3,961). General purchases include items such as housekeeping supplies, clothing, personal care products, prescription drugs and vitamins, and other vehicle expenses. CNBC Select used this budget to estimate how much the average consumer would save over the course of a year, two years and five years, assuming they would attempt to maximize their rewards potential by earning all welcome bonuses offered and using the card for all applicable purchases. All rewards total estimations are net the annual fee. While the five-year estimates we’ve included are derived from a budget similar to the average American’s spending, you may earn a higher or lower return depending on your shopping habits. For rates and fees of the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express, click here. For rates and fees of the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express, click here.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, purchases, grocery, rewards, blue, review, fee, cash, american, annual, strong, credit, everyday, express, card, competitive


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3 everyday, essential items that cost less on Amazon than at your drugstore

But if you plan ahead and anticipate your needs, you can save money on everyday household items by ordering them from Amazon instead. “They’re often overpriced due to marketing gimmicks that you don’t really need and won’t make a difference in performance.” A 6-foot AmazonBasics USB iPhone charger is $6, while a 6-foot, Apple USB phone charger at Walmart is $14. They’re often overpriced due to marketing gimmicks that you don’t really need and won’t make a difference in performance. On Amazon, a


But if you plan ahead and anticipate your needs, you can save money on everyday household items by ordering them from Amazon instead.
“They’re often overpriced due to marketing gimmicks that you don’t really need and won’t make a difference in performance.”
A 6-foot AmazonBasics USB iPhone charger is $6, while a 6-foot, Apple USB phone charger at Walmart is $14.
They’re often overpriced due to marketing gimmicks that you don’t really need and won’t make a difference in performance.
On Amazon, a
3 everyday, essential items that cost less on Amazon than at your drugstore Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24  Authors: aditi shrikant
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drugstore, amazon, theyre, walgreens, ridiculously, essential, batteries, everyday, usb, items, wont, cost, charger, need, amazonbasics


3 everyday, essential items that cost less on Amazon than at your drugstore

Drugstore buys are often spur-of-the-moment purchases. But if you plan ahead and anticipate your needs, you can save money on everyday household items by ordering them from Amazon instead. The site offer its own private label, AmazonBasics, and it also offers lower prices on brand-name products you can find at stores like CVS and Walgreens. Here are three essentials that experts recommend you buy on Amazon and not your drugstore:

Gadget chargers

If you need an HDMI cord, phone charger, or other cable to keep your gadgets primed for daily use, AmazonBasics probably has it for much cheaper than your drugstore or electronics store, says Julie Ramhold, a consumer analyst for DealNews.com. “Cables can be ridiculously expensive when you purchase them in-store,” she says. “They’re often overpriced due to marketing gimmicks that you don’t really need and won’t make a difference in performance.” An Android charger at CVS Pharmacy is $10, but you can get a 3-pack of Deegotech Android charging cords from Amazon for $10. A 6-foot AmazonBasics USB iPhone charger is $6, while a 6-foot, Apple USB phone charger at Walmart is $14.

Cables can be ridiculously expensive when you purchase them in-store. They’re often overpriced due to marketing gimmicks that you don’t really need and won’t make a difference in performance. Julia Ramhold Consumer analyst, DealNews.com

Batteries

Batteries tend to be something you pick up at the register as needed, which means you may not be getting the best deal. Ordering batteries from AmazonBasics in advance can be much smarter, says Kristin McGrath, shopping expert at Offers.com, and “the savings become even more compelling when you buy large multipacks.” For example, a 16-pack of Duracell batteries at Walgreens is $17.99, or $1.12 per battery. On Amazon, a 20-pack of AmazonBasics batteries is $8.49, or $0.42 per battery. A 48-pack is $13.99, which works out to $0.29 per battery.

Office supplies


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24  Authors: aditi shrikant
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drugstore, amazon, theyre, walgreens, ridiculously, essential, batteries, everyday, usb, items, wont, cost, charger, need, amazonbasics


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Apple Card algo issue and the future of AI in your everyday life

Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces Apple Card during a launch event at Apple headquarters on Monday, March 25, 2019, in Cupertino, California. Goldman spokesman Patrick Lenihan said algorithmic bias is an important issue, but the Apple Card is not an example of it. Here are key points about AI algorithms that will factor in future headlines. can be biasedThe AI Now Institute has also found biases in the people who are creating AI systems. “It’s actually a very real problem that keeps resurfacing in A


Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces Apple Card during a launch event at Apple headquarters on Monday, March 25, 2019, in Cupertino, California.
Goldman spokesman Patrick Lenihan said algorithmic bias is an important issue, but the Apple Card is not an example of it.
Here are key points about AI algorithms that will factor in future headlines.
can be biasedThe AI Now Institute has also found biases in the people who are creating AI systems.
“It’s actually a very real problem that keeps resurfacing in A
Apple Card algo issue and the future of AI in your everyday life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-14  Authors: jacob douglas, lauren feiner, phil quade, fortinet chief information security officer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, apple, technology, life, issue, card, data, algorithms, credit, systems, everyday, algorithmic, used, bias, algo


Apple Card algo issue and the future of AI in your everyday life

Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces Apple Card during a launch event at Apple headquarters on Monday, March 25, 2019, in Cupertino, California. Noah Berger | AFP | Getty Images

When tech entrepreneur David Heinmeier Hansson recently took to Twitter saying the Apple Card gave him a credit limit that was 20 times higher than his wife’s, despite the fact that she had a higher credit score, it may have been the first major headline about algorithmic bias you read in your everyday life. It was not the first — there have been major stories about potential algorithmic bias in child care and insurance — and it won’t be the last. The chief technology officer of project management software firm Basecamp, Heinmeier was not the only tech figure speaking out about algorithmic bias and the Apple Card. In fact, Apple’s own co-founder Steve Wozniak had a similar experience. Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren even got in on the action, bashing Apple and Goldman, and regulators said they are launching a probe. Goldman Sachs, which administers the card for Apple, has denied the allegations of algorithmic gender bias, and has also said it will examine credit evaluations on a case-by-case basis when applicants feel the card’s determination is unfair. Goldman spokesman Patrick Lenihan said algorithmic bias is an important issue, but the Apple Card is not an example of it. “Goldman Sachs has not and will never make decisions based on factors like gender, race, age, sexual orientation or any other legally prohibited factors when determining credit worthiness. There is no ‘black box.'” he said, referring to a term often used to describe algorithms. “For credit decisions we make, we can identify which factors from an individual’s credit bureau issued credit report or stated income contribute to the outcome. We welcome a discussion of this topic with policymakers and regulators.” As AI and the algorithms that underlie technology become an increasingly large part of everyday life, it’s important to know more about the technology. One of the major claims made by technology firms using algorithms in decisions like credit scoring is that algorithms are less biased than human beings. That’s being used in areas like job hiring: The state of California recently passed a rule to encourage the development of more job-based algorithms to remove human bias from the hiring process. But it is far from 100% scientifically proven that an AI that relies on code written by humans, as well as data fed into it as a learning mechanism, will not reflect the existing biases of our world. Here are key points about AI algorithms that will factor in future headlines.

1. A.I. is already being used widely in key areas of life

As Hansson and his wife found out, AI systems are becoming more commonplace in areas that everyday people rely on. This technology is not only being introduced in credit and job hiring but insurance, mortgages and child welfare. In 2016, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, introduced a tool called the Allegheny Family Screening Tool. It is a predictive-risk modeling tool that is used to help with child welfare call-screening decisions when concerns of child maltreatment are raised to the county’s department of human services. The system collected data on each person in the referral and uses it to create an “overall family score.” That score determines the likelihood of a future event. Allegheny did face some backlash, but one conclusion was that it created “less bad bias.” Other places, including Los Angeles, have used similar technology in an attempt to improve child welfare, and it is an example of how AI systems will be used in ways that can affect people in large ways, and as a result, it is important to know how those systems can be flawed.

2. A.I. can be biased

Most AI is created from a process called machine learning, which is teaching a computer something by feeding them thousands of pieces of data to help them learn the information of the data set by itself. An example would be giving an AI system thousands of pictures of dogs, with the purpose of teaching the system what a dog is. From there the system would be able to look at a photo and decide whether it is a dog or not based on that past data. So what if the data you are feeding a system is 75% golden retrievers and 25% Dalmations? Postdoctoral researcher at the AI Now Institute, Dr. Sarah Myers West, says these systems are built to reflect the data they are fed, and that data can be built on bias. “These systems are being trained on data that’s reflective of our wider society,” West said. “Thus, AI is going to reflect and really amplify back past forms of inequality and discrimination.” One real-world example: While the human manager-based hiring process can undoubtedly be biased, debate remains over whether algorithmic job application technology undoubtedly removes human bias. The AI learning process could incorporate the biases of the data they are fed — for example, the resumes of top-performing candidates at top firms.

3. People who program A.I. can be biased

The AI Now Institute has also found biases in the people who are creating AI systems. In an April 2019 study, they found that only 15% of the AI staff at Facebook are women, and only 4% of their total workforce are black. Google’s workforce is even less diverse, with only 10% of their AI staff being women and 2.5% of their workers black. Joy Buolamwini, a computer scientist at MIT, found during her research on a project that would project digital masks onto a mirror, that the generic facial recognition software she was using would not identify her face unless she used a white colored mask. She found that her system could not identify the face of a black woman, because the data set it was running on were overwhelmingly lighter-skinned. “Quite clearly, it’s not a solved problem,” West said. “It’s actually a very real problem that keeps resurfacing in AI systems on a weekly, almost daily basis.”

4. Algorithms are not public information

AI algorithms are completely proprietary to the company that created them. “Researchers face really significant challenges understanding where there’s algorithmic bias because so many of them are opaque,” West said. Even if we could see them, it doesn’t mean we would understand, says co-director of the Digital Platforms and Democracy Project, and Shorenstein Fellow at Harvard University, Dipayan Ghosh. “It’s difficult to draw any conclusions based on source code,” Ghosh said. “Apple’s proprietary creditworthiness algorithm is something that not even Apple can easily pin down, and say, ‘Okay, here is the code for this,’ because it probably involves a lot of different sources of data and a lot of different implementations of code to analyze that data in different siloed areas of the company.” To take things a step further, companies like Apple write their code to be legible to Apple employees, and it may not make sense to those outside of the company.

5. There is limited government oversight of A.I.

Right now there is little government oversight of AI systems. “When AI systems are being used in areas that are of incredible social, political and economic importance, we have a stake in understanding how they are affecting our lives,” West said. “We currently don’t really have the avenues for the kind of transparency we would need for accountability.” One presidential candidate is trying to change that. New Jersey Senator Cory Booker sponsored a bill earlier this year called “The Algorithmic Accountability Act.” The bill requires companies to look at flawed algorithms that could create unfair or discriminatory situations for Americans. Under the bill, the Federal Trade Commission would be able to create regulations to ‘conduct impact assessments of highly sensitive automated decision systems.’ That requirement would impact systems under the FTC’s jurisdiction, new or existing. Cory Booker’s website’s description of the bill directly cites algorithmic malpractice from Facebook and Amazon in the past years. Booker isn’t the first politician to call for better regulation of AI. In 2016, the Obama administration called for development within the industry of algorithmic auditing and external testing of big data systems.

6. Algorithms can be audited, but it is not a requirement

While government oversight is rare, an increasing practice is third-party auditing of algorithms. The process involves an outside entity coming in and analyzing how the algorithm is made without revealing trade secrets, which is a large reason why algorithms are private. Ghosh says this is happening more frequently, but not all of the time. “It happens when companies feel compelled by public opinion or public sway to do something because they don’t want to be called out having had no audits whatsoever,” Ghosh said. Ghosh also said that regulatory action can happen, as seen in the FTC’s numerous investigations into Google and Facebook. “If a company is shown to harmfully discriminate, then you could have a regulatory agency come in and say ‘Hey, we’re either going to sue you in court, or you’re going to do X,Y and Z. Which one do you want to do?'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-14  Authors: jacob douglas, lauren feiner, phil quade, fortinet chief information security officer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, apple, technology, life, issue, card, data, algorithms, credit, systems, everyday, algorithmic, used, bias, algo


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25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in


Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in
25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Like a lot of kids, Myles Gage was into sneakers when he was growing up. But his mom suggested an unusual rule: For every pair of Nikes that Gage owned, he should own a share of Nike stock. Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. The platform makes a game out of the markets: Users get $10,000 fictitious dollars to buy and sell stocks, which helps them learn how the markets work and start to experience the excitement and potential benefit of investing. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future.

Learning early to be ‘financially literate’

Gage says his parents made a lot of financial mistakes and they wanted to make sure their kids didn’t follow in their footsteps: “They wanted us to be financially literate and in a position to make better decisions.” That’s partly why Gage’s mother, who worked for the Chicago Parks District, found a way to get him and his brother, Mario, into Ariel Community Academy, a specialized public school for students K-8 with a focus on financial education. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience investing in stocks. Attending Ariel made a huge difference in Gage’s life: “The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy,” he says.

The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy. Myles Gage CFO, Rapunzl Investments

That knowledge paid off: It helped Gage win a full-ride scholarship to the University of Chicago Laboratory School, a prestigious private high school. “I wrote an essay about how I planned to finance my college tuition. And the main point of that was that I was going to liquidate my stock portfolio,” he says. “I don’t think the judges were expecting a 14-year-old to be talking about liquidating a portfolio, let alone one from the south side of Chicago.”

The origins of Rapunzl

As a high school freshman in 2008, Gage immediately bonded with another student, Brian Curcio. While discussing the stock market and the budding financial crisis, the two came up with the idea of a stock market game, using fictional money, to teach people how the markets work. Over the next few years, the economy recovered. Some investors, who had money to buy stocks when the markets bottomed out, started to see strong returns. Average Americans, however, were often missing out. Gage didn’t think that profits should belong only to a select few, hidden away at the top of a tower like the character of Rapunzel in the 1812 Brothers Grimm fairy tale. Rapunzl the app, Gage and Curcio decided, would make investing accessible. It would give anybody the chance to learn, to figure out how the stock markets work. Then, when users were comfortable, they could actually start investing.

How the app got funded

Through their college years, the two met frequently to refine the concept for Rapunzl. They settled on an idea that would allow users to simulate a stock portfolio without risking real money. But to make their idea come to life, real money is exactly what the two young entrepreneurs needed. So, after graduating in 2016, they organized their ideas and started looking around for seed funding.

Myles Gage with Rapunzl cofounder Brian Curcio. Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC

“We put a mini-pitch deck together and shopped it around to our friends and family, and were able to muster up funds to develop a prototype,” Gage says. They hired a Canadian developer who created an early version of the app and made it available for download in April 2017. Around that time, Rapunzl also did another round of fundraising, which netted the company enough money to continue perfecting the platform. Several months later, the founders brought in a third partner, Chris Thomas, as the company’s CTO.

‘Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl’

To attract users and take aim at their mission of creating a new generation of confident, financially literate investors, Gage and the team headed back to school — literally. Rapunzl partnered with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and started sponsoring conferences, plus essay and investing competitions at schools around the Chicago area. The team also met with John Rogers, the chairman and CEO of Ariel Investments — which also funds and sponsors Ariel Community Academy — who agreed to sponsor the competitions and provide prize money. In 2018, Rapunzl was involved in competitions in more than 70 Chicago-area schools, comprising more than 2,000 students.

Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap. Arne Duncan Former U.S. Secretary of Education

Rapunzl is building on its success in Chicago schools by expanding. Last year, it sponsored competitions in Los Angeles, Boston, and New York, with plans for more cities next year, and colleges, too. It has even managed to catch the attention of former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap,” Duncan said, following an announcement about Rapunzl partnering with investing firm Wedbush. Duncan, who doesn’t have any current connection to the app, did play a role in developing the curriculum at Ariel Community Academy.

The app and its founders hope to make a difference

So far, the Rapunzl team has focused their efforts on generating interest in the platform and getting young users hooked on trading. The app doesn’t currently drive revenue, though, and Gage is hopeful that will change. He says at some point in 2020, the platform will be monetized through affiliate marketing and premium subscriptions.

Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


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