Too old to get rich? No way, if you follow these 7 tips for starting a business

Starting your own business puts you back in the driver’s seat. In fact, with extra years under your belt, you have more of an edge than you think when it comes to starting a business, Hannon says.The 50-plus crowd has some advantages that don’t get enough attention. One critical financial warning: Do not tap your retirement funds.That should be the absolute last resource you turn to fund a business. Winning womenWomen are especially good collaborators, Hannon says, and women over 50 are the top


Starting your own business puts you back in the driver’s seat.
In fact, with extra years under your belt, you have more of an edge than you think when it comes to starting a business, Hannon says.The 50-plus crowd has some advantages that don’t get enough attention.
One critical financial warning: Do not tap your retirement funds.That should be the absolute last resource you turn to fund a business.
Winning womenWomen are especially good collaborators, Hannon says, and women over 50 are the top
Too old to get rich? No way, if you follow these 7 tips for starting a business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, help, tips, experience, business, rich, old, financial, youve, women, follow, starting, hannon, retirement, getty


Too old to get rich? No way, if you follow these 7 tips for starting a business

10’000 Hours | DigitalVision | Getty Images

Among other reasons, it’s hard to get back into the traditional workplace after age 50 if you were forced out. Starting your own business puts you back in the driver’s seat. In fact, with extra years under your belt, you have more of an edge than you think when it comes to starting a business, Hannon says.The 50-plus crowd has some advantages that don’t get enough attention. Here’s what to keep in mind before you strike out on your own.

1. Two top qualities

People who got into the game a little later have more capacity in several areas. No. 1: experience. “You’ve been through some ups and downs,” Hannon said. “You can bring some balance that a younger person can’t, who doesn’t have your world experience.” Next, you likely have the financial cushion to help you begin. “Most people who start are self-funded,” Hannon said. “It’s really critical to have that support underneath you.”

Be comfortable selling yourself. It’s all about sales. Kerry Hannon career transitions and retirement expert

You’ve got a network. “If you’re starting in an industry you’ve already worked in as customer or a client, you have a network to call on as potential clients and customers,” Hannon said.

2. Check your financial fitness

First, get a financial checkup. As someone with a few decades of work-world experience, you’ll understand the importance of paying down debt and drawing up a budget. Some people consider relocating to an area with a lower cost of living, Hannon says.

Maskot | Maskot | Getty Images

“Pay attention to the bigger-ticket items, not just cutting back on restaurant spending, to make sure you have that ability to be nimble,” Hannon said. One critical financial warning: Do not tap your retirement funds.That should be the absolute last resource you turn to fund a business.

3. Embrace what’s free

Take advantage of all the free resources you can. Hannon mentions SCORE, a partner of the Small Business Administration. This organization provides free business mentoring and education for those looking for experienced help from experienced entrepreneurs. Look for ways to reach out in your community, says Hannon. The internet also offers plenty of sites and templates for business plans.

Don’t make any rash moves. Do your homework to see what you can do. Kerry Hannon career transitions and retirement expert

4. Your value proposition

Look at the market and see what you have to contribute that no one else is doing. You can volunteer or moonlight, but find something that is as close to the work as possible to see if it will work for you. A scenario might sound great until you actually try it on. You might have to pick up some new skills or a certification. Without going as far as a master’s degree, it’s still worth thinking of ways to ramp up your professional profile.

5. Partner up

Consider a senior/junior partnership. Think “The Intern,” with Robert De Niro and Anne Hathaway.

Hero Images | Hero Images | Getty Images

When an older entrepreneur pairs with someone younger, you get an unbeatable combination: They’ve got tech savvy and enthusiasm, and you have the capital, the resources and older, wiser contacts. You could build a business that goes on for 20 years. After all, you want a business that will grow slowly and organically, Hannon says.

6. Winning women

Women are especially good collaborators, Hannon says, and women over 50 are the top demographic worldwide starting businesses. Women may even have a higher success rate than men, according to a BNP Paribas study. “What makes women fabulous is, we are great collaborators,” Hannon said.

Ezra Bailey | Taxi | Getty Images

Women are also less focused on immediately hitting it out of the ballpark. Remember to put your pieces in place and ask for help, Hannon says, and be patient. “This isn’t a sprint,” Hannon said. “It’s a marathon.”

7. Sell it


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, help, tips, experience, business, rich, old, financial, youve, women, follow, starting, hannon, retirement, getty


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12-time gold medalist Allyson Felix on the negotiating advice she wishes she knew at the start of her career

Like many athletes, Felix said she relied solely on her agent at the start of her career to negotiate all of her business deals. “You know, you’re coming in either straight from college or even younger than that, and you don’t have experience in this,” she said. “So, you don’t know what to ask for. But being grateful for any deal that comes your way can be problematic, she said, especially when you don’t know the details of the contract. After facing a lot of backlash for its policies surroundin


Like many athletes, Felix said she relied solely on her agent at the start of her career to negotiate all of her business deals.
“You know, you’re coming in either straight from college or even younger than that, and you don’t have experience in this,” she said.
“So, you don’t know what to ask for.
But being grateful for any deal that comes your way can be problematic, she said, especially when you don’t know the details of the contract.
After facing a lot of backlash for its policies surroundin
12-time gold medalist Allyson Felix on the negotiating advice she wishes she knew at the start of her career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, athletes, gold, dont, wishes, deal, months, told, know, negotiating, experience, career, start, felix, knew, nike, allyson, lot, medalist, advice


12-time gold medalist Allyson Felix on the negotiating advice she wishes she knew at the start of her career

Though the 33-year-old has seen a lot of success in her career, she says there is one piece of advice she wishes she knew as a young athlete who was turning pro. “I look back at when I did my first deal at 17 to where I am now,” she told CNBC Make It at a recent event for personal finance company SoFi, “and I wish I was being more present in those conversations and had more knowledge about what was going on in the negotiation process.”

Her win, which came just 10 months after giving birth to her daughter Camryn, broke Usain Bolt’s record for the most track-and-field gold medals at a world championship.

Allyson Felix of the United States competes in the 4×400 Metres Mixed Relay during day three of 17th IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha 2019 at Khalifa International Stadium on September 29, 2019 in Doha, Qatar.

Like many athletes, Felix said she relied solely on her agent at the start of her career to negotiate all of her business deals. “You know, you’re coming in either straight from college or even younger than that, and you don’t have experience in this,” she said. “So, you don’t know what to ask for. A lot of times I think we’re just grateful to get offered something.”

But being grateful for any deal that comes your way can be problematic, she said, especially when you don’t know the details of the contract. Earlier this year, Felix penned an op-ed for The New York Times where she opened up about her experience with renegotiating her contract with Nike as a pregnant athlete.

Despite being one of the most decorated athletes in history, Felix said Nike wanted to pay her 70% less than before, and they didn’t want to offer her maternity protection during the months following her child’s birth. “I asked Nike to contractually guarantee that I wouldn’t be punished if I didn’t perform at my best in the months surrounding childbirth,” she wrote. “I wanted to set a new standard. If I, one of Nike’s most widely marketed athletes, couldn’t secure these protections, who could?”

After facing a lot of backlash for its policies surrounding female athletes, Nike later announced that it was updating its contracts to protect its pregnant clients more. Under the new terms, the sportswear brand said that no performance-related reductions could take place for an 18-month period, starting eight months prior to a woman’s due date.

Nike did not immediately respond to Make It’s request for comment.

Felix, who signed a new sponsorship deal with Athleta in July, said her experience with Nike taught her that you have to be ready to negotiate for more than just money.

“I’m excited about this new partnership deal, and it’s different,” she told the crowd at SoFi’s “Get That Raise” event. “I had been with Nike for so long, and I really don’t think they thought I would leave the brand. But, I realized there are things that are more valuable than money.”

College and career coach Kat Cohen agrees with Felix and explained that even if you aren’t an athlete, you should still consider more than just money when negotiating with an employer.

“You should look at compensation holistically,” she told CNBC Make It. “This means reviewing the retirement savings, paid time off, commuter benefits and whatever other benefits are offered.”

Cohen added that in some cases, such as with tuition reimbursement, your benefits can actually help to cut down your monthly payments on a bill. In this situation, she said, it should not be a deal breaker if a company can’t increase your pay.

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Don’t miss: 8 successful women share how they negotiated their first big raise—and the advice they’d give others looking to do the same


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, athletes, gold, dont, wishes, deal, months, told, know, negotiating, experience, career, start, felix, knew, nike, allyson, lot, medalist, advice


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Deepak Chopra: These 3 simple exercises will change the way you see the world

If you’re serious about incorporating meditative journaling into your daily routine, the three exercises below will help get your creative juices flowing. Exercise #1: Get in touch with the basicsInsight: The everyday experience of reality starts with perceptions: sounds, colors, shapes, textures, tastes and smells. Exercise #2: Get in touch with your sense of realityInsight: The range of human perception is a narrow bandwidth of raw sensations. Waking up to the world around us helps expand that


If you’re serious about incorporating meditative journaling into your daily routine, the three exercises below will help get your creative juices flowing. Exercise #1: Get in touch with the basicsInsight: The everyday experience of reality starts with perceptions: sounds, colors, shapes, textures, tastes and smells. Exercise #2: Get in touch with your sense of realityInsight: The range of human perception is a narrow bandwidth of raw sensations. Waking up to the world around us helps expand that
Deepak Chopra: These 3 simple exercises will change the way you see the world Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: deepak chopra
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, sense, world, senses, reality, youre, waking, exercises, chopra, experience, touch, write, narrow, change, deepak, simple


Deepak Chopra: These 3 simple exercises will change the way you see the world

Research has shown again and again that there are numerous benefits to meditative journaling: it can improve your mental health by helping you manage depression and anxiety, be more aware and present, recognize triggers and allow space for positive self-talk and encouragement. But getting started can be challenging because it requires a lot of patience and commitment. If you stick to it, however, you may open your eyes one morning, look around, and know with certainty that you have fully awakened to the world around you. If you’re serious about incorporating meditative journaling into your daily routine, the three exercises below will help get your creative juices flowing. It’s important to focus on doing just one exercise per day. Each one starts with an insight, followed by a brief explanation. After you’ve read both at least once (although I recommend several times throughout the day as well, so you can fully embrace its meaning) and completed the “action step,” write about the experience in your journal. Think about things like how you felt before the exercise and what changes you noticed after. Did you have an “aha!” moment? Do you feel calmer, more focused, more present, more awakened?

Exercise #1: Get in touch with the basics

Insight: The everyday experience of reality starts with perceptions: sounds, colors, shapes, textures, tastes and smells. What it means: Waking up is supposed to be effortless. But it’s important to know where to start, and there is no better place to begin than where you are right this moment. In fact, we will wind up in trouble if we pretend that there is any other starting point. You are experiencing your life as it is: a flow of experiences that begin with the five senses. For today: Sit for a moment and simply embrace the light, warmth and smells wafting your way. Relax into the experience. Just observe. The more you’re able to relax, the more effortless waking up will be. In a relaxed state, your mental activity calms down, and observing your direct experience will happen naturally. Now, write about your experience.

Exercise #2: Get in touch with your sense of reality

Insight: The range of human perception is a narrow bandwidth of raw sensations. What it means: The five senses are our window into reality, but the opening is just a slit. The phrase “seeing is believing” usually only applies to a small fraction of raw data bombarding the eye every second. The same is true for the other four senses — smell, hearing, taste and touch: they conspire to deliver a narrow bandwidth of reality. Waking up to the world around us helps expand that bandwidth and increases our perception of reality. For today: Get in touch with how narrow your sense of reality actually is. Cup your hands over your ears and noticed how muffled the world is. Then, put on your sunglasses and notice how dim the world becomes. Turn off the lights and cautiously, with small steps, try to navigate a room in your house that you’re very familiar with. When you take your hands away from your ears, remove your sunglasses and turn the lights back on, you’ll notice that your sense of awareness has expanded. Now, write about your experience.

Exercise #3: Listen to the birds singing


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: deepak chopra
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, sense, world, senses, reality, youre, waking, exercises, chopra, experience, touch, write, narrow, change, deepak, simple


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American Airlines shuffles top staff after key customer service executive steps down

Kerry Philipovitch, senior vice president of customer experience, handling areas from reservations, customer service, baggage and premium service, will retire at the end of the year, the airline said Thursday. A spokesman called the departure of Philipovitch, 49, who has been in the role at American since 2013, “entirely voluntary.” We haven’t been consistently hitting the mark, and that’s not fair to our team or our customers,” American’s president, Robert Isom, said in a note to employees. Hea


Kerry Philipovitch, senior vice president of customer experience, handling areas from reservations, customer service, baggage and premium service, will retire at the end of the year, the airline said Thursday. A spokesman called the departure of Philipovitch, 49, who has been in the role at American since 2013, “entirely voluntary.” We haven’t been consistently hitting the mark, and that’s not fair to our team or our customers,” American’s president, Robert Isom, said in a note to employees. Hea
American Airlines shuffles top staff after key customer service executive steps down Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, changes, key, senior, americans, operations, vice, isom, airlines, role, service, shuffles, steps, experience, staff, executive, customer, president, american


American Airlines shuffles top staff after key customer service executive steps down

American Airlines is shuffling some of its top executives after a key departure and struggles with its operations that led to hundreds of flight cancellations and long delays over the past few months.

Kerry Philipovitch, senior vice president of customer experience, handling areas from reservations, customer service, baggage and premium service, will retire at the end of the year, the airline said Thursday. A spokesman called the departure of Philipovitch, 49, who has been in the role at American since 2013, “entirely voluntary.”

The changes come amid growing pressure on American’s CEO, Doug Parker, to improve the Fort Worth, Texas-based carrier’s operations after it faced hundreds of cancellations over the summer, angering customers and employees. American’s stock is down more than 15% so far this year while Delta and United are each up 4%.

American has blamed many of the delays and cancellations on the unions representing its mechanics, which it accused of conducting an illegal work slowdown to gain leverage in contract talks, accusations the unions have denied. Negotiations resumed last month.

“The most important thing we can do to make culture a competitive advantage and deliver a world-class customer experience is run a safe and reliable operation. We haven’t been consistently hitting the mark, and that’s not fair to our team or our customers,” American’s president, Robert Isom, said in a note to employees.

The airline has made recent improvements, however. In September, nearly 83% of American’s flights arrived on time, its best month since November 2017 and more than 4 percentage points higher than the year-earlier period.

“The changes we’re announcing today will help build on that momentum and ensure we’re operating better than ever by increasing coordination across all operations functions,” Isom said.

The changes will mean Isom will have four direct reports, down from five, since American won’t replace Philipovitch.

David Seymour, for example, will expand his role as head of operations to take on Philipovitch’s tasks of managing airport operations.

Head of network planning, Vasu Raja, who was promoted to senior vice president, will add airline alliances and partnerships to his role. Joint ventures and equity stakes have become more important to airlines as they expand because foreign ownership rules prevent carriers from buying foreign airlines outright. Last month, rival Delta announced a surprise minority stake in American’s longtime Latin American partner LATAM, the region’s largest airline.

Kurt Stache, senior vice president of loyalty and marketing, will take on passenger experience management, which Philiopovich previously handled.

The changes will mean Isom will have four direct reports, down from five.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, changes, key, senior, americans, operations, vice, isom, airlines, role, service, shuffles, steps, experience, staff, executive, customer, president, american


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In-car virtual reality experience launching to the general public at Universal Hollywood

Holoride, an in-car virtual reality (VR) startup, is partnering with Ford and Universal Pictures to launch its technology to the general public. The ride is inspired by Universal Pictures’ 1935 film “Bride of Frankenstein,” with new content created by the Universal Classic Monsters. Universal Pictures has been building virtual reality content for four years, according to Vice President of Technology Partnerships Greg Reed. The company has the potential to work with various automakers, virtual re


Holoride, an in-car virtual reality (VR) startup, is partnering with Ford and Universal Pictures to launch its technology to the general public. The ride is inspired by Universal Pictures’ 1935 film “Bride of Frankenstein,” with new content created by the Universal Classic Monsters. Universal Pictures has been building virtual reality content for four years, according to Vice President of Technology Partnerships Greg Reed. The company has the potential to work with various automakers, virtual re
In-car virtual reality experience launching to the general public at Universal Hollywood Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: contessa brewer jasmine kim, contessa brewer, jasmine kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virtual, universal, technology, pictures, reality, public, hollywood, content, experience, general, experiences, launching, incar, startup, holoride


In-car virtual reality experience launching to the general public at Universal Hollywood

Holoride, an in-car virtual reality (VR) startup, is partnering with Ford and Universal Pictures to launch its technology to the general public.

The startup announced Wednesday that it’s offering the VR experience at Universal CityWalk Hollywood in Los Angeles, California beginning Oct. 14 through select dates until Nov. 9. The immersive ride will take place in the back seat of 2020 Ford Explorers.

The ride is inspired by Universal Pictures’ 1935 film “Bride of Frankenstein,” with new content created by the Universal Classic Monsters.

Universal Pictures has been building virtual reality content for four years, according to Vice President of Technology Partnerships Greg Reed.

“VR is typically location-based experiences or home experiences,” Reed said. “This is the first opportunity we’ve had to take the content that we’ve been building and put it in a place where consumers are. ”

Holoride is a German tech startup that creates extended reality (XR) experience for users by connecting VR content with physical data points from the vehicle in real-time. The data points include acceleration, steering, traffic data, travel route and more, according to the company’s website.

“As we’re getting to more connectivity in the vehicle, we’re interested in learning about the types of experiences that our customers are interested in…. really understanding the context of how they may want these experiences,” Albert Choi, Ford’s partnership lead for content digital services, told CNBC.

Nils Wollny, Holoride CEO, said the technology could be a game-changer for gaming, entertainment and even education where students can explore ancient Egypt, outer space or even inside the human body.

“What we create is basically a revolution in car entertainment because it adapts to travel time, to route,” he said.

Wollny said his system could make for more efficient use of time. By synchronizing the car’s movement to visual content, the technology aims to create a more immersive experience with reduced motion sickness.

“A lot of people want to work while they’re on the go, but if they get motion sick, they simply can’t,” he said.

He suggested that motion-synchronized spatial computing will make workers more productive.

The CEO said he hopes to have his software installed in vehicles by 2021. He said Holoride will incentivize car makers to offer the system standard in vehicles and then share a portion of the revenue earned from the content.

The company has the potential to work with various automakers, virtual reality headset manufacturers like Facebook’s Oculus and content creators such as Discovery, Disney and Universal.

Holoride is currently in a proof-of-concept phase but the company has previously partnered with Audi, which owns a minority stake in Holoride, to conduct demos at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show, according to the company’s website.

Disclosure: NBCUniversal is the parent company of CNBC, Universal Studios and Universal CityWalk Hollywood.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: contessa brewer jasmine kim, contessa brewer, jasmine kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virtual, universal, technology, pictures, reality, public, hollywood, content, experience, general, experiences, launching, incar, startup, holoride


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Review: The 2019 Acura NSX is the next-generation supercar for $157,500

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBCAcura reinvented the supercar 29 years ago with the original NSX. The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBCThat’s especially apparent inside, where the NSX feels a lot like a standard-issue Acura. The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBCHow we’d option itFor 2019, Acura made a lot of optional equipment on the NSX standard. The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBCFinal thoughtsUnless you consider the three-cylinder BMW i8 to be a supercar, the Acura NSX is the only hybrid s


The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBCAcura reinvented the supercar 29 years ago with the original NSX. The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBCThat’s especially apparent inside, where the NSX feels a lot like a standard-issue Acura. The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBCHow we’d option itFor 2019, Acura made a lot of optional equipment on the NSX standard. The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBCFinal thoughtsUnless you consider the three-cylinder BMW i8 to be a supercar, the Acura NSX is the only hybrid s
Review: The 2019 Acura NSX is the next-generation supercar for $157,500 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-29  Authors: mack hogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, electric, nsx, 157500, acura, hogan, experience, 2019, review, mack, lot, driving, nextgeneration, supercar


Review: The 2019 Acura NSX is the next-generation supercar for $157,500

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBC

Acura reinvented the supercar 29 years ago with the original NSX. The high-powered, mid-engined supercar went toe-to-toe with Ferrari and Porsche while offering Acura levels of reliability and ease of use. While Ferrari owners had to pull the engine out of their cars every few years for service, NSX owners happily racked up hundreds of thousands of trouble-free miles. That NSX — short for New Sports Experience — predicted what would come next. In the years since, supercars have gotten more livable, more reliable and more comfortable. So after correctly predicting the future the first time around, Acura has built a new NSX that previews the supercar of the future.

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBC

The good

For all the talk of automakers electrifying their lineups, few are actually making moves at the top end of the market. The world of high-performance supercars is still a largely gas-powered market. Unless you have a few million bucks to spend on a limited-production hypercar like the McLaren P1, LaFerrari or Porsche 918 Spyder, you have one option for a high-performance hybrid supercar: the Acura NSX. If hybrids and electrified drivetrains are the future of performance cars, then, Acura’s new flagship is living up to its name. It’s got a twin-turbocharged V-6 sucking down gasoline to both motivate the rear wheels and charge the batteries. Those batteries send their electrons to three electric motors; one on the rear axle and one on each front corner. Altogether, this combination produces 571 horsepower when everything is delivering peak power.

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBC

Because electric motors can provide full torque from a standstill and the powerful V-6 charges hard to its redline, you’ll basically find it impossible to catch the NSX off guard. It zips to 60 mph in 2.9 seconds and will keep charging up to 191 mph, with ample thrust available at any speed. Drag racers and parking lot braggarts will also be pacified knowing that the NSX’s official 0 to 60 time is faster than those of the Audi R8 V10 or the McLaren 570s. But with a $173,400 as-tested price, being fast isn’t good enough. The beautify of the original NSX was the holistic driving experience. The new NSX is undeniably different, with a much more complicated drivetrain than the analog first-gen NSX, but the driving experience is still brilliant. Despite having a brake-by-wire system, a hybrid powertrain, two turbochargers and a dual-clutch transmission, the NSX feels surprisingly approachable and normal on the road.

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBC

Brake feel is good despite there not being a physical link between your foot and the brakes, steering is precise and full of feedback and power delivery is instantaneous. Plus, the trick powertrain allows the NSX to pull some clever cornering magic. Take a tight right turn, for instance, and the NSX will send more power to the front left electric motor while pulling power from the front right motor. By speeding up the outside wheel, the NSX can pull you around corners using this electric setup to increase your cornering agility. But because they’ve spent so much time tuning it, it never feels intrusive or synthetic, rather increases your confidence in the car.

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBC

Plus, you get a track mode that limits stability control intervention, firms up the suspension and opens up the exhaust. The NSX doesn’t just have the performance and handling of a blue-blooded supercar, but the spectacle and driving excitement of one too. But, like the original NSX, the new one is perfectly suitable for daily driving. The seats are comfortable and supportive, the cabin in “quiet” mode is more hushed than any other supercar we’ve driven and the ride is compliant enough for trips to city centers or long highway cruises. We even managed 21 miles per gallon with some extremely aggressive driving, way better than the 12 mpg of the last McLaren we drove. Plus, the nose isn’t too low, nothing scrapes and our tester still felt great with over 13,000 miles on it.

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBC

That’s not just a lot for a supercar tester car, that’s the highest-mileage tester car that we’ve ever driven. Considering how hard review cars get driven, Acura loaning out a 13,000-mile supercar demonstrates extreme confidence in its product.

The bad

No matter how good it is, some people still can’t stomach paying $157,500 for an Acura. If you care about branding or want a supercar as a status symbol, the NSX might not be the choice for you.

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBC

That’s especially apparent inside, where the NSX feels a lot like a standard-issue Acura. The infotainment is a particular pain point, with slow responses and no physical volume knob. Standard Acuras and Hondas have already fixed these issues, so it’s disappointing to see the company’s flagship product running an outdated setup. The electric motors and related equipment take up the space where you’d expect to find a front trunk in a mid-engined supercar, so cargo space is limited to a trunk behind the engine. It’s wide enough, but not particularly deep and can get hot if the car’s working hard. It’ll fit your groceries or a duffle bag, but don’t expect to fit a week’s worth of luggage in the NSX.

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBC

How we’d option it

For 2019, Acura made a lot of optional equipment on the NSX standard. That means that the upgraded seats, premium audio system and navigation system are all included in the NSX’s $157,500 base price. There is a carbon-ceramic brake package for $10,600, but that’s really only useful if you’re spending a lot of time on race tracks with your NSX. Otherwise, we’d stop at the base price unless cosmetic options — like premium paints and carbon fibre trim — really get your attention. Otherwise, an $1,800 destination charge brings our total to $159,300.

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBC

Final thoughts

Unless you consider the three-cylinder BMW i8 to be a supercar, the Acura NSX is the only hybrid supercar on sale right now. It’s also great to look at, usable in daily life, great to drive and wicked quick. It’s not insanely powerful or faster on a race track than its competitors, but the Acura NSX feels like a new generation of the supercar, where electrification enhances the driving experience and livability of performance vehicles. If the goal was to provide a new sports experience, consider it a job well done.

The 2019 Acura NSX Mack Hogan | CNBC

Rating:

Exterior: 4.5 Interior: 2.5 Driving Experience: 5 Value: 4.5 Overall: 4.1 Price as tested: $173,400


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-29  Authors: mack hogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, electric, nsx, 157500, acura, hogan, experience, 2019, review, mack, lot, driving, nextgeneration, supercar


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Target stores, website experience temporary outage Tuesday afternoon

On Tuesday afternoon, customers looking to shop at retail giant Target’s stores and on its website were briefly met with an outage, preventing purchases. “As the result of a payment processing issue, some Target guests were temporarily unable to make purchases at Target stores and at Target.com,” a company spokesman told CNBC in an email. The outage was one of several hiccups Target has had with its systems this year. In June, registers were down for nearly two hours on a Saturday, leaving custo


On Tuesday afternoon, customers looking to shop at retail giant Target’s stores and on its website were briefly met with an outage, preventing purchases. “As the result of a payment processing issue, some Target guests were temporarily unable to make purchases at Target stores and at Target.com,” a company spokesman told CNBC in an email. The outage was one of several hiccups Target has had with its systems this year. In June, registers were down for nearly two hours on a Saturday, leaving custo
Target stores, website experience temporary outage Tuesday afternoon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: jasmine wu lauren thomas, jasmine wu, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, targets, temporary, website, stores, guests, outage, company, experience, afternoon, issue, target, unable, customers


Target stores, website experience temporary outage Tuesday afternoon

On Tuesday afternoon, customers looking to shop at retail giant Target’s stores and on its website were briefly met with an outage, preventing purchases.

At some stores, there were payment processing issues. On the Target.com homepage, a message greeted customers: “We’re sorry! This page is currently unavailable. Please try again later.” Target’s mobile application also did not load.

Around 5 p.m. Tuesday, systems seemed to be back to normal.

“As the result of a payment processing issue, some Target guests were temporarily unable to make purchases at Target stores and at Target.com,” a company spokesman told CNBC in an email. “Within an hour, our technology teams identified and began to remedy the issue to limit the impact on our guests. This was not a security-related issue. We apologize for the inconvenience and appreciate our guests’ patience.”

The outage was one of several hiccups Target has had with its systems this year.

In June, registers were down for nearly two hours on a Saturday, leaving customers unable to check out. The company later said it was a result of “an internal technology issue.” The issues continued into Sunday, as customers reported not being able to use the card readers. Shares fell nearly 2% after the incident, and one retail industry executive said the company could have lost as much as $100 million in sales that weekend.

Some customers complained on social media Tuesday of not being able to use the website or the mobile application.

One customer lamented having Target withdrawal.

According to outage website Down Detector, reports of an outage affected major metropolitan areas including Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Chicago and New York.

According to an August filing, 7.3% of Target’s sales are digitally originated. Shares of the company have risen 62.6% since the beginning of the year. Target has a market value of $54.9 billion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: jasmine wu lauren thomas, jasmine wu, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, targets, temporary, website, stores, guests, outage, company, experience, afternoon, issue, target, unable, customers


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’10-hour lines are not a sign of success:’ How Galaxy’s Edge is preserving the Disney guest experience

Stormtroopers interact with attendees during the unveiling of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Walt Disney Co.’s Disneyland theme park in Anaheim, California, May 29, 2019. During its earnings report earlier this month, Disney CEO Bob Iger noted that park attendance at its domestic Disney Parks fell 3% in the fiscal third quarter. Some analysts have even speculated that this is a sign that the new Star Wars-themed land was not well-received by fans. Disney’s customer satisfaction scores have indicate


Stormtroopers interact with attendees during the unveiling of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Walt Disney Co.’s Disneyland theme park in Anaheim, California, May 29, 2019. During its earnings report earlier this month, Disney CEO Bob Iger noted that park attendance at its domestic Disney Parks fell 3% in the fiscal third quarter. Some analysts have even speculated that this is a sign that the new Star Wars-themed land was not well-received by fans. Disney’s customer satisfaction scores have indicate
’10-hour lines are not a sign of success:’ How Galaxy’s Edge is preserving the Disney guest experience Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, edge, guest, land, sign, success, lines, disney, stormtroopers, experience, preserving, park, galaxys, star, 10hour, parks


'10-hour lines are not a sign of success:' How Galaxy's Edge is preserving the Disney guest experience

Stormtroopers interact with attendees during the unveiling of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Walt Disney Co.’s Disneyland theme park in Anaheim, California, May 29, 2019.

When you land on the outer rim planet of Batuu, you may notice bubbling pods of blue and green milk, stormtroopers interrogating citizens or even the sound of a TIE Fighter zipping overhead. What you won’t notice are lines.

During its earnings report earlier this month, Disney CEO Bob Iger noted that park attendance at its domestic Disney Parks fell 3% in the fiscal third quarter. The cause was attributed to its decision to block out annual passholders and raise park ticket prices as well as a fear from potential parkgoers that lines would be unbearable as the company opened the gates to its Galaxy’s Edge attraction in Anaheim, California.

Some analysts have even speculated that this is a sign that the new Star Wars-themed land was not well-received by fans. In fact, shares of the company slumped due in part to the disappointing attendance numbers.The integration of Fox’s entertainment assets as well as streaming investments also weighed on the company’s stock.

Despite the fall in foot traffic, Disney executives were happy with the experience they was able provide to guests during the first three months the land was open.

Disney’s customer satisfaction scores have indicated that Galaxy’s Edge is the most popular area in the Disneyland park.

“One of the wins that we had with the opening of the original Galaxy’s Edge is that we didn’t have the waits,” Bob Chapek, chairman of parks, experiences and products, said. “The deep secret is that we don’t intend to have lines … If you build in enough capacity, the rides don’t go down and it operates at 99% efficiency, you shouldn’t have 10-hour lines.”

“So, 10-hour lines are not a sign of success,” he said. “It should be seen as a sign of, frankly, failure.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, edge, guest, land, sign, success, lines, disney, stormtroopers, experience, preserving, park, galaxys, star, 10hour, parks


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The 10 highest-paying college majors of 2019, according to PayScale

The site also identified the highest-paying college majors, and polled workers about whether or not they felt their work makes the world a better place. Here are the 10 highest-paying college majors, according to PayScale:Graduate students in MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics create simulators of a winged aircraft or ground vehicles. Aeronautics & astronauticsMedian salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $73,100Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,6


The site also identified the highest-paying college majors, and polled workers about whether or not they felt their work makes the world a better place. Here are the 10 highest-paying college majors, according to PayScale:Graduate students in MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics create simulators of a winged aircraft or ground vehicles. Aeronautics & astronauticsMedian salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $73,100Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,6
The 10 highest-paying college majors of 2019, according to PayScale Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, majors, college, say, experience, makes, highestpaying, work, place, 05, payscale, 2019, better, world, alumni, according


The 10 highest-paying college majors of 2019, according to PayScale

College students arriving on campuses across the U.S. this fall may think that choosing a school was the biggest decision they’d have to make for a while. But now, they’ll need to choose a major. “Research shows that in many ways it doesn’t really matter where you go to college,” Jon Marcus, higher education editor at The Hechinger Report, tells CNBC Make It. “What major you pick has a greater influence on your future postgraduate earnings and career success.” As part of its annual College Salary Report, released today, PayScale analyzed data from graduates of more than 2,500 schools in order to spotlight how much graduates typically make early and mid-way through their careers. The site also identified the highest-paying college majors, and polled workers about whether or not they felt their work makes the world a better place. Here are the 10 highest-paying college majors, according to PayScale:

Graduate students in MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics create simulators of a winged aircraft or ground vehicles. Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor | Getty Images

10. Aeronautics & astronautics

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $73,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,600

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 59%

9. Pharmacy

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $79,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $132,500

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 77%

8. Business analysis

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $133,200

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 50%

7. Electrical power engineering

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $134,700

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 63%

6. Actuarial mathematics

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,100

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 46%

5. Political economy

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $136,200

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 38%

4. Operations research

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $77,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $137,100

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 48%

3. Applied economics and management

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $58,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $140,000

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 69%

2. Electrical engineering & computer science

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $88,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $142,200

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 44%

1. Petroleum engineering

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $94,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $176,900

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 72%

sezer66 | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, majors, college, say, experience, makes, highestpaying, work, place, 05, payscale, 2019, better, world, alumni, according


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How ‘FOMO’ inspired this millennial founder to build a $71 million-dollar virtual reality game

Steve Zhao, founder and CEO of Sandbox VR. As a serial entrepreneur, Chen knew the value of creating demand for a product, Zhao explained at RISE tech conference in Hong Kong. “We started Sandbox VR in 2016, when the hype of VR was very palpable,” said Zhao. Players experience Sandbox VR’s immersive virtual reality game. But, rather than fail, they launched a Sandbox VR center in San Francisco and quickly signed up investors to get on board.


Steve Zhao, founder and CEO of Sandbox VR. As a serial entrepreneur, Chen knew the value of creating demand for a product, Zhao explained at RISE tech conference in Hong Kong. “We started Sandbox VR in 2016, when the hype of VR was very palpable,” said Zhao. Players experience Sandbox VR’s immersive virtual reality game. But, rather than fail, they launched a Sandbox VR center in San Francisco and quickly signed up investors to get on board.
How ‘FOMO’ inspired this millennial founder to build a $71 million-dollar virtual reality game Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reality, zhao, millennial, inspired, sandbox, build, experience, funding, founder, vr, game, 71, virtual, kong, hong, business, steve, really, milliondollar, fomo


How 'FOMO' inspired this millennial founder to build a $71 million-dollar virtual reality game

When Steve Zhao was looking for investment for his virtual reality arcade business, he did something unconventional: He lined up all his meetings back-to-back and had the investors sit together in the same waiting room. It was part of the young founder’s “FOMO” strategy — fear of missing out — to build a hype around his business. And it seemed to work. Within five days, Sandbox VR closed out its Series A funding round with a total of $68 million, led by famed Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. That took the company’s total funding raised to $71 million. “Investors are emotional beings, just like everybody else,” Zhao told CNBC Make It. “It’s important for VCs (venture capitalists) to see you’re in demand.”

Steve Zhao, founder and CEO of Sandbox VR. RISE

It was the idea of Siqi Chen, the company’s chief product officer and the brains behind journaling app Heyday. As a serial entrepreneur, Chen knew the value of creating demand for a product, Zhao explained at RISE tech conference in Hong Kong. So they made it clear that their immersive gaming experience was hot property. It was just the boost the young entrepreneurs needed to make it big, explained 36-year-old Zhao.

Getting in on the game

At that stage, in 2018, Sandbox VR had already won $3 million in early-stage funding, including from Chinese tech giant Alibaba. Zhao himself put in a personal investment of $300,000. But they felt they had to build a following in the U.S. to really get their start-up off the ground. “We started Sandbox VR in 2016, when the hype of VR was very palpable,” said Zhao.

Players experience Sandbox VR’s immersive virtual reality game. Sandbox VR

The engineer, who had relocated from the U.S. to Hong Kong for business, had seen the growing popularity of VR while working on a separate mobile gaming app, and decided to pivot. At that time, other immersive VR gaming attractions — such as The Void and MindTrek VR — were beginning to emerge in major cities. But Zhao dreamed of creating an experience that put greater emphasis on in-headset interactions between players. “There were a lot of VR experiences like what you experience at home. Then there were full immersive ones. We didn’t do any of that. We felt the game experience was not about the environment, but your friend,” said Zhao.

We thought ‘okay, this is the VR center globally, we can either fail really hard here or not.’ Steve Zhao founder of Sandbox VR

However, he lacked conviction from investors. “Our business felt like a paradox. Lots of money was going into VR in the U.S., Japan etc., but not Hong Kong. People didn’t see the VR tech potential in Hong Kong — they thought it would only have a local reach, ” he said. While Hong Kong has long been recognized as a global financial center, it has so far struggled to gain traction as a major start-up hub, particularly with regard to emerging technologies such as VR and artificial intelligence.

Sandbox VR’s virtual reality graphics in action. Sandbox VR

Finding funding in the Valley

So, with their team of six having successfully built a pop-up venue and amassed a small cult following for its games in Hong Kong, they decided in 2018 to take their business stateside — to the mecca of VR, Silicon Valley. “We thought ‘okay, this is the VR center globally, we can either fail really hard here or not,'” said Zhao. But, rather than fail, they launched a Sandbox VR center in San Francisco and quickly signed up investors to get on board. “That was the second paradox: People were curious about us being from Hong Kong, so they were interested in investing,” said Zhao.

Andrew Chen, partner at Andreessen Horowitz, Siqi Che, chief product officer at Sandbox VR, and Steve Zhao, founder and CEO of Sandbox VR, after singing an investment deal at 1am at an In N Out Burger restaurant. Sandbox VR

Before long, the company attracted investment from U.S. venture capital firms Floodgate Fund and Andreessen Horowitz, and Stanford University with whom Zhao signed a deal at 1 a.m. in a local In-N-Out Burger restaurant in San Francisco. That funding round, which closed in January 2019, took Sandbox VR’s total funds raised to date to $71 million. With it, the company has expanded to new markets including Vancouver, Canada; Jakarta, Indonesia; Macau, greater China; and Singapore. Zhao said those venues enjoy around 90% occupancy during peak hours, which are on weekends and in the evenings from 6 p.m.

It’s a fundamentally human experience, so the scope is global. Steve Zhao founder and CEO, Sandbox VR

Virtually limitless potential

Sandbox VR now plans to open new locations in a range of U.S. cities, including Austin, Chicago and New York, as part of the company’s plans to target leading global markets. “It’s a fundamentally human experience, so the scope is global. But we’re aiming for countries with high GDP (gross domestic product) initially,” said Zhao, pinpointing other parts of the U.S., the U.K., Japan and China. A 30-minute session in the U.S. currently costs $48. At the same time, Zhao’s team of developers, which had grown to 75, started looking for other VR avenues to pursue beyond the traditional zombie, pirate and futuristic franchises. “Zombies are easy,” said Zhao. “Comedy and Esports are really exciting.” It’s part of Zhao’s grand ambition to create a “new movie industry” of VR content. For that, the entrepreneur will be looking to raise more funds next year. Perhaps this time, he’ll need to find a bigger waiting room. Don’t miss: What this couple learned from Facebook and Google about building a Chinese mega app Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reality, zhao, millennial, inspired, sandbox, build, experience, funding, founder, vr, game, 71, virtual, kong, hong, business, steve, really, milliondollar, fomo


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