FAA reportedly didn’t review crucial safety assessments of Boeing 737 Max system before fatal crashes

The Federal Aviation Administration’s internal probe of Boeing’s 737 Max approval process has reportedly found that senior agency officials failed to review key safety assessments of the plane’s flight-control system that was later implicated in two fatal crashes. The preliminary findings, reported by The Wall Street Journal, are the first to shed light on how the faulty design of the so-called MCAS system, which led to crashes that killed 346 people in October and March, remained in the Max fle


The Federal Aviation Administration’s internal probe of Boeing’s 737 Max approval process has reportedly found that senior agency officials failed to review key safety assessments of the plane’s flight-control system that was later implicated in two fatal crashes. The preliminary findings, reported by The Wall Street Journal, are the first to shed light on how the faulty design of the so-called MCAS system, which led to crashes that killed 346 people in October and March, remained in the Max fle
FAA reportedly didn’t review crucial safety assessments of Boeing 737 Max system before fatal crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeings, shed, system, reportedly, fatal, wall, senior, crashes, socalled, review, safety, faa, crucial, street, didnt, max


FAA reportedly didn't review crucial safety assessments of Boeing 737 Max system before fatal crashes

The Federal Aviation Administration’s internal probe of Boeing’s 737 Max approval process has reportedly found that senior agency officials failed to review key safety assessments of the plane’s flight-control system that was later implicated in two fatal crashes.

The preliminary findings, reported by The Wall Street Journal, are the first to shed light on how the faulty design of the so-called MCAS system, which led to crashes that killed 346 people in October and March, remained in the Max fleet. Boeing’s Max jets have been grounded since March.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeings, shed, system, reportedly, fatal, wall, senior, crashes, socalled, review, safety, faa, crucial, street, didnt, max


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Boeing should have disclosed automated system to pilots, FAA head says

The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration told lawmakers Wednesday that Boeing should have given pilots more information about a new anti-stall system that is suspected in two deadly crashes of the 737 Max since October. Investigators have pointed to erroneous sensor data that fed into the planes’ new, automated anti-stall system in the crashes shortly after takeoff in both deadly flights. Some pilots complained that they weren’t aware the MCAS system existed on the planes until aft


The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration told lawmakers Wednesday that Boeing should have given pilots more information about a new anti-stall system that is suspected in two deadly crashes of the 737 Max since October. Investigators have pointed to erroneous sensor data that fed into the planes’ new, automated anti-stall system in the crashes shortly after takeoff in both deadly flights. Some pilots complained that they weren’t aware the MCAS system existed on the planes until aft
Boeing should have disclosed automated system to pilots, FAA head says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, crashes, automated, fly, faa, planes, head, pilots, crash, aviation, told, system, disclosed


Boeing should have disclosed automated system to pilots, FAA head says

The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration told lawmakers Wednesday that Boeing should have given pilots more information about a new anti-stall system that is suspected in two deadly crashes of the 737 Max since October.

“I, as a pilot, when I first heard about this, I thought there should have been more text in the manual” about the MCAS anti-stall system Boeing added to the planes before they were delivered to customers, Daniel Elwell, the FAA’s acting administrator, told a House aviation subcommittee.

The fast-selling 737 Max has been grounded worldwide after the second crash, in Ethiopia in March. The first crash, in October, happened in Indonesia. The crashes killed 346 people.

Investigators have pointed to erroneous sensor data that fed into the planes’ new, automated anti-stall system in the crashes shortly after takeoff in both deadly flights. Some pilots complained that they weren’t aware the MCAS system existed on the planes until after the crash of the Lion Air flight in Indonesia.

Audio surfaced this week of a tense meeting in November in which airline pilots confronted a Boeing executive after the Lion Air crash, angry that they weren’t informed about the system. Boeing vice president Mike Sinnett reportedly told the pilots “In a million miles you’re going to maybe fly this airplane, maybe once you’re going to see this ever,” according to a report in The New York Times.

The FAA is facing several investigations about its role in approving the new planes in 2017 as well as heightened scrutiny of its practice of using company employees to help certify the aircraft before the planes are delivered to airlines.

Elwell also said Boeing engineers discovered a problem with displays that show if sensors on the plane were giving bad information, but the FAA didn’t find out about it for more than a year. The sensors in question transmit what is known as the angle of attack — the angle of the aircraft relative to oncoming air.

“I am not happy with 13-month gap” between the discovery by Boeing and when the FAA and customers found out, Elwell said. He added that the displays are not critical to flight safety and that the agency welcomes scrutiny and has room to improve. Boeing did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Some lawmakers criticized the FAA for its oversight and questioned its longtime practice of using manufacturers own employees to help speed aircraft certification.

“The FAA needs to fix its credibility problem,” Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Wash., and chairman of the subcommittee on aviation, said in prepared remarks.

Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., said “Boeing is yet to provide a single document” to the House panel about the plane.

Boeing is working on a fix for the planes that would give pilots more control over the system and use data from two, instead of one sensor, but the grounding has already pinched some airlines’ revenue and is threatening to crimp sales further if the planes remain off limits during the peak summer travel season.

“If the public doesn’t feel safe about flying then they won’t fly,” Larsen said.

Elwell said the FAA will allow the planes to fly again once it’s “absolutely safe to do so. … It’s important we get this right.”

Also Wednesday, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation is holding a nomination hearing for President Donald Trump’s pick to run the FAA, former Delta Air Lines executive Stephen Dickson.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, crashes, automated, fly, faa, planes, head, pilots, crash, aviation, told, system, disclosed


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Alphabet’s Wing becomes first drone delivery firm to win FAA approval in the US

Wing, an initiative of Google’s parent company Alphabet, has received Air Carrier Certification from the Federal Aviation Administration. Wing is the first drone delivery firm to get certification from the FAA. To get FAA certification, Wing said it had to provide evidence that its operations were safe. At the beginning of April, Wing launched a commercial delivery service in Australia’s capital, Canberra. Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority said Wing had “satisfied us that their operati


Wing, an initiative of Google’s parent company Alphabet, has received Air Carrier Certification from the Federal Aviation Administration. Wing is the first drone delivery firm to get certification from the FAA. To get FAA certification, Wing said it had to provide evidence that its operations were safe. At the beginning of April, Wing launched a commercial delivery service in Australia’s capital, Canberra. Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority said Wing had “satisfied us that their operati
Alphabet’s Wing becomes first drone delivery firm to win FAA approval in the US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: anmar frangoul, charles mostoller, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, delivery, safe, approval, win, wing, faa, certification, alphabets, safety, drone, start, statement, order, firm, service, technology


Alphabet's Wing becomes first drone delivery firm to win FAA approval in the US

Wing, an initiative of Google’s parent company Alphabet, has received Air Carrier Certification from the Federal Aviation Administration.

The certificate allows a firm to carry out state-to-state or overseas transportation.

In a blog post Tuesday, Wing said the certification meant that it could start a commercial service that delivers goods from local businesses to U.S. households. Wing is the first drone delivery firm to get certification from the FAA.

“This is an important step forward for the safe testing and integration of drones into our economy,” Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao said in a statement. “Safety continues to be our number one priority as this technology continues to develop and realize its full potential.”

To get FAA certification, Wing said it had to provide evidence that its operations were safe. It added that it had supplied submissions including data that demonstrated how a delivery from Wing carried “a lower risk to pedestrians than the same trip made by car.”

The company’s drones — which are electric — have already made more than 70,000 test flights and completed more than 3,000 deliveries in Australia.

Wing said it would be getting in touch with businesses and residents in Blacksburg and Christiansburg, Virginia, over the next few months. The purpose of this would be to demonstrate its technology, respond to questions and garner feedback, with the company aiming to start a delivery trial later in the year.

At the beginning of April, Wing launched a commercial delivery service in Australia’s capital, Canberra.

In a statement at the time, Wing said the service would enable users to order items including fresh food, hot coffee, and over-the-counter chemist items using a mobile app. Once an order is placed, a drone will be able to make deliveries “in minutes.”

Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority said Wing had “satisfied us that their operation meets an acceptable level of safety.”

It said Wing had been required to submit a safety case as part of their application, which included information relating to the reliability of its drones.

“Following an assessment of the safety case, we have permitted Wing to operate over North Canberra and in closer proximity to a person, than our regulations would normally permit,” CASA said.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: anmar frangoul, charles mostoller, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, delivery, safe, approval, win, wing, faa, certification, alphabets, safety, drone, start, statement, order, firm, service, technology


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FAA panel says Boeing 737 Max software is ‘operationally suitable’ in new report

The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday released its initial review of Boeing’s update to its 737 Max anti-stall software suspected of contributing to two fatal plane crashes, calling it “operationally suitable.” The draft report from the FAA’s Flight Standardization Board recommends that pilots take additional computer-based training for the MCAS automated flight system. Boeing said it’s completed 96 flights totaling over 159 hours of air time with its software fix for the Max jet. The c


The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday released its initial review of Boeing’s update to its 737 Max anti-stall software suspected of contributing to two fatal plane crashes, calling it “operationally suitable.” The draft report from the FAA’s Flight Standardization Board recommends that pilots take additional computer-based training for the MCAS automated flight system. Boeing said it’s completed 96 flights totaling over 159 hours of air time with its software fix for the Max jet. The c
FAA panel says Boeing 737 Max software is ‘operationally suitable’ in new report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: emma newburger, jason redmond, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, fix, max, works, wells, operationally, faa, 737, systemthe, panel, boeings, suitable, flight, company, board, report, software


FAA panel says Boeing 737 Max software is 'operationally suitable' in new report

The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday released its initial review of Boeing’s update to its 737 Max anti-stall software suspected of contributing to two fatal plane crashes, calling it “operationally suitable.”

The draft report from the FAA’s Flight Standardization Board recommends that pilots take additional computer-based training for the MCAS automated flight system.

The company’s shares jumped by about 2% on the news.

Boeing said it’s completed 96 flights totaling over 159 hours of air time with its software fix for the Max jet. The company is also updating airlines by bringing representatives into flight simulators and showing them the modified flight control system.

The company has stopped deliveries and has cut Max production by 20% as it works on a fix. The jets have been grounded since mid-March. Wells Fargo said Tuesday that Boeing’s troubles with the Max will reduce second-quarter GDP growth by 0.2%.

Separately, Institutional Shareholder Services on Tuesday recommended that shareholders vote in favor of a proposal that would require Boeing to have an independent chairman of the board. That title is currently held by CEO Dennis Muilenburg.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: emma newburger, jason redmond, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, fix, max, works, wells, operationally, faa, 737, systemthe, panel, boeings, suitable, flight, company, board, report, software


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Boeing CEO says it’s completed 96 test flights with 737 Max software fix

The test flights are one prong of a broad effort by Boeing to get the Max back in the air. Boeing says representatives from two-thirds of the 50 airlines that have the Max in their fleets have tested the new software in a simulator. The company said it will cut Max production by 20% as it works on a software fix to get the jets running again. Investigators suspect that faulty data feeding into the aircraft’s MCAS flight system played a major role in the Indonesia and Ethiopia accidents. Investig


The test flights are one prong of a broad effort by Boeing to get the Max back in the air. Boeing says representatives from two-thirds of the 50 airlines that have the Max in their fleets have tested the new software in a simulator. The company said it will cut Max production by 20% as it works on a software fix to get the jets running again. Investigators suspect that faulty data feeding into the aircraft’s MCAS flight system played a major role in the Indonesia and Ethiopia accidents. Investig
Boeing CEO says it’s completed 96 test flights with 737 Max software fix Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: phil lebeau, emma newburger, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, test, completed, system, flights, ceo, 737, software, jets, 96, faa, fix, boeing, max, weeks, flight, grounded


Boeing CEO says it's completed 96 test flights with 737 Max software fix

The test flights are one prong of a broad effort by Boeing to get the Max back in the air. The company is also updating airlines by bringing representatives into flight simulators and showing them how the modified flight control system will feel in the cockpit. Boeing says representatives from two-thirds of the 50 airlines that have the Max in their fleets have tested the new software in a simulator.

“We want everyone to be confident in it and the additional training and educational resources we’re developing and deploying,” Muilenberg said, adding that the last few weeks have been the most “heartwrenching” of his career.

The company will likely submit its plan to fix the Max, which has been grounded since mid-March, to the Federal Aviation Administration and other regulators within the next two weeks, according to people familiar with the matter. Getting those regulators to approve the plan will likely take several more weeks.

“I expect that the airplane is still several weeks away from getting the final seal of approval to be flown again, not so much that the software fix is a problem, but just from an optics standpoint,” said Jeff Guzzetti, former director of the FAA’s accident investigation civision. Guzzetti believes the FAA is stinging from criticism its relationship with Boeing was “too cozy” because the FAA designated Boeing engineers to self-certify parts of the 737 Max before the plane was given final approval in 2017.

Boeing has scrambled to restore faith in its 737 Max after the jet’s anti-stall software was implicated in two crashes in the last five months that killed 346 people and grounded the planes worldwide. The company said it will cut Max production by 20% as it works on a software fix to get the jets running again. They’ve been grounded since mid-March.

Investigators suspect that faulty data feeding into the aircraft’s MCAS flight system played a major role in the Indonesia and Ethiopia accidents. Investigators and lawmakers have scrutinized Boeing’s software system malfunction, from the original design to the training and safety certifications.

When designing the newest Max jets, Boeing allegedly increased the power of the automated system that pushes the plane nose down, making it hard for pilots to regain control of the doomed jets. Changes to the anti-stall system were not fully reviewed by the FAA.

Boeing said Tuesday that deliveries and new orders for all of its 737 jets fell in the first quarter, and earlier in the week, Wall Street analysts downgradedBoeing stock. The company’s shares have have fallen nearly 9 percent in the past month.

WATCH: What the future of FAA oversight may look like


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: phil lebeau, emma newburger, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, test, completed, system, flights, ceo, 737, software, jets, 96, faa, fix, boeing, max, weeks, flight, grounded


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Southwest Boeing 737 Max makes emergency landing in Orlando; FAA cites engine issue unrelated to recent crashes

The crew of a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max declared an emergency shortly after takeoff and returned to Orlando’s main airport on Tuesday after reporting an engine problem, the Federal Aviation Administration said. The FAA grounded this type of aircraft earlier this month following two fatal crashes of the popular model. The FAA on March 13 joined dozens of other countries in grounding the planes, following the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8. The FAA said it is in


The crew of a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max declared an emergency shortly after takeoff and returned to Orlando’s main airport on Tuesday after reporting an engine problem, the Federal Aviation Administration said. The FAA grounded this type of aircraft earlier this month following two fatal crashes of the popular model. The FAA on March 13 joined dozens of other countries in grounding the planes, following the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8. The FAA said it is in
Southwest Boeing 737 Max makes emergency landing in Orlando; FAA cites engine issue unrelated to recent crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: leslie josephs, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recent, returned, unrelated, max, type, 737, faa, makes, southwest, takeoff, flight, landing, passengers, issue, shortly, orlando, engine


Southwest Boeing 737 Max makes emergency landing in Orlando; FAA cites engine issue unrelated to recent crashes

The crew of a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max declared an emergency shortly after takeoff and returned to Orlando’s main airport on Tuesday after reporting an engine problem, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

The FAA grounded this type of aircraft earlier this month following two fatal crashes of the popular model.

Airlines aren’t allowed to fly passengers under the FAA’s order. The Southwest plane, which was not carrying passengers, was bound for Victorville, Calif., where the carrier is storing the aircraft in a facility in the western Mojave Desert.

The FAA on March 13 joined dozens of other countries in grounding the planes, following the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8. All 157 passengers on board were killed and investigators said the crash had “clear similarities” with a Lion Air flight in October, operated by the same type of plane, plunged into the Java Sea in Indonesia, killing the 189 people on board.

The FAA said it is investigating the Southwest incident on Tuesday and that the issue was not related to other concerns about the 737 Max that led the agency to ground the plane.

Southwest Flight 8701, the ferry flight, returned to Orlando International Airport shortly before 3 p.m. EDT after the pilots “reported a performance issue with one of the engines shortly after takeoff,” Southwest said in a statement. “The crew followed protocol and safely landed back at the airport.”

CNBC’s Phil LeBeau contributed to this report.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: leslie josephs, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recent, returned, unrelated, max, type, 737, faa, makes, southwest, takeoff, flight, landing, passengers, issue, shortly, orlando, engine


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Dow futures under pressure again as Boeing shares drop on FAA probe

U.S. stock index futures were mixed on Monday morning, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average under renewed pressure by a drop in shares of Boeing. Dow futures were down 51 points, indicating a slip of 30.87 points at the open. Investors are also awaiting the start of a two-day Federal Reserve policy meeting this week. The Federal Reserve is expected to lower their interest rate forecasts — or “dot plots” — to show little or no further tightening in 2019. There’s also a strong focus on a potentia


U.S. stock index futures were mixed on Monday morning, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average under renewed pressure by a drop in shares of Boeing. Dow futures were down 51 points, indicating a slip of 30.87 points at the open. Investors are also awaiting the start of a two-day Federal Reserve policy meeting this week. The Federal Reserve is expected to lower their interest rate forecasts — or “dot plots” — to show little or no further tightening in 2019. There’s also a strong focus on a potentia
Dow futures under pressure again as Boeing shares drop on FAA probe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: fred imbert, silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, potential, futures, dow, reserve, points, pressure, trade, federal, meeting, shares, strong, faa, probe, stock, drop


Dow futures under pressure again as Boeing shares drop on FAA probe

U.S. stock index futures were mixed on Monday morning, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average under renewed pressure by a drop in shares of Boeing.

Dow futures were down 51 points, indicating a slip of 30.87 points at the open. S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures indicated a higher open, however.

Boeing shares dropped 3 percent in the premarket after the U.S. Department of Transportation launched an investigation into whether there were lapses in the Federal Aviation Administration’s approval of Boeing planes involved in two recent fatal crashes, The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.

Investors are also awaiting the start of a two-day Federal Reserve policy meeting this week.

The U.S. central bank will begin its meeting on interest rates on Tuesday, which ends with a news conference on Wednesday. The Federal Reserve is expected to lower their interest rate forecasts — or “dot plots” — to show little or no further tightening in 2019.

There’s also a strong focus on a potential trade deal between the United States and China. The Chinese Vice Premier, Liu He, spoke via telephone with U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer recently after a report in the South China Morning Post suggested that the two sides have made further progress.

Optimism regarding a potential U.S.-China trade deal boosted the stock market on Friday.

There is also strong attention on oil markets and an OPEC meeting. Russia’s energy minister Alexander Novak told CNBC over the weekend that his country will be fully compliant with OPEC-led supply cuts in the coming weeks.

Market participants are likely to monitor a fresh round of U.S. housing data. The National Association of Home Builders will release its monthly housing market survey at 10 a.m. ET.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: fred imbert, silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, potential, futures, dow, reserve, points, pressure, trade, federal, meeting, shares, strong, faa, probe, stock, drop


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Next-generation satellites gave federal officials key data in Boeing 737 Max investigation

Only a few months after SpaceX launched the last set of Iridium Communications satellites into orbit, the new network is helping deliver critical data to aviation officials. The Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, grounded Boeing’s 737 Max airplanes on Wednesday, after receiving data from air traffic surveillance company Aireon about the deadly crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. Aireon gave “the data transmitted from Flight 302” to support the investigations of the FAA and several othe


Only a few months after SpaceX launched the last set of Iridium Communications satellites into orbit, the new network is helping deliver critical data to aviation officials. The Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, grounded Boeing’s 737 Max airplanes on Wednesday, after receiving data from air traffic surveillance company Aireon about the deadly crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. Aireon gave “the data transmitted from Flight 302” to support the investigations of the FAA and several othe
Next-generation satellites gave federal officials key data in Boeing 737 Max investigation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: michael sheetz, istock editorial, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aviation, satellites, key, investigation, gave, data, aireon, federal, faa, flight, system, max, nextgeneration, company, provide, boeing, officials, statement


Next-generation satellites gave federal officials key data in Boeing 737 Max investigation

Only a few months after SpaceX launched the last set of Iridium Communications satellites into orbit, the new network is helping deliver critical data to aviation officials.

The Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, grounded Boeing’s 737 Max airplanes on Wednesday, after receiving data from air traffic surveillance company Aireon about the deadly crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302.

Aireon’s system piggybacks on Iridium’s network of 75 satellites. Expected to become fully operational in a few weeks, Aireon can track airplanes anywhere on the planet. But the company’s data is already proving to be critical, as Aireon said in a statement to CNBC that “the system was able to capture information associated with Flight 302.”

While Aireon declined to make company officials available for an interview while the investigation is ongoing, the company said it is working with federal officials to provide them with raw data. Even though the Aireon system has not been fully rolled out, the company is able to provide investigators with information about an aircraft’s location, velocity, altitude and more.

“Our sympathies go out to the families of the passengers and crew of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302,” Aireon said in a statement. Aireon gave “the data transmitted from Flight 302” to support the investigations of the FAA and several other aviation authorities, the company said.

Even after dozens of countries grounded Boeing’s 737 Max, the FAA did not. It was only until “actionable data” arrived from Aireon that the FAA made the decision, acting Administrator Daniel Elwell told CNBC.

“We cannot comment on the cause of the tragedy or the outcome of the investigation, only that we have provided the data,” Aireon clarified in its statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: michael sheetz, istock editorial, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aviation, satellites, key, investigation, gave, data, aireon, federal, faa, flight, system, max, nextgeneration, company, provide, boeing, officials, statement


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US airlines cancel flights after FAA grounds Boeing 737 Max jets

That has left airlines scrambling to rebook passengers and reassign planes. American Airlines, which has 24 Boeing 737 Max planes in its fleet of nearly 1,000 aircraft, said it was ferrying those planes to be parked until the FAA order is lifted. It operates about 85 flights out its 6,700 flights a day using the Max. United Airlines has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s, a larger model, in its fleet. Southwest Airlines flies 34 Boeing 737 8s that service about 4 percent of its daily flights.


That has left airlines scrambling to rebook passengers and reassign planes. American Airlines, which has 24 Boeing 737 Max planes in its fleet of nearly 1,000 aircraft, said it was ferrying those planes to be parked until the FAA order is lifted. It operates about 85 flights out its 6,700 flights a day using the Max. United Airlines has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s, a larger model, in its fleet. Southwest Airlines flies 34 Boeing 737 8s that service about 4 percent of its daily flights.
US airlines cancel flights after FAA grounds Boeing 737 Max jets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: leslie josephs, shannon stapleton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flights, 737, airlines, planes, cancel, grounds, travelers, passengers, rebook, boeing, jets, faa, order, max


US airlines cancel flights after FAA grounds Boeing 737 Max jets

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday joined dozens of other countries’ regulators in ordering airlines to ground new Boeing 737 Max planes, citing evidence linking a deadly crash of one of them in Ethiopia over the weekend to a similar fatal flight in Indonesia in October. (You can find more detail on why the planes were grounded here.)

That has left airlines scrambling to rebook passengers and reassign planes. The three U.S. airlines — United, American and Southwest — that have recently added the planes to their fleets, and have more on order, said they will rebook or waive ticket-change fees and fare differences for travelers affected by the FAA’s order, which went into immediate effect.

American Airlines, which has 24 Boeing 737 Max planes in its fleet of nearly 1,000 aircraft, said it was ferrying those planes to be parked until the FAA order is lifted. It operates about 85 flights out its 6,700 flights a day using the Max.

Routes with multiple flights each day, where passengers can more easily be rebooked to another time, are likely to take the biggest hit. Travelers who aren’t booked on the Max may also be affected as airlines deploy their planes to cover other routes with less frequent service.

United Airlines has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s, a larger model, in its fleet. The airline said it expects minimal disruptions from the issue, but it will work with customers if their flights are canceled.

Southwest Airlines flies 34 Boeing 737 8s that service about 4 percent of its daily flights. The carrier does not charge travelers to change their trips, but said passengers booked on canceled Boeing Max flights won’t have to pay the difference in fares to change their dates if it’s within two weeks of their original departure.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: leslie josephs, shannon stapleton
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US grounds Boeing 737 Max planes, citing links between 2 fatal crashes

The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday grounded all Boeing 737 Max jets in the U.S., citing new evidence that showed similarities between two fatal crashes of the popular planes that have killed 346 people in less than five months. New satellite data shows the plane’s movement was similar to the October crash, the FAA’s acting administrator Daniel Elwell told reporters on a call Wednesday. “It became clear the track was very close and behaved similarly to the Lion Air flight,” Elwell t


The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday grounded all Boeing 737 Max jets in the U.S., citing new evidence that showed similarities between two fatal crashes of the popular planes that have killed 346 people in less than five months. New satellite data shows the plane’s movement was similar to the October crash, the FAA’s acting administrator Daniel Elwell told reporters on a call Wednesday. “It became clear the track was very close and behaved similarly to the Lion Air flight,” Elwell t
US grounds Boeing 737 Max planes, citing links between 2 fatal crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: leslie josephs, kevin breuninger, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grounding, 737, reporters, planes, grounds, links, crashes, data, parties, boeing, flight, elwell, faa, told, citing, max, fatal


US grounds Boeing 737 Max planes, citing links between 2 fatal crashes

The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday grounded all Boeing 737 Max jets in the U.S., citing new evidence that showed similarities between two fatal crashes of the popular planes that have killed 346 people in less than five months.

The move marks a stunning turnaround for the U.S., which has stood by the American-made aircraft as dozens of countries around the world grounded the planes.

The crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 on Sunday came less than five months after a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8 — the same type of plane — plunged into the Java Sea minutes into the flight from Jakarta, Indonesia, killing all 189 people on board. Both planes were new, delivered from Boeing just months before their doomed flights.

The FAA said the grounding will remain in effect while it investigates the crash.

“An FAA team is in Ethiopia assisting the NTSB as parties to the investigation of the Flight 302 accident,” it said in a statement.

New satellite data shows the plane’s movement was similar to the October crash, the FAA’s acting administrator Daniel Elwell told reporters on a call Wednesday. The agency also took physical evidence into account, but Elwell declined to elaborate.

“It became clear the track was very close and behaved similarly to the Lion Air flight,” Elwell told reporters on a call Wednesday. “My hope is the FAA, the carriers, the manufacturers and all parties will work very hard to make this grounding as short as possible so that these airplanes can get back up in the sky.”

The agency did not have enough data to warrant grounding the planes earlier, he said. “We are a fact-driven, a data-based organization,” said Elwell. “Since this accident occurred we were resolute in our decision that we would not take action until we had data to support taking action. That data coalesced today and we made the call.”

The Ethiopian Airlines plane’s black boxes, which contain flight data and cockpit voice recordings, will be sent to France for analysis this week, he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: leslie josephs, kevin breuninger, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grounding, 737, reporters, planes, grounds, links, crashes, data, parties, boeing, flight, elwell, faa, told, citing, max, fatal


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