Dow futures under pressure again as Boeing shares drop on FAA probe

U.S. stock index futures were mixed on Monday morning, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average under renewed pressure by a drop in shares of Boeing. Dow futures were down 51 points, indicating a slip of 30.87 points at the open. Investors are also awaiting the start of a two-day Federal Reserve policy meeting this week. The Federal Reserve is expected to lower their interest rate forecasts — or “dot plots” — to show little or no further tightening in 2019. There’s also a strong focus on a potentia


U.S. stock index futures were mixed on Monday morning, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average under renewed pressure by a drop in shares of Boeing. Dow futures were down 51 points, indicating a slip of 30.87 points at the open. Investors are also awaiting the start of a two-day Federal Reserve policy meeting this week. The Federal Reserve is expected to lower their interest rate forecasts — or “dot plots” — to show little or no further tightening in 2019. There’s also a strong focus on a potentia
Dow futures under pressure again as Boeing shares drop on FAA probe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: fred imbert, silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, potential, futures, dow, reserve, points, pressure, trade, federal, meeting, shares, strong, faa, probe, stock, drop


Dow futures under pressure again as Boeing shares drop on FAA probe

U.S. stock index futures were mixed on Monday morning, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average under renewed pressure by a drop in shares of Boeing.

Dow futures were down 51 points, indicating a slip of 30.87 points at the open. S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures indicated a higher open, however.

Boeing shares dropped 3 percent in the premarket after the U.S. Department of Transportation launched an investigation into whether there were lapses in the Federal Aviation Administration’s approval of Boeing planes involved in two recent fatal crashes, The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.

Investors are also awaiting the start of a two-day Federal Reserve policy meeting this week.

The U.S. central bank will begin its meeting on interest rates on Tuesday, which ends with a news conference on Wednesday. The Federal Reserve is expected to lower their interest rate forecasts — or “dot plots” — to show little or no further tightening in 2019.

There’s also a strong focus on a potential trade deal between the United States and China. The Chinese Vice Premier, Liu He, spoke via telephone with U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer recently after a report in the South China Morning Post suggested that the two sides have made further progress.

Optimism regarding a potential U.S.-China trade deal boosted the stock market on Friday.

There is also strong attention on oil markets and an OPEC meeting. Russia’s energy minister Alexander Novak told CNBC over the weekend that his country will be fully compliant with OPEC-led supply cuts in the coming weeks.

Market participants are likely to monitor a fresh round of U.S. housing data. The National Association of Home Builders will release its monthly housing market survey at 10 a.m. ET.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: fred imbert, silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, potential, futures, dow, reserve, points, pressure, trade, federal, meeting, shares, strong, faa, probe, stock, drop


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US airlines cancel flights after FAA grounds Boeing 737 Max jets

That has left airlines scrambling to rebook passengers and reassign planes. American Airlines, which has 24 Boeing 737 Max planes in its fleet of nearly 1,000 aircraft, said it was ferrying those planes to be parked until the FAA order is lifted. It operates about 85 flights out its 6,700 flights a day using the Max. United Airlines has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s, a larger model, in its fleet. Southwest Airlines flies 34 Boeing 737 8s that service about 4 percent of its daily flights.


That has left airlines scrambling to rebook passengers and reassign planes. American Airlines, which has 24 Boeing 737 Max planes in its fleet of nearly 1,000 aircraft, said it was ferrying those planes to be parked until the FAA order is lifted. It operates about 85 flights out its 6,700 flights a day using the Max. United Airlines has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s, a larger model, in its fleet. Southwest Airlines flies 34 Boeing 737 8s that service about 4 percent of its daily flights.
US airlines cancel flights after FAA grounds Boeing 737 Max jets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: leslie josephs, shannon stapleton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flights, 737, airlines, planes, cancel, grounds, travelers, passengers, rebook, boeing, jets, faa, order, max


US airlines cancel flights after FAA grounds Boeing 737 Max jets

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday joined dozens of other countries’ regulators in ordering airlines to ground new Boeing 737 Max planes, citing evidence linking a deadly crash of one of them in Ethiopia over the weekend to a similar fatal flight in Indonesia in October. (You can find more detail on why the planes were grounded here.)

That has left airlines scrambling to rebook passengers and reassign planes. The three U.S. airlines — United, American and Southwest — that have recently added the planes to their fleets, and have more on order, said they will rebook or waive ticket-change fees and fare differences for travelers affected by the FAA’s order, which went into immediate effect.

American Airlines, which has 24 Boeing 737 Max planes in its fleet of nearly 1,000 aircraft, said it was ferrying those planes to be parked until the FAA order is lifted. It operates about 85 flights out its 6,700 flights a day using the Max.

Routes with multiple flights each day, where passengers can more easily be rebooked to another time, are likely to take the biggest hit. Travelers who aren’t booked on the Max may also be affected as airlines deploy their planes to cover other routes with less frequent service.

United Airlines has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s, a larger model, in its fleet. The airline said it expects minimal disruptions from the issue, but it will work with customers if their flights are canceled.

Southwest Airlines flies 34 Boeing 737 8s that service about 4 percent of its daily flights. The carrier does not charge travelers to change their trips, but said passengers booked on canceled Boeing Max flights won’t have to pay the difference in fares to change their dates if it’s within two weeks of their original departure.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: leslie josephs, shannon stapleton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flights, 737, airlines, planes, cancel, grounds, travelers, passengers, rebook, boeing, jets, faa, order, max


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Next-generation satellites gave federal officials key data in Boeing 737 Max investigation

Only a few months after SpaceX launched the last set of Iridium Communications satellites into orbit, the new network is helping deliver critical data to aviation officials. The Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, grounded Boeing’s 737 Max airplanes on Wednesday, after receiving data from air traffic surveillance company Aireon about the deadly crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. Aireon gave “the data transmitted from Flight 302” to support the investigations of the FAA and several othe


Only a few months after SpaceX launched the last set of Iridium Communications satellites into orbit, the new network is helping deliver critical data to aviation officials. The Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, grounded Boeing’s 737 Max airplanes on Wednesday, after receiving data from air traffic surveillance company Aireon about the deadly crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. Aireon gave “the data transmitted from Flight 302” to support the investigations of the FAA and several othe
Next-generation satellites gave federal officials key data in Boeing 737 Max investigation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: michael sheetz, istock editorial, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aviation, satellites, key, investigation, gave, data, aireon, federal, faa, flight, system, max, nextgeneration, company, provide, boeing, officials, statement


Next-generation satellites gave federal officials key data in Boeing 737 Max investigation

Only a few months after SpaceX launched the last set of Iridium Communications satellites into orbit, the new network is helping deliver critical data to aviation officials.

The Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, grounded Boeing’s 737 Max airplanes on Wednesday, after receiving data from air traffic surveillance company Aireon about the deadly crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302.

Aireon’s system piggybacks on Iridium’s network of 75 satellites. Expected to become fully operational in a few weeks, Aireon can track airplanes anywhere on the planet. But the company’s data is already proving to be critical, as Aireon said in a statement to CNBC that “the system was able to capture information associated with Flight 302.”

While Aireon declined to make company officials available for an interview while the investigation is ongoing, the company said it is working with federal officials to provide them with raw data. Even though the Aireon system has not been fully rolled out, the company is able to provide investigators with information about an aircraft’s location, velocity, altitude and more.

“Our sympathies go out to the families of the passengers and crew of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302,” Aireon said in a statement. Aireon gave “the data transmitted from Flight 302” to support the investigations of the FAA and several other aviation authorities, the company said.

Even after dozens of countries grounded Boeing’s 737 Max, the FAA did not. It was only until “actionable data” arrived from Aireon that the FAA made the decision, acting Administrator Daniel Elwell told CNBC.

“We cannot comment on the cause of the tragedy or the outcome of the investigation, only that we have provided the data,” Aireon clarified in its statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: michael sheetz, istock editorial, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aviation, satellites, key, investigation, gave, data, aireon, federal, faa, flight, system, max, nextgeneration, company, provide, boeing, officials, statement


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US grounds Boeing 737 Max planes, citing links between 2 fatal crashes

The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday grounded all Boeing 737 Max jets in the U.S., citing new evidence that showed similarities between two fatal crashes of the popular planes that have killed 346 people in less than five months. New satellite data shows the plane’s movement was similar to the October crash, the FAA’s acting administrator Daniel Elwell told reporters on a call Wednesday. “It became clear the track was very close and behaved similarly to the Lion Air flight,” Elwell t


The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday grounded all Boeing 737 Max jets in the U.S., citing new evidence that showed similarities between two fatal crashes of the popular planes that have killed 346 people in less than five months. New satellite data shows the plane’s movement was similar to the October crash, the FAA’s acting administrator Daniel Elwell told reporters on a call Wednesday. “It became clear the track was very close and behaved similarly to the Lion Air flight,” Elwell t
US grounds Boeing 737 Max planes, citing links between 2 fatal crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: leslie josephs, kevin breuninger, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grounding, 737, reporters, planes, grounds, links, crashes, data, parties, boeing, flight, elwell, faa, told, citing, max, fatal


US grounds Boeing 737 Max planes, citing links between 2 fatal crashes

The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday grounded all Boeing 737 Max jets in the U.S., citing new evidence that showed similarities between two fatal crashes of the popular planes that have killed 346 people in less than five months.

The move marks a stunning turnaround for the U.S., which has stood by the American-made aircraft as dozens of countries around the world grounded the planes.

The crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 on Sunday came less than five months after a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8 — the same type of plane — plunged into the Java Sea minutes into the flight from Jakarta, Indonesia, killing all 189 people on board. Both planes were new, delivered from Boeing just months before their doomed flights.

The FAA said the grounding will remain in effect while it investigates the crash.

“An FAA team is in Ethiopia assisting the NTSB as parties to the investigation of the Flight 302 accident,” it said in a statement.

New satellite data shows the plane’s movement was similar to the October crash, the FAA’s acting administrator Daniel Elwell told reporters on a call Wednesday. The agency also took physical evidence into account, but Elwell declined to elaborate.

“It became clear the track was very close and behaved similarly to the Lion Air flight,” Elwell told reporters on a call Wednesday. “My hope is the FAA, the carriers, the manufacturers and all parties will work very hard to make this grounding as short as possible so that these airplanes can get back up in the sky.”

The agency did not have enough data to warrant grounding the planes earlier, he said. “We are a fact-driven, a data-based organization,” said Elwell. “Since this accident occurred we were resolute in our decision that we would not take action until we had data to support taking action. That data coalesced today and we made the call.”

The Ethiopian Airlines plane’s black boxes, which contain flight data and cockpit voice recordings, will be sent to France for analysis this week, he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: leslie josephs, kevin breuninger, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grounding, 737, reporters, planes, grounds, links, crashes, data, parties, boeing, flight, elwell, faa, told, citing, max, fatal


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FAA administrator on grounding Boeing 737 Max: ‘We didn’t feel global pressure’

The Federal Aviation Administration grounded Boeing 737 Max planes after receiving new data, not because the agency gave into pressure, Acting Administrator Daniel Elwell told CNBC on Wednesday. Earlier, the agency grounded all Boeing 737 Max jets in the U.S. while it investigates the Sunday crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, which killed all 157 people on board. That crash came less than five months after a Lion Air 737 Max 8 plunged into the Java Sea, killing 189 people. Elwell said the F


The Federal Aviation Administration grounded Boeing 737 Max planes after receiving new data, not because the agency gave into pressure, Acting Administrator Daniel Elwell told CNBC on Wednesday. Earlier, the agency grounded all Boeing 737 Max jets in the U.S. while it investigates the Sunday crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, which killed all 157 people on board. That crash came less than five months after a Lion Air 737 Max 8 plunged into the Java Sea, killing 189 people. Elwell said the F
FAA administrator on grounding Boeing 737 Max: ‘We didn’t feel global pressure’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: christine wang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, didnt, grounding, 737, pressure, administrator, ground, planes, aircraft, data, boeing, global, decisions, faa, elwell, order, max, decision, feel


FAA administrator on grounding Boeing 737 Max: 'We didn't feel global pressure'

The Federal Aviation Administration grounded Boeing 737 Max planes after receiving new data, not because the agency gave into pressure, Acting Administrator Daniel Elwell told CNBC on Wednesday.

Earlier, the agency grounded all Boeing 737 Max jets in the U.S. while it investigates the Sunday crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, which killed all 157 people on board. That crash came less than five months after a Lion Air 737 Max 8 plunged into the Java Sea, killing 189 people.

The FAA’s decision to ground the planes marked a stunning turnaround for the U.S., which has stood by the American-made aircraft as dozens of countries around the world ground the planes.

Elwell said the FAA was “certainly aware” of decisions other countries made to ground the planes. But the official emphasized, “We didn’t feel global pressure.”

“As I said, we are a data-driven, action-oriented agency and we don’t make decisions about grounding aircraft or regulating or even shutdown decisions for airports or aircraft without actionable data. And in this case, the actionable data didn’t arrive until today,” Elwell said in an interview on “Closing Bell.”

President Donald Trump told reporters earlier that he was ordering the planes to be taken out of service. He said he made the decision after speaking with Boeing’s CEO, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao and Elwell.

But Elwell clarified that the emergency order grounding the aircraft was not issued by the White House.

“So the decision is an emergency order to ground the airplanes and that is authority rested in the FAA with me,” he said.

While Elwell said he did make the decision, he consulted experts as well as Chao and the White House because of the magnitude of the order.

— With reporting from CNBC’s Leslie Josephs.

WATCH: U.S. grounds 737 Max 8 & Max 9 aircraft


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: christine wang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, didnt, grounding, 737, pressure, administrator, ground, planes, aircraft, data, boeing, global, decisions, faa, elwell, order, max, decision, feel


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Southwest Airlines finally gets FAA approval to fly to Hawaii

Southwest Airlines is finally on its way to Hawaii. The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday approved the low-cost carrier to fly to the islands from the West Coast, Southwest said. The airline needed the FAA to sign off on its plans to fly Boeing 737-800 jets over water for long distances. Southwest plans to fly to the islands from four California cities: Oakland, San Diego, San Jose and Sacramento and fly to Honolulu, Kahului on Maui, Kona, and Lihue on Kauai. Southwest plans to grow i


Southwest Airlines is finally on its way to Hawaii. The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday approved the low-cost carrier to fly to the islands from the West Coast, Southwest said. The airline needed the FAA to sign off on its plans to fly Boeing 737-800 jets over water for long distances. Southwest plans to fly to the islands from four California cities: Oakland, San Diego, San Jose and Sacramento and fly to Honolulu, Kahului on Maui, Kona, and Lihue on Kauai. Southwest plans to grow i
Southwest Airlines finally gets FAA approval to fly to Hawaii Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27  Authors: leslie josephs, scott olson getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, faa, mechanics, service, plans, gets, fly, flying, hawaiian, hawaii, southwest, airline, approval, finally, airlines, islands


Southwest Airlines finally gets FAA approval to fly to Hawaii

Southwest Airlines is finally on its way to Hawaii.

The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday approved the low-cost carrier to fly to the islands from the West Coast, Southwest said.

The airline, which will service Hawaii from several cities in California, will announce when it will start selling tickets to the popular vacation destination in the coming days, it said in a statement.

The low-cost airline has been eagerly waiting for regulators to clear it to fly to the islands, which are a big part of its growth plan this year.

The approval comes as Southwest is locked in a bitter dispute with its mechanics’ union after a surge in out-of-service planes due to mechanical issues that have grounded dozens of jets. The airline and its mechanics have been negotiating a contract for more than six years and the some 2,400 in-house mechanics seek bigger pay raises that what the company has proposed.

Southwest revealed its plan to start flying to Hawaii in October 2017, with an eye on selling tickets by 2018, but the partial government shutdown delayed those plans.

The airline needed the FAA to sign off on its plans to fly Boeing 737-800 jets over water for long distances. Safety inspectors had been flying with Southwest to Honolulu from Oakland, Calif. in recent weeks and met with airline executives to review Southwest’s navigation, maintenance and other procedures.

The airline’s decision to offer service to the Aloha State could make Hawaiian vacations cheaper. In markets where the airline has nonstop service, average one-way fares are $45 lower than in cities without those routes in what’s been dubbed the “Southwest Effect,” a University of Virginia study found.

Southwest plans to fly to the islands from four California cities: Oakland, San Diego, San Jose and Sacramento and fly to Honolulu, Kahului on Maui, Kona, and Lihue on Kauai. The airline also intends to offer service between the islands.

Southwest plans to grow its flying 5 percent this year, and half of that will come from Hawaii, the airline said last month.

That growth comes at the expense of expanding to some international destinations.

“Were it not for Hawaii, we would absolutely be adding some more international routes and augmenting some of our flying,” Southwest CEO Gary Kelly told analysts on an earnings call in January. “So it’s simply a matter of prioritization, and Hawaii, I think, deserves that kind of prioritization. It’s that big of an opportunity.”

Southwest shares were little changed postmarket trading. Shares of Hawaiian Holdings, parent of competitor Hawaiian Airlines, were also flat.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27  Authors: leslie josephs, scott olson getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, faa, mechanics, service, plans, gets, fly, flying, hawaiian, hawaii, southwest, airline, approval, finally, airlines, islands


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US is reportedly investigating Southwest over baggage weight discrepancies

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is investigating Southwest Airlines for widespread failure to accurately track the combined weight of checked bags loaded onto its jets, according to a Wall Street Journal report on Monday. The FAA has not decided whether to impose fines or any other punishment, the report cited people familiar with the investigation as saying. The inaccuracies ranged from a few dozen pounds to more than 1,000 pounds in excess of what the paperwork indicated, sparking dis


The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is investigating Southwest Airlines for widespread failure to accurately track the combined weight of checked bags loaded onto its jets, according to a Wall Street Journal report on Monday. The FAA has not decided whether to impose fines or any other punishment, the report cited people familiar with the investigation as saying. The inaccuracies ranged from a few dozen pounds to more than 1,000 pounds in excess of what the paperwork indicated, sparking dis
US is reportedly investigating Southwest over baggage weight discrepancies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, southwest, program, weight, faa, discrepancies, report, potential, reportedly, safety, loi, investigating, baggage, pounds, spokesman


US is reportedly investigating Southwest over baggage weight discrepancies

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is investigating Southwest Airlines for widespread failure to accurately track the combined weight of checked bags loaded onto its jets, according to a Wall Street Journal report on Monday.

The U.S. aviation safety agency’s year-long civil probe found systemic and significant mistakes with employee calculations and luggage-loading practices, resulting in potential discrepancies when pilots compute takeoff weights, the Journal said, citing government officials and internal agency documents.

The FAA has not decided whether to impose fines or any other punishment, the report cited people familiar with the investigation as saying.

The inaccuracies ranged from a few dozen pounds to more than 1,000 pounds in excess of what the paperwork indicated, sparking disputes between the company and some agency inspectors about potential safety consequences, the report said.

A company spokesman said there is an open Letter of Investigation (LOI) which is a common mechanism for the FAA to document and share safety interests or concerns with an airline.

The airline has not been issued fines and faces no enforcement action regarding its weight and balance program, Southwest spokesman Brandy King said.

“In this case, the LOI addresses an issue that Southwest voluntarily reported to the FAA last year and since that time, Southwest has implemented controls to address weight and balance program concerns, and shared those measures with the FAA,” King said.

The FAA could not be immediately reached for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, southwest, program, weight, faa, discrepancies, report, potential, reportedly, safety, loi, investigating, baggage, pounds, spokesman


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Air traffic controller shortage delays flights at several major US airports

An increase in sick leave among air traffic controllers delayed flights at several major airports in the eastern U.S. on Friday, the Federal Aviation Administration said. Airline executives and aviation workers have warned that the partial government shutdown could roil air travel, causing longer lines, delays and flight cancellations. JetBlue Airways CEO Robin Hayes said on an earnings call on Thursday that “we are close to a tipping point” with federal aviation workers set to miss a second pay


An increase in sick leave among air traffic controllers delayed flights at several major airports in the eastern U.S. on Friday, the Federal Aviation Administration said. Airline executives and aviation workers have warned that the partial government shutdown could roil air travel, causing longer lines, delays and flight cancellations. JetBlue Airways CEO Robin Hayes said on an earnings call on Thursday that “we are close to a tipping point” with federal aviation workers set to miss a second pay
Air traffic controller shortage delays flights at several major US airports Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-25  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airport, major, shortage, controller, faa, delays, controllers, aviation, air, traffic, shutdown, federal, lines, flights, airports, workers


Air traffic controller shortage delays flights at several major US airports

An increase in sick leave among air traffic controllers delayed flights at several major airports in the eastern U.S. on Friday, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

Flights at New York’s LaGuardia Airport, Newark Liberty International Airport and Philadelphia International Airport were delayed on Day 35 of the partial government shutdown. More than 14,000 air traffic controllers and thousands of others federal aviation workers have been deemed essential and have been ordered to work even though they aren’t receiving regular pay due to the impasse between lawmakers and President Donald Trump over funding for a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico.

The FAA had briefly halted flights into LaGuardia and some arriving flights were delayed almost an hour and a half, the agency said. By early afternoon, delays had moderated at Philadelphia and Newark, but had picked up at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, the world’s busiest and a hub of Delta Air Lines, according to the FAA.

“The President has been briefed and we are monitoring the ongoing delays at some airports,” said White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders. “We are in regular contact with officials at the Department of Transportation and the FAA.”

Airline executives and aviation workers have warned that the partial government shutdown could roil air travel, causing longer lines, delays and flight cancellations.

JetBlue Airways CEO Robin Hayes said on an earnings call on Thursday that “we are close to a tipping point” with federal aviation workers set to miss a second paycheck.

Aviation workers, including air traffic controllers, pilots and flight attendants in a joint statement earlier this week said they were worried about safety and security risks as a result of already stretched resources at federal aviation departments.

“We have experienced a slight increase in sick leave at two facilities,” an FAA spokesman said. “We’ve mitigated the impact by augmenting staffing, rerouting traffic, and increasing spacing between aircraft when needed. The results have been minimal impacts to efficiency while maintaining consistent levels of safety in the national airspace system.”

The FAA said the two stations affected by the shortages of workers were in Jacksonville, Florida and in Washington, D.C.

On Thursday, an FAA spokesman said the agency had seen “no unusual increased absenteeism and there are no operational disruptions due to staffing” because of the government shutdown.

The union that represents the federal air traffic controllers “does not condone or endorse any federal employees participating in or endorsing a coordinated activity that negatively effects the capacity of the National Airspace System or other activities that undermine the professional image and reputation of the men and women we represent,” said Paul Rinaldi, president the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, in a statement. “With that said, in the past few weeks, we have warned about what could happen as a result of the prolonged shutdown. Many controllers have reached the breaking point of exhaustion, stress, and worry caused by this shutdown. Each hour that goes by that the shutdown continues makes the situation worse.”

A spike in the absences of Transportation Security Administration screeners has led to longer lines at some of the country’s busiest airports throughout this month. The TSA has said unscheduled absences have been higher than usual because some officers are facing financial strain in the shutdown, which began Dec. 22. TSA said on Friday that officers’ unscheduled absences remain elevated.

For its part, United Airlines, which has the biggest presence of any airline in Newark, said it was working with FAA to minimize delays.

“At this point, we don’t anticipate significant schedule disruptions, but it is another good illustration of the escalating impact of the government shutdown and the need for the federal government to promptly re-open,” the airline said in a statement.

Delta Air Lines said it had about 200 flight delays at LaGuardia Airport on Friday and was working to rebook passengers affected by the delays.

Correction: Headlines for this story were revised to correct that the disruptions stemmed from a shortage of air traffic control workers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-25  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airport, major, shortage, controller, faa, delays, controllers, aviation, air, traffic, shutdown, federal, lines, flights, airports, workers


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FAA says drone sightings temporarily halted traffic into Newark airport

Reports of drone sightings in northern New Jersey temporarily halted arrivals at Newark Liberty International Airport on Tuesday, but normal operations had since been resumed, officials said. The federal agency said information about the drone sightings was turned over to law enforcement. The FAA’s Air Traffic Control System Command Center briefly issued a ground stop at Newark citing “drone activity,” according to a document posted on its website. United Airlines, the largest carrier at Newark,


Reports of drone sightings in northern New Jersey temporarily halted arrivals at Newark Liberty International Airport on Tuesday, but normal operations had since been resumed, officials said. The federal agency said information about the drone sightings was turned over to law enforcement. The FAA’s Air Traffic Control System Command Center briefly issued a ground stop at Newark citing “drone activity,” according to a document posted on its website. United Airlines, the largest carrier at Newark,
FAA says drone sightings temporarily halted traffic into Newark airport Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, temporarily, halted, flights, drone, reports, operations, air, faa, drones, sightings, newark, officials, traffic, airport


FAA says drone sightings temporarily halted traffic into Newark airport

Reports of drone sightings in northern New Jersey temporarily halted arrivals at Newark Liberty International Airport on Tuesday, but normal operations had since been resumed, officials said.

A spokesman from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) earlier said flights into Newark — the 11th busiest U.S. airport — were briefly suspended after two drones were seen flying at 3,500 feet over nearby Teterboro Airport, a small regional airport about 17 miles away that mostly handles corporate jets and private planes.

The federal agency said information about the drone sightings was turned over to law enforcement.

The FAA’s Air Traffic Control System Command Center briefly issued a ground stop at Newark citing “drone activity,” according to a document posted on its website.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operates both the Newark and Teterboro airports, later said on Twitter that normal operations had resumed and that it was coordinating with the FAA and law enforcement authorities as they investigate the incident.

United Airlines, the largest carrier at Newark, said it was aware of the reports of drone activity and was working with the airport and the FAA. It said the impact on its operations had been minimal.

The issue of drones impacting commercial air traffic has taken on new urgency after reports of drone sightings in the United Kingdom impacted air travel.

Earlier this month, flights from London’s Heathrow airport were halted for about an hour after a drone was sighted near Europe’s busiest air hub.

Gatwick Airport, London’s second busiest airport, was severely disrupted in December when drones were sighted on three consecutive days, resulting in about 1,000 flights being canceled or diverted and affecting 140,000 passengers.

Both airports responded to the Gatwick incident by ordering military-grade anti-drone technology.

Earlier this month, the U.S. Transportation Department proposed rules that would allow drones to operate over populated areas and end a requirement for special permits for night use, long-awaited actions that are expected to help speed commercial use.

The Trump administration noted there are nearly 1.3 million registered drones in the United States and more than 116,000 registered drone operators.

But officials say there are hundreds of thousands of additional drones that are not registered.

The U.S. Congress last year gave the Department of Justice and Department of Homeland Security new powers to disable or destroy threatening drones after officials raised concerns about the use of drones as potential weapons.

In September 2017, a small civilian drone struck a U.S. Army UH-60M Black Hawk helicopter near Staten Island, New York. The helicopter landed safely but there was some damage.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, temporarily, halted, flights, drone, reports, operations, air, faa, drones, sightings, newark, officials, traffic, airport


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Small businesses feel shutdown pinch. How to get financial wiggle room

Aircraft delivery company Jet Test and Transport has also seen the effects of the shutdown, due to paperwork that can’t be processed. Jet Test operates the planes as an intermediate party, which requires a one-time authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration. In a Catch-22, the DARs report directly to the FAA, and the FAA inspectors who commission the DARs are unavailable. As a result, Jet Test flights that require special airworthiness certificates are completely unable to operate ri


Aircraft delivery company Jet Test and Transport has also seen the effects of the shutdown, due to paperwork that can’t be processed. Jet Test operates the planes as an intermediate party, which requires a one-time authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration. In a Catch-22, the DARs report directly to the FAA, and the FAA inspectors who commission the DARs are unavailable. As a result, Jet Test flights that require special airworthiness certificates are completely unable to operate ri
Small businesses feel shutdown pinch. How to get financial wiggle room Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-16  Authors: lorie konish, alex wroblewski, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, test, small, feel, businesses, faa, company, financial, wiggle, jet, waiting, shutdown, workers, planes, room, pinch, giordano, fly


Small businesses feel shutdown pinch. How to get financial wiggle room

Aircraft delivery company Jet Test and Transport has also seen the effects of the shutdown, due to paperwork that can’t be processed.

The biggest part of the company’s business, according to managing director Steve Giordano, is transporting aircraft without people or cargo on board. Jet Test operates the planes as an intermediate party, which requires a one-time authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration.

Those authorizations are provided either directly from the FAA or through a designated airworthiness representative, or DAR.

In a Catch-22, the DARs report directly to the FAA, and the FAA inspectors who commission the DARs are unavailable. As a result, Jet Test flights that require special airworthiness certificates are completely unable to operate right now.

For example, the company has two planes in France that are waiting to fly to Brazil, but can’t go anywhere because they are registered with the U.S.

“Right now, it’s cost me $340,000 in revenue, which is probably about $90,000 in profit,” Giordano said of the shutdown’s impact on his bottom line so far.

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The Henderson, Nevada-based company, with eight employees, can still fly foreign-registered planes. But about 80 percent of their business is FAA-related, Giordano said.

“We had a really good year last year,” Giordano said. “We can kind of ride that wave.

“If it drags on more than a month, it’s definitely going to have an impact.”

Even if the shutdown ends today, companies like Tap Rm and Jet Test will likely still have to wait as the respective agencies they’re waiting on work through a backlog of paperwork.

In the meantime, there are steps that owners of small businesses facing a cash crunch may want to consider to help lighten their financial burdens.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-16  Authors: lorie konish, alex wroblewski, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, test, small, feel, businesses, faa, company, financial, wiggle, jet, waiting, shutdown, workers, planes, room, pinch, giordano, fly


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