Moscow deploys facial recognition technology for coronavirus quarantine

Moscow is using facial recognition technology to ensure people ordered to remain at home or at their hotels under coronavirus quarantine do so, the mayor of the Russian capital said on Friday. Sergei Sobyanin, the mayor of Moscow, said some 2,500 people who had landed in the city from China had been ordered to go into quarantine. To prevent them leaving their apartments, the authorities are using facial recognition technology in the city to catch any offenders, he said. “Compliance with the regi


Moscow is using facial recognition technology to ensure people ordered to remain at home or at their hotels under coronavirus quarantine do so, the mayor of the Russian capital said on Friday.
Sergei Sobyanin, the mayor of Moscow, said some 2,500 people who had landed in the city from China had been ordered to go into quarantine.
To prevent them leaving their apartments, the authorities are using facial recognition technology in the city to catch any offenders, he said.
“Compliance with the regi
Moscow deploys facial recognition technology for coronavirus quarantine Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recognition, coronavirus, technology, sobyanin, quarantine, virus, using, facial, deploys, city, moscow, ordered


Moscow deploys facial recognition technology for coronavirus quarantine

Moscow is using facial recognition technology to ensure people ordered to remain at home or at their hotels under coronavirus quarantine do so, the mayor of the Russian capital said on Friday.

Russia has temporarily barred Chinese nationals from entering the country to curb the spread of the virus, but has welcomed Russians who return home with an order to spend two weeks at home, even in the absence of symptoms.

Sergei Sobyanin, the mayor of Moscow, said some 2,500 people who had landed in the city from China had been ordered to go into quarantine. To prevent them leaving their apartments, the authorities are using facial recognition technology in the city to catch any offenders, he said.

“Compliance with the regime is constantly monitored, including with the help of facial recognition systems and other technical measures,” he wrote on his website.

In one case described by Sobyanin, surveillance footage showed a woman who had returned from China leaving her apartment and meeting friends outside. The authorities were able to track down the taxi driver who had taken her home from the airport thanks to video footage, Sobyanin said.

Sobyanin said the city was also forced to carry out raids against possible carriers of the virus, something he said was “unpleasant but necessary.”

The Moscow mayor’s office did not immediately reply to a request for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recognition, coronavirus, technology, sobyanin, quarantine, virus, using, facial, deploys, city, moscow, ordered


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Police to roll out live facial recognition cameras in London

British police are to start operational use of live facial recognition (LFR) cameras in London, despite warnings over privacy from rights groups and concerns expressed by the government’s own surveillance watchdog. “The use of live facial recognition technology will be intelligence-led and deployed to specific locations in London,” the city’s Metropolitan Police said in a statement on Friday. Facial recognition cameras have been deployed in other British cities and shopping centers but their use


British police are to start operational use of live facial recognition (LFR) cameras in London, despite warnings over privacy from rights groups and concerns expressed by the government’s own surveillance watchdog.
“The use of live facial recognition technology will be intelligence-led and deployed to specific locations in London,” the city’s Metropolitan Police said in a statement on Friday.
Facial recognition cameras have been deployed in other British cities and shopping centers but their use
Police to roll out live facial recognition cameras in London Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, live, london, cameras, facial, rights, recognition, privacy, roll, officers, surveillance, using


Police to roll out live facial recognition cameras in London

British police are to start operational use of live facial recognition (LFR) cameras in London, despite warnings over privacy from rights groups and concerns expressed by the government’s own surveillance watchdog.

First used in the capital at the Notting Hill carnival in 2016, the cameras will alert police when they spot anyone on “wanted” lists.

“The use of live facial recognition technology will be intelligence-led and deployed to specific locations in London,” the city’s Metropolitan Police said in a statement on Friday.

“This is an important development for the Met and one which is vital in assisting us in bearing down on violence.”

The cameras will be clearly signposted and officers will hand out leaflets about what is happening.

Facial recognition cameras have been deployed in other British cities and shopping centers but their use has prompted privacy concerns and opponents have questioned the accuracy of the technology.

Last year, a Cardiff man took South Wales Police to the High Court, arguing that his human rights had been breached by officers using automated facial recognition without his knowledge when he was shopping.

The court ruled that using the technology was lawful but civil rights group Liberty are appealing the decision.

Responding to the ruling last September, the government’s Surveillance Camera Commissioner, Tony Porter, said that police should not see it as a “green light” for generic deployment of automated facial recognition.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, live, london, cameras, facial, rights, recognition, privacy, roll, officers, surveillance, using


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IBM chief calls for ‘precision regulation’ on AI that weighs privacy against benefits to society

There does need to be artificial intelligence regulation but it must be thoughtfully crafted to allow for technological advancement, IBM Chair and CEO Ginni Rometty told CNBC on Wednesday. Rometty called on lawmakers to regulate “how the technology is used,” but not necessarily the technology itself. She pointed to facial recognition systems as an example of how such regulation could work. “When you go through an airport to get through safely, to find a criminal, those are good uses of facial re


There does need to be artificial intelligence regulation but it must be thoughtfully crafted to allow for technological advancement, IBM Chair and CEO Ginni Rometty told CNBC on Wednesday.
Rometty called on lawmakers to regulate “how the technology is used,” but not necessarily the technology itself.
She pointed to facial recognition systems as an example of how such regulation could work.
“When you go through an airport to get through safely, to find a criminal, those are good uses of facial re
IBM chief calls for ‘precision regulation’ on AI that weighs privacy against benefits to society Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rometty, liberties, ibm, facial, recognition, precision, calls, privacy, chief, benefits, technology, systems, society, told, regulation, world, weighs


IBM chief calls for 'precision regulation' on AI that weighs privacy against benefits to society

There does need to be artificial intelligence regulation but it must be thoughtfully crafted to allow for technological advancement, IBM Chair and CEO Ginni Rometty told CNBC on Wednesday.

“Precision regulation is what I think is needed because … we’ve got to compete in this world against every country,” Rometty said in a “Squawk Box” interview from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “You want to have innovation flourish and you’ve got to balance that with security.”

Rometty called on lawmakers to regulate “how the technology is used,” but not necessarily the technology itself. She pointed to facial recognition systems as an example of how such regulation could work.

“When you go through an airport to get through safely, to find a criminal, those are good uses of facial recognition,” she said. “To violate your civil liberties, it’s not.”

Beyond civil liberties issues, other concerns around A.I. involve bias in algorithms. A.I. systems use large amounts of data, which could itself be biased, and the people writing the programs can have their own biases.

The issue was highlighted in November when allegations of algorithmic bias were levied against Goldman Sachs and its Apple Card. The investment bank denied the accusations.

Rometty’s comments follow remarks earlier this week from Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai, who told European regulators to take a “proportionate approach” in its A.I. regulation proposals.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rometty, liberties, ibm, facial, recognition, precision, calls, privacy, chief, benefits, technology, systems, society, told, regulation, world, weighs


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Forget the QR code. Facial recognition could be the next big thing for payments in China

Scanning a barcode to make payments in China could soon be a thing of the past, as technology giants such as Tencent are now studying the use of facial and fingerprint recognition for such transactions. Most people in China pay using their mobile phones to scan QR codes — a type of barcode system. They do so via the two most popular mobile payment platforms: Tencent’s WeChat Pay and Alibaba’s payments arm Alipay. “In China, payment methods using QR codes have replaced cash and cards in just five


Scanning a barcode to make payments in China could soon be a thing of the past, as technology giants such as Tencent are now studying the use of facial and fingerprint recognition for such transactions.
Most people in China pay using their mobile phones to scan QR codes — a type of barcode system.
They do so via the two most popular mobile payment platforms: Tencent’s WeChat Pay and Alibaba’s payments arm Alipay.
“In China, payment methods using QR codes have replaced cash and cards in just five
Forget the QR code. Facial recognition could be the next big thing for payments in China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19  Authors: yen nee lee, kevin shalvey
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mobile, using, recognition, codes, wechat, pay, china, facial, payments, thing, forget, system, payment, big, code


Forget the QR code. Facial recognition could be the next big thing for payments in China

Scanning a barcode to make payments in China could soon be a thing of the past, as technology giants such as Tencent are now studying the use of facial and fingerprint recognition for such transactions.

Most people in China pay using their mobile phones to scan QR codes — a type of barcode system. They do so via the two most popular mobile payment platforms: Tencent’s WeChat Pay and Alibaba’s payments arm Alipay.

“In China, payment methods using QR codes have replaced cash and cards in just five years. It’s possible that in the next few years, new and better products could emerge to replace QR codes,” said Greg Geng, vice president of Tencent’s WeChat Business Group, at CNBC’s East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China.

Geng made those comments in Mandarin on Monday, which were translated by CNBC.

WeChat Pay in August introduced its “Frog Pro” system that allows customers to make payments by simply scanning their faces — without the use of their mobile phones. The technology is now being tested in several retail chains in China and came after Alipay rolled out its own facial recognition payment system, the “Dragonfly,” last year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19  Authors: yen nee lee, kevin shalvey
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mobile, using, recognition, codes, wechat, pay, china, facial, payments, thing, forget, system, payment, big, code


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Getting facial recognition right means balancing privacy with security, Chinese tech exec says

Facial recognition technology has been the subject of much controversy due to concerns over public surveillance. With that in mind, an executive at one leading Chinese firm deploying the technology says that getting it right will be something of a balancing act, with considerations around data privacy on the one hand and public security issues on the other. The firm also works with banks, which use its facial identification software at ATMs. Facial recognition companies have been at the heart of


Facial recognition technology has been the subject of much controversy due to concerns over public surveillance.
With that in mind, an executive at one leading Chinese firm deploying the technology says that getting it right will be something of a balancing act, with considerations around data privacy on the one hand and public security issues on the other.
The firm also works with banks, which use its facial identification software at ATMs.
Facial recognition companies have been at the heart of
Getting facial recognition right means balancing privacy with security, Chinese tech exec says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: ryan browne, kevin shalvey
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, privacy, recognition, firm, security, right, public, data, companies, tech, facial, exec, technology, issues, chinese, getting, means


Getting facial recognition right means balancing privacy with security, Chinese tech exec says

Facial recognition technology has been the subject of much controversy due to concerns over public surveillance.

With that in mind, an executive at one leading Chinese firm deploying the technology says that getting it right will be something of a balancing act, with considerations around data privacy on the one hand and public security issues on the other.

“Privacy is one of the major, very sensitive issues nowadays given that the data is increasing very rapidly,” Candy Wu, vice president of Guangzhou, China-based CloudWalk, said during a panel at CNBC’s East Tech West event.

According to a report from the South China Morning Post, CloudWalk’s technology has been used to help Chinese police arrest more than 10,000 criminals over the past four years. The firm also works with banks, which use its facial identification software at ATMs.

Facial recognition companies have been at the heart of a contentious debate over how the technology is deployed in China to monitor citizens. Chinese tech companies including Huawei, Hikvision, Dahua and ZTE supply artificial intelligence-powered surveillance technology for a number of so-called “smart city” projects.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: ryan browne, kevin shalvey
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, privacy, recognition, firm, security, right, public, data, companies, tech, facial, exec, technology, issues, chinese, getting, means


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Microsoft hires Eric Holder to audit AnyVision over use of facial recognition on Palestinians

Microsoft has hired former United States Attorney General Eric Holder to conduct an audit of facial recognition company AnyVision to determine whether it complies with Microsoft’s ethical principles on how the biometric surveillance technology should be used. Under the terms of the deal, Microsoft stipulated that AnyVision should comply with its six ethical principles to guide its facial recognition work: fairness, transparency, accountability, nondiscrimination, notice and consent, and lawful s


Microsoft has hired former United States Attorney General Eric Holder to conduct an audit of facial recognition company AnyVision to determine whether it complies with Microsoft’s ethical principles on how the biometric surveillance technology should be used.
Under the terms of the deal, Microsoft stipulated that AnyVision should comply with its six ethical principles to guide its facial recognition work: fairness, transparency, accountability, nondiscrimination, notice and consent, and lawful s
Microsoft hires Eric Holder to audit AnyVision over use of facial recognition on Palestinians Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: olivia solon, jordan novet, amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, palestinians, hires, surveillance, recognition, holder, facial, anyvision, audit, microsoft, technology, eric, west, work, ethical, principles


Microsoft hires Eric Holder to audit AnyVision over use of facial recognition on Palestinians

Microsoft has hired former United States Attorney General Eric Holder to conduct an audit of facial recognition company AnyVision to determine whether it complies with Microsoft’s ethical principles on how the biometric surveillance technology should be used.

Microsoft’s venture capital arm, M12, invested in AnyVision as part of a $74 million Series A funding round in June. Under the terms of the deal, Microsoft stipulated that AnyVision should comply with its six ethical principles to guide its facial recognition work: fairness, transparency, accountability, nondiscrimination, notice and consent, and lawful surveillance.

The last principle states, “We will advocate for safeguards for people’s democratic freedoms in law enforcement surveillance scenarios and will not deploy facial recognition technology in scenarios that we believe will put these freedoms at risk.”

AnyVision, headquartered in Israel, sells an “advanced tactical surveillance” software system, Better Tomorrow. It lets customers identify individuals and objects in any live camera feed, such as a security camera or smartphone, and then track targets as they move between different feeds.

NBC News reported in October that according to five sources familiar with the matter, AnyVision’s technology has powered a secret military surveillance project that has monitored Palestinians in the West Bank. The project was so successful that AnyVision won Israel’s top defense price in 2018 for preventing “hundreds of terror attacks” using “large amounts of data.”

Human rights activist argued that AnyVision’s work monitoring Palestinians in the West Bank was incompatible with its public statements about ethical standards for facial recognition technology.

“AnyVision’s facial recognition technology is not being used for surveillance in the West Bank or the Gaza Strip, and AnyVision would not allow its technology to be used for that purpose,” said AnyVision in a statement issued to NBC News last month.

The company said that its technology was only used at checkpoints into and out of Israel, “similar to Global Entry in the United States.”

AnyVision disputed the accuracy of the NBC News story published in October, but did not respond to subsequent questions seeking clarifications regarding its use of the technology.

AnyVision did not respond to a request for comment about the Holder audit when contacted Friday.

When NBC News reported on this classified work in October, Microsoft said it took the allegations of surveillance seriously because “they would violate our facial recognition principles,” a company spokesman said.

“If we discover any violation of our principles, we will end our relationship.”

“All of our installations have been examined and confirmed against not only Microsoft’s ethical principles, but also our own internal rigorous approval process,” AnyVision said at the time.

Holder will lead a team of former federal prosecutors at law firm Covington & Burling to carry out the investigation into how AnyVision’s technology is being used.

“They will move quickly, reviewing documents and conducting on the ground interviews with Anyvision employees and others to ensure a full and thorough investigation,” said a Microsoft spokesman in a statement.

In 2017, Uber hired Holder to investigate allegations of sexual harassment published by former employee Susan Fowler. Airbnb hired him the previous year to help develop the company’s anti-discrimination policies, after reports that some Airbnb hosts had rejected African-American and trangender travelers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: olivia solon, jordan novet, amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, palestinians, hires, surveillance, recognition, holder, facial, anyvision, audit, microsoft, technology, eric, west, work, ethical, principles


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Microsoft funded an Israeli firm that surveils West Bank Palestinians, according to NBC News investigation

The American technology company Google is not involved in the project, a spokesman said. The addition of facial recognition technology transforms passive camera surveillance combined with the list of suspects into a much more powerful tool. It’s hard to see how using it on a captive population [like Palestinians in the West Bank] could comply with Microsoft’s ethical principles,” he added. “Microsoft takes these mass surveillance allegations seriously because they would violate our facial recogn


The American technology company Google is not involved in the project, a spokesman said.
The addition of facial recognition technology transforms passive camera surveillance combined with the list of suspects into a much more powerful tool.
It’s hard to see how using it on a captive population [like Palestinians in the West Bank] could comply with Microsoft’s ethical principles,” he added.
“Microsoft takes these mass surveillance allegations seriously because they would violate our facial recogn
Microsoft funded an Israeli firm that surveils West Bank Palestinians, according to NBC News investigation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: olivia solon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, palestinians, technology, facial, ethical, israeli, principles, surveillance, company, firm, anyvision, surveils, west, nbc, bank, recognition, investigation, funded, microsoft


Microsoft funded an Israeli firm that surveils West Bank Palestinians, according to NBC News investigation

Satya Nadella, chief executive officer of Microsoft, speaks during a Microsoft launch event to introduce the new Microsoft Surface laptop and Windows 10 S operating system, May 2, 2017 in New York City. Getty Images

Microsoft has invested in a startup that uses facial recognition to surveil Palestinians throughout the West Bank, in spite of the tech giant’s public pledge to avoid using the technology if it encroaches on democratic freedoms. AnyVision, which is headquartered in Israel but has offices in the U.S., the U.K., and Singapore, sells an “advanced tactical surveillance” software system, Better Tomorrow. It lets customers identify individuals and objects in any live camera feed, such as a security camera or smartphone, and then track targets as they move between different feeds. According to five sources familiar with the matter, AnyVision’s technology powers a secret military surveillance project throughout the West Bank. One source said the project is nicknamed “Google Ayosh,” where “Ayosh” means occupied Palestinian territories and “Google” denotes the technology’s ability to search for people. The American technology company Google is not involved in the project, a spokesman said. The surveillance project was so successful that AnyVision won the country’s top defense prize in 2018. During the presentation, Israel’s defense minister lauded the company — without using its name — for preventing “hundreds of terror attacks” using “large amounts of data.” Palestinians living in the West Bank do not have Israeli citizenship or voting rights but are subject to movement restrictions and surveillance by the Israeli government. Face recognition is possibly the most perfect tool for complete government control in public spaces, so we need to treat it with extreme caution – ACLU’s Shankar Narayan The Israeli army has installed thousands of cameras and other monitoring devices across the West Bank to monitor the movements of Palestinians and deter terror attacks. Security forces and intelligence agencies also scan social media posts and use algorithms in an effort to predict the likelihood that someone will carry out a lone-wolf attack and arrest them before they do. The addition of facial recognition technology transforms passive camera surveillance combined with the list of suspects into a much more powerful tool. “The basic premise of a free society is that you shouldn’t be subject to tracking by the government without suspicion of wrongdoing. You are presumed innocent until proven guilty,” said Shankar Narayan, technology and liberty project director at the American Civil Liberties Union. “The widespread use of face surveillance flips the premise of freedom on its head and you start becoming a society where everyone is tracked no matter what they do all the time.” “Face recognition is possibly the most perfect tool for complete government control in public spaces, so we need to treat it with extreme caution. It’s hard to see how using it on a captive population [like Palestinians in the West Bank] could comply with Microsoft’s ethical principles,” he added. When NBC News first approached AnyVision for an interview, the company’s CEO Eylon Etshtein denied any knowledge of “Google Ayosh,” threatened to sue NBC News and said that AnyVision was the “most ethical company known to man.” He disputed that the West Bank was “occupied” and questioned the motivation of the NBC News inquiry, suggesting the reporter must have been funded by a Palestinian activist group. In subsequent written responses to NBC News’s questions and allegations, AnyVision apologized for the outburst and revised its position. “As a private company we are not in a position to speak on behalf of any country, company or institution,” Etshtein said. Days later, AnyVision gave a different response: “We are affirmatively denying that AnyVision is involved in any other project beyond what we have already stated [referring to the use of AnyVision’s software at West Bank border checkpoints].” AnyVision’s technology has also been used by Israeli police to track suspects through the Israel-controlled streets of East Jerusalem, where three of five residents are Palestinian. One of the company’s technology demonstrations, a video obtained by NBC News, shows what purports to be live camera feeds monitoring people, including children and women wearing hijabs and abayas, as they walk through Jerusalem. AnyVision said this did not reflect an “ongoing customer relationship,” referring to the Israeli police. When AnyVision won the prestigious Israel Defense Prize, awarded to entities found to have “significantly improved the security of the state,” the company wasn’t named in the media announcement because the surveillance project was classified. Employees were instructed not to talk about the award publicly. However, NBC News has seen a photo of the team accepting the prize, a framed certificate that commends AnyVision for its “technological superiority and direct contribution to the prevention of terror attacks.” AnyVision said it does not comment on behalf of “other companies, countries or institutions.” “Many countries and organizations face a diverse set of threats, whether it is keeping students and teachers safe in schools, facilitating the movement of individuals in and out of everyday buildings, and other situations where innocents could face risk,” said the company in a statement. “Our fundamental mission is to help keep all people safe with a best-in-class technology offering, wherever that threat may originate.” The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) declined to comment on “Google Ayosh” or AnyVision’s receipt of the Israel Defense Prize.

Microsoft’s investment

NBC’s investigation, which builds on reporting from Israeli business publication TheMarker, comes at a time when Microsoft is positioning itself as a moral leader among technology companies, a move that has shielded the company from sustained public criticism faced by others like Facebook and Google. The company’s investment in AnyVision raises questions about how it applies its ethical principles in practice. “Microsoft takes these mass surveillance allegations seriously because they would violate our facial recognition principles,” said a Microsoft spokesman. “If we discover any violation of our principles, we will end our relationship.” “All of our installations have been examined and confirmed against not only Microsoft’s ethical principles, but also our own internal rigorous approval process,” said AnyVision. In June, Microsoft’s venture capital arm M12 announced it would invest in AnyVision as part of a $74 million Series A funding round, along with Silicon Valley venture capital firm DFJ. The deal sparked criticism from human rights activists who argued — as Forbes reported — that the investment was incompatible with Microsoft’s public statements about ethical standards for facial recognition technology. While there are benign applications for facial recognition, such as unlocking your smartphone, the technology is controversial because it can be used to facilitate mass surveillance, exacerbate human bias in policing and infringe on people’s civil liberties. Because of this, several U.S. cities, including San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley in California and Somerville, Massachusetts, have banned the use of the software by the police and other agencies. In a December 2018 blog post, Microsoft President Brad Smith said, “We need to be clear-eyed about the risks and potential for abuse” and called for government regulation of facial-recognition technology. He noted that it can “lead to new intrusions into people’s privacy” and that when used by a government for mass surveillance can “encroach on democratic freedoms.” Microsoft also unveiled six ethical principles to guide its facial recognition work: fairness, transparency, accountability, non-discrimination, notice and consent and lawful surveillance. The last principle states: “We will advocate for safeguards for people’s democratic freedoms in law enforcement surveillance scenarios and will not deploy facial recognition technology in scenarios that we believe will put these freedoms at risk.” Microsoft said that AnyVision agreed to comply with these principles as part of M12’s investment and secured audit rights to ensure compliance. “We are proceeding with a third party audit and asked for a robust board level review and compliance process. AnyVision has agreed to both,” said a Microsoft spokesman. Microsoft declined to explain how, exactly, it defined these principles or how it verified AnyVision’s compliance prior to investing. “They seem to believe they can have their cake and eat it, that ethical principles just exist in the abstract and don’t have to engage with real-world politics. But their technologies do, which means that they do,” said Os Keyes, from the University of Washington, who researches the ethics of facial recognition.

‘Our mission is to help keep people safe’

Several former AnyVision employees, who did not want to be named because they had signed non-disclosure agreements and feared retaliation, told NBC News that the company did not adhere to Microsoft’s ethical standards. “Ultimately I saw no evidence that ethical considerations drove any business decisions,” said one former employee. They also described a cut-throat culture, where the pressure to sell technology to corporate, government and military clients overrode moral questions around the application of the technology. All of the former employees NBC News spoke to said they left because of broken promises over bonuses and other compensation and ethical questions over how the technology was being marketed and used in practice. “There’s a certain amount of ‘fake it until you make it’ with startups but let’s just say their definition of the truth is quite a bit more flexible than mine,” said one. Another suggested that AnyVision may have made similar misrepresentations to investors like Microsoft. AnyVision told NBC News that it reviewed all of its customers and use cases for compliance with Microsoft’s ethical standards and found nothing in violation. It did not provide any specific details about the compliance process. “While we are working very hard to meet and beat our commercial KPIs (key performance indicators), it is never at the expense of ethical considerations,” said AnyVision. AnyVision said that staffing changes were a difficult but expected part of being a “rapidly growing startup.” “Fundamentally our mission is to help keep people safe, improve daily life and do so in an ethical manner,” said Etshtein.

AnyVision’s military ties


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: olivia solon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, palestinians, technology, facial, ethical, israeli, principles, surveillance, company, firm, anyvision, surveils, west, nbc, bank, recognition, investigation, funded, microsoft


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Amazon says punishing counterfeiters and regulating facial recognition technology are among its top issues

In a 1,300-word blog post on Thursday, Amazon laid out its position on 11 sensitive matters, where “there is much room for healthy debate and differing opinions.” The topics include minimum wage, climate change, workplace diversity, immigration, regulation, counterfeit sales and data privacy. Warren has lobbied for Amazon, and other big tech companies, to be broken up, and in Europe the company is being investigated to determine if its use of merchant data breaches competition rules. Amazon didn


In a 1,300-word blog post on Thursday, Amazon laid out its position on 11 sensitive matters, where “there is much room for healthy debate and differing opinions.” The topics include minimum wage, climate change, workplace diversity, immigration, regulation, counterfeit sales and data privacy. Warren has lobbied for Amazon, and other big tech companies, to be broken up, and in Europe the company is being investigated to determine if its use of merchant data breaches competition rules. Amazon didn
Amazon says punishing counterfeiters and regulating facial recognition technology are among its top issues Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: eugene kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facial, including, technology, data, used, post, rekognition, warren, issues, regulating, governments, counterfeiters, framework, amazon, punishing, recognition


Amazon says punishing counterfeiters and regulating facial recognition technology are among its top issues

As Amazon expands into a host of new markets and stares down regulators and lawmakers across the globe, the company is spelling out to investors and consumers that it’s well aware of the many controversial issues that lie ahead.

In a 1,300-word blog post on Thursday, Amazon laid out its position on 11 sensitive matters, where “there is much room for healthy debate and differing opinions.” The topics include minimum wage, climate change, workplace diversity, immigration, regulation, counterfeit sales and data privacy.

The post lands at a time when U.S. politicians on both sides of the aisle, including President Trump on the right and Democratic presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders on the left, are taking aim at Amazon for some combination of its size, market power, taxes paid and treatment of workers. Warren has lobbied for Amazon, and other big tech companies, to be broken up, and in Europe the company is being investigated to determine if its use of merchant data breaches competition rules.

Amazon didn’t address antitrust in Thursday’s blog post, but it did say that its facial recognition technology, Rekognition, which has been used to help locate missing children and identify child sex trafficking victims, can be misused and should be quickly put under a regulatory framework by governments.

“We provide guidance to all Rekognition customers, including law enforcement customers, on the technology’s proper use and have a clear Acceptable Use Policy,” Amazon said. “However, we think that governments should act to regulate the use of this technology to ensure it’s used appropriately, and we have proposed guidelines for an appropriate U.S. national legislative framework that protects individual civil rights and ensures that governments are transparent in their application of the technology.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: eugene kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facial, including, technology, data, used, post, rekognition, warren, issues, regulating, governments, counterfeiters, framework, amazon, punishing, recognition


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Goldman evaluating role in China’s Megvii IPO after US blacklist

Goldman Sachs said on Tuesday it was reviewing its involvement in Megvii Technology’s planned initial public offering (IPO) after the U.S. government placed the Chinese artificial intelligence firm on a human rights blacklist. In an emailed statement in response to a request for comment on the Alibaba-backed Megvii IPO, Goldman said it was “evaluating in light of the recent developments.” Goldman is a joint sponsor of the Megvii IPO, alongside Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase, which both declined to


Goldman Sachs said on Tuesday it was reviewing its involvement in Megvii Technology’s planned initial public offering (IPO) after the U.S. government placed the Chinese artificial intelligence firm on a human rights blacklist. In an emailed statement in response to a request for comment on the Alibaba-backed Megvii IPO, Goldman said it was “evaluating in light of the recent developments.” Goldman is a joint sponsor of the Megvii IPO, alongside Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase, which both declined to
Goldman evaluating role in China’s Megvii IPO after US blacklist Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, firm, goldman, intelligence, evaluating, chinas, recognition, blacklist, shanghai, facial, megvii, ipo, role, public, companies


Goldman evaluating role in China's Megvii IPO after US blacklist

An attendee uses his smartphone to record a facial-recognition demonstration on himself at the Beijing Megvii booth at the MWC Shanghai exhibition in Shanghai, China, on June 27, 2019.

Goldman Sachs said on Tuesday it was reviewing its involvement in Megvii Technology’s planned initial public offering (IPO) after the U.S. government placed the Chinese artificial intelligence firm on a human rights blacklist.

The Trump administration said on Monday that Megvii and seven other Chinese companies were targeted because they were implicated in Beijing’s repression of Muslim minority populations in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region in the far west of the country.

In an emailed statement in response to a request for comment on the Alibaba-backed Megvii IPO, Goldman said it was “evaluating in light of the recent developments.” Sources had previously told Reuters the listing was scheduled for Hong Kong in the fourth quarter and might raise as much as $1 billion.

Risk consultants and Silicon Valley lawyers said that other U.S. companies involved with the blacklisted Chinese firms, whether as investors or as underwriters, are also likely to reevaluate their relationships.

Goldman is a joint sponsor of the Megvii IPO, alongside Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase, which both declined to comment.

Goldman had thoroughly evaluated the Megvii deal before initially signing onto it using its usual due diligence process, a person familiar with the matter said.

Known in the artificial intelligence business for its facial recognition platform Face++, Megvii will become the first Chinese AI firm to go public if the deal goes ahead. The company provides facial recognition and other AI technology to governments and companies including Alibaba, Ant Financial, Lenovo Group and Huawei.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, firm, goldman, intelligence, evaluating, chinas, recognition, blacklist, shanghai, facial, megvii, ipo, role, public, companies


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Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World Economic Forum says

Dan Kitwood | Getty ImagesNEW DELHI — Governments need to take people’s privacy into account as more and more countries consider using facial recognition technology to beef up security, said an expert at the World Economic Forum. Facial recognition software is powerful biometric technology that can identify individuals based on digital images or video frames. “Firstly, with the government use of facial recognition technology and then also with the company use of facial recognition.” It’s about a


Dan Kitwood | Getty ImagesNEW DELHI — Governments need to take people’s privacy into account as more and more countries consider using facial recognition technology to beef up security, said an expert at the World Economic Forum. Facial recognition software is powerful biometric technology that can identify individuals based on digital images or video frames. “Firstly, with the government use of facial recognition technology and then also with the company use of facial recognition.” It’s about a
Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World Economic Forum says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, world, forum, data, privacy, controls, recognition, protection, security, india, facial, technology, economic


Facial recognition technology needs controls on its use, World Economic Forum says

A CCTV camera is seen at King’s Cross on August 16, 2019 in London. CCTV cameras using facial recognition are being investigated by the UK’s data protection watchdog. Dan Kitwood | Getty Images

NEW DELHI — Governments need to take people’s privacy into account as more and more countries consider using facial recognition technology to beef up security, said an expert at the World Economic Forum. Facial recognition software is powerful biometric technology that can identify individuals based on digital images or video frames. Artificial intelligence, high-definition surveillance cameras, and remote sensors have made the technology more powerful and expanded the ways it can be used. “The problem’s really two-fold,” Kay Firth-Butterfield, head of artificial intelligence at WEF, told CNBC at the India Economic Summit. “Firstly, with the government use of facial recognition technology and then also with the company use of facial recognition.”

Security or invasion?

The amount of data that can be collected on an individual is massive, and that raises privacy concerns. But there’s also a bigger issue, Firth-Butterfield said. It’s about asking, “when does use (of facial recognition technology) by the government amount to security compared to the invasion of our civil liberties.” She added that governments may argue for the use of facial recognition in airports to stop security risks, but questioned: “Do they need it to, for example, follow us from our house to a street demonstration?”

In a report released Friday, WEF said governments have to act to ensure fair and transparent use of facial recognition systems. They must also include policies that can safeguard individual rights and guide the socially beneficial development of the technology it said. “India has an important role to play to show its political willingness and impetus in doing so.”

Bias in facial recognition

Unlike other types of biometric data collection, such as fingerprints and iris scanning, facial recognition technology can collect information on people without them being aware of it. In some instances, people have been wrongly identified and the World Economic Forum says studies have shown facial recognition to be biased and “performing more poorly on people with darker skin tones and on women.”

Facial recognition technologies are here to stay, and they will get used. Deepankar Sanwalka advisory leader at PwC India

This week, the World Economic Forum was invited to work with India in answering some of those questions around privacy and the use of facial recognition technology.

India’s laws and regulations

In June, India’s Ministry of Home Affairs, through the National Crime Records Bureau, invited bids to build an automated facial recognition system. The system would allow police to match people’s faces — captured on closed circuit cameras — against an existing image database and “generate alerts if a blacklist match is found.” That could help to identify criminals, missing persons or even dead bodies. But the move is said to have angered privacy campaigners because the country’s personal data protection laws are not yet up to par with regulation in other regions, such as the General Data Protection Regulation in Europe.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, world, forum, data, privacy, controls, recognition, protection, security, india, facial, technology, economic


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