Trump says the US needs a ‘fair playing field’ against China’s weaker currency as yuan hits lows of the year

President Donald Trump said China has given itself a “tremendous competitive” advantage by weakening its currency, and the playing field needs to be leveled. Trump made the comments as the Chinese yuan traded near its low of the year against the U.S. dollar. “Even without a fair playing field, we’re winning because the tariffs are putting us at a tremendous competitive advantage.” The Chinese yuan on Monday was near its low of the year, edging closer to 7 to the dollar. Analysts say China had st


President Donald Trump said China has given itself a “tremendous competitive” advantage by weakening its currency, and the playing field needs to be leveled. Trump made the comments as the Chinese yuan traded near its low of the year against the U.S. dollar. “Even without a fair playing field, we’re winning because the tariffs are putting us at a tremendous competitive advantage.” The Chinese yuan on Monday was near its low of the year, edging closer to 7 to the dollar. Analysts say China had st
Trump says the US needs a ‘fair playing field’ against China’s weaker currency as yuan hits lows of the year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, currency, field, fed, playing, trump, chinese, china, tremendous, yuan, needs, hits, lows, fair, say, advantage, weaker, president


Trump says the US needs a 'fair playing field' against China's weaker currency as yuan hits lows of the year

President Donald Trump said China has given itself a “tremendous competitive” advantage by weakening its currency, and the playing field needs to be leveled.

Trump, during a telephone interview with CNBC’s “Squawk Box, ” said the ability of Chinese President Xi Jinping to directly impact monetary policy is an unfair advantage. Trump made the comments as the Chinese yuan traded near its low of the year against the U.S. dollar.

“We should be entitled to have a fair playing field … because our Fed is very, very disruptive to us,” he said. “Even without a fair playing field, we’re winning because the tariffs are putting us at a tremendous competitive advantage.”

Trump said the U.S. decided not to call China a currency manipulator, but he added there are some who say China has offset its tariffs by letting the currency fall.

“Don’t forget, the head of the Fed in China is President Xi. He’s the president of China. … He can do whatever he wants. They devalue, they loosen or you would just say they pump a lot of money into China, and it nullifies to an extent, not fully, it nullifies the tariffs,” Trump said.

Trump has repeatedly voiced his frustration with the Federal Reserve for raising interest rates last year, and now for not cutting them. However, many Fed watchers are now forecasting two rate cuts this year, possibly as soon as July.

The Chinese yuan on Monday was near its low of the year, edging closer to 7 to the dollar. That level has become a line in the sand for markets around the world, and if broken, some strategists say it could trigger a negative reaction in risk markets globally, as investors move to price in a bigger impact from a longer, more contentious trade war.

The offshore currency, or CNH, which trades in Hong Kong and is more impacted by international traders, hit a low of 6.946 to the dollar. The onshore yuan, CNY, more controlled by the Chinese central bank, was just above 6.93 Monday, its lowest since November.

Analysts say China had steadied its currency, as talks proceeded with the U.S., but since talks broke down, the currency has weakened more.

“They devalue their currency. They have for years. It’s up to them at a tremendous competitive advantage, and we don’t have that advantage because we have a Fed that doesn’t lower interest rates. We have a Fed that raises interest rates the day before a bond issue goes out, so we have to pay more money,” said Trump.

The president did say that China is disadvantaged by the cheaper currency on the global market when it buys things like oil.

On Friday, People’s Bank of China Governor Yi Gang told Bloomberg the central bank has refrained from aggressive intervention, and that there is no specific level for the yuan that is important.

“I think the Chinese seem to be accepting a weaker RMB but they’re not causing it,” said Marc Chandler, Bannockburn Global Forex chief market strategist. The Chinese currency is also known as the Renminbi, or RMB.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, currency, field, fed, playing, trump, chinese, china, tremendous, yuan, needs, hits, lows, fair, say, advantage, weaker, president


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Here’s what advisors are telling clients worried about Trump’s China trade-war tweets

It appeared to be a painful start to the week for the stock market, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average tumbling more than 470 points at the open Monday. Yet Carolyn McClanahan, a certified financial planner, in Jacksonville, Florida, received no calls from worried clients. “There’s always something that’s troubling the stock market,” McClanahan said. “This is a man-made crisis that was created by a Trump trade tweet, and it can be ended by a Trump trade tweet, ” he said. Recent research from


It appeared to be a painful start to the week for the stock market, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average tumbling more than 470 points at the open Monday. Yet Carolyn McClanahan, a certified financial planner, in Jacksonville, Florida, received no calls from worried clients. “There’s always something that’s troubling the stock market,” McClanahan said. “This is a man-made crisis that was created by a Trump trade tweet, and it can be ended by a Trump trade tweet, ” he said. Recent research from
Here’s what advisors are telling clients worried about Trump’s China trade-war tweets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: annie nova, douglas holtz-eakin, president of the american action forum, alicia h munnell, director of the center for retirement research at
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, advisors, market, week, telling, funds, trump, trumps, fair, mcclanahan, tweets, clients, stock, china, heres, tradewar, worried, hebner, trade


Here's what advisors are telling clients worried about Trump's China trade-war tweets

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, December 19, 2018.

It appeared to be a painful start to the week for the stock market, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average tumbling more than 470 points at the open Monday.

Yet Carolyn McClanahan, a certified financial planner, in Jacksonville, Florida, received no calls from worried clients.

“There’s always something that’s troubling the stock market,” McClanahan said.

The issue this week? Fear of a trade war erupting after Trump said in a Sunday afternoon Twitter post that the current 10% tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods will rise to 25% on Friday. He also threatened to impose 25% levies on an additional $325 billion of Chinese goods “shortly.”

“It’s the least worry our clients have,” said McClanahan, founder of Life Planning Partners. (The Dow has since erased more than half its losses and was down about 200 points by early afternoon).

McClanahan attributes her and her clients calm to their previous discussions about risk.

“How much risk do you need and want to take?” McClanahan said she asks them annually. “We focus on what the client’s life goals are. You can’t control the market.”

Investors who make decisions in response to the president’s volatility should brace for whiplash, said James W. Paulsen, chief investment strategist of The Leuthold Group, an investment research firm in Minneapolis.

“This is a man-made crisis that was created by a Trump trade tweet, and it can be ended by a Trump trade tweet, ” he said.

Concerns over whether someone’s stocks are over- or undervalued are often needless, said Mark Hebner, president of Index Fund Advisors, which manages $3.9 billion.

“With roughly 10 million buyers and sellers every day, the market is setting the fair price all the time so going forward they’re positioned to get the fair return,” Hebner said.

That reality, of course, is why more people are now investing in index funds today rather than picking individual stocks. Recent research from Morningstar found that in 2018 just 38% of active U.S. stock funds fared better than their passive peer funds.

“This trading game doesn’t help investors,” Hebner said. (McClanahan said her firm transitioned to only passive funds in 2009, after the active funds did worse in the financial crisis.)

Advisors should remind any jittery clients that “news is random,” and that “buyers and sellers react to that news so that the new price positions the buyer to get a fair return,” Hebner said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: annie nova, douglas holtz-eakin, president of the american action forum, alicia h munnell, director of the center for retirement research at
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, advisors, market, week, telling, funds, trump, trumps, fair, mcclanahan, tweets, clients, stock, china, heres, tradewar, worried, hebner, trade


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China calls on New Zealand to provide ‘fair’ investment environment

China postponed a major tourism campaign in New Zealand days before its launch in February. “China also places a high importance on relations with New Zealand and is willing to,” he said. Ardern told Li that she wanted to underline the importance her country placed on its relationship with China. In 2008, New Zealand became the first Western country to sign a free trade agreement with China. “Human rights issues are things that New Zealand routinely raises in our bilaterals with China,” she said


China postponed a major tourism campaign in New Zealand days before its launch in February. “China also places a high importance on relations with New Zealand and is willing to,” he said. Ardern told Li that she wanted to underline the importance her country placed on its relationship with China. In 2008, New Zealand became the first Western country to sign a free trade agreement with China. “Human rights issues are things that New Zealand routinely raises in our bilaterals with China,” she said
China calls on New Zealand to provide ‘fair’ investment environment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-01  Authors: naohiko hatta, pool, kyodo news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meeting, zealand, country, chinese, calls, li, china, fair, investment, zealands, ardern, provide, environment, relationship, huawei


China calls on New Zealand to provide 'fair' investment environment

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang called on New Zealand on Monday to ensure a fair investment environment, as he meet Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern whose country has rejected a bid by Chinese telecom giant Huawei to build a 5G mobile network.

Ardern, on a one-day visit to China, said before meeting Li that she hoped to have a dialogue with Beijing about New Zealand’s intelligence agency’s decision to reject the bid.

Ties with China have been tense under Ardern’s government which has openly raised concerns about Beijing’s growing influence in the South Pacific.

China postponed a major tourism campaign in New Zealand days before its launch in February.

“At present, China-New Zealand ties overall are developing in a stable manner,” Li told Ardern at the start of their meeting in Beijing’s Great Hall of the people, noting New Zealand’s desire for good relations.

“China also places a high importance on relations with New Zealand and is willing to,” he said.

“And we hope that we can aspire to the greatest common denominator regarding each others’ interests and that when each sides businesses invest in each other’s businesses, they can enjoy a fair, transparent, convenient environment.”

Ardern told Li that she wanted to underline the importance her country placed on its relationship with China. In 2008, New Zealand became the first Western country to sign a free trade agreement with China.

“It is one of our most important and far reaching relationships,” she added. “We already enjoy a relationship with an impressive and innovative history and a very impressive future.”

Talking to reporters before the Li meeting, Ardern said she would set out the process New Zealand followed in the Huawei decision, and point out that there had been no political or diplomatic influence in the matter.

“This is an opportunity to have a dialogue to talk about the way the process has been undertaken to date and where it currently stands,” she said, adding that some media reports that suggest Huawei is banned in New Zealand are not true.

The interview with reporters was streamed on New Zealand’s 1NEWS.

Ardern has acknowledged there were complexities in the relationship with China, but has dismissed concerns of a rift with New Zealand’s largest trading partner.

The trip has been trimmed down to a one-day visit in the wake of an attack on two mosques in Christchurch on March 15 that killed 50 people.

Ardern said she also anticipated talks around an upgrade to the free trade agreement which has helped the Asian giant grow to become New Zealand’s largest goods export partner.

New York-based Human Rights Watch called in a letter to Arden last week for her to publicly express concern about the situation in China’s far Western region of Xinjiang when she meets Chinese leaders.

China has faced growing international opprobrium over a controversial de-radicalization program in the heavily Muslim populated Xinjiang, where critics say China is running internment camps.

China strongly denies this and calls them vocational training centers, defending its need to de-radicalize a part of the country where the government has blamed Islamist extremists and separatists for multiple attacks in which hundreds have died in recent years.

Ardern said New Zealand has raised the issue of Uighur Muslims in the past but did not specify if it would be discussed in the meetings on Monday.

“Human rights issues are things that New Zealand routinely raises in our bilaterals with China,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-01  Authors: naohiko hatta, pool, kyodo news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meeting, zealand, country, chinese, calls, li, china, fair, investment, zealands, ardern, provide, environment, relationship, huawei


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Macron visits French farm fair amid rural anger, decline

Macron’s speech at his country’s premier agriculture fair was aimed at assuaging French farmers’ anger at government policies seen as favoring urban elites and neglecting the heartland cherished for producing famed cheeses and wines. Macron proposed using blockchain technology to trace the source of food and putting Europe in the “avant-garde of agricultural technology.” He spoke amid European Union talks on its next agricultural aid plan, a major source of funding for French farmers. He appeale


Macron’s speech at his country’s premier agriculture fair was aimed at assuaging French farmers’ anger at government policies seen as favoring urban elites and neglecting the heartland cherished for producing famed cheeses and wines. Macron proposed using blockchain technology to trace the source of food and putting Europe in the “avant-garde of agricultural technology.” He spoke amid European Union talks on its next agricultural aid plan, a major source of funding for French farmers. He appeale
Macron visits French farm fair amid rural anger, decline Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-23  Authors: ian langsdon, afp, getty images
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Macron visits French farm fair amid rural anger, decline

President Emmanuel Macron pledged Saturday to protect European farming standards and culinary traditions threatened by aggressive foreign trade practices that see food as a “product like any other.”

Macron’s speech at his country’s premier agriculture fair was aimed at assuaging French farmers’ anger at government policies seen as favoring urban elites and neglecting the heartland cherished for producing famed cheeses and wines.

Europe’s “civilization of eating well, of gastronomy, of the art of living” is now threatened by world powers that pursue aggressive trade policies and “consider food a product like any other,” without taking into account environmental, health or culinary concerns, Macron said.

Macron proposed using blockchain technology to trace the source of food and putting Europe in the “avant-garde of agricultural technology.”

He spoke amid European Union talks on its next agricultural aid plan, a major source of funding for French farmers. He appealed for unity at those talks and argued against calls to re-nationalize French farming policy.

“In agriculture just like in many other areas, we must invent a new global deal. Yes, we must be on the offensive, carrying out a deep reform of trade policies,” said Macron, who didn’t shy from engaging in technical conversations with farmers as he walked past their stands. Around midday, Macron was offered a mini hamburger made of Cantal cheese and Salers beef, a famous breed native of central France.

He appealed to French farmers to view their livelihoods in a global context, but many are struggling under day-to-day debt and uncertainty about the future. Macron is seen by many in rural France as epitomizing out-of-touch city elites, and many French farmers want more government help to face growing foreign competition.

Macron is trying to tackle the concerns head-on by spending all day Saturday at the Salon d’Agriculture in Paris, where farmers showcase their livestock, food and wines. He’s meeting with dairy farmers, pork producers, vintners and others.

The yearly Salon has long been a key event of the French political calendar, with French presidents often using the event to test their popularity. Jacques Chirac used to spend whole days at the fair drinking and speaking with farmers while patting their cows. Back in 2008, Nicolas Sarkozy was involved in a spat with man who refused to shake his hand and the former president hit back with an insult.

Security was tight for Macron’s visit Saturday, which came as yellow vest protesters held anti-government protests around Paris and other cities for a 15th straight weekend. Macron, whose approval ratings have bounced back in recent weeks, was booed at last year’s farm fair over plans to ban a popular pesticide and trade deals.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-23  Authors: ian langsdon, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fair, talks, rural, threatened, farmers, food, farm, decline, amid, macron, anger, using, trade, french, visits, policies


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$60 to $70 is a fair price for a barrel of oil, Egypt’s petroleum minister says

There is a fair price for a barrel of oil and OPEC and its non-OPEC partners are close to achieving it through their deal to cut production, according to Egypt’s Petroleum Minister Tarek El-Molla. “It is in the range between $60 and $70 a barrel … somewhere in this bracket of price,” El Molla told CNBC on Sunday when asked if oil prices were at an acceptable level to keep producers and consumers happy. If we see prices go down below a certain price then we will see a slowdown in investments,” he


There is a fair price for a barrel of oil and OPEC and its non-OPEC partners are close to achieving it through their deal to cut production, according to Egypt’s Petroleum Minister Tarek El-Molla. “It is in the range between $60 and $70 a barrel … somewhere in this bracket of price,” El Molla told CNBC on Sunday when asked if oil prices were at an acceptable level to keep producers and consumers happy. If we see prices go down below a certain price then we will see a slowdown in investments,” he
$60 to $70 is a fair price for a barrel of oil, Egypt’s petroleum minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: holly ellyatt, mohd jailanee othman, eyeem, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, barrels, production, fair, million, egypts, barrel, minister, 60, prices, producers, day, petroleum, opec, oil, price, 70


$60 to $70 is a fair price for a barrel of oil, Egypt's petroleum minister says

There is a fair price for a barrel of oil and OPEC and its non-OPEC partners are close to achieving it through their deal to cut production, according to Egypt’s Petroleum Minister Tarek El-Molla.

“It is in the range between $60 and $70 a barrel … somewhere in this bracket of price,” El Molla told CNBC on Sunday when asked if oil prices were at an acceptable level to keep producers and consumers happy.

“If prices of crude increase significantly we would start to see inflation and an exaggeration in the slowdown in consumption from the other side. If we see prices go down below a certain price then we will see a slowdown in investments,” he said.

“So, actually, the fair equation is to have a balanced price between the producers and the consumers whereby each party is happy and to continue the growth of the global economy.”

Egypt is a significant oil and natural gas producer in the Middle East although it’s not a member of OPEC and its output is dwarfed by members of the oil producing group and other non-OPEC producers like Russia.

Egypt is aiming to boost production modestly in 2019, to 670,000 barrels a day, although its output still trails that of others in the region. The latest figures from OPEC’s monthly report in January showed that Egypt’s oil producing neighbors to the west, Libya and Algeria, produced 928,000 barrels a day and a million barrels a day respectively in December. OPEC lynchpin Saudi Arabia produced 10.5 million barrels a day.

OPEC and non-OPEC producers including Russia (collectively known as ‘OPEC plus’) have collaborated in recent years on cutting or increasing their oil production in a bid to stabilize oil prices which have been volatile since 2014.

They last agreed in December to cut oil production by 1.2 million barrels a day in order to put a floor under prices, which have fallen due to rising oil supply and lackluster demand amid an uncertain global growth outlook.

On Monday morning, Brent crude futures were trading at $61.87 a barrel while West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures was trading at $52.25 a barrel. Prices took a dip in the early trading session on Monday after data showed drilling activity in the U.S., now the world’s largest oil producer, had increased again, pointing higher production.

The OPEC-Plus deal has not yet been realized fully with Russia slower to meet the desired output cut. Once the 1.2 million barrel a day cut was reached, El Molla said “I think it will adjust, and reach, the desired outcome of price.”

Speaking to CNBC’s Dan Murphy at the Egypt Petroleum Show, ‘EGYPS, ‘taking place in Cairo, El Molla said oil markets were “somehow close” to a price that can keep both oil producers happy because although oil prices have fallen from peaks of around $114 a barrel in mid-2014, production costs have also fallen with technological advances.

“With the advancement of technology, new ways of producing oil have added new volumes to the market and this technology means you’re reducing the cost per barrel, and what might have been accepted a few years ago back when we were talking about $100, or $90 or $80, a barrel oil wouldn’t be accepted now.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: holly ellyatt, mohd jailanee othman, eyeem, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, barrels, production, fair, million, egypts, barrel, minister, 60, prices, producers, day, petroleum, opec, oil, price, 70


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Trump ‘hasn’t been fair’ to OPEC, Oman’s oil minister says

Oman’s oil minister thinks President Donald Trump has given OPEC some undue flak. “Sometimes he hasn’t been fair,” al-Rumhi told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble while at the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Forum in Abu Dhabi. “Nobody wants volatility, I am sure Trump doesn’t want volatility, because volatility is difficult to manage,” he said. Trump has spent months vocally criticizing the 14-member cartel for its management of oil output, urging the group to keep the taps open and oil prices low. “OPEC i


Oman’s oil minister thinks President Donald Trump has given OPEC some undue flak. “Sometimes he hasn’t been fair,” al-Rumhi told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble while at the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Forum in Abu Dhabi. “Nobody wants volatility, I am sure Trump doesn’t want volatility, because volatility is difficult to manage,” he said. Trump has spent months vocally criticizing the 14-member cartel for its management of oil output, urging the group to keep the taps open and oil prices low. “OPEC i
Trump ‘hasn’t been fair’ to OPEC, Oman’s oil minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-12  Authors: natasha turak, mohammed mahjoub, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thinks, prices, oil, politics, alrumhi, fair, opec, sure, minister, volatility, trump, omans


Trump 'hasn't been fair' to OPEC, Oman's oil minister says

Oman’s oil minister thinks President Donald Trump has given OPEC some undue flak. But echoing other Gulf ministers, Mohammed bin Hamad al-Rumhi stressed his desire to steer clear of political animosity with the American leader, appearing keen to give him the benefit of the doubt.

“Sometimes he hasn’t been fair,” al-Rumhi told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble while at the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Forum in Abu Dhabi. “I’m sure he has good intention too, he thinks he is representing the people of the U.S. and he thinks this is the way to do it.”

“Nobody wants volatility, I am sure Trump doesn’t want volatility, because volatility is difficult to manage,” he said. Trump has spent months vocally criticizing the 14-member cartel for its management of oil output, urging the group to keep the taps open and oil prices low. “OPEC is ripping us off,” Trump said in a tweet last October.

In December, OPEC members along with Russia reached an agreement to cut their crude production by 1.2 million barrels of oil per day from the market in order to stem the fall in prices, something that further drew Trump’s ire.

“Unfortunately there are politics, but sometimes the politics forces people to go to the social media or to CNBC to present their case. And that is the reality of today,” the minister said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-12  Authors: natasha turak, mohammed mahjoub, afp, getty images
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Trump’s trade war unleashes ‘hell’ on some Chinese toy manufacturers

Impact of US-China trade war on the toy industry 2:30 AM ET Wed, 9 Jan 2019 | 02:16The ongoing trade war between Washington and Beijing is weighing on Chinese toy exporters. Even though their products have yet to take a direct tariff hit, exhibitors at the Hong Kong Toys & Games Fair said the tariff battle and heightened tensions are still impacting their business. The two countries are racing to reach an agreement and avert U.S. President Donald Trump’s threat to increase the amount of existing


Impact of US-China trade war on the toy industry 2:30 AM ET Wed, 9 Jan 2019 | 02:16The ongoing trade war between Washington and Beijing is weighing on Chinese toy exporters. Even though their products have yet to take a direct tariff hit, exhibitors at the Hong Kong Toys & Games Fair said the tariff battle and heightened tensions are still impacting their business. The two countries are racing to reach an agreement and avert U.S. President Donald Trump’s threat to increase the amount of existing
Trump’s trade war unleashes ‘hell’ on some Chinese toy manufacturers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: kelly olsen, stringer, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, toy, yao, sze, trade, fair, unleashes, hell, chinese, war, toys, tariffs, trumps, manufacturers, hong, tariff


Trump's trade war unleashes 'hell' on some Chinese toy manufacturers

Impact of US-China trade war on the toy industry 2:30 AM ET Wed, 9 Jan 2019 | 02:16

The ongoing trade war between Washington and Beijing is weighing on Chinese toy exporters.

Even though their products have yet to take a direct tariff hit, exhibitors at the Hong Kong Toys & Games Fair said the tariff battle and heightened tensions are still impacting their business.

They cited uncertainty, the impact of tariffs already placed on some electronics that go into increasingly sophisticated toys and supply chain headaches as U.S. and Chinese negotiators work to forge a deal before a mutually-agreed-upon reprieve on new levies ends in March.

The two countries are racing to reach an agreement and avert U.S. President Donald Trump’s threat to increase the amount of existing tariffs and even expand them to virtually all of China’s exports.

China dominates global toy manufacturing and some companies are Hong Kong-owned, a remnant of the days in decades past when the city was a thriving toy making center, though now most manufacture is on the mainland.

Johnny Sze, director and vice general manager at Hong Kong-based educational toy producer Eastcolight, said that buyers from the United States are increasingly eager to lock in orders ahead of time in case toys end up on the tariff list.

“This year we noticed that we actually have a lot more U.S. customers coming here, which is quite unexpected,” Sze said Wednesday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” referring to the fair, which was slated to end Thursday.

Some at the event, which brought together more than 2,100 exhibitors from 42 countries and regions and is sponsored by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council, said the clash between the world’s two largest economies has clearly hurt industry sentiment.

According to Joe Yao, whose China-based Shantou Subotech Toys employs 500 people and makes precision remote control vehicles, business has declined as the trading companies that buy his wares for export worry about possible future tariffs.

“Hell” is how Yao described the situation Wednesday at his booth at the fair, citing the unease and declining sales as problems. The U.S. market, he said, has been his biggest.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: kelly olsen, stringer, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, toy, yao, sze, trade, fair, unleashes, hell, chinese, war, toys, tariffs, trumps, manufacturers, hong, tariff


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Time magazine says the US ‘remains a free and fair press’

Despite the White House ramping up its rhetoric, the United States remains a free and fair press, Ben Goldberger the assistant managing editor of Time magazine told CNBC on Wednesday. The year 2018 has been marked by manipulation, abuse of truth, along with efforts by governments to instigate mistrust of the facts, the magazine said in an essay when it named killed and imprisoned journalists as Person of the Year for 2018 on Tuesday. “There’s no doubt that the rhetoric from the White House about


Despite the White House ramping up its rhetoric, the United States remains a free and fair press, Ben Goldberger the assistant managing editor of Time magazine told CNBC on Wednesday. The year 2018 has been marked by manipulation, abuse of truth, along with efforts by governments to instigate mistrust of the facts, the magazine said in an essay when it named killed and imprisoned journalists as Person of the Year for 2018 on Tuesday. “There’s no doubt that the rhetoric from the White House about
Time magazine says the US ‘remains a free and fair press’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-12  Authors: harini v, kena betancur, afp, getty images, -ben goldberger, assistant managing editor of time magazine
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rhetoric, goldberger, remains, house, magazine, fair, free, white, states, united, press


Time magazine says the US 'remains a free and fair press'

Despite the White House ramping up its rhetoric, the United States remains a free and fair press, Ben Goldberger the assistant managing editor of Time magazine told CNBC on Wednesday.

The year 2018 has been marked by manipulation, abuse of truth, along with efforts by governments to instigate mistrust of the facts, the magazine said in an essay when it named killed and imprisoned journalists as Person of the Year for 2018 on Tuesday.

“There’s no doubt that the rhetoric from the White House about the demonization of the media as ‘the enemy of the people,’ or the willingness to dismiss anything including credible news reporting as fake news, is incredibly worrisome and chilling,” Goldberger said. “But that said, I return to what I said about the United States — this remains a free and fair press.”

“Journalists here enjoy legal protections that are the envy of those in virtually every other country,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-12  Authors: harini v, kena betancur, afp, getty images, -ben goldberger, assistant managing editor of time magazine
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rhetoric, goldberger, remains, house, magazine, fair, free, white, states, united, press


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Malaysia Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad on Najib Razak’s 1MDB charges

Those charged with stealing money from sovereign wealth fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad will get a fair trial, including former leader Najib Razak, MalaysianPrime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said Monday. Whatever the law says, we accept,” Mahathir told CNBC’s Sri Jegarajah in response to a question about whether Najib can be guaranteed a fair trial. But we want a free judiciary and we hope that they will not be biased,” said the prime minister. Najib has been charged with money laundering offens


Those charged with stealing money from sovereign wealth fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad will get a fair trial, including former leader Najib Razak, MalaysianPrime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said Monday. Whatever the law says, we accept,” Mahathir told CNBC’s Sri Jegarajah in response to a question about whether Najib can be guaranteed a fair trial. But we want a free judiciary and we hope that they will not be biased,” said the prime minister. Najib has been charged with money laundering offens
Malaysia Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad on Najib Razak’s 1MDB charges Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: yen nee lee, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, najib, razaks, mahathir, judiciary, malaysia, law, wealth, charges, mohamad, fair, charged, prime, money, scandal, triali, 1mdb


Malaysia Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad on Najib Razak's 1MDB charges

Those charged with stealing money from sovereign wealth fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad will get a fair trial, including former leader Najib Razak, MalaysianPrime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said Monday.

“We believe in the rule of law. Whatever the law says, we accept,” Mahathir told CNBC’s Sri Jegarajah in response to a question about whether Najib can be guaranteed a fair trial.

“I must admit that, in the previous regime, there is an attempt to fiddle with the judiciary. But we want a free judiciary and we hope that they will not be biased,” said the prime minister.

Najib has been charged with money laundering offenses in relation to the disappearance of billions of dollars from 1MDB. The person said to be at the center of the scandal, Malaysian financier Low Taek Jho, has not been located.

The scandal involved money being illegally transferred across shell companies and individual bank accounts in many countries. The U.S. Department of Justice previously alleged that Najib received $681 million from proceeds misappropriated from a bond issue arranged by Goldman Sachs in 2013.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: yen nee lee, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, najib, razaks, mahathir, judiciary, malaysia, law, wealth, charges, mohamad, fair, charged, prime, money, scandal, triali, 1mdb


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Fair app uses subscription model to promote car ownership

Enter Fair, which is two-year old startup where you choose a used vehicle, get approved and complete the transaction — all on your smartphone app. After selecting a car and linking a bank account, the used car can be picked up at the dealer. According to Painter, Fair has 20,000 customers and is adding 500 a week. Before a driver gets their used car, Fair requires an upfront fee they call a “start payment” that’s “based on the value of each vehicle.” For an additional fee, Painter added that Fai


Enter Fair, which is two-year old startup where you choose a used vehicle, get approved and complete the transaction — all on your smartphone app. After selecting a car and linking a bank account, the used car can be picked up at the dealer. According to Painter, Fair has 20,000 customers and is adding 500 a week. Before a driver gets their used car, Fair requires an upfront fee they call a “start payment” that’s “based on the value of each vehicle.” For an additional fee, Painter added that Fai
Fair app uses subscription model to promote car ownership Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: trent gillies
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, monthly, money, start, used, vehicle, uses, model, fair, app, understand, subscription, fee, ownership, car, painter, promote


Fair app uses subscription model to promote car ownership

What if you need a car, but you have a fear of commitment?

To buy a car, an auto loan locks you in for 5 or 6 years. A lease is a shorter term alternative, but it’s still a 3 year deal. However, there’s a third, even more flexible option: A monthly subscription.

Enter Fair, which is two-year old startup where you choose a used vehicle, get approved and complete the transaction — all on your smartphone app. The service falls somewhere between a long-term car rental, and a shorter term car lease. Today, Fair is available in 22 cities and 12 states, with plans to go national by year’s end.

“What we’re doing is giving mobility without going into debt with a car loan,” Fair founder and CEO Scott Painter told CNBC’s “On the Money” in a recent interview.

“Americans are already at a place where we understand that we pay for what we want to use,” he said, adding that Fair promotes the idea that a car “doesn`t have to require this big burden of debt.”

It’s an idea that’s already got some adherents in car manufactures like BMW, Volvo and Cadillac, all of which are testing their own auto subscription models that give customers more flexibility to acquire new vehicles.

Painter explained that Fair clients pre-qualify on the app by scanning a driver’s license. After selecting a car and linking a bank account, the used car can be picked up at the dealer.

“All the cars that are in the Fair app are located on dealer lots and we partner with dealers,” said Painter, the former CEO and founder of TrueCar and CarsDirect. “Fair actually acquires the vehicle once you select it, and then we enter into an agreement with you as our driver to subscribe to that car. So for dealers this represents a sale.”

According to Painter, Fair has 20,000 customers and is adding 500 a week. He added that the average Fair user is paying a monthly fee of $360 a month. Available vehicles range from a Nissan Versa subcompact for $125 a month, all the way up to a McLaren 570S Coupe (which you can drive away with, if approved), for about $4,000 a month.

Before a driver gets their used car, Fair requires an upfront fee they call a “start payment” that’s “based on the value of each vehicle.” After 3 days or 100 miles, the start payment is non-refundable. And if you want to change your car, each new vehicle requires a new ‘start payment.”

Bundled in the monthly fee is a warranty and standard roadside maintenance. For an additional fee, Painter added that Fair offers month-to-month auto insurance, or drivers can use their own policies.

He specified that Fair makes money when customers “pay month-to-month [and] we generate fee-based revenue” — but accurate pricing of used cars is key to making a profit.

“Actually, the reason we’re able make money at it is because we understand today what a car is worth using data,” Painter said.

“These markets for new and used cars have become so transparent, and we have absolute clarity around what a car is worth, just based on a VIN number and a license plate,” he added. “We can see mileage, age, condition, repair history and understand what that car is worth.”

With its built-in advantages, the subscription model of car ownership is “definitely going mainstream and becoming a true alternative to…the hassle of getting a car loan and going into debt to buy a depreciating asset.”

On the Money airs on CNBC Saturday at 5:30 am ET, or check listings for air times in local markets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: trent gillies
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, monthly, money, start, used, vehicle, uses, model, fair, app, understand, subscription, fee, ownership, car, painter, promote


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