Dolce and Gabbana accused of racism in Chinese ‘chopsticks’ ads

Italian fashion house Dolce and Gabbana has been accused of racism after running three ads showing a Chinese woman being told how to use chopsticks. The series of three videos, entitled “Eating With Chopsticks,” show a woman eating large plates of pizza, spaghetti and a giant Italian cannolo pastry, while a male voiceover tells her what to do. The films were posted on Twitter and Instagram ahead of D&G’s “The Great Show” fashion event to be held Wednesday in Shanghai. But some people have reacte


Italian fashion house Dolce and Gabbana has been accused of racism after running three ads showing a Chinese woman being told how to use chopsticks. The series of three videos, entitled “Eating With Chopsticks,” show a woman eating large plates of pizza, spaghetti and a giant Italian cannolo pastry, while a male voiceover tells her what to do. The films were posted on Twitter and Instagram ahead of D&G’s “The Great Show” fashion event to be held Wednesday in Shanghai. But some people have reacte
Dolce and Gabbana accused of racism in Chinese ‘chopsticks’ ads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrote, chinese, gabbana, chopsticks, woman, accused, fashion, italian, eating, videos, ads, dolce, writing, racism, voiceover, way


Dolce and Gabbana accused of racism in Chinese 'chopsticks' ads

Italian fashion house Dolce and Gabbana has been accused of racism after running three ads showing a Chinese woman being told how to use chopsticks.

The series of three videos, entitled “Eating With Chopsticks,” show a woman eating large plates of pizza, spaghetti and a giant Italian cannolo pastry, while a male voiceover tells her what to do.

The films were posted on Twitter and Instagram ahead of D&G’s “The Great Show” fashion event to be held Wednesday in Shanghai. But some people have reacted angrily to them, with one writing “Orientalism is expressed so explicitly in this ad. It’s very offensive to portrait all Chinese ppl (people) in such a stereotypical way.” Another wrote “This is so stupid and culturally insensitive! Take down this video at once D&G!” and a third said: “This is racist, take it back.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrote, chinese, gabbana, chopsticks, woman, accused, fashion, italian, eating, videos, ads, dolce, writing, racism, voiceover, way


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Amazon and ASOS quizzed by lawmakers over ‘fast fashion’ sustainability

Lawmakers in the U.K. have questioned online “fast fashion” retailers about the impact of their production processes on workers and the environment. Stella Claxton, senior lecturer in fashion management, marketing and communication at Nottingham Trent University, said the UK fashion industry in its current form was “not that environmentally sustainable.” “Thinking about how consumption in Asia is going to rise in the next few years and how UK brands are looking to service those markets. Further


Lawmakers in the U.K. have questioned online “fast fashion” retailers about the impact of their production processes on workers and the environment. Stella Claxton, senior lecturer in fashion management, marketing and communication at Nottingham Trent University, said the UK fashion industry in its current form was “not that environmentally sustainable.” “Thinking about how consumption in Asia is going to rise in the next few years and how UK brands are looking to service those markets. Further
Amazon and ASOS quizzed by lawmakers over ‘fast fashion’ sustainability Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: chloe taylor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fashion, environmental, workers, letters, asos, sustainability, looking, uk, amazon, fast, quizzed, lawmakers, retailers, global, committee


Amazon and ASOS quizzed by lawmakers over 'fast fashion' sustainability

Lawmakers in the U.K. have questioned online “fast fashion” retailers about the impact of their production processes on workers and the environment.

Mary Creagh, chair of the U.K. government’s Environmental Audit Committee, wrote to five online-only fashion retailers — including global firms Amazon and ASOS — to request information on areas including staff wages, the life-cycle of the garments sold, and steps being taken to reduce the environmental and social impact of their businesses.

The committee said it was considering policy recommendations on reducing the harm caused by cheap garment production, and would factor in the retailers’ responses when delivering those recommendations to fellow lawmakers.

Published Friday, letters to Amazon and ASOS asked the retailers how they had ensured that all garment workers are paid the minimum wage; whether they educated suppliers on the cost of U.K. labour; and what recycled materials were used in their products.

Retailers were given a deadline of November 15 to respond to the letters, with MPs suggesting they could ask certain companies to give evidence in parliament.

In a statement on Friday, Creagh said evidence the committee had heard on October 30 from industry experts “raised alarm bells about the fast growing online-only retail sector.”

“Low quality £5 ($6.51) dresses aimed at young people are said to be made by workers on illegally low wages and are discarded almost instantly, causing mountains of non-recycled waste to pile up,” she said.

“We will be calling some of these online retailers in front of the Committee to answer questions, but in the meantime, my letters encourage them to face up to the social and environmental consequences of their business models. We want to know that they are fully compliant with employment law, that garments have a decent life-span, and that profit is not put before environmental damage.”

Stella Claxton, senior lecturer in fashion management, marketing and communication at Nottingham Trent University, said the UK fashion industry in its current form was “not that environmentally sustainable.”

“Coupled with that we have a situation where chasing low prices has led to global supply chains looking for cheaper manufacturing, which is normally in developing countries,” she said. “Thinking about how consumption in Asia is going to rise in the next few years and how UK brands are looking to service those markets. Although it is a UK problem, it is a global problem as well.”

Further evidence raised concern that suppliers in developing countries outsourced to sweatshops or were not paying workers the minimum wage. “Sweatshop” is a term for a workplace that has very poor, socially unacceptable working conditions.

Amazon declined to comment on the issue. In an email to CNBC, an ASOS spokesperson said: “ASOS is looking forward to co-operating with the committee.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: chloe taylor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fashion, environmental, workers, letters, asos, sustainability, looking, uk, amazon, fast, quizzed, lawmakers, retailers, global, committee


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Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


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Fashion giant Ralph Lauren is launching its first streetwear collaboration

Polo Ralph Lauren’s recent Instagram posts include images of its stores lit up in pink, in support of its Pink Pony cancer initiative, photographs of founder Ralph Lauren wearing his signature wide-lapel suits and all-American shots of the Lauren family. Palace’s posts, meanwhile, show images shot by edgy photographer Juergen Teller where models wear smiley-face denim jackets and camouflage pants. The Palace-Polo logo also appeared on three billboards in Tokyo’s Shibuya district, according to in


Polo Ralph Lauren’s recent Instagram posts include images of its stores lit up in pink, in support of its Pink Pony cancer initiative, photographs of founder Ralph Lauren wearing his signature wide-lapel suits and all-American shots of the Lauren family. Palace’s posts, meanwhile, show images shot by edgy photographer Juergen Teller where models wear smiley-face denim jackets and camouflage pants. The Palace-Polo logo also appeared on three billboards in Tokyo’s Shibuya district, according to in
Fashion giant Ralph Lauren is launching its first streetwear collaboration Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pink, fashion, posts, images, worn, giant, lauren, launching, tanju, website, collaboration, streetwear, wear, widelapel, ralph


Fashion giant Ralph Lauren is launching its first streetwear collaboration

Polo Ralph Lauren’s recent Instagram posts include images of its stores lit up in pink, in support of its Pink Pony cancer initiative, photographs of founder Ralph Lauren wearing his signature wide-lapel suits and all-American shots of the Lauren family.

Palace’s posts, meanwhile, show images shot by edgy photographer Juergen Teller where models wear smiley-face denim jackets and camouflage pants.

The Palace-Polo logo also appeared on three billboards in Tokyo’s Shibuya district, according to industry website Business of Fashion, with Palace founders Lev Tanju and Gareth Skewis telling the site that the collection was inspired by pieces they have worn throughout their lives. “It’s the only brand that you can wear to a board meeting, a funeral, and go to the football in — and all in the same day,” Tanju said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pink, fashion, posts, images, worn, giant, lauren, launching, tanju, website, collaboration, streetwear, wear, widelapel, ralph


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Rent the Runway brings high-end fashion to the office with drop boxes at WeWork

Rent the Runway is setting up drop boxes at 15 WeWork locations across the U.S. — the clothing subscription service’s attempt to bring high-end fashion to the office. “We knew there was a demand for creating these drop boxes in other convenient locations,” Rent the Runway COO Maureen Sullivan told CNBC. WeWork’s customers and the general public will have access to the drop boxes, which open on Thursday. Rent the Runway also said it will have pop-up shops full of clothes to rent at a handful of W


Rent the Runway is setting up drop boxes at 15 WeWork locations across the U.S. — the clothing subscription service’s attempt to bring high-end fashion to the office. “We knew there was a demand for creating these drop boxes in other convenient locations,” Rent the Runway COO Maureen Sullivan told CNBC. WeWork’s customers and the general public will have access to the drop boxes, which open on Thursday. Rent the Runway also said it will have pop-up shops full of clothes to rent at a handful of W
Rent the Runway brings high-end fashion to the office with drop boxes at WeWork Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: lauren thomas, scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, locations, office, customers, rent, highend, runway, boxes, brings, stores, subscription, month, drop, wework, fashion


Rent the Runway brings high-end fashion to the office with drop boxes at WeWork

Rent the Runway is setting up drop boxes at 15 WeWork locations across the U.S. — the clothing subscription service’s attempt to bring high-end fashion to the office.

The drop boxes will be set up in six U.S. cities — New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami and Washington, D.C. — allowing customers to more quickly return and order clothing, the companies announced Thursday.

WeWork has over 268,000 members, many of them small entrepreneurs, who share office space at more than 280 locations in 77 cities across the world.

Rent the Runway shoppers normally return items via a box in the mail, which slows down the turnaround time for new orders under the company’s monthly subscription plans. Customers can rent an unlimited number of outfits a month, with any four styles out at any one time, for $159 a month or they can rent just four pieces a month at $89.

“We knew there was a demand for creating these drop boxes in other convenient locations,” Rent the Runway COO Maureen Sullivan told CNBC. “There is a massive opportunity to not only grow our drop-box network … but also to grow mini stores within WeWork.”

WeWork’s customers and the general public will have access to the drop boxes, which open on Thursday. Rent the Runway also said it will have pop-up shops full of clothes to rent at a handful of WeWork locations around the launch of the boxes.

The move will help Rent the Runway, which currently has just five locations — in Chicago, New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. — expand via bricks and mortar without investing in additional stores. The company was started online in 2009 by Jenn Hyman and Jenny Fleiss. The latter joined Walmart in 2017 to help Jet.com founder Marc Lore roll out a new personal shopping start-up known as JetBlack.

Rent the Runway became popular for allowing women to rent designer dresses for special occasions online and receive them in the mail within a few days. More recently, the company’s subscription option — where shoppers pay a fee each month to be able to tap into an “endless wardrobe” — has become more popular.

“Our long-term vision is getting our clothing as close to the customer as possible,” Sullivan said. She wouldn’t count out Rent the Runway opening more of its own standalone stores down the road and said in the meantime the company plans to expand on a much larger scale with WeWork.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: lauren thomas, scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, locations, office, customers, rent, highend, runway, boxes, brings, stores, subscription, month, drop, wework, fashion


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Walmart acquires online lingerie retailer Bare Necessities

Walmart said on Friday it has acquired online lingerie retailer Bare Necessities for an undisclosed amount, its second apparel-focused acquisition in less than two weeks as it seeks deeper inroads into the online fashion space. The deal also reflects a sense of urgency to defend market share. The report estimated Amazon will overtake Walmart as the leading retailer in the apparel category in 2018. Bare Necessities will continue to operate its site as before and will run as a standalone brand, sh


Walmart said on Friday it has acquired online lingerie retailer Bare Necessities for an undisclosed amount, its second apparel-focused acquisition in less than two weeks as it seeks deeper inroads into the online fashion space. The deal also reflects a sense of urgency to defend market share. The report estimated Amazon will overtake Walmart as the leading retailer in the apparel category in 2018. Bare Necessities will continue to operate its site as before and will run as a standalone brand, sh
Walmart acquires online lingerie retailer Bare Necessities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bare, fashion, share, online, necessities, sells, market, retailer, lingerie, acquisition, acquires, category, walmart


Walmart acquires online lingerie retailer Bare Necessities

Walmart said on Friday it has acquired online lingerie retailer Bare Necessities for an undisclosed amount, its second apparel-focused acquisition in less than two weeks as it seeks deeper inroads into the online fashion space.

Walmart last week acquired Eloquii, a fashion startup that sells plus-sized clothing.

The company also tied up with comedian and talk show host Ellen DeGeneres to launch a women’s fashion line in August.

In 2017, the Bentonville, Arkansas based retailer partnered with department store chain Lord & Taylor and started offering its products on Walmart.com. Lord & Taylor is owned by Hudson’s Bay Co.

Walmart also last year bought ShoeBuy, which specializes in footwear and apparel; Moosejaw, which sells outdoor wear; Bonobos, which sells men’s clothing and ModCloth, an online seller of women’s apparel.

Walmart’s string of small fashion-company acquisitions is designed to help the retailer access younger, millennial customers who do not normally shop on its website, and recover ground lost to Amazon.com and others.

The deal also reflects a sense of urgency to defend market share. According to a report from Morgan Stanley, Walmart had 8.6 percent of the U.S. apparel market in 2017, followed by Amazon at 7.9 percent and Target at 4.8 percent.

The report estimated Amazon will overtake Walmart as the leading retailer in the apparel category in 2018.

“The acquisition of Bare Necessities fits well into our broader acquisition strategy, which includes two different types of companies: category leaders … and digital brands that offer unique products,” Denise Incandela, head of fashion, Walmart U.S. eCommerce, said in a blog post.

Bare Necessities will continue to operate its site as before and will run as a standalone brand, she said. The company was founded in 1998 and offers more than 160 brands, including bras, swimwear, shapewear and sleepwear.

Walmart did not offer additional details on the impact of the acquisition to earnings and did not comment on how this buy will bolster its market share in the category.

Noah Wrubel, co-founder and chief executive of the lingerie retailer, will oversee the intimates category on Walmart.com and Jet.com, which Walmart acquired in 2016. Wrubel will also continue to run the Bare Necessities business.

The deal closed on Friday, Walmart said. The retailer’s shares ended up 0.95 percent at $94.81 per share.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bare, fashion, share, online, necessities, sells, market, retailer, lingerie, acquisition, acquires, category, walmart


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Jimmy Choo co-founder is going in new direction with latest shoe line

In 1996 at just 27, Tamara Mellon saw an opportunity when, as an accessories editor at Vogue, she saw promise in an East London Malaysian shoemaker named Jimmy Choo Yeang Keat. Working by himself in his shop, Choo’s high-quality handmade women’s shoes caught the attention of Princess Diana, and his notoriety grew. Sensing that Choo could produce more shoes faster by contracting with Italian factories, Mellon suggested a partnership, and the young Choo agreed. Before long the fashion footwear was


In 1996 at just 27, Tamara Mellon saw an opportunity when, as an accessories editor at Vogue, she saw promise in an East London Malaysian shoemaker named Jimmy Choo Yeang Keat. Working by himself in his shop, Choo’s high-quality handmade women’s shoes caught the attention of Princess Diana, and his notoriety grew. Sensing that Choo could produce more shoes faster by contracting with Italian factories, Mellon suggested a partnership, and the young Choo agreed. Before long the fashion footwear was
Jimmy Choo co-founder is going in new direction with latest shoe line Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: barbara booth, photo courtesy of getty, tamara mellon, -tamara mellon, founder of luxury footwear label tamara mellon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, line, mellon, fashion, saw, cofounder, jimmy, direction, shoe, choo, tamara, luxury, going, shoes, latest, styles


Jimmy Choo co-founder is going in new direction with latest shoe line

In 1996 at just 27, Tamara Mellon saw an opportunity when, as an accessories editor at Vogue, she saw promise in an East London Malaysian shoemaker named Jimmy Choo Yeang Keat.

Working by himself in his shop, Choo’s high-quality handmade women’s shoes caught the attention of Princess Diana, and his notoriety grew. Sensing that Choo could produce more shoes faster by contracting with Italian factories, Mellon suggested a partnership, and the young Choo agreed.

Before long the fashion footwear was being referenced on hit shows like Sex and the City and the Sopranos and paraded up and down the red carpet. In 2014 Jimmy Choo became the first luxury shoe company to go public, and three years later Michael Kors bought the luxury shoe company for $1.2 billion.

Now Mellon is ahead of the curve once again, breaking all the rules of luxury fashion by abandoning seasonal collections and reimagining the shoe industry as an online, direct-to-consumer retailer that produces styles continuously — her namesake Tamara Mellon line features four to six new seasonless styles every month — rather than abiding by the traditional fashion calendar.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: barbara booth, photo courtesy of getty, tamara mellon, -tamara mellon, founder of luxury footwear label tamara mellon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, line, mellon, fashion, saw, cofounder, jimmy, direction, shoe, choo, tamara, luxury, going, shoes, latest, styles


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Target is back to its ‘cheap chic’ roots but has to keep momentum

Walk down the hallway, and it looks like you’ve arrived at an HGTV set with bedrooms, living rooms and kitchens on display. This is the creative hub of Target’s in-house brands — a key part of the retailer’s turnaround. Meetings take place around a dining table in Target’s Made By Design room, which is decked out with kitchen appliances and other utensils from that label. And “Targeters,” as they’re sometimes referred to, arrive back from fashion shows or visits to overseas shops, toting items t


Walk down the hallway, and it looks like you’ve arrived at an HGTV set with bedrooms, living rooms and kitchens on display. This is the creative hub of Target’s in-house brands — a key part of the retailer’s turnaround. Meetings take place around a dining table in Target’s Made By Design room, which is decked out with kitchen appliances and other utensils from that label. And “Targeters,” as they’re sometimes referred to, arrive back from fashion shows or visits to overseas shops, toting items t
Target is back to its ‘cheap chic’ roots but has to keep momentum Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04  Authors: lauren thomas, courtney reagan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, momentum, targets, place, room, cheap, design, roots, creative, fashion, clothing, chic, key, work, target


Target is back to its 'cheap chic' roots but has to keep momentum

Nestled inside Target’s Minneapolis headquarters, racks of unfinished clothes line the walls. In another area, sketches and splotches of color are hung up for inspiration. Walk down the hallway, and it looks like you’ve arrived at an HGTV set with bedrooms, living rooms and kitchens on display. This is the creative hub of Target’s in-house brands — a key part of the retailer’s turnaround.

Scattered throughout, there are chemical mixing labs and an alcove with a handful of 3-D printers. About 550 employees work together to bring roughly 40 private labels, such as Goodfellow & Co. for men’s clothing and Up & Up for cleaning supplies, to life.

Meetings take place around a dining table in Target’s Made By Design room, which is decked out with kitchen appliances and other utensils from that label. And “Targeters,” as they’re sometimes referred to, arrive back from fashion shows or visits to overseas shops, toting items they’ve collected on their journeys. Each week, so-called kid influencers are ushered in and out of the Cat & Jack room to offer feedback on clothing styles being developed for the coming year.

The work taking place throughout this creative space has been key to Target’s latest successes, putting the company in a stronger position following a sales slump in the early 2000s that drove Target into somewhat of an identity crisis. Battling names such as Walmart, Kroger, Kohl’s and increasingly Amazon for market share, Target started to drift away from its fashion and design roots — its “cheap chic” heritage — in the wake of the Great Recession, which thrust many businesses into a rut late in ’08 and ’09.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04  Authors: lauren thomas, courtney reagan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, momentum, targets, place, room, cheap, design, roots, creative, fashion, clothing, chic, key, work, target


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The luxury sector is growing faster than many others and Gucci is in the lead

Gucci and Louis Vuitton are among the fastest-growing brands in the world, with the luxury fashion and accessories sector overall growing by 42 percent since 2017, according to a ranking by consultancy Interbrand. Luxury apparel is the top-performing sector in a list of 100 companies that also includes the technology, consumer-goods, automotive and financial industries. Gucci’s brand value grew the most of any luxury fashion label on the list, up 30 percent to $12.9 billion, while Louis Vuitton


Gucci and Louis Vuitton are among the fastest-growing brands in the world, with the luxury fashion and accessories sector overall growing by 42 percent since 2017, according to a ranking by consultancy Interbrand. Luxury apparel is the top-performing sector in a list of 100 companies that also includes the technology, consumer-goods, automotive and financial industries. Gucci’s brand value grew the most of any luxury fashion label on the list, up 30 percent to $12.9 billion, while Louis Vuitton
The luxury sector is growing faster than many others and Gucci is in the lead Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04  Authors: lucy handley, bertrand guay, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, label, vuitton, list, luxury, sector, louis, billion, gucci, fashion, growing, value, faster, grew, lead


The luxury sector is growing faster than many others and Gucci is in the lead

Gucci and Louis Vuitton are among the fastest-growing brands in the world, with the luxury fashion and accessories sector overall growing by 42 percent since 2017, according to a ranking by consultancy Interbrand.

Luxury apparel is the top-performing sector in a list of 100 companies that also includes the technology, consumer-goods, automotive and financial industries.

Gucci’s brand value grew the most of any luxury fashion label on the list, up 30 percent to $12.9 billion, while Louis Vuitton grew 23 percent to $28.2 billion. The nine luxury brands featured had a combined brand value of $105.8 billion and also included Hermes, Tiffany & Co, Dior and Burberry.

Interbrand credits Gucci’s Chief Executive Marco Bizzarri and its flamboyant Creative Director Alessandro Michele as the reason behind the firm’s growth, with a “shadow committee” of young advisors who have helped the label appeal to a new generation. Meanwhile, Louis Vuitton appointed designer Virgil Abloh as its artistic director for menswear in March, a hire that will bring youth culture to the label.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04  Authors: lucy handley, bertrand guay, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, label, vuitton, list, luxury, sector, louis, billion, gucci, fashion, growing, value, faster, grew, lead


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Virgil Abloh on how Louis Vuitton and Rimowa can reach younger people

When American designer Virgil Abloh landed the job as artistic director of Louis Vuitton menswear, one of the highest profile jobs in fashion, he wanted a younger generation to know “there’s someone listening,” he told British Vogue. The 164-year-old French fashion house owned by the LVMH luxury conglomerate and known for its monogrammed leather goods, hired Abloh in March, with Louis Vuitton Chair and CEO Michael Burke praising his disruptive approach to fashion and popular culture. It’s also t


When American designer Virgil Abloh landed the job as artistic director of Louis Vuitton menswear, one of the highest profile jobs in fashion, he wanted a younger generation to know “there’s someone listening,” he told British Vogue. The 164-year-old French fashion house owned by the LVMH luxury conglomerate and known for its monogrammed leather goods, hired Abloh in March, with Louis Vuitton Chair and CEO Michael Burke praising his disruptive approach to fashion and popular culture. It’s also t
Virgil Abloh on how Louis Vuitton and Rimowa can reach younger people Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-02  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virgil, told, vuitton, lvmh, designer, reach, heritage, rimowa, louis, hired, abloh, younger, fashion


Virgil Abloh on how Louis Vuitton and Rimowa can reach younger people

When American designer Virgil Abloh landed the job as artistic director of Louis Vuitton menswear, one of the highest profile jobs in fashion, he wanted a younger generation to know “there’s someone listening,” he told British Vogue.

The 164-year-old French fashion house owned by the LVMH luxury conglomerate and known for its monogrammed leather goods, hired Abloh in March, with Louis Vuitton Chair and CEO Michael Burke praising his disruptive approach to fashion and popular culture.

It’s also this millennial-friendly style that attracted German brand Rimowa to Abloh, a LVMH majority-owned luggage company that hired the designer to star in a campaign video for its 120th anniversary. The film, released Tuesday, shows Abloh’s musings on travel as he leaves a hotel room and takes a flight.

“My premier position is just to translate brand into current culture… The brands that I choose to work with are usually best in category and they also have some heritage to them,” Abloh told CNBC on the phone as he waited for a flight from Chicago to Paris. “And my goal is to sort of articulate that heritage in a new refreshing way to a younger consumer.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-02  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virgil, told, vuitton, lvmh, designer, reach, heritage, rimowa, louis, hired, abloh, younger, fashion


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