Reebok aims to change perceptions with ad that mixes sport and fashion

With this campaign, we’re breaking convention and offering an alternative point of view on sport and life. We want them to be proud to sport the unexpected,” Boulden said in an online statement published Monday. Peter Reid, CEO and co-founder of ad agency group MSQ Partners, said Reebok needed to be braver in its approach. Reid cited Nike’s “Nothing Beats a Londoner” and Adidas’s “Pogba x Stormzy” films that have a fashion and sport focus. The second is “Back Where we Started,” featuring classic


With this campaign, we’re breaking convention and offering an alternative point of view on sport and life. We want them to be proud to sport the unexpected,” Boulden said in an online statement published Monday. Peter Reid, CEO and co-founder of ad agency group MSQ Partners, said Reebok needed to be braver in its approach. Reid cited Nike’s “Nothing Beats a Londoner” and Adidas’s “Pogba x Stormzy” films that have a fashion and sport focus. The second is “Back Where we Started,” featuring classic
Reebok aims to change perceptions with ad that mixes sport and fashion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, campaign, aims, ad, sport, unexpected, perceptions, reid, mixes, change, fashion, category, reebok, partners, statement


Reebok aims to change perceptions with ad that mixes sport and fashion

“If you look at the marketing coming from our industry over the years, it looks similar. With this campaign, we’re breaking convention and offering an alternative point of view on sport and life. We want consumers to know there is an alternative in the category. We want them to be proud to sport the unexpected,” Boulden said in an online statement published Monday. “These are young people who love to be active, love to be stylish. They want to mix it up and call their own shots. They want to do — and wear — what’s unexpected,” she added.

But Rick Burton, professor of sports management at Syracuse University’s Falk College said he was concerned about a campaign being able to straddle both the sport and fashion community.

“It’s very difficult to be everything to everybody. While it is an exciting piece of film-making that grabs your attention, the ad does not make a sports performance claim nor a fashion claim nor does it articulate a brand benefit. And keep in mind, they’re going up against products like Nike, Under Armour and Adidas on the sports side, and brands like Skechers on the causal comfortable shoe side,” Burton said in a statement emailed to CNBC.

Peter Reid, CEO and co-founder of ad agency group MSQ Partners, said Reebok needed to be braver in its approach. “My one concern is that it doesn’t differentiate Reebok particularly in the category from Nike or even Adidas. In some ways, it is reminiscent of a style which has been a feature of the category in recent times,” he said in an email to CNBC. Reid cited Nike’s “Nothing Beats a Londoner” and Adidas’s “Pogba x Stormzy” films that have a fashion and sport focus.

Reebok’s “Storm the Court” is the first of three ads. The second is “Back Where we Started,” featuring classic Reebok sneaker the Club C, but Reebok did not provide details of the third ad due out later this year. The campaign will run online and on social media as well as on traditional media platforms and was created by agency Venables Bell & Partners.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, campaign, aims, ad, sport, unexpected, perceptions, reid, mixes, change, fashion, category, reebok, partners, statement


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Fashion label Burberry apologizes for ‘suicide’ hoodie

Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week. He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.” The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashi


Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week. He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.” The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashi
Fashion label Burberry apologizes for ‘suicide’ hoodie Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, photo vianney le caer, invision
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fashion, apologizes, tisci, resembling, label, theme, runway, sorry, does, hoodie, burberrys, burberry, suicide, collection, statement


Fashion label Burberry apologizes for 'suicide' hoodie

Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week.

“We are deeply sorry for the distress caused by one of the products that featured in our A/W 2019 runway collection,” Marco Gobbetti, Burberry’s CEO, said in a statement emailed to CNBC.

“Though the design was inspired by the marine theme that ran throughout the collection, it was insensitive and we made a mistake.”

He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.”

The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. It has since been removed from the collection.

Criticism from Liz Kennedy — one of the British fashion house’s own models — led to online backlash. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashion.”

“Riccardo Tisci and everyone at Burberry it is beyond me how you could let a look resembling a noose hanging from a neck out on the runway,” she said. “How could anyone overlook this and think it would be okay to do this especially in a line dedicated to young girls and youth.”

In an emailed statement, Tisci said we was “deeply sorry for the distress” caused by the hoodie.

“While the design was inspired by a nautical theme, I realize that it was insensitive,” he said. “It does not reflect my values nor Burberry’s and we have removed it from the collection. I will make sure that this does not happen again.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, photo vianney le caer, invision
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fashion, apologizes, tisci, resembling, label, theme, runway, sorry, does, hoodie, burberrys, burberry, suicide, collection, statement


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Fashion label Burberry apologizes for ‘suicide’ hoodie

Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week. He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.” The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashi


Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week. He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.” The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashi
Fashion label Burberry apologizes for ‘suicide’ hoodie Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, photo vianney le caer, invision
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, collection, resembling, fashion, apologizes, hoodie, theme, does, label, burberrys, sorry, runway, burberry, tisci, statement, suicide


Fashion label Burberry apologizes for 'suicide' hoodie

Burberry apologized after a hoodie with ropes resembling a noose was featured in a catwalk event at London Fashion Week.

“We are deeply sorry for the distress caused by one of the products that featured in our A/W 2019 runway collection,” Marco Gobbetti, Burberry’s CEO, said in a statement emailed to CNBC.

“Though the design was inspired by the marine theme that ran throughout the collection, it was insensitive and we made a mistake.”

He added that Burberry would “reflect on this, learn from it, and put in place all necessary actions to ensure it does not happen again.”

The hoodie was one of the items unveiled in the Tempest collection in a show presented by Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer Riccardo Tisci on Sunday. It has since been removed from the collection.

Criticism from Liz Kennedy — one of the British fashion house’s own models — led to online backlash. Kennedy blasted the brand in an Instagram post this week, saying that “suicide is not fashion.”

“Riccardo Tisci and everyone at Burberry it is beyond me how you could let a look resembling a noose hanging from a neck out on the runway,” she said. “How could anyone overlook this and think it would be okay to do this especially in a line dedicated to young girls and youth.”

In an emailed statement, Tisci said we was “deeply sorry for the distress” caused by the hoodie.

“While the design was inspired by a nautical theme, I realize that it was insensitive,” he said. “It does not reflect my values nor Burberry’s and we have removed it from the collection. I will make sure that this does not happen again.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, photo vianney le caer, invision
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, collection, resembling, fashion, apologizes, hoodie, theme, does, label, burberrys, sorry, runway, burberry, tisci, statement, suicide


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Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85

Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85. Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerf


Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85. Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerf
Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: lucy handley, stephane cardinale – corbis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lvmh, legendary, designer, 85, release, talent, age, dies, lagerfeld, creative, karl, fashion, chanel, lost, fendi


Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85

Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85.

He passed away after a short illness, a statement given to Reuters said.

Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Regarding Gabrielle Chanel, he said, ‘My job is not to do what she did, but what she would have done. The good thing about Chanel is it is an idea you can adapt to many things,'” the release added.

Alain Wertheimer, Chanel’s chief executive, said in the release: “Today, not only have I lost a friend, but we have all lost an extraordinary creative mind to whom I gave carte blanche in the early 1980s to reinvent the brand.”

Tributes poured in from the world of haute couture.

Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerfeld a “creative genius.” Lagerfeld led Chanel’s design and had been the creative head at Fendi since 1965.

“With the passing of Karl Lagerfeld we have lost a creative genius who helped to make Paris the fashion capital of the world and Fendi one of the most innovative Italian houses. We owe him a great deal: his taste and talent were the most exceptional I have ever known. Artistic director of Jean Patou in 1959, creator of Fendi since 1965, member of the LVMH Prize jury since its creation in 2013, he honored the LVMH group with an extraordinarily stimulating creative and entrepreneurial friendship,” Arnault said.

New York Times fashion critic Vanessa Friedman tweeted: “In honor of Karl Lagerfeld, who died today, some of his indelible quotes and quips: ‘Sweatpants are a sign of defeat;’ ‘I’m very much down to earth. Just not this earth;'”

Italian designer Donatella Versace also praised Lagerfeld’s talent, writing on Instagram: “Karl your genius touched the lives of so many, especially Gianni and I. We will never forget your incredible talent and endless inspiration. We were always learning from you.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: lucy handley, stephane cardinale – corbis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lvmh, legendary, designer, 85, release, talent, age, dies, lagerfeld, creative, karl, fashion, chanel, lost, fendi


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Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85

Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85. Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerf


Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85. Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerf
Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: lucy handley, stephane cardinale – corbis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fendi, fashion, legendary, creative, dies, 85, lost, talent, age, chanel, lagerfeld, lvmh, karl, release, designer


Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85

Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85.

He passed away after a short illness, a statement given to Reuters said.

Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Regarding Gabrielle Chanel, he said, ‘My job is not to do what she did, but what she would have done. The good thing about Chanel is it is an idea you can adapt to many things,'” the release added.

Alain Wertheimer, Chanel’s chief executive, said in the release: “Today, not only have I lost a friend, but we have all lost an extraordinary creative mind to whom I gave carte blanche in the early 1980s to reinvent the brand.”

Tributes poured in from the world of haute couture.

Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerfeld a “creative genius.” Lagerfeld led Chanel’s design and had been the creative head at Fendi since 1965.

“With the passing of Karl Lagerfeld we have lost a creative genius who helped to make Paris the fashion capital of the world and Fendi one of the most innovative Italian houses. We owe him a great deal: his taste and talent were the most exceptional I have ever known. Artistic director of Jean Patou in 1959, creator of Fendi since 1965, member of the LVMH Prize jury since its creation in 2013, he honored the LVMH group with an extraordinarily stimulating creative and entrepreneurial friendship,” Arnault said.

New York Times fashion critic Vanessa Friedman tweeted: “In honor of Karl Lagerfeld, who died today, some of his indelible quotes and quips: ‘Sweatpants are a sign of defeat;’ ‘I’m very much down to earth. Just not this earth;'”

Italian designer Donatella Versace also praised Lagerfeld’s talent, writing on Instagram: “Karl your genius touched the lives of so many, especially Gianni and I. We will never forget your incredible talent and endless inspiration. We were always learning from you.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: lucy handley, stephane cardinale – corbis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fendi, fashion, legendary, creative, dies, 85, lost, talent, age, chanel, lagerfeld, lvmh, karl, release, designer


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Jeans you can lease instead of buying? How fashion is coming to terms with sustainability

According to a submission from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, in 2015 the global fashion industry generated 1.2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the Netherlands, a business called Mud Jeans wants to produce jeans in a sustainable manner using organic cotton and recycled denim. “Energy efficiency is very high up on our agenda,” Eva Engelen, who works on corporate social responsibility at Mud Jeans, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.” In a bid to prevent waste in the clothin


According to a submission from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, in 2015 the global fashion industry generated 1.2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the Netherlands, a business called Mud Jeans wants to produce jeans in a sustainable manner using organic cotton and recycled denim. “Energy efficiency is very high up on our agenda,” Eva Engelen, who works on corporate social responsibility at Mud Jeans, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.” In a bid to prevent waste in the clothin
Jeans you can lease instead of buying? How fashion is coming to terms with sustainability Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coming, sustainability, energy, clothing, terms, fashion, told, mud, buying, productivity, lease, industry, jeans, instead, added, sustainable


Jeans you can lease instead of buying? How fashion is coming to terms with sustainability

For many of us, the availability of cheap, mass-produced clothing is a blessing. For a few dollars we can bulk buy everything from shirts and shorts to pants, underwear and sweaters.

While “fast fashion” may be a boon for our wallets because of its value, its impact on the environment is significant.

In October 2018, the U.K. Parliament’s Environmental Audit Committee highlighted just how much our appetite for clothing affects the planet, publishing submissions it had received from experts for an inquiry into the sustainability of the fashion industry.

The findings make sobering reading. According to a submission from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, in 2015 the global fashion industry generated 1.2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. This represents more emissions than maritime shipping and international flights combined, the submission added. In 2017, the European Union said that the EU textile industry produced an estimated 16 million tons of waste annually.

In the Netherlands, a business called Mud Jeans wants to produce jeans in a sustainable manner using organic cotton and recycled denim. The company’s goal is to eventually design jeans produced from 100 percent recycled denim.

When it comes to the manufacturing process, it is also looking to use sustainable methods.

“Energy efficiency is very high up on our agenda,” Eva Engelen, who works on corporate social responsibility at Mud Jeans, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.” “We do this through prioritizing energy efficient production processes and supply chain partners.”

“For example, our fabric mill, Tejidos Royo, they have an energy generation system … in their factory, which uses the steam from the production lines to produce energy through a steam turbine,” she added. Engelen explained that the system allowed the site to be “100 percent self-sufficient with regards to energy.”

In a bid to prevent waste in the clothing industry, Mud Jeans has also developed a leasing system for its products, through which customers can pay 12 monthly instalments of 7.50 euros ($8.51).

At the end of that period, they can decide to keep the jeans or send them back to the business. Mud Jeans’ CEO Bert van Son told CNBC that if the latter took place, “we promise that we will use the raw material again.”

Looking at the broader picture, work still needs to be done to ensure that the fashion sector becomes sustainable.

“The clothing industry is recognized as possibly the second most polluting industry globally,” Steve Evans, director of research in industrial sustainability at the University of Cambridge’s Institute of Manufacturing, told CNBC.

“It knows this and it’s energetic in trying to change it,” Evans added. “It’s a very convoluted industry though: The brands don’t own their own factories, so their ability to influence what the factories do, how they create pollution in their local water, air and land, is difficult.”

Evans added that well-known brands were becoming more sustainable every year. Issues will not be sorted out overnight, however.

“Most factories and industries around the world are pushing very hard to make sure that their products arrive to consumers at the lowest possible cost,” Evans went on to explain. “You love them for doing that for you,” he added.

“Unfortunately, it means that they’re really focusing hard on labor productivity and capital productivity and they’ve put less attention on things like energy productivity. With 200 years of not tackling energy productivity, that gives them a really juicy thing to squeeze and if they do tackle it they can go a long way very quickly.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coming, sustainability, energy, clothing, terms, fashion, told, mud, buying, productivity, lease, industry, jeans, instead, added, sustainable


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Watches falling out of favor, Capri CEO says, sending shares of Fossil, Movado lower

The parent company of Michael Kors, Versace and Jimmy Choo is seeing weakness in sales of fashion watches. “[The] fashion watch category continues to see declines globally, and we are being impacted by this secular trend,” Idol said on the fiscal third-quarter conference call. In its holiday sales release, Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette noted weak watch sales, among several other categories. The earlier hints of watch weakness could be a warning sign ahead of other retailers’ earnings reports still to


The parent company of Michael Kors, Versace and Jimmy Choo is seeing weakness in sales of fashion watches. “[The] fashion watch category continues to see declines globally, and we are being impacted by this secular trend,” Idol said on the fiscal third-quarter conference call. In its holiday sales release, Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette noted weak watch sales, among several other categories. The earlier hints of watch weakness could be a warning sign ahead of other retailers’ earnings reports still to
Watches falling out of favor, Capri CEO says, sending shares of Fossil, Movado lower Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: courtney reagan, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, capri, sending, favor, weakness, ceo, sales, movado, apple, lower, fossil, fashion, watches, shares, category, nearly, falling, watch, quarter


Watches falling out of favor, Capri CEO says, sending shares of Fossil, Movado lower

While Capri Holdings just put up a quarter that beat profit expectations, CEO John Idol pointed out a key weakness in one category that pulled down shares of several competitors.

The parent company of Michael Kors, Versace and Jimmy Choo is seeing weakness in sales of fashion watches.

“[The] fashion watch category continues to see declines globally, and we are being impacted by this secular trend,” Idol said on the fiscal third-quarter conference call. “We now expect declines in watches to continue in the fourth quarter and into next year at a greater rate than we had anticipated.”

Shares of watchmakers Fossil and Movado fell on the comments. Fossil shares, which are down nearly 88 percent over the past year, plunged nearly 10 percent, while Movado shares dropped 3 percent. Movado shares are off nearly 4 percent over the past year.

Capri is not the first retailer to call out the weakness in recent weeks. In its holiday sales release, Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette noted weak watch sales, among several other categories.

The earlier hints of watch weakness could be a warning sign ahead of other retailers’ earnings reports still to come.

The soft sales may reflect consumer adoption of smartwatches, or a shift to consumers wearing watches less often now that mobile phones are ever-present time-telling devices.

Over the same time period that Capri and Macy’s saw weakness in fashion watches, Apple saw strength for its smartwatch. While the tech company does not provide a breakout for sales of its watch alone, on its fiscal first-quarter earnings conference call, Apple CEO Tim Cook said the tech company “had our best quarter ever for wearables, home, and accessories” noting “almost 50 percent growth from wearables, thanks to strong sales of both Apple Watch and AirPods.”

According to Strategy Analytics, the Apple Watch held the top spot for smartwatches with 45 percent of the global market in the third quarter of 2018. FitBit jumped to second with a 15 percent share of the market, overtaking Samsung at 11 percent and Garmin at 8 percent. I

The Michael Kors smartwatch continued to outperform the broader category, Idol said. He added that in fashion watches, “slim silhouettes, particularly those in luxury leather band offerings” were better selling, but in general “the overall watch category was more challenged than we anticipated in the quarter.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: courtney reagan, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, capri, sending, favor, weakness, ceo, sales, movado, apple, lower, fossil, fashion, watches, shares, category, nearly, falling, watch, quarter


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Conde Nast to launch Vogue Business for fashion industry execs

On Tuesday, Conde Nast International will launch Vogue Business, a fashion industry title that is aimed at professionals, after a turbulent couple of years for the publisher. Vogue Business will start as a newsletter, rather than a website, aiming for a niche audience over having broad reach. “In a consolidating media landscape, the launch of a new global title is a rare thing”, said Wolfgang Blau, President of Conde Nast International,” in an emailed to CNBC Monday. The company has been beta te


On Tuesday, Conde Nast International will launch Vogue Business, a fashion industry title that is aimed at professionals, after a turbulent couple of years for the publisher. Vogue Business will start as a newsletter, rather than a website, aiming for a niche audience over having broad reach. “In a consolidating media landscape, the launch of a new global title is a rare thing”, said Wolfgang Blau, President of Conde Nast International,” in an emailed to CNBC Monday. The company has been beta te
Conde Nast to launch Vogue Business for fashion industry execs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, conde, fashion, industry, vogue, nast, international, title, business, launch, titles, magazine, newsletter, execs


Conde Nast to launch Vogue Business for fashion industry execs

On Tuesday, Conde Nast International will launch Vogue Business, a fashion industry title that is aimed at professionals, after a turbulent couple of years for the publisher.

Vogue Business will start as a newsletter, rather than a website, aiming for a niche audience over having broad reach.

The new magazine will be run separately from the main Vogue title with its own editorial team and will cover the impact of technology on the industry, trends in manufacturing, marketing and hiring as well as broader issues such as climate change and geopolitics.

“In a consolidating media landscape, the launch of a new global title is a rare thing”, said Wolfgang Blau, President of Conde Nast International,” in an emailed to CNBC Monday. The company has been beta testing the newsletter with people in 29 countries, Conde Nast said.

The glossy magazine industry is no longer what it was, where sleek printed titles would be funded by advertisers keen to reach their aspirational audiences. Now, people read news and features and watch videos on the likes of Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook, which are more attractive to advertisers because of the data they have on users. Legacy publishers have had to catch up, and many are now putting their titles behind paywalls.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, conde, fashion, industry, vogue, nast, international, title, business, launch, titles, magazine, newsletter, execs


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How Allbirds went from Silicon Valley fashion staple to a $1.4 billion sneaker start-up

According to Sullivan, a “big part of Allbirds’ success” was happening even before celebrities started wearing them. The “style that they’ve adopted is very comfortable, but meaningful and sustainable, [and] is spreading beyond its borders,” Esquire magazine fashion director Nick Sullivan tells CNBC Make It. “I think people are naturally intrigued by the whole Silicon Valley thing and start-ups and app designers, and everything. “More and more, people are able to wear sneakers to work, or a snea


According to Sullivan, a “big part of Allbirds’ success” was happening even before celebrities started wearing them. The “style that they’ve adopted is very comfortable, but meaningful and sustainable, [and] is spreading beyond its borders,” Esquire magazine fashion director Nick Sullivan tells CNBC Make It. “I think people are naturally intrigued by the whole Silicon Valley thing and start-ups and app designers, and everything. “More and more, people are able to wear sneakers to work, or a snea
How Allbirds went from Silicon Valley fashion staple to a $1.4 billion sneaker start-up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: tom huddleston jr, mark dadswell, getty images, source, max shelton, filmmagic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, allbirds, think, shoes, sullivan, billion, really, staple, fashion, wear, went, startup, valley, silicon, sneaker, tells, athletic, 14, customers, work


How Allbirds went from Silicon Valley fashion staple to a $1.4 billion sneaker start-up

In August, Leonardo DiCaprio announced that he’d personally invested in Allbirds, noting the company’s use of environmentally friendly materials.

Allbirds does, on occasion, send free products to high-profile customers, including celebrities, but an Allbirds spokesperson noted that this typically happens after those big-name customers have already started wearing the brand on their own.

According to Sullivan, a “big part of Allbirds’ success” was happening even before celebrities started wearing them. The company had already sold more than a million pairs months earlier.

The trend that started in Silicon Valley, seamlessly expanded into mainstream fashion. The “style that they’ve adopted is very comfortable, but meaningful and sustainable, [and] is spreading beyond its borders,” Esquire magazine fashion director Nick Sullivan tells CNBC Make It. “I think people are naturally intrigued by the whole Silicon Valley thing and start-ups and app designers, and everything. It sort of feels like a modern thing to do.

“So it’s natural that [Allbirds], at those very reasonable prices, anybody can get in on that.”

“I think we could never have imagined how fast and how far the idea would have traveled,” Brown says. Indeed, in addition to a strong presence on social media, including an exclusive shoe sale on Instagram in March, and a rare retail collaboration with Nordstrom earlier this year, much of the buzz around Allbirds, especially early on, spread via word of mouth.

While Allbirds tends to inspire die-hard devotion from many of its wearers, some customers have voiced complaints that the shoes wear out too quickly, despite the company’s assertions about the resilience of its natural and sustainable materials. The company has also said it is constantly improving upon its shoes and that newer iterations are more durable than the earlier versions.

Also, one reason for Allbirds’ growing ubiquity has been the fact that the shoes have strayed, somewhat, from Brown’s original vision of a purely athletic sneaker made from wool. While Allbirds sneakers can be worn for light athletic activity (the company says they work best for “short runs and casual [<5 mile] hikes"), most customers wear them for more casual purposes — anything from lounging around to running errands — or even in more traditionally dressed-up situations. One reason for that shift is the years-old "athleisure" trend — think yoga pants and running shoes as an outfit for brunch, or even a casual Friday work meeting — pioneered by the likes of Lululemon and embraced by athletic brands like Nike and Adidas. Allbirds showed up just in time to ride that athleisure wave, according to NPD Group Vice President Matt Powell, a sports industry analyst. "I think they read the market correctly," Powell tells CNBC Make It. "One of the things we've seen over the past few years is really the blurring of what's athletic and what's not," Powell says. "More and more, people are able to wear sneakers to work, or a sneaker-like product, and I think [Allbirds] really meets that niche in between the two categories. It looks dressy, but it feels like a sneaker." Still, it might be easy to look at Allbirds and wonder what all the fuss is about. Wool has been used in all types of clothing for thousands of years, Sullivan points out, and Allbirds' designs are so minimal that they almost seem boring or over-simplified. But, that might also be the point. "Sometimes, simplicity really appeals to people," Sullivan tells CNBC Make It. "You just slip it on and go. You put it in a washing machine. Those kinds of advances really do revolutionize fashion, if they're done by the right people, in the right moment, and with the right distribution. Yeah, that's how they get huge."


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: tom huddleston jr, mark dadswell, getty images, source, max shelton, filmmagic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, allbirds, think, shoes, sullivan, billion, really, staple, fashion, wear, went, startup, valley, silicon, sneaker, tells, athletic, 14, customers, work


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Dolce and Gabbana accused of racism in Chinese ‘chopsticks’ ads

Italian fashion house Dolce and Gabbana has been accused of racism after running three ads showing a Chinese woman being told how to use chopsticks. The series of three videos, entitled “Eating With Chopsticks,” show a woman eating large plates of pizza, spaghetti and a giant Italian cannolo pastry, while a male voiceover tells her what to do. The films were posted on Twitter and Instagram ahead of D&G’s “The Great Show” fashion event to be held Wednesday in Shanghai. But some people have reacte


Italian fashion house Dolce and Gabbana has been accused of racism after running three ads showing a Chinese woman being told how to use chopsticks. The series of three videos, entitled “Eating With Chopsticks,” show a woman eating large plates of pizza, spaghetti and a giant Italian cannolo pastry, while a male voiceover tells her what to do. The films were posted on Twitter and Instagram ahead of D&G’s “The Great Show” fashion event to be held Wednesday in Shanghai. But some people have reacte
Dolce and Gabbana accused of racism in Chinese ‘chopsticks’ ads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrote, chinese, gabbana, chopsticks, woman, accused, fashion, italian, eating, videos, ads, dolce, writing, racism, voiceover, way


Dolce and Gabbana accused of racism in Chinese 'chopsticks' ads

Italian fashion house Dolce and Gabbana has been accused of racism after running three ads showing a Chinese woman being told how to use chopsticks.

The series of three videos, entitled “Eating With Chopsticks,” show a woman eating large plates of pizza, spaghetti and a giant Italian cannolo pastry, while a male voiceover tells her what to do.

The films were posted on Twitter and Instagram ahead of D&G’s “The Great Show” fashion event to be held Wednesday in Shanghai. But some people have reacted angrily to them, with one writing “Orientalism is expressed so explicitly in this ad. It’s very offensive to portrait all Chinese ppl (people) in such a stereotypical way.” Another wrote “This is so stupid and culturally insensitive! Take down this video at once D&G!” and a third said: “This is racist, take it back.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrote, chinese, gabbana, chopsticks, woman, accused, fashion, italian, eating, videos, ads, dolce, writing, racism, voiceover, way


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