Facebook Oops: Special employee hotline for faster customer support

Facebook has a special internal email hotline commonly referred to as “Oops@,” where employees can submit any support queries they have for priority treatment, multiple former Facebook employees told CNBC. These channels serve as routers that get employee requests where they need to go in a speedier fashion than the company’s external support systems, employees said. Primarily, employees submit requests when a friend gets suspended from their account or forgets their password. However, some empl


Facebook has a special internal email hotline commonly referred to as “Oops@,” where employees can submit any support queries they have for priority treatment, multiple former Facebook employees told CNBC. These channels serve as routers that get employee requests where they need to go in a speedier fashion than the company’s external support systems, employees said. Primarily, employees submit requests when a friend gets suspended from their account or forgets their password. However, some empl
Facebook Oops: Special employee hotline for faster customer support Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, customer, used, content, employees, companys, friends, hotline, facebook, requests, submit, told, oops, special, faster, employee


Facebook Oops: Special employee hotline for faster customer support

If your support query to Facebook is taking longer than you expected, it might be because the company’s employees and their friends and family are cutting to the front of the line.

Facebook has a special internal email hotline commonly referred to as “Oops@,” where employees can submit any support queries they have for priority treatment, multiple former Facebook employees told CNBC. There is also an internal online form that can be used for similar purposes.

“It’s good to know people in Facebook,” one former sales employee told CNBC.

These channels serve as routers that get employee requests where they need to go in a speedier fashion than the company’s external support systems, employees said.

The channels can be used for a variety of requests. Primarily, employees submit requests when a friend gets suspended from their account or forgets their password. They can also be used to help friends who run businesses submit an appeal to Facebook if their business submits an ad that gets rejected by the company. The tool can also be used to flag questionable content employees come across that they believe should not be on the company’s services.

Facebook built the tools because employees were taking too much time working on helping solve issues for their friends, one advertiser with friends at the company told CNBC.

“So that’s good for us, but bad for other folks,” the advertiser said.

However, some employees said the channels were not that helpful, and it is more helpful to submit requests to specific teams or employees.

A Facebook representative confirmed the existence of the hotline, but noted, “Oops is not the best way to report content issues,” such as inappropriate posts. “The best way is through the Report link that appears next to the content.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, customer, used, content, employees, companys, friends, hotline, facebook, requests, submit, told, oops, special, faster, employee


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Japan’s economy grew faster than expected on investment rebound, but trade war clouds outlook

The Japanese economy grew faster than initially estimated in the fourth quarter as capital expenditure staged a quick recovery from a series of natural disasters in the previous quarter. That followed a revised 2.4 percent annualized contraction in the third quarter, which was the biggest decline in more than four years. This is more than a preliminary reading of a 0.3 percent expansion and economists’ median estimate of a 0.4 percent increase. Private consumption, which accounts for roughly 60


The Japanese economy grew faster than initially estimated in the fourth quarter as capital expenditure staged a quick recovery from a series of natural disasters in the previous quarter. That followed a revised 2.4 percent annualized contraction in the third quarter, which was the biggest decline in more than four years. This is more than a preliminary reading of a 0.3 percent expansion and economists’ median estimate of a 0.4 percent increase. Private consumption, which accounts for roughly 60
Japan’s economy grew faster than expected on investment rebound, but trade war clouds outlook Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rose, rebound, expansion, revised, quarter, annualized, expected, estimate, trade, grew, median, war, investment, economy, japans, preliminary, faster, exports, outlook


Japan's economy grew faster than expected on investment rebound, but trade war clouds outlook

The Japanese economy grew faster than initially estimated in the fourth quarter as capital expenditure staged a quick recovery from a series of natural disasters in the previous quarter.

However, despite the upward revision to growth, economists are likely to temper their optimism on the outlook given a recent batch of disappointing data on exports and factory output and the economy expected to weaken due to the Sino-U.S. trade war.

Japan’s gross domestic product rose at an annualized rate of 1.9 percent in October-December, more than the initial estimate of a 1.4 percent annualized expansion and more than the median estimate for a 1.8 percent annualized increase, revised data from the Cabinet Office showed.

That followed a revised 2.4 percent annualized contraction in the third quarter, which was the biggest decline in more than four years.

Economists warn that capital expenditure and overall economic growth are likely to weaken in the first half of this year as exports dwindle and inventories pile up due to a slowdown in global trade.

The revised figure translates into a quarter-on-quarter expansion of 0.5 percent in real, price-adjusted terms. This is more than a preliminary reading of a 0.3 percent expansion and economists’ median estimate of a 0.4 percent increase.

The capital expenditure component of GDP rose 2.7 percent in October-December from the previous quarter to mark the fastest expansion since January-March 2015. That compares with the median forecast for a 2.8 percent increase and a preliminary 2.4 percent expansion.

Private consumption, which accounts for roughly 60 percent of GDP, rose 0.4 percent in the fourth quarter, less than the preliminary estimate of a 0.6 percent increase.

Net exports — or exports minus imports — contributed minus 0.3 percentage point, unchanged from preliminary data.

Domestic demand added a revised 0.8 percentage point to GDP, more than a preliminary reading of a 0.6 percentage point contribution.

Separate data on Friday showed household spending rose 2.0 percent year-on-year in January, more than the median estimate for a 0.4 percent annual contraction, which may ease concerns about domestic demand.

Real wages in January rose 1.1 percent year-on-year in January, matching the same pace of growth in the previous month, the labor ministry said on Friday.

The United States last year imposed tariffs on $250 billion worth of goods imported from China, with Beijing hitting back with duties on $110 billion worth of American products, including soybeans and other commodities.

U.S. President Donald Trump has delayed tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports as negotiations to resolve the eight-month trade war show signs of progress.

Even if the two sides resolve their differences, the damage to global trade and Japan’s economy may take some time to repair with uncertainty about trade policies hurting sentiment and disrupting manufacturers’ supply chains.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rose, rebound, expansion, revised, quarter, annualized, expected, estimate, trade, grew, median, war, investment, economy, japans, preliminary, faster, exports, outlook


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Tesla says new Superchargers let drivers fill up faster, 75 miles of charge in 5 minutes

Tesla has debuted its V3 Superchargers, saying they could enable drivers to add up to 75 miles of charge to a long-range Model 3 in just five minutes. The new Superchargers aren’t available to most Tesla drivers now, just participants in the company’s” early access program” who can drive to company’s public beta site near its factory in Fremont, California. Tesla plans to roll out the V3 Superchargers in North America in the second quarter of 2019, and to sites in Europe and China in the fourth


Tesla has debuted its V3 Superchargers, saying they could enable drivers to add up to 75 miles of charge to a long-range Model 3 in just five minutes. The new Superchargers aren’t available to most Tesla drivers now, just participants in the company’s” early access program” who can drive to company’s public beta site near its factory in Fremont, California. Tesla plans to roll out the V3 Superchargers in North America in the second quarter of 2019, and to sites in Europe and China in the fourth
Tesla says new Superchargers let drivers fill up faster, 75 miles of charge in 5 minutes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: lora kolodny, thomas peter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, europe, let, minutes, saying, charging, vehicles, superchargers, 75, model, miles, drivers, faster, sites, charge, v3, tesla


Tesla says new Superchargers let drivers fill up faster, 75 miles of charge in 5 minutes

Tesla has debuted its V3 Superchargers, saying they could enable drivers to add up to 75 miles of charge to a long-range Model 3 in just five minutes.

Elon Musk’s company also said the same car could add 1,000 miles worth of charge in an hour under ideal conditions.

The new Superchargers aren’t available to most Tesla drivers now, just participants in the company’s” early access program” who can drive to company’s public beta site near its factory in Fremont, California.

Tesla plans to roll out the V3 Superchargers in North America in the second quarter of 2019, and to sites in Europe and China in the fourth quarter.

The V3 was unveiled at the Fremont plant Wednesday night. Tesla also boasted about the reach of its already-installed charging infrastructure, saying in a blog post:

“Tesla has more than 12,000 Superchargers across North America, Europe, and Asia and our network continues to grow daily: more than 99% of the U.S. population is covered by the network, and we anticipate similar coverage in Europe by the end of 2019. Recently, we passed 90% population coverage in China and are growing that number quickly.”

The V3 Superchargers, which feature liquid-cooled cables, will allow drivers to fill up their virtual tanks, faster. But they will also allow Tesla to move more electric vehicles through their 12,000 charging sites every day — with most drivers paying each time they recharge.

In September, Tesla ended a generous “unlimited charging” promotion that it previously offered as a referral bonus to get new customers into its premium Model S and Model X electric vehicles.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: lora kolodny, thomas peter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, europe, let, minutes, saying, charging, vehicles, superchargers, 75, model, miles, drivers, faster, sites, charge, v3, tesla


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A new $2 million all-electric ‘hypercar’ accelerates faster than an F-16 jet

An Italian specialist carmaker unveiled an all-electric car that it claims can reach 180 miles per hour (mph) in less time than an F-16 jet. Automobili Pininfarina debuted its Battista “hypercar” at the Geneva International Motor Show on Tuesday. A hypercar is a term used by auto watchers to describe the very top fraction of so-called supercars. Its makers say the Battista can produce 1,900 brake horsepower (bhp), spread across four separate motors which power each wheel. In terms of acceleratio


An Italian specialist carmaker unveiled an all-electric car that it claims can reach 180 miles per hour (mph) in less time than an F-16 jet. Automobili Pininfarina debuted its Battista “hypercar” at the Geneva International Motor Show on Tuesday. A hypercar is a term used by auto watchers to describe the very top fraction of so-called supercars. Its makers say the Battista can produce 1,900 brake horsepower (bhp), spread across four separate motors which power each wheel. In terms of acceleratio
A new $2 million all-electric ‘hypercar’ accelerates faster than an F-16 jet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: david reid, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kmh, priced, hypercar, million, accelerates, pininfarina, mph, battista, perschke, f16, speed, released, power, jet, car, allelectric, faster


A new $2 million all-electric 'hypercar' accelerates faster than an F-16 jet

An Italian specialist carmaker unveiled an all-electric car that it claims can reach 180 miles per hour (mph) in less time than an F-16 jet.

Automobili Pininfarina debuted its Battista “hypercar” at the Geneva International Motor Show on Tuesday. A hypercar is a term used by auto watchers to describe the very top fraction of so-called supercars.

Its makers say the Battista can produce 1,900 brake horsepower (bhp), spread across four separate motors which power each wheel. This reportedly makes it the most powerful road car ever produced.

By comparison, a BMW 5 Series 530, priced at around $50,000, has a tenth of the engine power at 190 bhp.

In terms of acceleration, the Pininfarina Battista has been described as the fastest street-legal car, hitting 62 mph (100 kmh) in less than two seconds.

Speaking at the Munich show, Automobili Pininfarina CEO Michael Perschke said for safety reasons a restricted engine version, with a top speed of 350 kmh (217 mph), would be released first.

“This car is 0-300 (kmh) faster than an F-16 … So the car will be released with a 350 kilometers (per hour) top speed and then beyond that there will a special track package.”

One hundred and fifty of the cars will be built and available to drive in 2020. Each have been priced at around $2.2 million. Perschke said the firm wanted to be completely sold out after the 2019 Pebble Beach car show in August this year.

“We have around about 40 percent of global production already reserved and, in the U.S., it is closer to 70 percent,” he said.

Automobili Pininfarina, which is owned by Indian multinational conglomerate Mahindra Group and based in Germany, said the battery will grant around 280 miles on a single charge.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: david reid, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kmh, priced, hypercar, million, accelerates, pininfarina, mph, battista, perschke, f16, speed, released, power, jet, car, allelectric, faster


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6 ways college grads can find their first job faster

Millennials and Gen Zers receive plenty of advice on how to ace a job interview. But before you can wow an interviewer, you have to actually land an interview. Applying for jobs may feel like it’s mostly a waiting game, but there’s more to do than just submitting applications online, and taking those extra steps will get you better job search results. CNBC Make It spoke to Amanda Augustine, career expert for TopResume, who offers new grads these tips:


Millennials and Gen Zers receive plenty of advice on how to ace a job interview. But before you can wow an interviewer, you have to actually land an interview. Applying for jobs may feel like it’s mostly a waiting game, but there’s more to do than just submitting applications online, and taking those extra steps will get you better job search results. CNBC Make It spoke to Amanda Augustine, career expert for TopResume, who offers new grads these tips:
6 ways college grads can find their first job faster Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: veronika kero
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, waiting, steps, zers, ways, taking, college, faster, tips, grads, job, submitting, topresume, wow, theres


6 ways college grads can find their first job faster

Millennials and Gen Zers receive plenty of advice on how to ace a job interview. But before you can wow an interviewer, you have to actually land an interview.

Applying for jobs may feel like it’s mostly a waiting game, but there’s more to do than just submitting applications online, and taking those extra steps will get you better job search results.

CNBC Make It spoke to Amanda Augustine, career expert for TopResume, who offers new grads these tips:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: veronika kero
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, waiting, steps, zers, ways, taking, college, faster, tips, grads, job, submitting, topresume, wow, theres


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Samsung is making the same mistakes as Apple did with its new phones

Instead, Samsung introduced phones with more colorful displays, fingerprint readers that hide under the screen, and a fun feature that lets you charge wireless headphones by placing them on the back of the phone. They’re not compelling enough for consumers to spend this sort of money. There’s also a Samsung Galaxy S10 5G that promises faster data speeds, but it’s not launching until the second quarter. We’ve also seen no reason why faster data speeds will drastically improve our experience outsi


Instead, Samsung introduced phones with more colorful displays, fingerprint readers that hide under the screen, and a fun feature that lets you charge wireless headphones by placing them on the back of the phone. They’re not compelling enough for consumers to spend this sort of money. There’s also a Samsung Galaxy S10 5G that promises faster data speeds, but it’s not launching until the second quarter. We’ve also seen no reason why faster data speeds will drastically improve our experience outsi
Samsung is making the same mistakes as Apple did with its new phones Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: todd haselton, sergei savostyanov, tass, getty images, dain evans
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iphones, faster, mistakes, phones, spend, samsung, speeds, consumers, galaxy, apple, data, phone, making


Samsung is making the same mistakes as Apple did with its new phones

Instead, Samsung introduced phones with more colorful displays, fingerprint readers that hide under the screen, and a fun feature that lets you charge wireless headphones by placing them on the back of the phone. These are compelling, don’t get me wrong, but why should someone with a Galaxy S8 with an already-nice display and facial recognition, want to spend another $850 or $999 for these upgrades? They’re not compelling enough for consumers to spend this sort of money.

There’s also a Samsung Galaxy S10 5G that promises faster data speeds, but it’s not launching until the second quarter. We’ve also seen no reason why faster data speeds will drastically improve our experience outside downloads. When LTE phones came out, we could suddenly place video calls and stream music. That made them must-haves. What is 5G going to add that will make consumers really need a phone that supports it?

We saw a similar innovation lag with the new iPhones. The screens got bigger, the processors got faster, and the cameras were slightly improved. All great features! Millions of people still bought them, but fewer than historically and not in markets where Apple needs to make up ground, like China. If anything, all I heard were complaints about how the new iPhones cost too much.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: todd haselton, sergei savostyanov, tass, getty images, dain evans
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iphones, faster, mistakes, phones, spend, samsung, speeds, consumers, galaxy, apple, data, phone, making


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Samsung is making the same mistakes as Apple did with its new phones

Instead, Samsung introduced phones with more colorful displays, fingerprint readers that hide under the screen, and a fun feature that lets you charge wireless headphones by placing them on the back of the phone. They’re not compelling enough for consumers to spend this sort of money. There’s also a Samsung Galaxy S10 5G that promises faster data speeds, but it’s not launching until the second quarter. We’ve also seen no reason why faster data speeds will drastically improve our experience outsi


Instead, Samsung introduced phones with more colorful displays, fingerprint readers that hide under the screen, and a fun feature that lets you charge wireless headphones by placing them on the back of the phone. They’re not compelling enough for consumers to spend this sort of money. There’s also a Samsung Galaxy S10 5G that promises faster data speeds, but it’s not launching until the second quarter. We’ve also seen no reason why faster data speeds will drastically improve our experience outsi
Samsung is making the same mistakes as Apple did with its new phones Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: todd haselton, sergei savostyanov, tass, getty images, dain evans
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iphones, faster, mistakes, phones, spend, samsung, speeds, consumers, galaxy, apple, data, phone, making


Samsung is making the same mistakes as Apple did with its new phones

Instead, Samsung introduced phones with more colorful displays, fingerprint readers that hide under the screen, and a fun feature that lets you charge wireless headphones by placing them on the back of the phone. These are compelling, don’t get me wrong, but why should someone with a Galaxy S8 with an already-nice display and facial recognition, want to spend another $850 or $999 for these upgrades? They’re not compelling enough for consumers to spend this sort of money.

There’s also a Samsung Galaxy S10 5G that promises faster data speeds, but it’s not launching until the second quarter. We’ve also seen no reason why faster data speeds will drastically improve our experience outside downloads. When LTE phones came out, we could suddenly place video calls and stream music. That made them must-haves. What is 5G going to add that will make consumers really need a phone that supports it?

We saw a similar innovation lag with the new iPhones. The screens got bigger, the processors got faster, and the cameras were slightly improved. All great features! Millions of people still bought them, but fewer than historically and not in markets where Apple needs to make up ground, like China. If anything, all I heard were complaints about how the new iPhones cost too much.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: todd haselton, sergei savostyanov, tass, getty images, dain evans
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iphones, faster, mistakes, phones, spend, samsung, speeds, consumers, galaxy, apple, data, phone, making


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Facebook, Google and Twitter are faster at removing hate speech: EU

Social media companies are getting faster at responding to hate speech online. Tech companies including Facebook, Google and Twitter removed 72 percent of illegal hate speech on their platforms during 2018, the EU found. The response rate is a big increase from two years ago, when tech companies removed just 28 percent of content. Eighty-nine percent of content flagged as hate speech was reviewed by tech companies within 24 hours, up from 40 percent in 2016, the EU also stated. The EU’s report f


Social media companies are getting faster at responding to hate speech online. Tech companies including Facebook, Google and Twitter removed 72 percent of illegal hate speech on their platforms during 2018, the EU found. The response rate is a big increase from two years ago, when tech companies removed just 28 percent of content. Eighty-nine percent of content flagged as hate speech was reviewed by tech companies within 24 hours, up from 40 percent in 2016, the EU also stated. The EU’s report f
Facebook, Google and Twitter are faster at removing hate speech: EU Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: elizabeth schulze, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, companies, removed, hate, faster, social, removing, speech, platforms, twitter, google, media, content, eu, tech


Facebook, Google and Twitter are faster at removing hate speech: EU

Social media companies are getting faster at responding to hate speech online.

Tech companies including Facebook, Google and Twitter removed 72 percent of illegal hate speech on their platforms during 2018, the EU found. The response rate is a big increase from two years ago, when tech companies removed just 28 percent of content.

Eighty-nine percent of content flagged as hate speech was reviewed by tech companies within 24 hours, up from 40 percent in 2016, the EU also stated.

The figures come from an evaluation released Monday by the European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, as part of its “code of conduct” for social media platforms. Tech companies including Facebook, Google, Twitter and Microsoft signed onto the initiative when it launched in 2016 in an effort to remove racist and xenophobic content from their platforms.

“Today, after two and a half years, we can say that we found the right approach and established a standard throughout Europe on how to tackle this serious issue, while fully protecting freedom of speech,” said Vera Jourova, a European commissioner for justice, consumers and gender equality, in a press release.

The EU’s report found Facebook now removes 82 percent of illegal hate speech on the platform, up from 28 percent in 2016. The figures are a rare piece of goods news for the social media giant that has struggled to manage misinformation and “fake news” on its platform.

Facebook has struggled to curtail abusive content on its platform and has faced criticism for failing to contain the spread of fake information in election campaigns. Last week the company removed nearly 800 fake pages and accounts with ties to Iran.

Twitter, meanwhile, showed a slight decrease in the amount of content it took down. The report found 43.5 percent of hate speech flagged on Twitter was removed in that time frame, down from 45 percent in December 2017.

“Let me be very clear, the good results of this monitoring exercise don’t mean the companies are off the hook,” Jorouva said in a press conference in Brussels on Monday. “We will continue to monitor this very closely, and we can always consider additional measures if efforts slow down.”

The European Commission defines “hate speech” as “the public incitement to violence or hatred directed to groups or individuals on the basis of certain characteristics, including race, color, religion, descent and national or ethnic origin.”

The EU has taken on a leading role regulating big technology companies. Last year the bloc enacted a sweeping set of privacy rules called the General Data Protection Regulation that aims to give users more control over their personal data. Companies that don’t comply with the law face fines of up to 4 percent of annual revenues.

“It is time to balance the power and the responsibility of the platforms and social media giants,” Jorouva said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: elizabeth schulze, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, companies, removed, hate, faster, social, removing, speech, platforms, twitter, google, media, content, eu, tech


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Falling oil prices will be a hidden blessing for Saudi start-ups, investor says

In a part of the world better known for towering skyscrapers and oil than for its startup scene, Gulf Arab entrepreneurs might be seeing bright times ahead. That’s according to Fadi Ghandour, executive chairman of Wanda Group, whose venture capital fund invests in tech companies all over the Middle East and North Africa. Now that oil prices are dramatically down from their October highs, the veteran Middle East investor says the market moves “will definitely be a blessing in disguise” and in tha


In a part of the world better known for towering skyscrapers and oil than for its startup scene, Gulf Arab entrepreneurs might be seeing bright times ahead. That’s according to Fadi Ghandour, executive chairman of Wanda Group, whose venture capital fund invests in tech companies all over the Middle East and North Africa. Now that oil prices are dramatically down from their October highs, the veteran Middle East investor says the market moves “will definitely be a blessing in disguise” and in tha
Falling oil prices will be a hidden blessing for Saudi start-ups, investor says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-11  Authors: natasha turak, simon dawson, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middle, falling, investor, arab, prices, hidden, faster, east, scale, ghandour, blessing, region, startups, oil, saudi


Falling oil prices will be a hidden blessing for Saudi start-ups, investor says

In a part of the world better known for towering skyscrapers and oil than for its startup scene, Gulf Arab entrepreneurs might be seeing bright times ahead. That’s according to Fadi Ghandour, executive chairman of Wanda Group, whose venture capital fund invests in tech companies all over the Middle East and North Africa.

“For years we’ve said there is an inverse relationship between how change happens on the regulatory environment and the price of oil — the lower the price of oil, the faster the change process happens,” Ghandour told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble on Thursday, pointing to Arab Gulf countries like Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates whose economies have historically been dependent on hydrocarbon revenues.

Now that oil prices are dramatically down from their October highs, the veteran Middle East investor says the market moves “will definitely be a blessing in disguise” and in that it will force the development of sustainable, knowledge-based economies and jobs. He believes that startups founded five or more years ago are now reaching their maturity stage, meaning there will be more businesses scaling up in the next several years — if they can get the necessary support.

“These companies born somewhere around 2011, 2012, have raised much more money, they are growing much faster, the region is adopting mobile smartphone technology much faster, they are interacting much faster and at a much larger scale, specifically in Saudi Arabia,” Ghandour said.

“This is the time when there is size, there is scale, and the big funds globally who don’t want to take the risk early on, are going to be looking for entry into a market that they don’t have much presence in.” He pointed to New York-based global equity firm General Atlantic’s investment of $120 million in Dubai-based website Property Finder last November. The Middle East real estate platform was founded in 2007 and has been profitable since 2013.

Investments in Middle East and North Africa (MENA)-based startups went up by 31 percent between 2017 and 2018 to $893 million, with 366 deals made, according to Magnitt, a regional data platform for investors. The database also found that more than 155 institutions invested in MENA startups in 2018, 30 percent of which were from outside the region and 47 percent of which had not previously invested in the region.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-11  Authors: natasha turak, simon dawson, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middle, falling, investor, arab, prices, hidden, faster, east, scale, ghandour, blessing, region, startups, oil, saudi


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Facebook board says it pushed Zuckerberg and Sandberg to ‘move faster’ on Russia interference

Facebook’s board said Thursday it pushed CEO Mark Zuckerberg and second-in-command Sheryl Sandberg to “move faster” on investigating Russian interference on the platform, but said “to suggest that they knew about Russian interference and either tried to ignore it or prevent investigations into what had happened is grossly unfair.” “The company was too slow to spot Russian interference, and too slow to take action. Facebook executives and lawmakers named in the New York Times report have countere


Facebook’s board said Thursday it pushed CEO Mark Zuckerberg and second-in-command Sheryl Sandberg to “move faster” on investigating Russian interference on the platform, but said “to suggest that they knew about Russian interference and either tried to ignore it or prevent investigations into what had happened is grossly unfair.” “The company was too slow to spot Russian interference, and too slow to take action. Facebook executives and lawmakers named in the New York Times report have countere
Facebook board says it pushed Zuckerberg and Sandberg to ‘move faster’ on Russia interference Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: sara salinas, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pushed, faster, times, facebook, zuckerberg, slow, york, board, facebooks, statement, interference, russian, sandberg, russia


Facebook board says it pushed Zuckerberg and Sandberg to 'move faster' on Russia interference

Facebook’s board said Thursday it pushed CEO Mark Zuckerberg and second-in-command Sheryl Sandberg to “move faster” on investigating Russian interference on the platform, but said “to suggest that they knew about Russian interference and either tried to ignore it or prevent investigations into what had happened is grossly unfair.”

The statement comes a day after a New York Times investigation claimed Zuckerberg and Sandberg downplayed internal efforts to assess Russian misinformation campaigns, and sought to deflect public scrutiny onto Facebook’s competitors.

“The company was too slow to spot Russian interference, and too slow to take action. As a board we did indeed push them to move faster,” the board said in its statement. “In the last eighteen months Facebook, with the full support of this board, has invested heavily in more people and better technology to prevent misuse of its services, including during elections.”

Facebook executives and lawmakers named in the New York Times report have countered some of its claims. Former Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos, who first brought evidence of Russian interference to Facebook’s top executives, pushed back on the story on Twitter Thursday.

Earlier Thursday, Facebook released its latest report on the removal of harmful content from its services. The company has been consistent in its messaging for the last year that it was “too slow” to spot abuse on the platform, but that it is getting better.

Here’s the full statement from Facebook’s board:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: sara salinas, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pushed, faster, times, facebook, zuckerberg, slow, york, board, facebooks, statement, interference, russian, sandberg, russia


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