Nearly 1 in 5 Americans are stashing cash at home in fear of a recession

The ongoing conversation around if and when the U.S. will enter a recession is prompting many Americans to make some potentially costly mistakes when it comes to their money. Based on their fears of a potential recession, 17% of Americans have started hiding cash in their home, according to a new poll from MetLife of over 8,000 U.S. adults over the age of 18. Between 1926 and 2015, an aggressive portfolio actually netted higher average returns than a conservative portfolio, investment company Va


The ongoing conversation around if and when the U.S. will enter a recession is prompting many Americans to make some potentially costly mistakes when it comes to their money. Based on their fears of a potential recession, 17% of Americans have started hiding cash in their home, according to a new poll from MetLife of over 8,000 U.S. adults over the age of 18. Between 1926 and 2015, an aggressive portfolio actually netted higher average returns than a conservative portfolio, investment company Va
Nearly 1 in 5 Americans are stashing cash at home in fear of a recession Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stashing, recession, living, youre, money, cash, job, savings, portfolio, investments, nearly, going, fear, americans


Nearly 1 in 5 Americans are stashing cash at home in fear of a recession

The ongoing conversation around if and when the U.S. will enter a recession is prompting many Americans to make some potentially costly mistakes when it comes to their money. Based on their fears of a potential recession, 17% of Americans have started hiding cash in their home, according to a new poll from MetLife of over 8,000 U.S. adults over the age of 18. And 21% of respondents report they have become more conservative with their money. Making these kinds of moves can prove costly. If you’re hiding cash in your home, you’re not able to take advantage of compound interest, which helps your money grow exponentially the longer you have it invested. Plus, inflation actually eats away at the value of your money, so leaving large amounts of cash lying around can make it harder to achieve your long-term financial goals. “Hiding cash in your house is one of the worst things you can do,” Erin Lowry, author of “Broke Millennial Takes on Investing,” tells CNBC Make It. Beyond the financial implications, there’s also the possibility that the money could get forgotten or destroyed. Meanwhile, if you move your money into investments that are too conservative while you’re young, you may lose out on opportunities to grow your money at higher rates. Between 1926 and 2015, an aggressive portfolio actually netted higher average returns than a conservative portfolio, investment company Vanguard found.

Even people who are not going to extremes are being influenced by all the talk of a recession. About 41% of Americans say they check their investments more frequently because of talk about the potential for a market downturn, according to MetLife’s survey. “That’s 100% the wrong move — because it’s going to freak you out,” Lowry says. If your investments are properly designed to withstand the ups and downs of the market, checking on them is just going to make you anxious and provoke an emotional reaction. “What you need to be controlling for is you,” Lowry says. One of the biggest mistakes you can make — especially if you have a well-built portfolio — is panicking and selling off your investments. If you get out of the market and then wait too long to jump back in, you may miss the upswing, which could prove a costly error in the long run.

Building a balanced portfolio means spreading out your money by investing in different types of assets, such as stocks and bonds, in a variety of different sectors. This lowers the risk that your entire investment will be wiped out if something happens to one particular company or industry. You can put this type of portfolio together yourself or you could opt to work with a professional or invest through so-called robo-advisors, which typically manage your money for you. Beyond having a well-balanced portfolio, here are three simple, positive steps you can take to help mitigate any impact a potential recession might have on your finances.

1. Build up a savings cushion

One way to prepare for any financial setback is to have an emergency savings account. “You should be having at least three months,” says Tiffany Aliche, personal finance expert and founder of The Budgetnista. However, saving up only three months of living expenses is for someone who knows they can get a job quickly, she adds. For example, a nurse. Nurses are in high demand and it’s a job that you can find pretty much everywhere. But if you have a specialized job, such as an aerospace engineer or a psychobiologist, it may be more difficult and take longer to find another position if you’re laid off. In that case, you should aim to put away more than three months’ worth of emergency savings, likely closer to a year or more. Many people are already. About 40% of Americans say they have started saving more money to support themselves should the U.S. experience an economic downturn, according to MetLife’s survey.

2. Cut back your spending

Almost half of Americans, 43%, told MetLife they’re living paycheck to paycheck. If that’s you, take the time to get your finances in good shape before a downturn hits. Put together a monthly budget so you can identify where you’re spending money and where it may be possible to trim, Aliche recommends. This is going to look different for everyone. For example, it might mean packing your lunch more often or opting for a cheaper cable package — or it may require some bigger changes, such as finding a more affordable apartment. But if you’re able to live below your means, it gives you a bigger savings cushion and some breathing room if you lose your job. That’s because if a recession does occur, you may need to worry about unemployment. When economic growth slows, companies typically generate less revenue and may need to lay off employees. “You should not be living at capacity because you want to be able to pivot,” Aliche says. When the last recession hit, Aliche lost her $50,000 teaching job at a non-profit school. But because she was only spending about $30,000 a year, it was easier for her to find a collection of jobs that covered her living expenses.

3. Keep investing


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stashing, recession, living, youre, money, cash, job, savings, portfolio, investments, nearly, going, fear, americans


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October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies


October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies
October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, say, spooky, reputation, worst, historically, fear, volatility, worry, great, market, day, heres, lambert, financial, experts


October can be spooky for investors — here's why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market.

This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October.

“The big one is October 1987, when the Dow plunged 22% in a single day,” says Jason Lambert, the president and CEO of Northwest Financial & Tax Solutions, near Portland, Oregon. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.”

The Great Depression began after a market crash in October 1929 and the financial crisis that sparked the Great Recession started with an October market meltdown in 2008.

There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies fear,” he says, “even if it doesn’t mean that the market is moving up or down.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, say, spooky, reputation, worst, historically, fear, volatility, worry, great, market, day, heres, lambert, financial, experts


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How millennials can overcome their fear of investing

Source: Tyler HuckWhen Tyler Huck graduated from college in 2008, it was smack in the middle of the financial crisis. The best day to start investing was yesterday. The investing education website, in partnership with Chirp Research, surveyed 844 affluent millennials, ages 23-38, through an online survey. To overcome that fear and start investing — or to simply get smarter about how you are doing it — there are several steps you can take. You can overcome that fear by making sure you are investe


Source: Tyler HuckWhen Tyler Huck graduated from college in 2008, it was smack in the middle of the financial crisis. The best day to start investing was yesterday. The investing education website, in partnership with Chirp Research, surveyed 844 affluent millennials, ages 23-38, through an online survey. To overcome that fear and start investing — or to simply get smarter about how you are doing it — there are several steps you can take. You can overcome that fear by making sure you are investe
How millennials can overcome their fear of investing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retirement, survey, financial, money, overcome, millennials, start, income, tyler, fear, investing, huck


How millennials can overcome their fear of investing

Tyler Huck, his wife Claire and daughter Camryn. Source: Tyler Huck

When Tyler Huck graduated from college in 2008, it was smack in the middle of the financial crisis. That shaped his views on money and investing. “I saw friends, family lose heavy money on real estate,” Huck said. “I saw parents lose heavy money on their stock investments inside IRAs and 401(k)s.” “My first real exposure to the market as an adult going into the workforce was negative,” he added. “It was fear and panic and it was tough to get a job at that time.” A marketing major, Huck eventually landed a job as a teller at a local bank. Now, at 33 years old, he’s a financial advisor for Oxygen Financial, a financial advisory and wealth management firm specializing in Generations X and Y (also known as millennials). His advice: start saving now. “The rising cost of health care, mixed with the fact you will not have your retirement supplemented by a pension and potentially Social Security, it’s going to be on your shoulders to save the brunt of your retirement [income]”, said Huck, who also hosts a finance and careers podcast for millennials called “They Don’t Teach You This.”

The best day to start investing was yesterday. The next best day is today. Caleb Silver editor in chief, Investopedia

Retirement is something many millennials feel unprepared for. In fact, even affluent members of that generation are worried — 39% expect to be forced to work beyond retirement age, a new survey by Investopedia found. The investing education website, in partnership with Chirp Research, surveyed 844 affluent millennials, ages 23-38, through an online survey. The median income for the survey was $132,473, compared to the median household income of approximately $71,400 for the generation as a whole, according to Pew Research. Of those surveyed by Investopedia, 36% said they should be investing more. “The lack of knowledge and the lack of education makes them fearful and makes it feel very risky to them,” said Investopedia’s editor in chief, Caleb Silver. To overcome that fear and start investing — or to simply get smarter about how you are doing it — there are several steps you can take.

Invest in your 401(k)

Consider a Roth IRA

Roth individual retirement accounts allow your money to grow tax-free, since the contributions are made after tax — unlike 401(k) plans or traditional IRAs. There are income limits. If you are married and have a modified adjusted gross income of $203,000, you can’t contribute to a Roth. If you are single, you can’t contribute to it if your income is over $137,000. You can contribute a reduced amount if, as a couple, your income is between $193,000 and $203,000 or, if you are single, your income falls between $122,000 and $137,000.

Curtis likes Roth IRAs, especially for younger people. “Even though they are best used as retirement plans — letting the money grow tax-free for decades, they have flexibility,” she said. “If a person really needs the money, if they follow the rules, they won’t pay tax on the withdrawal.” Your after-tax contributions can be taken out at any time without penalty. However, it’s a different story for withdrawing investment earnings. After you hit age 59½ and have funded the account for a least five years, you can start to make withdrawals without any penalties.

Check out apps

Since millennials do almost everything online, using an app could be a good way to start socking away money, even in small amounts, Curtis suggests. There are a number of investing apps available — from newer disruptors, like Acorns and Robinhood, to those from big banks, like J.P. Morgan Chase.

Diversify

Still afraid of dipping your toe in the water or diving deeper? You can overcome that fear by making sure you are invested in a diversified portfolio, including bonds, Curtis said.

NicoElNino | iStock | Getty Images

Bonds offer your portfolio some protection when the stock market goes down — so if you are highly risk intolerant, don’t put most of your money into equities. In fact, if you start early, a 60/40 stocks-to-bonds portfolio mix can do quite well over the long term, said Curtis. “Volatility is what scares most people, but volatility is temporary and is the price investors pay to get the better returns that stocks provide,” she said.

Find companies that interest you

If you have money in a 401(k), IRA or some sort of index fund and are looking to invest in individual stocks, then look at names that have a product or service you enjoy, said Oxygen Financial’s Huck. “It gets you excited about saving money,” he said.

It’s not too late


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retirement, survey, financial, money, overcome, millennials, start, income, tyler, fear, investing, huck


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Jim Cramer: I want to stop the fear of Senator Warren

Jim Cramer: I want to stop the fear of Senator Warren4 Hours AgoFacebook’s Mark Zuckerberg blasts presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren’s call to break up the social media giant. CNBC’s Jim Cramer discusses.


Jim Cramer: I want to stop the fear of Senator Warren4 Hours AgoFacebook’s Mark Zuckerberg blasts presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren’s call to break up the social media giant. CNBC’s Jim Cramer discusses.
Jim Cramer: I want to stop the fear of Senator Warren Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, media, stop, presidential, jim, warrens, warren4, cramer, senator, social, warren, fear


Jim Cramer: I want to stop the fear of Senator Warren

Jim Cramer: I want to stop the fear of Senator Warren

4 Hours Ago

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg blasts presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren’s call to break up the social media giant. CNBC’s Jim Cramer discusses.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, media, stop, presidential, jim, warrens, warren4, cramer, senator, social, warren, fear


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Trump said he wanted to save Christmas, but shoppers fear tariffs could ruin the holiday season

Fifty-seven percent are concerned about tariffs raising prices on holiday goods, Coresight Research found in surveying 1,784 U.S. consumers last month. Six in 10 people are worried about tariffs impacting their holiday shopping, according to a new study. Tariffs aside, one analyst had already said last month that he was expecting the holiday season to be dismal for many companies. Wells Fargo expects tourism to be a headwind for many companies this holiday season as the trade war between the U.S


Fifty-seven percent are concerned about tariffs raising prices on holiday goods, Coresight Research found in surveying 1,784 U.S. consumers last month. Six in 10 people are worried about tariffs impacting their holiday shopping, according to a new study. Tariffs aside, one analyst had already said last month that he was expecting the holiday season to be dismal for many companies. Wells Fargo expects tourism to be a headwind for many companies this holiday season as the trade war between the U.S
Trump said he wanted to save Christmas, but shoppers fear tariffs could ruin the holiday season Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shoppers, fear, christmas, stores, wanted, holiday, coresight, save, tariffs, season, earnings, walmart, ruin, retailers, shopping, buy, trump


Trump said he wanted to save Christmas, but shoppers fear tariffs could ruin the holiday season

“We think our survey results should sound alarm bells for retailers looking to pass on cost increases even if those come after the holidays: A majority of shoppers are unwilling to accept price hikes and will look to trade down in volume, by retailer, or by product,” Coresight CEO and founder Deborah Weinswig said in the report.

Fifty-seven percent are concerned about tariffs raising prices on holiday goods, Coresight Research found in surveying 1,784 U.S. consumers last month. And when asked what those people would do if prices were to go up, 22.5% said they would buy fewer items, while 22% said they would switch to a cheaper retailer. Nearly 70% said they would still spend the same amount of money and not increase their spending to keep up with the price hikes, meaning they would likely end up buying fewer goods.

President Donald Trump had said he chose to delay part of the taxes on $300 billion worth of Chinese imports from Sept. 1 until Dec. 15 “for the Christmas season … just in case some of the tariffs would have an impact on U.S. customers. ” But consumers are still anxious.

Six in 10 people are worried about tariffs impacting their holiday shopping, according to a new study.

While Trump said he was delaying tariffs on more consumer-facing goods ahead of the holidays, the American Apparel & Footwear Association has said that isn’t the case at all. It found that 91.6% of apparel, 68.4% of home textiles and 52.5% of footwear imports from China were expected to be hit with the 15% tariff that began Sunday.

“Unfortunately many common holiday items are being hit on September 1 – including holiday stockings,” the association said in a statement last month.

Tariffs aside, one analyst had already said last month that he was expecting the holiday season to be dismal for many companies.

“While the majority of companies appear optimistic on their ability to drive solid growth in [the fourth quarter of 2019], we believe that the holiday setup this year is actually quite bearish and thus we continue to view our space through a more cautious lens,” Wells Fargo analyst Ike Boruchow wrote in a note to clients. “First and foremost, fundamental trends have deteriorated thus far in 2019.”

He listed five reasons for being negative on the 2019 holidays:

1. “Hockey-stick” outlooks: Boruchow noted that many of the retailers he’s monitoring have reiterated their full-year outlooks in recent earnings reports. But he added that a lot of companies need “significant” acceleration in fourth quarter earnings and sales to get there, calling out Under Armour, Urban Outfitters, Victoria’s Secret parent L Brands, Fossil and Michael Kors-owner Capri Holdings as examples.

2. There are six fewer days between Thanksgiving and Christmas this year compared with 2018. The last time that happened was in 2013, when “many retailers experienced significant traffic/promotional issues and missed plan.”

3. Inventory appears to be piling up. Boruchow said that up until late 2018, inventory levels were looking healthy. But they’re started to build again.

4. Wells Fargo expects tourism to be a headwind for many companies this holiday season as the trade war between the U.S. and China rages on. The U.S. dollar is also stronger than many foreign currencies year over year. Tiffany is one retailer to recently call these headwinds out as a factor impeding growth.

5. Current weather forecasts are calling for a warmer winter this year, and that could hurt retailers more dependent on selling cold-weather goods like boots and jackets.

Big-box retailers Walmart and Target recently reported strong quarterly earnings and boosted earnings outlooks for the year. But these results stand in stark contrast to mall-based apparel brands like Victoria’s Secret and Gap, which are struggling to drive shoppers to stores. Department store chains are also fighting for sales.

The Coresight study found Walmart and Amazon to be neck and neck as the No. 1 destination for holiday shopping this year. In the survey, 78.9% of respondents said they plan to buy gifts at Walmart, and 78.6% said Amazon. Target was next, with 57.1%, followed by Kohl’s (34.2%) and Best Buy (33.1%).

Some 68% expect to shop online and in stores this holiday season, Coresight found, with only 4.7% expecting to only buy things online.

“Shoppers primarily go online to strip friction from the shopping,” Weinswig’s team said. “The appeal of stores remains skewed toward ease of browsing, the ability to see products in person and the enjoyment of the experience.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shoppers, fear, christmas, stores, wanted, holiday, coresight, save, tariffs, season, earnings, walmart, ruin, retailers, shopping, buy, trump


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A ‘fear bubble’ is creating a huge buying opportunity, long-time market bull Jim Paulsen says

But long-time bull Jim Paulsen is positioning for a breakout by year’s end because he believes dread is oversaturating the market. “People are not loading into stocks even though we’re really close to market highs. Paulsen, who correctly predicted the stock market would sharply rebound from last December’s historic pullback, expects evidence of a stronger economy will calm fears. “I think the odds favor all of the policy stimulus we’ve introduced: fiscal stimulus, policy stimulus, monetary growt


But long-time bull Jim Paulsen is positioning for a breakout by year’s end because he believes dread is oversaturating the market. “People are not loading into stocks even though we’re really close to market highs. Paulsen, who correctly predicted the stock market would sharply rebound from last December’s historic pullback, expects evidence of a stronger economy will calm fears. “I think the odds favor all of the policy stimulus we’ve introduced: fiscal stimulus, policy stimulus, monetary growt
A ‘fear bubble’ is creating a huge buying opportunity, long-time market bull Jim Paulsen says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-01  Authors: stephanie landsman, steve chiavarone
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, longtime, think, stimulus, fear, bull, stocks, huge, risk, creating, weve, paulsen, close, thats, yields, market, opportunity, buying, jim


A 'fear bubble' is creating a huge buying opportunity, long-time market bull Jim Paulsen says

A bad August for the markets may usher in an even worst September based on seasonal trends.

But long-time bull Jim Paulsen is positioning for a breakout by year’s end because he believes dread is oversaturating the market.

“We almost have a fear bubble. That’s our primary thing that sits out there for me,” the Leuthold Group’s chief investment strategist told CNBC’s “Trading Nation ” on Friday. “People are not loading into stocks even though we’re really close to market highs. They’re loading into bonds even though they have close to record low yields… The behavior just screams fear.”

August marked the market’s second losing month of the year. The Dow and S&P 500 were off almost 2% while the tech-heavy Nasdaq fell by about 3%. In July, stocks were hitting all-time highs.

Paulsen, who correctly predicted the stock market would sharply rebound from last December’s historic pullback, expects evidence of a stronger economy will calm fears.

“I think the odds favor all of the policy stimulus we’ve introduced: fiscal stimulus, policy stimulus, monetary growth, lower yields,” he added. “It’s been about six to nine months lag time, and I think it’s going to start to improve economic reports.”

According to Paulsen, that’ll be what ultimately paves the way to new record highs.

“If you pierce a fear bubble, do you have a big rally? And, I kind of think that’s one of the contributing factors to the upside,” said Paulsen. “If we find out it turns out better than feared, many, many portfolios are under allocated to risk assets and will have to re-adjust themselves trying to get more risk which could drive risk assets a lot higher.”

Yet, he acknowledges the market is in a late-stage economic growth cycle. However, he isn’t going into recession countdown mode like many of his Wall Street peers.

“We’ve grown slowly close to the 2% stall speed we used to worry about the entire recovery. We’re at full employment with 4% unemployment,” Paulsen said. “We’re in the longest recovery ever now in U.S. history. So there are certainly characteristics of being near the end. But character wise, I just don’t see the overextended nature mainly because we’ve been so conservative.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-01  Authors: stephanie landsman, steve chiavarone
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, longtime, think, stimulus, fear, bull, stocks, huge, risk, creating, weve, paulsen, close, thats, yields, market, opportunity, buying, jim


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How ‘reluctant investor’ Danielle Town overcame her fear and discovered the power of investing

Author and investor Danielle Town used to be afraid of the stock market. “I was such a reluctant investor,” said Town, co-host of the podcast “InvestED. ” “Yet, we can find a way to make this stuff become actually a joyful part of our lives, which I know sounds completely insane but can happen.” It happened for Town — but not until she became burned out in her law career. Danielle Town and her father, Phil Town Source: Danielle TownDanielle Town and her father, Phil Town Source: Danielle Town


Author and investor Danielle Town used to be afraid of the stock market. “I was such a reluctant investor,” said Town, co-host of the podcast “InvestED. ” “Yet, we can find a way to make this stuff become actually a joyful part of our lives, which I know sounds completely insane but can happen.” It happened for Town — but not until she became burned out in her law career. Danielle Town and her father, Phil Town Source: Danielle TownDanielle Town and her father, Phil Town Source: Danielle Town
How ‘reluctant investor’ Danielle Town overcame her fear and discovered the power of investing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: michelle fox, billy j hensley, president, ceo of the national endowment for financial educat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, town, overcame, towndanielle, source, phil, danielle, father, investor, reluctant, discovered, way, used, investing, stuff, fear, power


How 'reluctant investor' Danielle Town overcame her fear and discovered the power of investing

Author and investor Danielle Town used to be afraid of the stock market. Financial statements, numbers and spreadsheets all made her eyes glaze over. “I was such a reluctant investor,” said Town, co-host of the podcast “InvestED. ” “Yet, we can find a way to make this stuff become actually a joyful part of our lives, which I know sounds completely insane but can happen.” It happened for Town — but not until she became burned out in her law career.

Danielle Town and her father, Phil Town Source: Danielle Town

Danielle Town and her father, Phil Town Source: Danielle Town


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: michelle fox, billy j hensley, president, ceo of the national endowment for financial educat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, town, overcame, towndanielle, source, phil, danielle, father, investor, reluctant, discovered, way, used, investing, stuff, fear, power


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Amazon says its facial recognition can now identify fear

Amazon said this week its facial recognition software can detect a person’s fear. Rekognition is one of many Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud services available for developers. It can be used for facial analysis or sentiment analysis, which identifies different expressions and predicts emotions from images of people’s faces. “With this release, we have further improved the accuracy of gender identification,” Amazon said in a blog post. “In addition, we have improved accuracy for emotion detection


Amazon said this week its facial recognition software can detect a person’s fear. Rekognition is one of many Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud services available for developers. It can be used for facial analysis or sentiment analysis, which identifies different expressions and predicts emotions from images of people’s faces. “With this release, we have further improved the accuracy of gender identification,” Amazon said in a blog post. “In addition, we have improved accuracy for emotion detection
Amazon says its facial recognition can now identify fear Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fear, emotion, improved, identify, emotions, accuracy, analysis, week, amazon, services, gender, facial, recognition


Amazon says its facial recognition can now identify fear

Amazon said this week its facial recognition software can detect a person’s fear.

Rekognition is one of many Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud services available for developers. It can be used for facial analysis or sentiment analysis, which identifies different expressions and predicts emotions from images of people’s faces. The service uses artificial intelligence to “learn” from the reams of data it processes.

The tech giant revealed updates to the controversial tool on Monday that include improving the accuracy and functionality of its face analysis features such as identifying gender, emotions and age range.

“With this release, we have further improved the accuracy of gender identification,” Amazon said in a blog post. “In addition, we have improved accuracy for emotion detection (for all 7 emotions: ‘Happy’, ‘Sad’, ‘Angry’, ‘Surprised’, ‘Disgusted’, ‘Calm’ and ‘Confused’) and added a new emotion: ‘Fear.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fear, emotion, improved, identify, emotions, accuracy, analysis, week, amazon, services, gender, facial, recognition


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Trump’s latest broadside on China raises fear that the trade war is the ‘new status quo’

The president’s announcement jolted markets, which had bounced back sharply off Wednesday’s disappointing Fed rate cut only to have their legs cut out from underneath by news of a heightened trade war. Trump’s move means that all Chinese goods entering the U.S. will be subject to some sort of duties. “The direct impact of these tariffs is smaller than a bread box,” said Bill Adams, senior economist at PNC. Indeed, if business surveys have been clear about anything it’s that American business is


The president’s announcement jolted markets, which had bounced back sharply off Wednesday’s disappointing Fed rate cut only to have their legs cut out from underneath by news of a heightened trade war. Trump’s move means that all Chinese goods entering the U.S. will be subject to some sort of duties. “The direct impact of these tariffs is smaller than a bread box,” said Bill Adams, senior economist at PNC. Indeed, if business surveys have been clear about anything it’s that American business is
Trump’s latest broadside on China raises fear that the trade war is the ‘new status quo’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, latest, status, tariffs, broadside, effect, manufacturing, cut, fear, stanley, key, china, quo, goods, impact, trade, war, raises, trumps


Trump's latest broadside on China raises fear that the trade war is the 'new status quo'

The surprise tariffs President Donald Trump announced Thursday against $300 billion or so of Chinese goods takes the trade dispute between the two countries to a new level, even though in dollar terms it doesn’t amount to a whole lot.

The president’s announcement jolted markets, which had bounced back sharply off Wednesday’s disappointing Fed rate cut only to have their legs cut out from underneath by news of a heightened trade war.

Trump’s move means that all Chinese goods entering the U.S. will be subject to some sort of duties. While the actual price tag of the latest action is technically just $30 billion, or about 0.14 percentage points of GDP, the psychological damage that could be inflicted comes at an inopportune time.

“The direct impact of these tariffs is smaller than a bread box,” said Bill Adams, senior economist at PNC. “The larger effect is going to be through confidence channels and the effect on capital spending.”

Indeed, if business surveys have been clear about anything it’s that American business is nervous about trade. The closely watched Institute of Supply Management manufacturing survey dipped again in July and is teetering on contraction territory, while the Federal Reserve’s key manufacturing gauge has fallen for consecutive quarters.

Morgan Stanley strategists said the latest round of tariffs, if implemented, would contribute to “slowbalization,” or a continuation of lackluster growth, and could hasten a U.S. recession in as soon as three quarters.

“One key reason: about 68% of the next good tariffed will be consumer goods and autos/parts, with more potential for immediate impact to the economy,” Morgan Stanley strategist Michael Zezas said in a note.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, latest, status, tariffs, broadside, effect, manufacturing, cut, fear, stanley, key, china, quo, goods, impact, trade, war, raises, trumps


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Fewer investors have a ‘fear of missing out,’ so it may be time to buckle up, market bull suggests

He’s blaming uncertainty surrounding this week’s Federal Reserve decision on interest rates, another big batch of second quarter earnings results and a fresh round of U.S.-China trade talks. With the fear of missing out gripping fewer investors, Stoltzfus contends it’s not the time to get aggressive. The index, which closed the week at new record highs, has already surpassed Stoltzfus’ year-end target of 2,860 by almost 6%. Stoltzfus notes a more favorable development in the U.S.-China trade war


He’s blaming uncertainty surrounding this week’s Federal Reserve decision on interest rates, another big batch of second quarter earnings results and a fresh round of U.S.-China trade talks. With the fear of missing out gripping fewer investors, Stoltzfus contends it’s not the time to get aggressive. The index, which closed the week at new record highs, has already surpassed Stoltzfus’ year-end target of 2,860 by almost 6%. Stoltzfus notes a more favorable development in the U.S.-China trade war
Fewer investors have a ‘fear of missing out,’ so it may be time to buckle up, market bull suggests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: stephanie landsman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buckle, bull, investors, kind, target, uschina, yearend, suggests, point, missing, technology, fewer, fear, stocks, market, trade, stoltzfus


Fewer investors have a 'fear of missing out,' so it may be time to buckle up, market bull suggests

Oppenheimer Asset Management’s John Stoltzfus suggests investors may want to fasten their seat belts.

The long-time bull expects a wave of near-term volatility to pressure stocks. He’s blaming uncertainty surrounding this week’s Federal Reserve decision on interest rates, another big batch of second quarter earnings results and a fresh round of U.S.-China trade talks.

“Any kind of disappointment in a sense, okay, I can kind of take profits today without FOMO [fear of missing out] gripping my soul,” the firm’s chief investment strategist told CNBC’s “Futures Now ” last Thursday.

With the fear of missing out gripping fewer investors, Stoltzfus contends it’s not the time to get aggressive.

“We’re highly selective at this point with the S&P 500 up over 20%, ” he said.

The index, which closed the week at new record highs, has already surpassed Stoltzfus’ year-end target of 2,860 by almost 6%. He’s planning to tweak the number once there’s more visibility.

“It’s under revision at this time. We’re going to wait until after the Fed makes its decision on the 31st,” he said “At that point, we’ll put in our new target for the year-end, depending on how that goes.”

Stoltzfus notes a more favorable development in the U.S.-China trade war would be an integral part of his bull case. He believes it’s the biggest headwind holding back stocks from ripping even higher.

“It would be confirmation that indeed the markets thought things weren’t so bad, were actually pretty good,” he said.

For now, Stoltzfus is bracing for a 3 to 4% pullback to strike stocks near term. He’d look to add cyclical names such as consumer discretionary, industrials, financials and technology on weakness.

“Tech looks like a great place to be because technology flows into all of the eleven sectors. Every business needs technology,” Stoltzfus said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: stephanie landsman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buckle, bull, investors, kind, target, uschina, yearend, suggests, point, missing, technology, fewer, fear, stocks, market, trade, stoltzfus


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