Europe stocks trade lower as trade fears linger; Brexit talks collapse; Thomas Cook shares down 29%

European stocks traded lower Friday as trade fears ratcheted up, amid the U.S. administration’s bid to blacklist Chinese telecoms giant Huawei and the ruling Chinese Communist Party’s newspaper striking a defiant tone. The notable contributor to auto losses was BMW, which saw its shares slip 5.7%. In Asia, most major indexes gained in Friday trade following overnight gains on Wall Street, but mainland Chinese shares tumbled amid ongoing tensions between Beijing and Washington. Stateside, investo


European stocks traded lower Friday as trade fears ratcheted up, amid the U.S. administration’s bid to blacklist Chinese telecoms giant Huawei and the ruling Chinese Communist Party’s newspaper striking a defiant tone. The notable contributor to auto losses was BMW, which saw its shares slip 5.7%. In Asia, most major indexes gained in Friday trade following overnight gains on Wall Street, but mainland Chinese shares tumbled amid ongoing tensions between Beijing and Washington. Stateside, investo
Europe stocks trade lower as trade fears linger; Brexit talks collapse; Thomas Cook shares down 29% Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, linger, thomas, cook, talks, losses, stocks, war, ruling, chinese, saw, shares, lower, fears, traded, europe, tensions


Europe stocks trade lower as trade fears linger; Brexit talks collapse; Thomas Cook shares down 29%

European stocks traded lower Friday as trade fears ratcheted up, amid the U.S. administration’s bid to blacklist Chinese telecoms giant Huawei and the ruling Chinese Communist Party’s newspaper striking a defiant tone.

The pan-European STOXX 600 dropped 0.6% after the opening bell, autos leading the losses with a fall of 1.6% in the early minutes of trading, while only travel and leisure and utilities stocks traded in the black mid-morning.

The notable contributor to auto losses was BMW, which saw its shares slip 5.7%.

The morning’s biggest loser was British tour operator Thomas Cook, which saw its shares plummet 30% by mid-morning, hitting their lowest since July 2012 and on track for the biggest one-day drop since November 2011. Citi analysts downgraded the company’s stock to “sell” after its latest profit warning Thursday.

In Asia, most major indexes gained in Friday trade following overnight gains on Wall Street, but mainland Chinese shares tumbled amid ongoing tensions between Beijing and Washington. The Shenzhen component led the losses, dropping 1.77% in the morning session.

Stateside, investors will be monitoring the trade war between the world’s largest economies, as President Donald Trump’s bid to block Huawei from buying American technology ratcheted up tensions. Meanwhile, China’s ruling Communist Party’s newspaper struck a defiant tone Friday, insisting the trade war will only make China stronger.

While major U.S. indexes gained Thursday, shares in American chipmakers fell upon the news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, linger, thomas, cook, talks, losses, stocks, war, ruling, chinese, saw, shares, lower, fears, traded, europe, tensions


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The stock market fears more trade retaliation from China is coming next week

In fact, they drifted lower toward the close on word that trade negotiations with China were in flux. With the S&P mostly flat for the week, trade related names were far and away the worst performers — Caterpillar, Apple, 3M, and Intel all down 2 to 6%. “China is still out there, and the market knows that is a tough nut, and traders want assurances that no new tariffs are coming on.” It could come in the form of regulatory harassment of U.S. corporations operating in China, but it could be even


In fact, they drifted lower toward the close on word that trade negotiations with China were in flux. With the S&P mostly flat for the week, trade related names were far and away the worst performers — Caterpillar, Apple, 3M, and Intel all down 2 to 6%. “China is still out there, and the market knows that is a tough nut, and traders want assurances that no new tariffs are coming on.” It could come in the form of regulatory harassment of U.S. corporations operating in China, but it could be even
The stock market fears more trade retaliation from China is coming next week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: bob pisani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retaliatory, market, sentiment, stock, fears, china, chinese, trade, coming, form, business, tariffs, week, trump, retaliation


The stock market fears more trade retaliation from China is coming next week

Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017.

On Friday, we had positive news on trade related to delaying tariffs on European auto imports and eliminating steel and aluminum tariffs for Mexico and Canada. All good news — but a funny thing happened: the markets didn’t move much. In fact, they drifted lower toward the close on word that trade negotiations with China were in flux.

With the S&P mostly flat for the week, trade related names were far and away the worst performers — Caterpillar, Apple, 3M, and Intel all down 2 to 6%.

Caterpillar down 6.3%

Apple down 4.3%

MMM down 3.9%

Intel down 2.9%

“After all these trade disappointments it’s getting to be a tougher sell,” Alec Young, Managing Director, Global Markets Research at FTSE Russell. “China is still out there, and the market knows that is a tough nut, and traders want assurances that no new tariffs are coming on.”

What’s going on?

Traders are concerned there is another shoe to drop: more retaliatory measures from China, which may or may not come in the form of tariffs. Chinese media outlets have been warning all week they are coming.

What other form would retaliation take? It wouldn’t be hard to imagine. China has already cancelled a large pork order. It could come in the form of regulatory harassment of U.S. corporations operating in China, but it could be even simpler.

Jim Kelleher at Argus tells his clients to watch for sudden announcement of loss of business: “We would be careful to monitor investments in U.S. ‘champion’ names such as Boeing and Caterpillar. Should the trade environment between the U.S. and China deteriorate further, Chinese officials could directly or indirectly discourage Chinese companies and consumers from doing business with high-profile symbols of U.S. corporate might.”

Kelleher also warns against simply using a dollars and cents approach to trade: “Trade can be about more than dollar amounts. Business is a delicate mix of activity and sentiment; deterioration in sentiment can have an outsized effect on activity. Moreover, global supply chains have become complicated and entangled among nations. Counting the dollar value of car parts, for example, does not capture how those delayed or absent parts may impact the production of an entire vehicle.”

President Trump, presumably, is well aware of this, but Chris Krueger at Cowen notes that his efforts to shield farmers from the pain felt by retaliatory tariffs may be skewing his thinking: “The most important takeaway (from our perspective) is that anything that insulates Trump’s base from the near term costs of his actions raises the likelihood we continue on the tariff path.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: bob pisani
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European stocks close higher as trade fears fade

European stocks traded higher Thursday as markets recovered from an early rattle caused by U.S. President Donald Trump’s renewed targeting of Chinese tech firm Huawei. The pan-European STOXX 600 hit a day high just around the close of trade. Kone shares traded 4.98% higher. This came after a market sell-off Monday as the trade war between the world’s largest economies gathered pace. Trade tensions, however, continued to weigh on investor sentiment as Trump declared a national emergency over thre


European stocks traded higher Thursday as markets recovered from an early rattle caused by U.S. President Donald Trump’s renewed targeting of Chinese tech firm Huawei. The pan-European STOXX 600 hit a day high just around the close of trade. Kone shares traded 4.98% higher. This came after a market sell-off Monday as the trade war between the world’s largest economies gathered pace. Trade tensions, however, continued to weigh on investor sentiment as Trump declared a national emergency over thre
European stocks close higher as trade fears fade Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, european, trade, president, higher, stocks, technology, chinese, trump, shares, fade, fears, traded, market, close, threats


European stocks close higher as trade fears fade

European stocks traded higher Thursday as markets recovered from an early rattle caused by U.S. President Donald Trump’s renewed targeting of Chinese tech firm Huawei. The pan-European STOXX 600 hit a day high just around the close of trade.

The STOXX 600 closed provisionally up by around 1.2%, Chemicals leading the gains with a 2.54% climb, while autos struggled to make headway, slipping 0.6%.

Thyssenkrupp was the strongest performer, its stock rising 10.03% on reports that Finland’s Kone is assessing the viability of a bid for the German industrial company’s elevators division. Kone shares traded 4.98% higher.

The European Commission revealed Thursday that Barclays, Citigroup, J.P. Morgan, MUFG and Royal Bank of Scotland have been fined a total of 1.07 billion euros ($1.2 billion) by EU antitrust regulators for rigging the spot foreign exchange market for 11 currencies.

In Asia, shares were mixed in Thursday afternoon trade after the U.S. took aim at Huawei again, with President Donald Trump declaring a national emergency over threats against U.S. technology. The move, done via executive order, is expected to precede a ban on American firms dealing with the Chinese telecommunications company.

However, French President Emmanuel Macron spoke to CNBC Thursday and poured cold water on the idea of implementing protectionist measures on tech companies like Huawei.

Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong shares recovered from an early slip to trade slightly higher in the afternoon, while stocks in Japan and South Korea finished in the red.

Stateside, investors will be monitoring a volatile market environment after stocks rose Wednesday following multiple sources telling CNBC of the delay to auto tariffs. This came after a market sell-off Monday as the trade war between the world’s largest economies gathered pace.

Trade tensions, however, continued to weigh on investor sentiment as Trump declared a national emergency over threats against American technology.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, european, trade, president, higher, stocks, technology, chinese, trump, shares, fade, fears, traded, market, close, threats


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Asia markets fall amid tariffs fears while Chinese trade data surprises

Asia stocks declined Wednesday as investors digested ongoing developments in the U.S.-China trade negotiations, which sent stateside shares tumbling overnight. Mainland Chinese shares were lower on the day, with the Shanghai composite down 1.12% to about 2,893.76. Chinese trade data for April showed both exports and trade surplus missed expectations while imports surprisingly rose. Customs data showed trade surplus was $13.84 billion, far lower than the $35 billion analysts had expected. Elsewhe


Asia stocks declined Wednesday as investors digested ongoing developments in the U.S.-China trade negotiations, which sent stateside shares tumbling overnight. Mainland Chinese shares were lower on the day, with the Shanghai composite down 1.12% to about 2,893.76. Chinese trade data for April showed both exports and trade surplus missed expectations while imports surprisingly rose. Customs data showed trade surplus was $13.84 billion, far lower than the $35 billion analysts had expected. Elsewhe
Asia markets fall amid tariffs fears while Chinese trade data surprises Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, tariffs, fall, declined, lower, fell, asia, amid, surprises, markets, index, fears, chinese, shenzhen, shares, data, surplus, showed


Asia markets fall amid tariffs fears while Chinese trade data surprises

Asia stocks declined Wednesday as investors digested ongoing developments in the U.S.-China trade negotiations, which sent stateside shares tumbling overnight.

Mainland Chinese shares were lower on the day, with the Shanghai composite down 1.12% to about 2,893.76. The Shenzhen component slid 0.96% to 9,002.53 while the Shenzhen composite declined 0.649% to approximately 1,530.31.

Chinese trade data for April showed both exports and trade surplus missed expectations while imports surprisingly rose. Customs data showed trade surplus was $13.84 billion, far lower than the $35 billion analysts had expected.

April exports fell 2.7 percent from a year ago. They were expected to have risen 2.3 percent from a year earlier, according to economists Reuters polled.

The Hang Seng index in Hong Kong declined around 1.2%, as of its final hour of trading.

Elsewhere in Asia, Japan’s Nikkei 225 dropped 1.46% to close at 21,602.59, with shares of index heavyweight Fanuc declining 2.24%. The Topix index also fell 1.72% to 1,572.33.

In South Korea, the Kospi finished its trading day lower by 0.41% at 2,168.01, with Samsung Electronics shares declining 1.34%.

Australia’s ASX 200 also shed 0.42% to close at 6,269.10, as most sectors slipped. Shares of TPG Telecom plunged 13.53% after the company’s merger with Vodafone was blocked by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

“”From an asset allocation perspective … we think that we are quite defensive right now, waiting for this volatility to pass,” Thomas Poullaouec, head of Asia Pacific multi-asset solutions at T. Rowe Price, told CNBC’s “Street Signs” on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: eustance huang
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Trade war fears are crushing stocks, and sell-off could keep going if there is no deal by Friday

Stocks plunged and bonds rose in a safety trade Tuesday, after the Trump administration set the clock ticking on a 12:01 a.m. Analysts said the threat of new tariffs puts assumptions about the market at risk, including the expectations for 3% earnings growth this year. Global equity markets could also take a hit, as global growth would expected to slowdown on another round of tariffs. “If we have the increase from 10% to 25%, that would lower Chinese growth by a half a percentage point, and glob


Stocks plunged and bonds rose in a safety trade Tuesday, after the Trump administration set the clock ticking on a 12:01 a.m. Analysts said the threat of new tariffs puts assumptions about the market at risk, including the expectations for 3% earnings growth this year. Global equity markets could also take a hit, as global growth would expected to slowdown on another round of tariffs. “If we have the increase from 10% to 25%, that would lower Chinese growth by a half a percentage point, and glob
Trade war fears are crushing stocks, and sell-off could keep going if there is no deal by Friday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: patti domm
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Trade war fears are crushing stocks, and sell-off could keep going if there is no deal by Friday

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange as the Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell holds a news conference on December 19, 2018 in New York City. Spencer Platt | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Investors are worried the U.S. and China may not find enough common ground to head off a new round of tariffs later this week that could bite into global growth, squeeze profit margins and drive down stock prices. Trade negotiators are scheduled to meet this week in Washington, but recent tensions make it less likely a deal will be agreed to before the Trump administration unleashes a new round of tariffs. Analysts say a deal is still possible, but the risks have risen that there will be more tariffs before a deal can be agreed, and it could then take a lot longer than expected for an agreement to be hammered out.

Stocks plunged and bonds rose in a safety trade Tuesday, after the Trump administration set the clock ticking on a 12:01 a.m. ET Friday deadline for raising tariffs to 25% on $200 billion in Chinese goods. Trump administration officials said they still expect to meet with a Chinese trade delegation this week, but at a media briefing late Monday they said their Chinese counterparts reneged on some key areas of agreement in trade talks. The Dow fell more than 473 points to 25,965, and the S&P 500 was off 48 points at 2,884. “It all depends on what happens Friday. Traders were not expecting this. The market is trying to discount it in case tariffs get reinstated,” said Scott Redler, partner with T3live.com. “This is a curve ball, unexpected scenario.” With the threat of tariffs, analysts say many of Wall Street’s assumption for profits and growth would have to be tossed —suggesting that stocks could be too richly priced near recent highs. The forward price-to-earnings ratio on the S&P 500 was at 17 times earnings expectations. “That has to come down because growth has to come down…A good part of what went on in this market was predicated on a deal getting done in the first place. If that’s not the case, we have to start taking [earnings] estimates down,” said Art Hogan, National Securities chief market strategist. Keith Parker, chief U.S. equities strategist at UBS, said the hit to S&P 500 earnings would be 2% or greater, if the 10% tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods are raised to 25%. Parker said earnings would be hit by 7% if there was a full blown trade war, while the S&P 500 could trade in a range of 600 points on different scenarios of escalation of trade wars to de-escalation. The S&P is now near the top of the range, he said. “We think the most likely path is the deal. But escalation risks have risen and the growth backdrop is bit better so [investors should be] selectively staying involved in cyclicals and look for ways to hedge,” said Parker. “The S&P is probably trading much more in line with a status quo or some form of a deal. I would say it’s not pricing that trade war scenario.” The seeming divide between Chinese officials and the Trump administration added to concerns, after week’s of positive commentary from both sides. Hogan said China’s comments are problematic and could indicate the two sides are far apart. “They’re not going to back down from the parts of the deal they want. They don’t want to have a full account of the deal made public,” he said.

But at the same time, leaders in Washington and Beijing may feel like they have more leverage in the negotiations. China’s recent data has shown its economy is stabilizing after months of fiscal and monetary stimulus. The Trump administration too must be feeling upbeat after a strong U.S. jobs report and higher stock prices. Analysts said the threat of new tariffs puts assumptions about the market at risk, including the expectations for 3% earnings growth this year. Earnings in the first quarter grew at 1.2%, much better than earlier estimates for a decline, and second quarter S&P 500 earnings growth is expected at 1.5%, according to Refinitiv. On Tuesday, stocks reversed the pattern of Monday, where the worst losses were in the early morning as markets reacted to President Donald Trump’s Sunday afternoon tweets threatening more tariffs. As the day went on, stocks shook off losses as traders took the president’s threats as more a bargaining ploy by the president. Global equity markets could also take a hit, as global growth would expected to slowdown on another round of tariffs. “If we have the increase from 10% to 25%, that would lower Chinese growth by a half a percentage point, and global growth by 0.2 of a percentage point,” said Cesar Rojas, global economist at Citigroup. The impact on U.S. growth would be less than a tenth of a percentage point. “I think that we will get a deal,” said Rojas. “I’m still hopeful there will be an announcement that tariffs will not increase, and that they will come to an agreement…If that’s not the case, and there is a tariff increase on Friday , I will change my base case to having an escalation of trade tensions.” Rojas said if that’s the case, then a deal might be a much longer way off. China might not come back to the table in a serious way, until after it felt the pain of tariffs. The U.S. would also be hit by Chinese tariffs, and that would also come as U.S. growth was already slowing down from last year’s level.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, tariffs, selloff, trump, deal, war, global, earnings, fears, chinese, stocks, come, crushing, going, growth, sp


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Friday’s report of first quarter growth should show economy is strong and no recession in sight

Over the past week, as the late quarter data was released, economists boosted their forecasts. Stanley said he expects that he expects growth of about 3.3% for the second quarter. He expects to see a comeback by the consumer, after sluggish spending growth in the first quarter. He also said there are signs business spending will also pick up in the second quarter. Economists said that first quarter growth has traditionally been weaker because of seasonal factors.


Over the past week, as the late quarter data was released, economists boosted their forecasts. Stanley said he expects that he expects growth of about 3.3% for the second quarter. He expects to see a comeback by the consumer, after sluggish spending growth in the first quarter. He also said there are signs business spending will also pick up in the second quarter. Economists said that first quarter growth has traditionally been weaker because of seasonal factors.
Friday’s report of first quarter growth should show economy is strong and no recession in sight Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: patti domm, getty images
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Friday's report of first quarter growth should show economy is strong and no recession in sight

Traders are paying closer than normal attention to the data, which is viewed as backward looking, because of the recession fears and what implication it might have for growth heading into the second quarter. Dow Jones consensus forecast is for 2.5% growth, while CNBC/Moody’s Analytics GDP Survey shows economists have a median forecast of 2.4%.

“Almost half the quarter you had the threat of the March 1 tariff hike hanging over everyone. That went away, but it should not be a surprise the quarter started out on a really weak note. The fears were exasperated by the fact we didn’t have data for awhile and we were kind of in a vacuum,” Stanley said.

Over the past week, as the late quarter data was released, economists boosted their forecasts. The GDP report is expected at 8:30 a.m. ET Friday.

“We already know the first quarter is stronger than people expected. We might get some headline affect, but we’re not going to learn a lot we already don’t know,” said Marc Chandler, chief market strategist at Bannockburn Global Forex.

Stanley said he expects that he expects growth of about 3.3% for the second quarter. He expects to see a comeback by the consumer, after sluggish spending growth in the first quarter. “Given the blowout retail sales we saw in March, the stage was set for a nice bounce back in Q2,” he said. He also said there are signs business spending will also pick up in the second quarter.

Economists said that first quarter growth has traditionally been weaker because of seasonal factors.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: patti domm, getty images
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Earnings and data could be proof that slowdown fears were overblown

The outlook for first-quarter growth has suddenly shifted upward, after a series of better data releases later in the quarter. This past week, China reported first-quarter GDPat 6.4%, slightly better than the 6.3% expected by economists. I think investors have kind of gotten past this notion of global downturn. I do think next week is going to be important for earnings. Dan Suzuki, portfolio strategist at Richard Bernstein Advisors, said he still sees deteriorating fundamentals for both earnings


The outlook for first-quarter growth has suddenly shifted upward, after a series of better data releases later in the quarter. This past week, China reported first-quarter GDPat 6.4%, slightly better than the 6.3% expected by economists. I think investors have kind of gotten past this notion of global downturn. I do think next week is going to be important for earnings. Dan Suzuki, portfolio strategist at Richard Bernstein Advisors, said he still sees deteriorating fundamentals for both earnings
Earnings and data could be proof that slowdown fears were overblown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-19  Authors: patti domm, brendan mcdermid
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Earnings and data could be proof that slowdown fears were overblown

Earnings season shifts into a higher gear in the week ahead, as investors also watch for fresh economic data that could show that the economy is pulling out of a temporary rut.

Amazon, Boeing, Microsoft and ExxonMobil are among more than 140 S&P 500 companies reporting quarterly results. According to Refinitiv, 74% of the companies reporting so far have beaten expectations. Based on forecasts and actual reports, earnings for the S&P 500 as a whole are expected to decline 1.7%, the first negative quarter in three years. Some forecasters had projected an earnings decline of 4% or more.

The equivalent of the economy’s first-quarter report card will be released Friday, with the first reading of GDP. The outlook for first-quarter growth has suddenly shifted upward, after a series of better data releases later in the quarter. CNBC/Moody’s Analytics Rapid Update survey shows economists’ median forecast is now tracking at 2.4%, way above the 1% expected earlier in the quarter, when severe winter weather and the government shutdown were stifling the economy.

At the same time, investors are feeling better about global growth and far less fearful of a recession in the near term. One reason is that China’s data has also been picking up. This past week, China reported first-quarter GDPat 6.4%, slightly better than the 6.3% expected by economists.

“I think a lot of this is leveraged on economic activity. I think investors have kind of gotten past this notion of global downturn. The China number was pretty good earlier in the week. I do think next week is going to be important for earnings. We’re going to get a great cross section of industries,” said Jack Ablin, CIO at Cresset Wealth Advisors. On Wednesday, China’s first quarter GDP

U.S. trade talks with China could be also important in the week ahead, with negotiations continuing and investors awaiting news of a summit between President Donald Trump and China President Xi Jinping.

Dan Suzuki, portfolio strategist at Richard Bernstein Advisors, said he still sees deteriorating fundamentals for both earnings and the economy, even though data appears to be improving.

“I think it’s a function of expectations were probably dropping too quickly, and I think recent data is telling you that growth isn’t collapsing but it’s slowing,” he said. “I think that’s very important. That’s probably going to be the most important dynamic. That’s probably going to continue.”

That could make for a choppier market at some point, he said. Suzuki said he could see stocks ending the year higher than current levels but he expects to see the market pull back first.

The market shrugged off Thursday’s release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the Trump campaign and Russian election interference.

“This type of thing firmly falls into the category of it can move the needle for the market on a daily or weekly performance basis, but it’s not going to be a longer term story for the market,” Suzuki said. Analysts have said the economy’s performance is more important for Trump’s reelection than the report at this point.

What to Watch

Monday

Earnings: Halliburton, Kimberly-Clark, Whirlpool, Celanese, Allison Transmission, Range Resources, WW Grainger, Zions Bancorp, Cadence Designs

10:00 a.m. Existing home sales

Tuesday

Earnings: Coca-Cola, Lockheed Martin, Procter and Gamble, Verizon, Twitter, NextEra Energy, Northern Trust, Teradyne, Carlisle Cos, United Technologies, Fifth Third, JetBlue, Harley Davidson, PulteGroup, State Street, eBay, Six Flags, Stryker, Snap, Texas Instruments, Canadian Pacific Railway, Kaiser aluminum

9:00 a.m. FHFA home prices

9:45 a.m. Manufacturing PMI 9:45 a.m. Services PMI 10:00 a.m. New home sales

Wednesday

Earnings: AT&T, Caterpillar, Boeing, Facebook, Microsoft, Visa, Tesla, PayPal, General Dynamics, Northrop Grumman, Chipotle Mexican Grill, F5 Networks, Boston Beer, Churchill Downs, Netgear, Sirius XM, Moody’s, T.Rowe Price, Spirit Airlines, Graco, Biogen, Domino’s Pizza, Nasdaq OMX, Anthem, Boston Scientific

Thursday

Earnings: Amazon, 3M, Comcast, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Freeport-McMoRan, Hershey, Alexion Pharma, Altria, Barclays, UBS, Starbucks, Intel, Ford, Discover Financial, Eastman Chemical, Alaska Air, American Electric, Illinois Tool Works, Nintendo, UPS, DR Horton, Capitol One, Valero Energy, Southwest Air, Nokia, Tractor Supply, Brunswick

8:30 a.m. Initial claims

8:30 a.m. Durable goods 10:00 a.m. Housing vacancies

Friday

Earnings: Exxon Mobil, Chevron; Archer Daniels Midland, AstraZeneca, Colgate-Palmolive, Daimler, Cabot Oil and Gas, AutoNation, Autoliv, Bloomin’ Brands, Deutsche Bank, Sanofi, Sony,

8:30 a .m. Real GDP (Q1 advance)

8:30 a.m. Advance economic indicators

10:00 a.m. Consumer sentiment


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-19  Authors: patti domm, brendan mcdermid
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Fading fears of a ‘hard landing’ for China’s economy could push stocks higher, strategist predicts

Hofer cautioned that more data is needed to confirm whether a “soft landing” will be achieved. And if it is, stocks will likely push higher, he predicted, while pointing out that it will not be at the pace seen so far this year. “But at least we can hold on to what we have, which is already quite important, and so profit-taking should actually be quite minimal,” Hofer said. Speaking earlier on CNBC’s “Street Signs,” Hofer described such a deal as one that contains methods for enforcement and mon


Hofer cautioned that more data is needed to confirm whether a “soft landing” will be achieved. And if it is, stocks will likely push higher, he predicted, while pointing out that it will not be at the pace seen so far this year. “But at least we can hold on to what we have, which is already quite important, and so profit-taking should actually be quite minimal,” Hofer said. Speaking earlier on CNBC’s “Street Signs,” Hofer described such a deal as one that contains methods for enforcement and mon
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Fading fears of a 'hard landing' for China's economy could push stocks higher, strategist predicts

Hofer cautioned that more data is needed to confirm whether a “soft landing” will be achieved. And if it is, stocks will likely push higher, he predicted, while pointing out that it will not be at the pace seen so far this year.

“But at least we can hold on to what we have, which is already quite important, and so profit-taking should actually be quite minimal,” Hofer said.

The strategist said that a further “gentle 5, 10, 15 percent” in gains is possible the rest of the year, adding that “green shoots of recovery” are visible and will likely increase.

“And if you do have that U.S.-China trade deal that we’re expecting, which is a higher quality one, then investor sentiment in China is going to go through the roof and it should be relatively clear sailing,” he said.

Speaking earlier on CNBC’s “Street Signs,” Hofer described such a deal as one that contains methods for enforcement and monitoring.

“If all we get is an agreement from China to buy more U.S. agricultural product, I think the market will be very disappointed with that,” he said.

China is scheduled to release economic growth numbers for the first quarter of 2019 on Wednesday and economists polled by Reuters expect GDP to increase 6.3 percent from the same period last year. China’s economy grew 6.4 percent in the last quarter of 2018 from a year earlier.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, strategist, quite, visible, landing, stocks, push, fears, economy, hofer, earlier, yearbut, hard, predicts, likely, china, higher, fading, deal, quarter


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Companies still expect ‘pretty solid’ Asia growth despite ominous signals on global economy

Despite fears of slowing growth globally, companies seem set for a relatively strong performance this year — especially in Asia, according to one expert. That is, guidance from companies on their expected earnings for this year have been “pretty good,” said Ken Wong, Asia equity portfolio specialist at asset management firm Eastspring Investments. “Despite all this talk (about the) trade war slowing down economic growth, companies are still seeing a fairly decent amount of earnings growth expect


Despite fears of slowing growth globally, companies seem set for a relatively strong performance this year — especially in Asia, according to one expert. That is, guidance from companies on their expected earnings for this year have been “pretty good,” said Ken Wong, Asia equity portfolio specialist at asset management firm Eastspring Investments. “Despite all this talk (about the) trade war slowing down economic growth, companies are still seeing a fairly decent amount of earnings growth expect
Companies still expect ‘pretty solid’ Asia growth despite ominous signals on global economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: weizhen tan, giulia marchi, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, solid, outlook, signals, wong, 2019, signs, recession, pretty, growth, global, despite, economy, slowing, companies, expect, ominous, fears


Companies still expect 'pretty solid' Asia growth despite ominous signals on global economy

Despite fears of slowing growth globally, companies seem set for a relatively strong performance this year — especially in Asia, according to one expert.

That is, guidance from companies on their expected earnings for this year have been “pretty good,” said Ken Wong, Asia equity portfolio specialist at asset management firm Eastspring Investments.

“Despite all this talk (about the) trade war slowing down economic growth, companies are still seeing a fairly decent amount of earnings growth expectations for 2019,” he told CNBC’s “Street Signs” on Tuesday.

Talk of a recession heightened in the last few weeks as developments in March sent ominous signs of a potential downturn. For one, the yields on long-term U.S. debts became lower than those of short term debts: A so-called yield curve inversion is widely regarded as one of the most reliable recession indicators in the market

On top of that, weak economic data also stoked fears: Manufacturing activity in the eurozone dropped to its lowest level in more than six years in March. And, the U.S. Federal Reserve, adopted a significantly dovish stance, projecting no further interest rate hikes this year, and justifying its more temperate outlook by cutting the 2019 growth outlook for the U.S.

All those signals “had a lot of people spooked,” Wong said. “But then, we started talking to companies … when they reported their numbers, what they said to us was: Actually, 2019 is looking to be pretty solid, things are picking up.”

Such companies are still expecting double-digit growth in markets like China, Hong Kong and India, he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: weizhen tan, giulia marchi, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, solid, outlook, signals, wong, 2019, signs, recession, pretty, growth, global, despite, economy, slowing, companies, expect, ominous, fears


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Economist Jim O’Neill says his fears over China are at a 30-year high

The renowned economist who coined the acronym BRICS told CNBC that he’s started to worry about some parts of the Chinese economy after several decades of stellar growth. Speaking at the Ambrosetti Workshop on the shores of Lake Como, near Milan, Jim O’Neill said that China has become an integral part of the global economy, and any slump would have the potential to drag other major economies lower. The world’s second-largest economy grew 6.6 percent in 2018 — the slowest pace since 1990. Retail s


The renowned economist who coined the acronym BRICS told CNBC that he’s started to worry about some parts of the Chinese economy after several decades of stellar growth. Speaking at the Ambrosetti Workshop on the shores of Lake Como, near Milan, Jim O’Neill said that China has become an integral part of the global economy, and any slump would have the potential to drag other major economies lower. The world’s second-largest economy grew 6.6 percent in 2018 — the slowest pace since 1990. Retail s
Economist Jim O’Neill says his fears over China are at a 30-year high Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: matt clinch, simon dawson, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yearonyear, workshop, economist, told, economy, 2018, sales, fears, 30year, worlds, high, watchers, china, warning, oneill, worry, jim


Economist Jim O'Neill says his fears over China are at a 30-year high

The renowned economist who coined the acronym BRICS told CNBC that he’s started to worry about some parts of the Chinese economy after several decades of stellar growth.

Speaking at the Ambrosetti Workshop on the shores of Lake Como, near Milan, Jim O’Neill said that China has become an integral part of the global economy, and any slump would have the potential to drag other major economies lower.

“I have to say, for the past year, for the first time in 30 years I have been a bit more troubled about some aspects of China’s path than I have been before,” the former Goldman Sachs Asset Management chairman told CNBC’s Steve Sedgwick on Thursday.

The world’s second-largest economy grew 6.6 percent in 2018 — the slowest pace since 1990. Recent consumer data has also spooked market watchers. Retail sales growth in 2018 declined to 6.9 percent year-on-year, from a 9.1 percent increase the year before. There’s also been plummeting auto sales, fears over household debt, and firms like Apple warning about falling demand in the country of 1.4 billion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: matt clinch, simon dawson, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yearonyear, workshop, economist, told, economy, 2018, sales, fears, 30year, worlds, high, watchers, china, warning, oneill, worry, jim


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