If you are a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian

While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app. High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free. The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. While users


While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app. High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free. The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. While users
If you are a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, source, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, course, valyrian, thrones, speak, peterson, game, teach, created, develop, app, high, feinberg, fan, duolingo, language, languages


If you are a 'Game of Thrones' fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian

“Skorverdon zaldrīzoti Daenerys ēza?”

Translation: How many dragons does Daenerys have? It’s not a ridiculous question if you’re a fan of the HBO hit series “Game of Thrones,” which returns for its eighth and final season on Sunday. The language? It’s called High Valyrian, the tongue of the ruined Valyrian Freehold empire, and it’s one of four languages created by linguist David J. Peterson spoken on the show.

While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app.

Duolingo first offered lessons in High Valyrian in 2017 and, since then, 1.2 million people have started the course. In the last two weeks leading up to the premier of the final season, Duolingo has seen a near 65% increase in people taking the course, said Sam Dalsimer, a spokesman for Duolingo.

High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. Star Trek fans can find Klingon, a language constructed by Marc Okrand and centered around spacecraft, warfare and weaponry.

To offer languages on Duolingo, the company usually relies on hundreds of volunteers and employees to develop course material and monitor users’ experiences. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free.

“We teach over 30 languages and most have thousands of people who speak them and are capable of helping us teach them.” Dalsimer said. “There’s only one person on planet Earth who knows the language, and that’s David Peterson.”

The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. Martin. Peterson won a contest to develop the more common language used on “Game of Thrones” called Dothraki but was asked to build High Valyrian later in the series. His goal was to create a classic language that could give birth to many others, similar to Romance languages, and Peterson noted it had to fit with the names Martin created for the book, such as Daenerys, Viserys and Rhaella.

There are now 824 words of High Valyrian that users can learn on Duolingo, and that number continues to grow. Peterson said there are now 2,000 words in the full version of the language he maintains.

“With every single language I create I keep working on it for the rest of my life or until I’m not happy with it,” said Peterson, who has created more than 50 languages. “It will basically just be another one of my languages, it’s not like it’s going to get any special treatment.”

When Peterson first encountered Duolingo, he felt it could revolutionize the way people learned languages. It had a great interface, it was free and, as a linguist, it’s the dream for people like him to create languages people would have access to, although he didn’t foresee how popular High Valyrian would become.

Today, High Valyrian has 822,000 active learners, or those who have used the course in the last 12 months. That’s more than Czech, Norwegian, Vietnamese and Hungarian.

“I imagined it would attract casual interest, but I never imagined there would be that many people who would actually be interested in taking the course,” Peterson said.

There is one statistic Peterson is particularly proud of: 44% of users who came to Duolingo to learn High Valyrian went on to practice other languages. While users may not perfect High Valyrian, Peterson sees the language as a “gateway drug” to learners discovering other cultures.

“As we become more economically focused, people view language as a tool as opposed to an art piece in and of itself or cultural history,” Peterson said.

More than 40% of the world speaks one of eight languages, although there are more than 7,000 worldwide. UNESCO, The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, has labeled 2,680 languages in danger as it celebrates the International Year of Indigenous Languages, designed to raise awareness to disappearing languages.

“It’s nice that the UN is putting this emphasis on indigenous languages because people need to start addressing this issue,” Peterson said. “We’re losing them and we’re losing them quickly, and once they’re lost, they’re lost.”

Duolingo has worked with communities and volunteers like Peterson to develop courses in endangered languages, such as offering lessons in Hawaiian, Irish and Navajo, Dalsimer said.

“Those courses are driven entirely by volunteer contributors and for them it’s more about a desire to preserve their language and their culture because they see it as being endangered, and it is,” Dalsimer said. “Languages die every year and Duolingo can help them preserve it.”

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“I remember thinking that if David Peterson ever taught the ‘Game of Thrones’ language I would definitely check it out,” said Andrew Feinberg, a volunteer for Duolingo who has used the app since its beta version nearly seven years ago.

Except when Duolingo announced it would offer High Valyrian courses, Feinberg thought it was a joke. He helped Duolingo develop its Norwegian and Japanese platforms, and he’s witnessed the company’s pranks in the past, like when it offered pirate and zombie languages.

But Feinberg noticed the only contributor to the course was Peterson. That’s when he realized it wasn’t a joke.

Peterson, dubbed by the Los Angeles Times as “Hollywood’s go-to language guy” has created languages for many film and television projects, including the movies “Thor: The Dark World” and “Doctor Strange.”

“I had sort of stalked him on YouTube and watched all those videos on how he created those languages,” Feinberg said. “I was really excited for it. I knew that he was a serious linguist who had complimented Duolingo before.”

Now Feinberg manages learning groups on Facebook for Japanese, Chinese, Norwegian and, a day after its introduction, High Valyrian, which has amassed over 200 members learning alongside Peterson himself, who encourages people to use and develop the language in conversation with each other even if that means moving beyond what he imagined.

“It’s always a little different since I did create High Valyrian and, in a sense, there is an arbiter to determine what is right and what is wrong,” Peterson said. “But as long as I’m here I feel like not only do I want to, but I should be there to try to help people out.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, source, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, course, valyrian, thrones, speak, peterson, game, teach, created, develop, app, high, feinberg, fan, duolingo, language, languages


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Walgreens to tackle health-care costs with Alphabet’s Verily

Walgreens Boots Alliance is teaming with Verily, Alphabet’s life sciences unit, on improving outcomes for patients with chronic conditions, the companies announced. Verily CEO Andrew Conrad said that working with Walgreens provides the health tech company “the opportunity to jointly tackle real-world issues that significantly impact the health of individuals and communities.” Both Walgreens and competitor CVS Health have mentioned lowering health-care costs for consumers as a priority in recent


Walgreens Boots Alliance is teaming with Verily, Alphabet’s life sciences unit, on improving outcomes for patients with chronic conditions, the companies announced. Verily CEO Andrew Conrad said that working with Walgreens provides the health tech company “the opportunity to jointly tackle real-world issues that significantly impact the health of individuals and communities.” Both Walgreens and competitor CVS Health have mentioned lowering health-care costs for consumers as a priority in recent
Walgreens to tackle health-care costs with Alphabet’s Verily Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-19  Authors: christine wang, christina farr, steve hockstein, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diabetes, feinberg, patients, health, alphabets, verily, company, companies, costs, tackle, walgreens, healthcare, verilys


Walgreens to tackle health-care costs with Alphabet's Verily

Walgreens Boots Alliance is teaming with Verily, Alphabet’s life sciences unit, on improving outcomes for patients with chronic conditions, the companies announced.

The partnership would increase access to Verily’s technology by deploying them at Walgreens’ pharmacies. A big focus for the companies will be medication adherence, which costs the U.S. health care system some $100 billion to $289 billion a year. Much of this cost is due to increased hospitalizations for patients who get sick when they don’t take their medication as prescribed.

Walgreens CEO Stefano Pessina said the company is committed to finding more affordable solutions for patients and that forging the right partnerships is part of that effort.

“The continued rise in chronic diseases today can be costly to patients as well as to our healthcare system,” Pessina said in a statement. “Working with Verily, we’ll look at how we can best support integrated and value-based care to meet our patients’ needs, as well as opportunities to address other chronic conditions over time.”

Verily CEO Andrew Conrad said that working with Walgreens provides the health tech company “the opportunity to jointly tackle real-world issues that significantly impact the health of individuals and communities.”

Both Walgreens and competitor CVS Health have mentioned lowering health-care costs for consumers as a priority in recent announcements. While competitor CVS Health pursued this goal through its blockbuster acquisition of insurer Aetna, Walgreens has sought to transform itself through a series of partnerships with companies like insurer Humana and diagnostics company LabCorp.

Similarly, it is the latest signal from Verily’s parent company Alphabet that it intends to ramp up in the health-care space.

In November, Alphabet’s Google hired hospital executive David Feinberg to run its new health division, which is focused on bringing its medical AI research into clinical practice. Verily will not serve under Feinberg, but the two groups are closely aligned. For instance, Verily’s head of engineering Linus Upson is currently the interim CEO of that division, but will be replaced by Feinberg when he joins early next year.

The Walgreens collaboration is the unit’s first known partnership in the pharmacy space.

The companies said that Onduo, Verily’s diabetes company, will work together on a virtual solution for Walgreens employees and their family members. This will be available to those who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The details on this program are still vague, but the companies said they’d be part of a broader alliance between Verily and Walgreens.

Onduo was created by Verily and pharmaceutical giant Sanofi to roll out what it refers to on its website as a “virtual diabetes clinic.” It offers supplies and coaching to people with diabetes to help them manage their condition.

Verily, which was initially known as Google Life Sciences, works closely with health care companies from Johnson & Johnson to Sanofi on joint ventures ranging in scope from next-generation glucose monitors to surgical robots.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-19  Authors: christine wang, christina farr, steve hockstein, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diabetes, feinberg, patients, health, alphabets, verily, company, companies, costs, tackle, walgreens, healthcare, verilys


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Google names Linus Upson as interim head of health

Google is moving forward quickly with its newly-formed health organization led by former Geisigner CEO David Feinberg. Before Feinberg officially starts next year, the company has named an interim leader: Linus Upson, the former engineering lead for Google Chrome and now an engineering head at Verily, the Alphabet subsidiary focused on life sciences. At Verily, Upson is responsible for “Debug,” the company’s project to curb the spread of mosquitoes that carry disease, along with a variety of oth


Google is moving forward quickly with its newly-formed health organization led by former Geisigner CEO David Feinberg. Before Feinberg officially starts next year, the company has named an interim leader: Linus Upson, the former engineering lead for Google Chrome and now an engineering head at Verily, the Alphabet subsidiary focused on life sciences. At Verily, Upson is responsible for “Debug,” the company’s project to curb the spread of mosquitoes that carry disease, along with a variety of oth
Google names Linus Upson as interim head of health Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: christina farr, brooks kraft, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, various, coordination, work, linus, head, alphabet, health, upson, sources, google, verily, feinberg, names, interim


Google names Linus Upson as interim head of health

Google is moving forward quickly with its newly-formed health organization led by former Geisigner CEO David Feinberg.

Before Feinberg officially starts next year, the company has named an interim leader: Linus Upson, the former engineering lead for Google Chrome and now an engineering head at Verily, the Alphabet subsidiary focused on life sciences. That appointment was announced in an internal email to Google employees on Friday, two sources familiar with the hiring told CNBC.

Upson was selected for the job because he has already been a key figure behind-the-scenes in helping drive coordination and strategy across the various Alphabet health units, the sources said.

At Verily, Upson is responsible for “Debug,” the company’s project to curb the spread of mosquitoes that carry disease, along with a variety of other initiatives.

Vivian Lee, another high-ranking Verily employee, will also work closely with Feinberg once he joins Google, sources said.

Alphabet has broadly been trying to improve communication and coordination across its various health teams. Employees have been told that Verily and other Alphabet groups won’t be impacted by Feinberg’s hire and will work closely with the new health team instead, sources said.

Feinberg will report to Google’s AI chief Jeff Dean, who ran the hiring process and took input from other Alphabet health executives to help define the scope of the role, the sources said. It’s essentially a coordination and strategy effort, they said, rather than a company re-org across Alphabet.

Sources said that the decision to hire Feinberg was driven by some external confusion in the marketplace, with some health customers unclear about the difference between Alphabet and Google’s health efforts.

Google declined to comment.

Update: The story has been updated to reflect that this new role will not carry a “CEO” title.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: christina farr, brooks kraft, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, various, coordination, work, linus, head, alphabet, health, upson, sources, google, verily, feinberg, names, interim


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Google has hired Geisinger’s David Feinberg to lead its health strategy

Google has selected Geisinger Health CEO David Feinberg to define a strategy to coordinate its moves into the $3 trillion health care sector, Geisinger has announced. One particular area of interest is building out a health team within Nest to help manage users’ health at home, as well as to monitor seniors who are choosing to live independently. Nest had been an independent company under Google holding company Alphabet, but was absorbed back into the Google Home team earlier this year. The comp


Google has selected Geisinger Health CEO David Feinberg to define a strategy to coordinate its moves into the $3 trillion health care sector, Geisinger has announced. One particular area of interest is building out a health team within Nest to help manage users’ health at home, as well as to monitor seniors who are choosing to live independently. Nest had been an independent company under Google holding company Alphabet, but was absorbed back into the Google Home team earlier this year. The comp
Google has hired Geisinger’s David Feinberg to lead its health strategy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: christina farr, source, chris wong
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, alphabet, nest, google, strategy, geisingers, david, care, feinberg, lead, health, team, company, search, hired, intelligence, work


Google has hired Geisinger's David Feinberg to lead its health strategy

Google has selected Geisinger Health CEO David Feinberg to define a strategy to coordinate its moves into the $3 trillion health care sector, Geisinger has announced.

The search has been underway for months, according to several people familiar with the search process. Artificial intelligence head Jeff Dean has been deeply involved in the process and personally interviewing candidates, the people said. Some of the candidates have included leaders in health consulting, hospital management and insurance. The position would report to Dean, but would also work closely with Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

Feinberg’s job will be figuring out how to organize Google’s fragmented health initiatives, which overlap among many different business groups.

Among the groups interested in health care are Google’s core search team, its cloud business, the Google Brain artificial intelligence team (one of several groups at Alphabet working on AI), the Nest home automation group and the Google Fit wearables team.

One particular area of interest is building out a health team within Nest to help manage users’ health at home, as well as to monitor seniors who are choosing to live independently. Nest had been an independent company under Google holding company Alphabet, but was absorbed back into the Google Home team earlier this year.

It’s not known how Feinberg will work with other Alphabet companies that are already doing work in health care, including Verily, its life sciences research and development group; and DeepMind, another group focused on artificial intelligence. This particular role is more focused on coordinating across the various teams at Google proper, the people said. But the job could be complicated by the number of powerful executives at the company who have a strong interest in health care, including Alphabet President and Google co-founder Sergey Brin, former CEO Eric Schmidt, and Verily boss Andy Conrad.

The company recently hosted a two-day conference for employees working in health at Google, as well as its Alphabet subsidiaries.

Google is just one of the technology companies that has made moves in health in recent years. Apple is also making investments in the space, particularly in health hardware, and Amazon is looking into a number of areas, including prescription medicines, medical supplies and employer health. Amazon has also teamed up with Berkshire Hathaway and J.P. Morgan to brainstorm ways to lower health costs and make health care more efficient.

Google did not respond to requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: christina farr, source, chris wong
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, alphabet, nest, google, strategy, geisingers, david, care, feinberg, lead, health, team, company, search, hired, intelligence, work


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Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan health CEO won’t be Geisinger’s Feinberg

Update: Following the publication of this article, Feinberg made clear that he is staying at Geisinger Health. David Feinberg, the CEO of Pennsylvania-based health system Geisinger Health System, has told CNBC that he will remain with the firm. Feinberg has been Geisinger’s CEO since 2015, after serving as the CEO of the UCLA Hospital System. The company claims to be known for its innovation in health care records and health plans, as well as being led by its physicians. In 2011, Feinberg gave a


Update: Following the publication of this article, Feinberg made clear that he is staying at Geisinger Health. David Feinberg, the CEO of Pennsylvania-based health system Geisinger Health System, has told CNBC that he will remain with the firm. Feinberg has been Geisinger’s CEO since 2015, after serving as the CEO of the UCLA Hospital System. The company claims to be known for its innovation in health care records and health plans, as well as being led by its physicians. In 2011, Feinberg gave a
Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan health CEO won’t be Geisinger’s Feinberg Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-07  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, health, wont, system, venture, lead, geisingers, geisinger, feinberg, remain, amazonberkshirejpmorgan, ceo


Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan health CEO won't be Geisinger's Feinberg

Update: Following the publication of this article, Feinberg made clear that he is staying at Geisinger Health.

David Feinberg, the CEO of Pennsylvania-based health system Geisinger Health System, has told CNBC that he will remain with the firm.

Feinberg was at one point the top candidate in discussions to lead the Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan joint venture to fix health care in the United States, according to people close to the selection process.

However, through a spokesperson, Feinberg now says he remains committed to staying at Geisinger:

“I appreciate being part of the conversation, which I believe reflects the accomplishments of the entire Geisinger team. I personally remain 100% committed to Geisinger and remain excited about the work we are doing and the opportunities ahead as we continue to deliver exceptional care to our patients, our members and our communities.”

On Thursday morning, Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett and JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon announced on CNBC that they had found a final candidate and would publicly name a leader of the venture within two weeks. According to people close to the situation, they did not announce the name on Thursday because Feinberg had not accepted the job.

According to two people familiar with the selection process, the top ten candidates were asked to write a white paper on how they would fix the health care system.

From those white papers, three people were chosen to go through a harrowing interview loop. First, all three talked to Dimon, who referred his two favorite picks to Buffett. Buffett’s top choice then interviewed with Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, who could have vetoed the pick.

Feinberg has been advising the group since the announcement was made in January of this year but ultimately emerged as a top pick to lead the initiative himself, said a person familiar.

Feinberg has been Geisinger’s CEO since 2015, after serving as the CEO of the UCLA Hospital System. At Geisinger, he oversaw a complex integrated health system that serves more than 500,000 patients in Pennsylvania, which includes 13 hospitals, two research centers and more than 1,600 doctors, as well as various insurance plans. The company claims to be known for its innovation in health care records and health plans, as well as being led by its physicians.

In 2011, Feinberg gave a TEDx talk focused on the importance of improving the patient experience in health care. And he’s been an active proponent of increasing access to genetic tests to prevent, and not just treat disease.

Feinberg will face the challenge of controlling health care costs and improving the patient experience for three companies with a combined 1.2 million employees. In addition, he’ll face the considerable weight of working under these three business leaders.

The joint venture was first announced in January, and the CEO vetting process has been slow and deliberate.

As CNBC has reported, Todd Combs, an investment manager at Berkshire, has been the lead recruiter for the venture, and venture capitalist John Doerr has also helped out with recruiting.

Some early candidates approached included former Medicare chief Andy Slavitt, former United States CTO Todd Park, and ex-Aetna senior executive Gary Loveman, CNBC previously reported. One of the three finalists was Owen Tripp, CEO of Grand Rounds Health, a start-up that sells a second medical opinion service as a benefit to large employers like Walmart and Target.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-07  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, health, wont, system, venture, lead, geisingers, geisinger, feinberg, remain, amazonberkshirejpmorgan, ceo


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Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan health CEO won’t be Geisinger’s Feinberg

Update: Following the publication of this article, Feinberg made clear that he is staying at Geisinger Health. David Feinberg, the CEO of Pennsylvania-based health system Geisinger Health System, has told CNBC that he will remain with the firm. Feinberg has been Geisinger’s CEO since 2015, after serving as the CEO of the UCLA Hospital System. The company claims to be known for its innovation in health care records and health plans, as well as being led by its physicians. In 2011, Feinberg gave a


Update: Following the publication of this article, Feinberg made clear that he is staying at Geisinger Health. David Feinberg, the CEO of Pennsylvania-based health system Geisinger Health System, has told CNBC that he will remain with the firm. Feinberg has been Geisinger’s CEO since 2015, after serving as the CEO of the UCLA Hospital System. The company claims to be known for its innovation in health care records and health plans, as well as being led by its physicians. In 2011, Feinberg gave a
Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan health CEO won’t be Geisinger’s Feinberg Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-07  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, health, wont, system, venture, lead, geisingers, geisinger, feinberg, remain, amazonberkshirejpmorgan, ceo


Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan health CEO won't be Geisinger's Feinberg

Update: Following the publication of this article, Feinberg made clear that he is staying at Geisinger Health.

David Feinberg, the CEO of Pennsylvania-based health system Geisinger Health System, has told CNBC that he will remain with the firm.

Feinberg was at one point the top candidate in discussions to lead the Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan joint venture to fix health care in the United States, according to people close to the selection process.

However, through a spokesperson, Feinberg now says he remains committed to staying at Geisinger:

“I appreciate being part of the conversation, which I believe reflects the accomplishments of the entire Geisinger team. I personally remain 100% committed to Geisinger and remain excited about the work we are doing and the opportunities ahead as we continue to deliver exceptional care to our patients, our members and our communities.”

On Thursday morning, Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett and JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon announced on CNBC that they had found a final candidate and would publicly name a leader of the venture within two weeks. According to people close to the situation, they did not announce the name on Thursday because Feinberg had not accepted the job.

According to two people familiar with the selection process, the top ten candidates were asked to write a white paper on how they would fix the health care system.

From those white papers, three people were chosen to go through a harrowing interview loop. First, all three talked to Dimon, who referred his two favorite picks to Buffett. Buffett’s top choice then interviewed with Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, who could have vetoed the pick.

Feinberg has been advising the group since the announcement was made in January of this year but ultimately emerged as a top pick to lead the initiative himself, said a person familiar.

Feinberg has been Geisinger’s CEO since 2015, after serving as the CEO of the UCLA Hospital System. At Geisinger, he oversaw a complex integrated health system that serves more than 500,000 patients in Pennsylvania, which includes 13 hospitals, two research centers and more than 1,600 doctors, as well as various insurance plans. The company claims to be known for its innovation in health care records and health plans, as well as being led by its physicians.

In 2011, Feinberg gave a TEDx talk focused on the importance of improving the patient experience in health care. And he’s been an active proponent of increasing access to genetic tests to prevent, and not just treat disease.

Feinberg will face the challenge of controlling health care costs and improving the patient experience for three companies with a combined 1.2 million employees. In addition, he’ll face the considerable weight of working under these three business leaders.

The joint venture was first announced in January, and the CEO vetting process has been slow and deliberate.

As CNBC has reported, Todd Combs, an investment manager at Berkshire, has been the lead recruiter for the venture, and venture capitalist John Doerr has also helped out with recruiting.

Some early candidates approached included former Medicare chief Andy Slavitt, former United States CTO Todd Park, and ex-Aetna senior executive Gary Loveman, CNBC previously reported. One of the three finalists was Owen Tripp, CEO of Grand Rounds Health, a start-up that sells a second medical opinion service as a benefit to large employers like Walmart and Target.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-07  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, health, wont, system, venture, lead, geisingers, geisinger, feinberg, remain, amazonberkshirejpmorgan, ceo


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Extremist content is on Facebook and Google ahead of Senate hearing

Even as executives from Google and Facebook prepare to testify in front of the Senate on how they’re combating extremist content, the internet giants are struggling to keep it off their sites. All of the content that was brought to the attention of Google and Facebook by CNBC was removed within 24 hours of notification. “Terrorists are using Google and Facebook technology to run what are essentially sophisticated social media marketing campaigns,” said Eric Feinberg, co-founder of the Global Int


Even as executives from Google and Facebook prepare to testify in front of the Senate on how they’re combating extremist content, the internet giants are struggling to keep it off their sites. All of the content that was brought to the attention of Google and Facebook by CNBC was removed within 24 hours of notification. “Terrorists are using Google and Facebook technology to run what are essentially sophisticated social media marketing campaigns,” said Eric Feinberg, co-founder of the Global Int
Extremist content is on Facebook and Google ahead of Senate hearing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-01-12  Authors: john shinal
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, facebook, extremist, social, hearing, posts, videos, senate, violent, feinberg, ahead, online, google, media, content


Extremist content is on Facebook and Google ahead of Senate hearing

Even as executives from Google and Facebook prepare to testify in front of the Senate on how they’re combating extremist content, the internet giants are struggling to keep it off their sites.

Dozens of accounts on sites owned by those two companies have been used this week to promote violent attacks and recruit people to the cause of Islamic terrorism, a CNBC investigation has found.

All of the content that was brought to the attention of Google and Facebook by CNBC was removed within 24 hours of notification. Yet many of the posts and videos, which contained graphic images and threats of violence, had been online for days or weeks before we alerted them to it.

Its presence on their pages underscores the enormous challenge these internet firms have in controlling content while remaining open platforms.

“Terrorists are using Google and Facebook technology to run what are essentially sophisticated social media marketing campaigns,” said Eric Feinberg, co-founder of the Global Intellectual Property Enforcement Center, or GIPEC, which tracks extremist content online.

Extremist groups are using their tools the way brand advertisers and other online marketers do, cross-promoting videos on one account with posts on other social media services.

Facebook, YouTube and Twitter are sending representatives to Washington, D.C., on Wednesday morning to testify in front of the Senate Commerce Committee in a hearing titled “Terrorism and Social Media: #IsBigTechDoingEnough?”

CNBC initially discovered some of the violent videos and posts while reporting an earlier story on Facebook users who had been locked out of their accounts by hackers.

After that story was published, CNBC reported its findings to counter-terrorism officials at the U.S. Attorney’s Office in San Francisco, because some of the content appeared to include coded messages about potential attacks over the Christmas holiday.

The office acknowledged receipt of our e-mail and said it couldn’t comment further.

We then contacted GIPEC, a cyber-intelligence firm whose patented software finds social media activity produced by criminals and terrorists, and asked Feinberg if the group could locate more violent and extremist content.

“There’s plenty out there if you know how to look for it,” said Feinberg, who previously ran an online marketing and ad-tech firm based in New York. “These companies are playing whack-a-mole” in their fight against extremism, he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-01-12  Authors: john shinal
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, facebook, extremist, social, hearing, posts, videos, senate, violent, feinberg, ahead, online, google, media, content


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