China gives little indication US trade talks are progressing

Chinese Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng speaks at a press conference in Beijing, days ahead of an imminent US-China trade war, on July 5, 2018. BEIJING — China’s official spokespeople are keeping quiet on trade talks with the U.S. amid growing uncertainty on when even a phase-one agreement can be reached. “China believes if both sides reach a phase-one agreement, relevant tariffs must be lowered,” Gao Feng, Ministry of Commerce spokesman, said Thursday, according to a CNBC translation of


Chinese Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng speaks at a press conference in Beijing, days ahead of an imminent US-China trade war, on July 5, 2018.
BEIJING — China’s official spokespeople are keeping quiet on trade talks with the U.S. amid growing uncertainty on when even a phase-one agreement can be reached.
“China believes if both sides reach a phase-one agreement, relevant tariffs must be lowered,” Gao Feng, Ministry of Commerce spokesman, said Thursday, according to a CNBC translation of
China gives little indication US trade talks are progressing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commerce, gao, tariffs, china, ministry, feng, gives, spokesman, indication, talks, details, progressing, trade, provide, little, phaseone


China gives little indication US trade talks are progressing

Chinese Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng speaks at a press conference in Beijing, days ahead of an imminent US-China trade war, on July 5, 2018.

BEIJING — China’s official spokespeople are keeping quiet on trade talks with the U.S. amid growing uncertainty on when even a phase-one agreement can be reached.

“China believes if both sides reach a phase-one agreement, relevant tariffs must be lowered,” Gao Feng, Ministry of Commerce spokesman, said Thursday, according to a CNBC translation of his Mandarin-language remarks.

The comments reiterated the position Beijing has expressed in the last few weeks, since both countries indicated a rollback of tariffs would be part of a so-called phase-one agreement.

On Thursday, Gao noted both trade delegations remain in communication, but disclosed few additional details about the negotiations.

He did not provide a direct response when asked about China’s view on additional U.S. tariffs, which are set to take effect Dec. 15. Gao also did not provide details on the unreliable entities list. The commerce ministry raised the threat of such a designation in late May, shortly after U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration put Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei on a blacklist that effectively prevents it from buying from American suppliers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commerce, gao, tariffs, china, ministry, feng, gives, spokesman, indication, talks, details, progressing, trade, provide, little, phaseone


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Chinese auto executive identifies what’s holding back self-driving cars

The technology behind self-driving cars has advanced in recent years, but the vehicles still have a long way to go before becoming a common feature on the roads, said an executive from a a major Chinese automaker. Some of the hurdles impeding self-driving cars include legal restrictions, people’s mobility habits, and technology that’s still changing and maturing, Feng Xingya, president of Guangzhou Automobile Group or GAC, said on Monday at CNBC’s East Tech West conference in the Nansha district


The technology behind self-driving cars has advanced in recent years, but the vehicles still have a long way to go before becoming a common feature on the roads, said an executive from a a major Chinese automaker.
Some of the hurdles impeding self-driving cars include legal restrictions, people’s mobility habits, and technology that’s still changing and maturing, Feng Xingya, president of Guangzhou Automobile Group or GAC, said on Monday at CNBC’s East Tech West conference in the Nansha district
Chinese auto executive identifies what’s holding back self-driving cars Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: yen nee lee, ana nicolaci da costa
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vehicles, executive, guangzhou, whats, xingya, cars, selfdriving, identifies, chinese, auto, west, feng, way, holding, technology, translated


Chinese auto executive identifies what's holding back self-driving cars

The technology behind self-driving cars has advanced in recent years, but the vehicles still have a long way to go before becoming a common feature on the roads, said an executive from a a major Chinese automaker.

Some of the hurdles impeding self-driving cars include legal restrictions, people’s mobility habits, and technology that’s still changing and maturing, Feng Xingya, president of Guangzhou Automobile Group or GAC, said on Monday at CNBC’s East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou city, China.

“A self-driving system is a developing concept,” Feng said in Mandarin translated by CNBC. He added that the technology behind such vehicles are still being developed, with breakthroughs coming in batches.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: yen nee lee, ana nicolaci da costa
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vehicles, executive, guangzhou, whats, xingya, cars, selfdriving, identifies, chinese, auto, west, feng, way, holding, technology, translated


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Asia stocks mixed amid US-China trade uncertainty

Asia markets were mixed in Friday morning trade following a record close overnight on Wall Street for the S&P 500. Meanwhile, Australian stocks advanced in morning trade. Investors continue to monitor U.S.-China trade developments. White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said Thursday that Washington is “getting close” to a trade deal with Beijing, Reuters reported. Markets have been on edge for much of the trading week amid uncertainty over the state of U.S.-China trade negotiations.


Asia markets were mixed in Friday morning trade following a record close overnight on Wall Street for the S&P 500.
Meanwhile, Australian stocks advanced in morning trade.
Investors continue to monitor U.S.-China trade developments.
White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said Thursday that Washington is “getting close” to a trade deal with Beijing, Reuters reported.
Markets have been on edge for much of the trading week amid uncertainty over the state of U.S.-China trade negotiations.
Asia stocks mixed amid US-China trade uncertainty Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, uschina, economic, mixed, tariffs, week, feng, trade, index, asia, deal, morning, stocks, uncertainty, traded


Asia stocks mixed amid US-China trade uncertainty

Asia markets were mixed in Friday morning trade following a record close overnight on Wall Street for the S&P 500.

The Nikkei 225 in Japan rose fractionally in early trade while the Topix index added 0.15%. South Korea’s Kospi, on the other hand, slipped 0.1%.

Meanwhile, Australian stocks advanced in morning trade. The S&P/ASX 200 gained 0.36% as almost all the sectors traded higher.

Overall, the MSCI Asia ex-Japan index traded 0.17% higher.

Investors continue to monitor U.S.-China trade developments. White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said Thursday that Washington is “getting close” to a trade deal with Beijing, Reuters reported.

Markets have been on edge for much of the trading week amid uncertainty over the state of U.S.-China trade negotiations.

Earlier this week, reports surfaced that talks between the economic powerhouses hit a snag over agricultural purchases.

Chinese Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng said Thursday that both countries are holding deep discussions about a “phase one” deal, but noted that the rolling back of some tariffs is key to reaching an agreement.

“The trade war was begun with adding tariffs, and should be ended by canceling these additional tariffs. This is an important condition for both sides to reach an agreement,” Feng said Thursday at a weekly press conference.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, uschina, economic, mixed, tariffs, week, feng, trade, index, asia, deal, morning, stocks, uncertainty, traded


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

China developer Soho wins ‘feng shui’ lawsuit against blog who claimed its property was unlucky

A Beijing district court ruled Wednesday that a blog operator must apologize and pay more than 200,000 yuan ($29,851) to real estate developer Soho China for reputational damage. That’s after a blog run by the operator, Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology, claimed that one of the developer’s properties brought bad luck to its tenants due to inauspicious “feng shui.” Soho China is one of the largest real estate developers in the country, best known for several iconic office complexes located throug


A Beijing district court ruled Wednesday that a blog operator must apologize and pay more than 200,000 yuan ($29,851) to real estate developer Soho China for reputational damage. That’s after a blog run by the operator, Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology, claimed that one of the developer’s properties brought bad luck to its tenants due to inauspicious “feng shui.” Soho China is one of the largest real estate developers in the country, best known for several iconic office complexes located throug
China developer Soho wins ‘feng shui’ lawsuit against blog who claimed its property was unlucky Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: evelyn cheng, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claimed, shui, developer, waterloo, property, feng, beijing, post, lawsuit, wins, unlucky, official, blog, china, soho, court, operator


China developer Soho wins 'feng shui' lawsuit against blog who claimed its property was unlucky

A Beijing district court ruled Wednesday that a blog operator must apologize and pay more than 200,000 yuan ($29,851) to real estate developer Soho China for reputational damage.

That’s after a blog run by the operator, Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology, claimed that one of the developer’s properties brought bad luck to its tenants due to inauspicious “feng shui.”

Feng shui is an ancient Chinese way of determining the optimal location and layout of a dwelling, office or capital for the occupants’ success. The practice, which translates to “wind and water” in Chinese, is still followed by some in China.

“The internet is not outside the bounds of the law,” Ouyang Hua, the official on the case, said in a public verdict posted on the Beijing Chaoyang District Court website.

In the Mandarin-language post translated by CNBC, the official added that companies should focus on building up core technology and “not entrust development to feng shui theory.”

The South China Morning Post first reported the court ruling.

Soho China is one of the largest real estate developers in the country, best known for several iconic office complexes located throughout Beijing.

In November, a blog called “S Shengunju S” published an article claiming that the feng shui of Soho’s Wangjing development in northeastern Beijing was a “Waterloo” for internet companies, according to Soho’s complaint to the court published online. The term refers to the Battle of Waterloo which marked the downfall of French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte in the early 19th century.

The blog also said the development was only suitable for early-stage companies, and that they should move away if they wanted to develop further, the court website said.

According to the public verdict, the article in question was read more than 100,000 times before it was deleted from the blogger’s official account on WeChat — China’s ubiquitous messaging app run by internet giant Tencent.

Tencent and Soho China did not immediately respond to a CNBC request for comment. Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology’s website returned an error message and no other method of contact was immediately apparent.

The blog operator told the Beijing court that the post was deleted and phrases such as “Waterloo” were only a form of expression and did not constitute insults.

The complex in question was designed by the late award-winning architect Zaha Hadid.

Pan Shiyi, chairman of Soho China, said in a post on Weibo, China’s version of Twitter, that the company will continue to manage Wangjing Soho with great care.

“Criticism of architecture and malicious slander are two separate things,” he said in the Mandarin-language post translated by CNBC. “The distance between reason and ignorance are worlds apart.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: evelyn cheng, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claimed, shui, developer, waterloo, property, feng, beijing, post, lawsuit, wins, unlucky, official, blog, china, soho, court, operator


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Feng shui prediction: Year of the Pig may be ‘volatile’ for Hong Kong stocks

Chinese New Year is just around the corner and ahead of next month’s celebrations, financial company CLSA says stocks in Hong Kong will likely be in for a rocky Year of the Pig. But take heart, it says, the year could ultimately be profitable for those investing there. The investment group released its annual CLSA Feng Shui Index this week, which uses Chinese geomancy to try and predict the market. Feng shui, which literally means “wind” and “water” in Chinese, is an ancient method that seeks to


Chinese New Year is just around the corner and ahead of next month’s celebrations, financial company CLSA says stocks in Hong Kong will likely be in for a rocky Year of the Pig. But take heart, it says, the year could ultimately be profitable for those investing there. The investment group released its annual CLSA Feng Shui Index this week, which uses Chinese geomancy to try and predict the market. Feng shui, which literally means “wind” and “water” in Chinese, is an ancient method that seeks to
Feng shui prediction: Year of the Pig may be ‘volatile’ for Hong Kong stocks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-25  Authors: kelly olsen, suhaimi abdullah, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, feng, shui, ahead, stocks, prediction, chinese, china, index, kong, hong, fortune, pig, clsa, volatile


Feng shui prediction: Year of the Pig may be 'volatile' for Hong Kong stocks

Chinese New Year is just around the corner and ahead of next month’s celebrations, financial company CLSA says stocks in Hong Kong will likely be in for a rocky Year of the Pig. But take heart, it says, the year could ultimately be profitable for those investing there.

The investment group released its annual CLSA Feng Shui Index this week, which uses Chinese geomancy to try and predict the market.

CLSA describes the exercise as “tongue in cheek,” though it illustrates the power that traditional ideas — such as ensuring good fortune and avoiding disaster — hold in China and many parts of Asia.

Feng shui, which literally means “wind” and “water” in Chinese, is an ancient method that seeks to maximize luck and fortune based on the analysis of a complex system of factors.

There are 12 Chinese zodiac animals that represent each lunar year. It is currently the Year of the Dog. And when more than a billion people in China, and millions more around the world, celebrate the Chinese New Year which starts on Feb. 5, they will be ushering in the Year of the Pig.

“According to our predictions the Hang Seng Index will likely have a volatile year ahead in the Year of the Pig,” Sally Chan, who covers internet stocks for CLSA, told CNBC on Friday when explaining about the report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-25  Authors: kelly olsen, suhaimi abdullah, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, feng, shui, ahead, stocks, prediction, chinese, china, index, kong, hong, fortune, pig, clsa, volatile


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Feng shui says ‘fire-related sectors’ could do well: CLSA

Feng shui says ‘fire-related sectors’ could do well: CLSA19 Hours AgoSally Chan of CLSA explains where to buy property in Hong Kong in order to find love or wealth in the Year of the Pig, based on Chinese geomancy.


Feng shui says ‘fire-related sectors’ could do well: CLSA19 Hours AgoSally Chan of CLSA explains where to buy property in Hong Kong in order to find love or wealth in the Year of the Pig, based on Chinese geomancy.
Feng shui says ‘fire-related sectors’ could do well: CLSA Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pig, hong, clsa, wealth, property, love, kong, sectors, hours, firerelated, shui, order, feng


Feng shui says 'fire-related sectors' could do well: CLSA

Feng shui says ‘fire-related sectors’ could do well: CLSA

19 Hours Ago

Sally Chan of CLSA explains where to buy property in Hong Kong in order to find love or wealth in the Year of the Pig, based on Chinese geomancy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pig, hong, clsa, wealth, property, love, kong, sectors, hours, firerelated, shui, order, feng


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The future of the auto industry lies in car sharing, Chinese executives say

Several Chinese auto and transportation industry leaders are preparing for a future in which people share cars, rather than own them individually. They’re probably more interested in accessibility,” Freeman Shen, founder and CEO of Chinese electric car company WM Motor, said last week at CNBC’s East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China. Traditional automakers, many already trying to navigate rising interest in the electric vehicle market, are paying close attention to


Several Chinese auto and transportation industry leaders are preparing for a future in which people share cars, rather than own them individually. They’re probably more interested in accessibility,” Freeman Shen, founder and CEO of Chinese electric car company WM Motor, said last week at CNBC’s East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China. Traditional automakers, many already trying to navigate rising interest in the electric vehicle market, are paying close attention to
The future of the auto industry lies in car sharing, Chinese executives say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: evelyn cheng, dave zhong getty images for cnbc international
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, electric, lies, auto, general, car, traditional, feng, sharing, chinese, say, executives, interested, industry, future, theyre


The future of the auto industry lies in car sharing, Chinese executives say

Several Chinese auto and transportation industry leaders are preparing for a future in which people share cars, rather than own them individually.

“(The new generation), they’re not interested in the ownership. They’re probably more interested in accessibility,” Freeman Shen, founder and CEO of Chinese electric car company WM Motor, said last week at CNBC’s East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China.

Technological advances in the last several years have aided the rise of multibillion-dollar ride-hailing giants such as Uber and Didi. They, in turn, have challenged the traditional taxi driver system and cultivated a habit of on-demand car services for tens of millions of users globally despite ongoing safety concerns. Traditional automakers, many already trying to navigate rising interest in the electric vehicle market, are paying close attention to the ride sharing trend. Notably, General Motors is testing the waters with its own rental program.

In China, Feng Xing Ya, general manager of Guangzhou-based automaker GAC, also said the future of the auto industry lies in car sharing.

“(It’s) a challenge for the auto industry because people may buy fewer cars,” Feng said in Mandarin, according to a CNBC translation, during a Nov. 27 conference session.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: evelyn cheng, dave zhong getty images for cnbc international
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, electric, lies, auto, general, car, traditional, feng, sharing, chinese, say, executives, interested, industry, future, theyre


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post