Both Biden and Sanders want to boost Social Security benefits. So why are they fighting on the issue?

Top Democratic presidential candidates all want to boost Social Security benefits. On Wednesday, Biden denied he would cut Social Security benefits if he wins the White House, in an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” But Sanders’ campaign has questioned Biden’s record because he has called for cuts to the program in the past. Both Biden and Sanders have outlined measures to expand, not cut, benefits as part of their 2020 presidential campaign platforms. Meanwhile, Sanders calls for giving $1,30


Top Democratic presidential candidates all want to boost Social Security benefits.
On Wednesday, Biden denied he would cut Social Security benefits if he wins the White House, in an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”
But Sanders’ campaign has questioned Biden’s record because he has called for cuts to the program in the past.
Both Biden and Sanders have outlined measures to expand, not cut, benefits as part of their 2020 presidential campaign platforms.
Meanwhile, Sanders calls for giving $1,30
Both Biden and Sanders want to boost Social Security benefits. So why are they fighting on the issue? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boost, fighting, biden, benefit, sanders, issue, presidential, security, social, benefits, calls, campaign, candidates


Both Biden and Sanders want to boost Social Security benefits. So why are they fighting on the issue?

Former Vice President Joe Biden (L) greets Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) before the Democratic presidential primary debate at Drake University on January 14, 2020 in Des Moines, Iowa.

Top Democratic presidential candidates all want to boost Social Security benefits.

But two of the candidates — Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and former vice president Joe Biden — have come to figurative blows over this very issue.

The crux of the argument: whether Biden has fought to protect or previously backed cuts to the program.

On Wednesday, Biden denied he would cut Social Security benefits if he wins the White House, in an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

But Sanders’ campaign has questioned Biden’s record because he has called for cuts to the program in the past. In response, Biden and his campaign have accused Sanders’ team of misrepresenting recent comments and even doctoring a recent video.

Both Biden and Sanders have outlined measures to expand, not cut, benefits as part of their 2020 presidential campaign platforms.

Both candidates also call for raising Social Security payroll taxes from their current $137,700 cap in order to get more money into the program.

That would pave the way for benefit increases, which both candidates back. Their plans, however, differ.

Biden calls for increasing benefits for those who have been receiving retirement checks for at least 20 years, as well as for widows and widowers. His plan also would set a new minimum benefit, so that workers who have paid into the system for at least 30 years would get a benefit equal to at least 125% of the federal poverty level.

Meanwhile, Sanders calls for giving $1,300 more per year to seniors with incomes of $16,000 or less. His plan also calls for raising benefits for low-income workers as well as higher annual cost-of-living adjustments.

Despite those seemingly compatible goals, the two candidates are at odds.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boost, fighting, biden, benefit, sanders, issue, presidential, security, social, benefits, calls, campaign, candidates


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With package theft at an all-time high, Amazon and others are fighting back

Package theft is at an all-time high, with 1.7 million packages stolen or lost every day in the U.S., according to researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. As Amazon drives more shopping online, Prime members say they receive on average 51 packages a year, and one in three Americans report having at least one package stolen, resulting in $25 million of lost goods and services every day, according to C+R Research. Postal Service also offer a growing number of storefronts where packages ca


Package theft is at an all-time high, with 1.7 million packages stolen or lost every day in the U.S., according to researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
As Amazon drives more shopping online, Prime members say they receive on average 51 packages a year, and one in three Americans report having at least one package stolen, resulting in $25 million of lost goods and services every day, according to C+R Research.
Postal Service also offer a growing number of storefronts where packages ca
With package theft at an all-time high, Amazon and others are fighting back Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: katie schoolov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stolen, high, fighting, theft, lost, according, day, video, million, alltime, package, amazon, packages


With package theft at an all-time high, Amazon and others are fighting back

Package theft is at an all-time high, with 1.7 million packages stolen or lost every day in the U.S., according to researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. As Amazon drives more shopping online, Prime members say they receive on average 51 packages a year, and one in three Americans report having at least one package stolen, resulting in $25 million of lost goods and services every day, according to C+R Research.

In response, Amazon has installed secure locker locations in 900 U.S. cities and now offers Amazon Key, which allows customers to give remote access to delivery drivers so they can leave packages inside the home, garage or car trunk. UPS, FedEx and the U.S. Postal Service also offer a growing number of storefronts where packages can be picked up. Other solutions include video doorbells by companies like Google, start-ups experimenting with advanced package tracking, and lockboxes for individual homes.

Watch the video to see why package theft is on the rise and how Amazon and others are working to keep your packages safe.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: katie schoolov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stolen, high, fighting, theft, lost, according, day, video, million, alltime, package, amazon, packages


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2020 Democrats are already fighting over Kamala Harris’ biggest fundraisers

While Harris, of California, cited a lack of “financial resources” in her dropout announcement Tuesday, her bundler list is among the most valuable in the 2020 field. This person noted that he has heard from donors with allegiances to Biden, Klobuchar and Booker but has not made a decision on whom to back. Representatives of Harris, Biden, Booker, Buttigieg and Klobuchar did not return a request for comment. He said he even heard from people close to Sen. Bernie Sanders, but not for the sake of


While Harris, of California, cited a lack of “financial resources” in her dropout announcement Tuesday, her bundler list is among the most valuable in the 2020 field.
This person noted that he has heard from donors with allegiances to Biden, Klobuchar and Booker but has not made a decision on whom to back.
Representatives of Harris, Biden, Booker, Buttigieg and Klobuchar did not return a request for comment.
He said he even heard from people close to Sen. Bernie Sanders, but not for the sake of
2020 Democrats are already fighting over Kamala Harris’ biggest fundraisers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biden, primary, sen, candidates, person, sanders, 2020, klobuchar, fundraisers, democrats, biggest, harris, booker, fighting, south, kamala


2020 Democrats are already fighting over Kamala Harris' biggest fundraisers

Democratic presidential candidates Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) (L-R), Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), former tech executive Andrew Yang, former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke, former housing secretary Julian Castro appear on stage before the start of the Democratic Presidential Debate at Texas Southern University’s Health and PE Center on September 12, 2019 in Houston, Texas.

Sen. Kamala Harris dropped out of the Democratic presidential primary just a day ago, but members of her wealthy finance committee are already seeing outreach from allies of rival campaigns in an effort to recruit them to their cause.

Harris’ most affluent fundraisers, spanning from Wall Street to Silicon Valley, have been receiving calls and emails from people close to top-tier candidates like former Vice President Joe Biden, South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, and Sens. Amy Klobuchar and Cory Booker. These people are hoping to snag the support of the bundlers and their donor networks.

While Harris, of California, cited a lack of “financial resources” in her dropout announcement Tuesday, her bundler list is among the most valuable in the 2020 field. She had more than 100 members on her fundraising committee spanning multiple industries.

“I’ve gotten calls from most of the campaigns asking me to sit down with the candidates so they can try to woo me,” said a New York-based financier who asked not to be identified. This person noted that he has heard from donors with allegiances to Biden, Klobuchar and Booker but has not made a decision on whom to back.

Separately, a Wall street private equity executive who supported Harris has been hearing from people close to Biden and Booker since Tuesday, asking for help. This person said that the approach has been “soft” and that these people have been asking to meet in order to get a feel for whether they can receive this person’s support. This person is leaning toward helping Biden but has not yet reached a decision. That will come, this person said, in January, the month before the first contests of the primary season.

A public relations executive who has offices in New York, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles and San Francisco said that there has been talk with Buttigieg’s donor circle for months. But, this Harris backer added, discussions with Biden’s team ramped up after the California senator dropped out, and that the former vice president will likely get access to this person’s donor network.

Many of these people spoke on the condition of anonymity due to the conversations being deemed private.

Representatives of Harris, Biden, Booker, Buttigieg and Klobuchar did not return a request for comment.

Bakari Sellers, a former South Carolina state lawmaker and a member of the Harris finance committee, said he has been called by allies of most of the higher-profile candidates running in the Democratic primary, except for Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

He said he even heard from people close to Sen. Bernie Sanders, but not for the sake of fundraising. Sanders has sworn to focus solely on funding his campaign through grassroots donations. Instead, a potential endorsement from Sellers, who is black, could go a long way in trying to capture black votes in the early primary state of South Carolina. Biden, who leads national survey averages, has been leading in the polls with black voters, particularly in South Carolina.

A recent Monmouth University poll showed Biden with 52% of the black vote in South Carolina. Sanders, meanwhile, had 25%.

Picking up members of Harris’ donor network would be a boon for the remaining candidates in the 2020 field.

Many of the contenders have been battling it out for fundraising supremacy in order to have enough resources to compete in the more delegate-rich primary states. That urgency to gobble up more donors will be even more prevalent in the months ahead since candidates Mike Bloomberg and Tom Steyer are billionaires and have extensive personal funds to compete in the race.

Funding for advertisements, field staff and overall campaign infrastructure is going to be key to success, particularly in Super Tuesday states like California and Texas. The contests are scheduled for March 3. Big victories that day could go a long way in helping propel a candidate to the nomination.

Biden has put enormous emphasis on Super Tuesday, while Bloomberg has already flooded the airwaves with TV ads in both of these states.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biden, primary, sen, candidates, person, sanders, 2020, klobuchar, fundraisers, democrats, biggest, harris, booker, fighting, south, kamala


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‘They will destroy everything here’: Syrians flee Turkish advance and search for shelter as Winter looms

Sleman Alshallah, 40, and his family prepare to flee the advancing Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army in the northern Syrian village of Am Alkef on November 6th, 2019. Only around 15,000 have made it to northern Iraq, while the rest search for clean water and shelter in Syria. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s military sat at the border as fighters in northern Syria beat back IS in 2014. He also said he would resettle at least a million Syrian refugees, now living in Turkey, into those areas


Sleman Alshallah, 40, and his family prepare to flee the advancing Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army in the northern Syrian village of Am Alkef on November 6th, 2019.
Only around 15,000 have made it to northern Iraq, while the rest search for clean water and shelter in Syria.
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s military sat at the border as fighters in northern Syria beat back IS in 2014.
He also said he would resettle at least a million Syrian refugees, now living in Turkey, into those areas
‘They will destroy everything here’: Syrians flee Turkish advance and search for shelter as Winter looms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24  Authors: justin higginbottom, special to cnbccom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shelter, syrians, flee, syrian, northern, village, fighting, turkey, advance, search, serekani, 2019, turkish, destroy, water, syria, looms, winter


'They will destroy everything here': Syrians flee Turkish advance and search for shelter as Winter looms

Sleman Alshallah, 40, and his family prepare to flee the advancing Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army in the northern Syrian village of Am Alkef on November 6th, 2019. Photo: Jade Sacker

QAMISHLI, SYRIA — Sleman Alshallah, 40, gathered his wife and five children outside his home with what little they owned — cooking pots, blankets and a rug — in the small northern Syrian farming village of Am Alkef last week. “We are ready to leave at any hour,” said Alshallah.

It would be difficult to abandon his grandparents’ farm and only source of income, he said. He looked north, in the direction of Turkey and dull thuds of fighting, where a mile away was the last defense against the advancing Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (TFSA). The shelling often reaches his village, where bombs can land in an open field or someone’s home during the daily back-and-forth barrage.

“They will destroy everything here like in other villages,” he said of the TFSA. His was the last inhabited village before the frontline and the latest border of the Autonomous Administration of North and East Syria. Residents expected the village to fall, maybe within the week. After that, the town of Tal Tamr, where thousands more reside, would be in the TFSA’s crosshairs. Heavy fighting has continued despite a cease-fire deal in northern Syria after Turkey vowed to clear SDF fighters from a 20-mile-deep “safe zone” between the border cities of Tal Abyad and Ras al-Ayn in October. A cease-fire was brokered by Russia with Turkey to end fighting in late October. But the war never stopped, according to sources on the ground. According to the United Nations, more than 200,000 people have been displaced since the invasion last month. Only around 15,000 have made it to northern Iraq, while the rest search for clean water and shelter in Syria. Aid in many areas is nonexistent. Those displaced fear an approaching winter and the future of their autonomous region, which has enjoyed a brief period of peace since kicking out the Islamic State.

Syrians who have been recently turned refugees by the Turkish military operation in northeastern Syria are pictured upon arriving at the Bardarash camp, near the Kurdish city of Dohuk, in Iraq’s autonomous Kurdish region, on October 20, 2019. Safin Hamed | AFP | Getty Images

Turkey sees the largely Kurdish-led government and its fighters in northern Syria as a threat and aligned to the Kurdistan Worker’s Party, which has fought against Turkish soldiers since the 1980s. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s military sat at the border as fighters in northern Syria beat back IS in 2014. But this October, using an army of Syrian rebels trained in Turkey, Erdogan announced an operation to end his southern menace. He also said he would resettle at least a million Syrian refugees, now living in Turkey, into those areas conquered.

The sound of outgoing mortars from a nearby SDF position didn’t seem to cause concern for shoppers at the general store of Abdel Kareem, 38, in Tal Tamr. Kareem has worked in his small shop for 12 years. After IS left the area, he said the city began rebuilding. People returned and business resumed. “We shared happy days and sad days,” he said of the small population home to Christians and Muslims, Arabs and Kurds.

At the frontier of a shrinking autonomous northern Syria

Now residents are preparing for its fall, despite being outside of Turkey’s “safe zone.” In the distance, tire fires, lit by SDF, attempt to give cover from drones and jets. “Everyone is waiting to see whether they will leave their homes,” said Kareem, adding that while he plans to send his children away when the war arrives, he will remain: “I will be here until the end.”

Those that flee the fighting have few places to turn. Most don’t have the money to reach camps in northern Iraq. Instead, they head away from the front, looking for buildings and homes abandoned during past fighting with IS, to prepare for the approaching harsh winter.

Children are seen at a public school turned refugee center in the city of Hasakah, Syria on November 6, 2019. Families mostly from Serekani share classrooms for shelter as a bitter winter approaches. Jade Sacker

Alshallah and his family found a new home around 15 miles west in a largely abandoned Christian village named Am Albaloa. Only a couple families remained from the original inhabitants, living amid a burned church and pockmarked homes.

No one could say how the first family found the village, but as refugees began heading south after the invasion — with the majority coming from Serekani and the surrounding area — the Christian families opened their doors to their Muslim countrymen. Now around 200 refugees are crammed four or five families to a house, with more arriving daily by foot or in the back of trucks.

Although they had found shelter, the recently displaced described a dire situation. The village is without clean water and electricity. Many houses don’t have windows or doors. They dread the coming winter. “The situation is zero,” said Hajamad Hassain, 66, from Serekani, describing living without food, warm clothes or water. His family has resorted to drinking from a dirty river nearby. “Even the animals can’t drink from that river,” he said.

The village of Am Alkef in northern Syria sits largely abandoned on November 7, 2019. An advancing Turkey-backed Free Syrian Army has displaced most of the residents in the countryside of Tal Tamr. Jade Sacker

The villagers said the water has made some sick. One quickly fetched his 10-month-old baby, displaying a skin rash on her face he thinks was caused by the dirty water.

Water and winter was also on 55-year-old Diak Mahmoud’s mind as he sat inside a public school now housing refugees in the city of Hasakah. His children only have summer clothes, while it gets colder by the week. Fighting has destroyed infrastructure and contaminated the water all the way to his new host city. Teachers now tasked with taking care of the arriving families ration bottled water.

The fate of the Kurds

“God made some American. But he made us Kurdish. Why does everyone attack Kurdish people? Why does no one help Kurdish people?” says Mahmoud. “If you were a Kurd, how would you feel?”

Tire fires burn in the village of Am Alkef to obscure the sky for Turkish jets and drones on November 8, 2019 Jade Sacker

He stayed with his wife and six children in Serekani for four days after fighting started. But on the fourth night, as they sat down for dinner, muzzle flashes from the neighboring building lit up the street. They fled on foot that night with what they could carry, sleeping in an open field infested with spiders. Five days after making it to another village, the advancing TFSA caught up and they fled again.

Serekani was beautiful before the war, Mahmoud said. They felt safe under SDF protection, and there was plenty of food and water. He worked as a mechanic. Now he has word from a relative that his garage and home have been emptied. Everything was stolen by the TFSA, claimed Mahmoud. “Everyone left in Serekani is poor.”

His family expects to be asked to leave the relative warmth of the concrete school in the coming weeks for tents. He thinks he will return to Serekani one day. But he no longer trusts American or European leaders. “We just trust in [Syrian Democratic Forces] General Mazloum Abdi and Syria.”

Syrians flee with their belongings the countryside of the northeastern Syrian town of Ras al-Ain on the Turkish border, toward the west to the town of Tal Tamr on October 19, 2019. Delil Souleiman | AFP | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24  Authors: justin higginbottom, special to cnbccom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shelter, syrians, flee, syrian, northern, village, fighting, turkey, advance, search, serekani, 2019, turkish, destroy, water, syria, looms, winter


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US, China are fighting the ‘wrong war’ in their trade face-off

China and the United States are fighting the “wrong war” by imposing tariffs worth billions of dollars on each other, according to a senior executive at Beijing-based think tank. “The trade war, or the tariff war, is the wrong war to fight,” said Gao, who is also a regular commentator for state-owned China Global Television Network. China will not surrender to the United States as far as the trade war is concerned. Acknowledging problems that persist in the Chinese market, he said solving them r


China and the United States are fighting the “wrong war” by imposing tariffs worth billions of dollars on each other, according to a senior executive at Beijing-based think tank.
“The trade war, or the tariff war, is the wrong war to fight,” said Gao, who is also a regular commentator for state-owned China Global Television Network.
China will not surrender to the United States as far as the trade war is concerned.
Acknowledging problems that persist in the Chinese market, he said solving them r
US, China are fighting the ‘wrong war’ in their trade face-off Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, kavita chandran
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, trade, wrong, chinese, faceoff, fighting, gao, united, war, states, china, market, world


US, China are fighting the 'wrong war' in their trade face-off

China and the United States are fighting the “wrong war” by imposing tariffs worth billions of dollars on each other, according to a senior executive at Beijing-based think tank. Neither country will emerge victorious from the trade fight, said Victor Gao, vice president at the Center for China and Globalization, and a former translator for the late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping. “The trade war, or the tariff war, is the wrong war to fight,” said Gao, who is also a regular commentator for state-owned China Global Television Network. U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday threatened higher tariffs on Chinese goods if Beijing does not make a deal on trade. His comments came after both countries agreed to a “phase one” trade deal in October, but have sent mixed signals about how to move forward.

China will not surrender to the United States as far as the trade war is concerned. Victor Gao Center for China and Globalization

Expectations that Beijing will give in to all of Washington’s demands, in exchange for the removal of U.S. tariffs on Chinese exports, was “indulging in fantasy,” Gao told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore during a panel discussion at the East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China on Wednesday. “China will not surrender to the United States as far as the trade war is concerned,” Gao said, adding that tariffs are being paid by American consumers and businesses, which would ultimately drag down productivity in the U.S. It doesn’t mean China will escape unscathed. “China will pay a lot of collateral damages — for example, forced closure of companies and relocation of some capacities out of China, but given China’s size and the magnitude, these disruptions, painful as they are, will not be the end of the world,” said Gao. As part of the “phase one” trade deal, China is pushing for a removal of the additional duties imposed on each other’s products in different stages. But Trump said he has not agreed to scrap tariffs on Chinese goods. The U.S. has longstanding concerns over Beijing’s trade practices, including theft of American intellectual property and forced technology transfers. For his part, Gao said China is gradually opening up market access to foreign investors and companies, and likened the move to a “motion picture” instead of a static one. Acknowledging problems that persist in the Chinese market, he said solving them requires pooling together of various resources instead of threatening to “walk away from the China market.” “No company, in my best judgment, can survive if they walk away from the Chinese market. The Chinese consumers’ market is already the largest market in the world,” he said.

Looking ahead to 2020

When asked about what investors should take away as 2020 approaches, Gao said they should keep their faith in China. He explained that companies like Huawei and others are leading names globally in terms of their technological developments. “Keep faith in China,” as that will be “key for 2020,” he said. Gao also urged investors to be prudent, and pointed to the historical trend of a financial crisis hitting the world economy every decade. He said: “Given the increasingly complex and complicated geopolitical factors and others … I think 2020 is the year to manage more risks and to be very prudent, and to focus on the megatrends.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, kavita chandran
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, trade, wrong, chinese, faceoff, fighting, gao, united, war, states, china, market, world


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Many Americans are fighting the Fed. Good for them

However, there are some Americans who aren’t buying into the “Don’t fight the Fed” theory. The theory is that lower rates encourage businesses and consumers to borrow and spend, boosting corporate profits. Following Zweig’s advice, investors have taken the stock market to new highs on the heels of three Fed rate cuts. This oft-cited wisdom from the late investment guru Marty Zweig holds that when the Federal Reserve cuts rates, investors should double down on stock investments. Or it may be an a


However, there are some Americans who aren’t buying into the “Don’t fight the Fed” theory.
The theory is that lower rates encourage businesses and consumers to borrow and spend, boosting corporate profits.
Following Zweig’s advice, investors have taken the stock market to new highs on the heels of three Fed rate cuts.
This oft-cited wisdom from the late investment guru Marty Zweig holds that when the Federal Reserve cuts rates, investors should double down on stock investments.
Or it may be an a
Many Americans are fighting the Fed. Good for them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: sheila bair, former chair of the fdic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fighting, households, investors, politicians, rates, good, economy, survey, financial, fed, money, washington, americans


Many Americans are fighting the Fed. Good for them

However, there are some Americans who aren’t buying into the “Don’t fight the Fed” theory.

Overall, investors seem oblivious to multiple warnings signs that the economy is turning , including slumping business investment, a slowdown in hiring, stalled wage growth and a stubbornly narrow-to-inverted yield curve.

The theory is that lower rates encourage businesses and consumers to borrow and spend, boosting corporate profits. Following Zweig’s advice, investors have taken the stock market to new highs on the heels of three Fed rate cuts.

“Don’t fight the Fed.” This oft-cited wisdom from the late investment guru Marty Zweig holds that when the Federal Reserve cuts rates, investors should double down on stock investments.

More from Invest in You:

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‘Money disorders’ may be to blame for chronic debt

Your overactive imagination could be making you poorer

To that point, 65% of respondents to a recent CNBC + Acorns Invest in You survey on voter attitudes toward money and the economy think a recession is likely next year. What’s more, a large percentage of those are taking steps to prepare. Nearly half of those polled are paying down debt, 45% are cutting household spending, and over a third are putting money in an emergency fund.

The online survey was conducted by Survey Monkey Oct. 20-25 among a national sample of 2,776 adults.

This refreshing prudence on the part of the U.S. households is, of course, exactly opposite of what macroeconomists at the Fed — as well as incumbent politicians who view lower rates as enhancing their re-election prospects — want to happen.

The whole idea of lowering rates is to penalize saving while making it cheap to borrow, so consumers save less and spend more. That strategy, of course, works until it doesn’t, as consumer debt levels eventually become unsustainable, risking economic collapse as we witnessed in 2008 and 2009.

This time, it looks like American households have learned their lesson, even if Washington has not.

It is particularly gratifying to see households building emergency funds. This trend is consistent with national data showing savings rates among households increasing to nearly 9% of disposable income, compared to less than 3% before the financial crisis, when so many American families were caught ill-prepared.

While the survey respondents seem very aware of risks to the economy, a surprisingly small percentage view it as a central issue in the upcoming election.

That might because the economy has not yet turned, as it had in 1992 when Bill Clinton ousted George H.W. Bush with his famous “It’s the Economy, Stupid” slogan. Or it may be an astute recognition that there is little Washington politicians can do to abate the end of a debt-fueled economic cycle. Politicians can, however, impact individual family’s financial burdens through, for instance, tax and health-care policy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: sheila bair, former chair of the fdic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fighting, households, investors, politicians, rates, good, economy, survey, financial, fed, money, washington, americans


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‘We’re fighting for our lives’ – US apple farmers endure major crop and profit losses as climate changes

“We’re fighting for our lives in this moment of climate change.” Climate change is posing an existential threat to the precarious lives of farmers across the country. “We’re fighting for our lives in this moment of climate change.” Consumers could soon feel the painThe ramifications of climate change on the entire food system will be immense. Climate change is pervasive, and the negative impacts on all crops is so fundamental to our existence.”


“We’re fighting for our lives in this moment of climate change.”
Climate change is posing an existential threat to the precarious lives of farmers across the country.
“We’re fighting for our lives in this moment of climate change.”
Consumers could soon feel the painThe ramifications of climate change on the entire food system will be immense.
Climate change is pervasive, and the negative impacts on all crops is so fundamental to our existence.”
‘We’re fighting for our lives’ – US apple farmers endure major crop and profit losses as climate changes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, crop, losses, major, machines, lives, wind, ryan, apple, fighting, climate, farmers, trees, endure, change, profit, york, changes, growers


'We're fighting for our lives' – US apple farmers endure major crop and profit losses as climate changes

“The weather’s been ferocious,” said Elizabeth Ryan, the owner of Stone Ridge Orchard. “We’re fighting for our lives in this moment of climate change.” Emma Newburger / CNBC

STONE RIDGE, N.Y. — Elizabeth Ryan was standing among her ruined Golden Supreme apple trees, recalling how they were snapped and toppled by Hurricane Sandy and debating if she should finally replace the remains with plums or grapes. “The weather’s been ferocious. We’ve seen such dramatic, frightening crop losses,” said Ryan, who’s farmed for 40 years in the rich apple-growing Hudson Valley region of New York. “I tried to salvage and restake my trees, but they never recovered. It was $300,000 in losses,” she said, examining a dead branch. Climate change is posing an existential threat to the precarious lives of farmers across the country. More intense and frequent weather disasters are wiping out entire harvests, and warmer winters are exposing crops to severe frost damage. For apples, a warm spell in the winter will force trees to flower prematurely and expose the buds to unpredictable winter frosts, hail and other extreme weather. In some cases, entire trees can become stressed and die. Experienced fruit growers like Ryan are experimenting with more resilient crops, growing tactics and technology to cope with warmer winters and unprecedented heat, rain and drought. But climate change has become an impossible financial burden for many farmers. “It’s daunting. But we soldier on,” Ryan said. “We’re fighting for our lives in this moment of climate change.”

Ryan examines hurricane ravaged apple trees on her orchard in Hudson Valley, New York. Emma Newburger / CNBC

The Hudson Valley has a long and robust history of apple growing. New York is the second-largest apple producer in the U.S, and about 22% of the state’s annual apple production is derived from the Valley. But the apple-lush region is under serious pressure. In the past 50 years, the Valley has experienced a 71% increase in heavy rains, with unpredictable downpours and flooding. Ryan, who operates several orchards in the Hudson Valley, has experienced three major crop losses due to bad weather in the last decade. In 2012, apples in New York bloomed about a month earlier than usual when temperatures rose up to 70 degrees in February and then dropped back down. Half of the state’s apple crop was destroyed and farmers endured millions of dollars in losses. It’s a significant economic problem, as apple production in the Northeast U.S. is valued at more than $400 million. Unless farmers can find ways to grow more resilient apple varieties, or implement technology to combat severe weather, scientists warn that fruit-growing regions in the U.S. will continue to be ravaged. But for some struggling New York fruit growers, adapting to climate change and rising property values has become too difficult. Between 2012 and 2017, more than 2,000 farms closed in the state, representing a 6% drop in the number of farms statewide, according to the New York Farm Bureau. “A lot of farms in the Hudson Valley are being sold and built into housing developments,” Ryan said, walking along her row of ripe Asian pears and plucking a couple to store in her hat. Since 1982, real estate development has eaten away over 471,000 acres of the state’s farmland, according to data from the preservation group American Farmland Trust. “I’ve never known any farmer to just sell out,” Ryan said. “But after years of back-to-back crop losses, they can’t continue.”

Technology is often unaffordable

Lack of winter chilling and early bloom in the spring might seem like obvious problems, but climate change also poses a slew of other hardships for apple growers. For instance, warmer nights lead to the spread of pests and other diseases, and hot days in the winter sunburn the apple’s plant tissue. Warming temperatures also cause significant defects and pigment damage to developed fruit, making it impossible for growers to sell them on the market. If the nights don’t cool down enough, an apple that is supposed to turn red will turn brown or pink instead. Some farmers are turning to technology to protect against disasters, including irrigation systems for periods of drought, netting to protect against hail storms and giant wind machines that blow warm air onto the crops during cold spells to protect them from frost damage. The wind machines, which are large propane-powered fans with two 12-foot blades, mix rising warmer air with colder air closer to the ground. The fans raise the air temperatures around the apple trees by a few degrees, but aren’t always effective under extreme cold or windy conditions, functioning best between −4 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit.

A high-tech New York apple orchard that’s installed wind machines. Emma Newburger / CNBC

The machines exploded in popularity after the 2012 frost devastated apple harvests in New York. Researchers at Cornell University estimated that the number of wind machines in the state likely doubled between 2012 and 2013, and have since helped farmers protect their crops from frost damage. However, wind machines are expensive, and mostly used by larger-scale growers who can afford high-tech alternatives, according to Gregory Peck, a professor of horticulture at Cornell University. The machines can cost up to $10,000, and only cover roughly 10 acres. “The costs add up,” Peck said. “It’s a thousand here, a thousand there, and suddenly orchards are costing twice as much as they did to install.” In the Northeast U.S., a few apple growers have some irrigation equipment, but researchers say that most haven’t invested in enough equipment to optimize protections against periods of unexpected drought. Adaptation is a gradual, decadeslong process for most fruit growers, whether they are turning to technology or changing the types of crops they are growing. While Ryan hopes to eventually install wind machines for her orchard, her focus now is on how to replace less-resilient apple varieties with different types that bloom later in the season and have roots that can withstand heavy wind, rain and drought conditions. In addition to planting larger, stronger trees, she’s harvesting weeds, baking pies and making hard cider from the apples that are hail damaged or dinged up. Ryan uses weeds like dandelion, purslane and chickweed for salad mixes, and sumac, rose hips and wind grapes for hard ciders. Like other farmers who are diversifying and trying to stay profitable, Ryan wakes up at 3:00 a.m. on some mornings to drive down to the Union Square Greenmarket in Manhattan to sell her cider, apples and baked goods. Those markets are often a lifesaver for farmers, she said. “I would be out of business without the farmers markets,” she said. “My farm would be a housing development. Period.” Ryan said she often feels like she’s running out of ideas for diversifying, and no longer expects a full harvest every year. Yet she remains optimistic. “We’re still in the game and we’re gonna fight like hell,” she said.

Consumers could soon feel the pain

The ramifications of climate change on the entire food system will be immense. But the problem is not yet obvious for most U.S. consumers, in part because a destroyed harvest in one region of the country could be masked by a better harvest in another. “Farmers carry most of the risk, and get less of the returns,” Peck said. “It’s not just about the cost to farmers. Climate change is pervasive, and the negative impacts on all crops is so fundamental to our existence.” Despite the rising costs for farmers, food prices for consumers won’t increase at the same rate, according to researchers. For instance, shoppers at the grocery store won’t necessarily see any price increases for apples right now. A food system where lower prices still dominate can create a near-impossible cost scenario for growers, Peck said. Eventually, however, the higher cost of production will translate to a higher price tag for shoppers. “The reality is that we can lose our whole crop in the Northeast and we don’t see a change in pricing because there’s so much stuff that comes from somewhere else,” Ryan said. “But I don’t believe that will continue indefinitely.” Ryan circled back to her damaged trees, which paled in comparison to the large row of Empire apples just across the pathway. “It just goes to show how long it takes to recover from a hurricane,” she said, repeating her intentions to replace the entire row with new, entirely different fruit.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, crop, losses, major, machines, lives, wind, ryan, apple, fighting, climate, farmers, trees, endure, change, profit, york, changes, growers


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Elizabeth Warren slams Twitter for a policy that bans ads from groups fighting climate change

On Tuesday, Sen. Warren, who’s running for president, slammed Twitter’s new ad policy that bans political ads. Her criticism comes a week after Twitter said it would no longer allow political ads on its service, a policy that blocks ads from politicians, ads that refer to an election or candidate or ads related to politically-sensitive issues. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has defended his company’s political ads policy, saying in a speech at Georgetown University that “banning political ads favo


On Tuesday, Sen. Warren, who’s running for president, slammed Twitter’s new ad policy that bans political ads.
Her criticism comes a week after Twitter said it would no longer allow political ads on its service, a policy that blocks ads from politicians, ads that refer to an election or candidate or ads related to politically-sensitive issues.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has defended his company’s political ads policy, saying in a speech at Georgetown University that “banning political ads favo
Elizabeth Warren slams Twitter for a policy that bans ads from groups fighting climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policy, company, twitter, elizabeth, fighting, climate, ads, bans, change, political, slams, saying, facebook, groups, social, warren, twitters


Elizabeth Warren slams Twitter for a policy that bans ads from groups fighting climate change

Elizabeth Warren is proving to be an equal opportunist when it comes to taking on social media companies.

On Tuesday, Sen. Warren, who’s running for president, slammed Twitter’s new ad policy that bans political ads. In a series of tweets on Tuesday, the Massachusetts Democrat attacked the company for blocking organizations that are fighting climate change from running ads on the social network while allowing ads from companies like Exxon on the same topic.

Her criticism comes a week after Twitter said it would no longer allow political ads on its service, a policy that blocks ads from politicians, ads that refer to an election or candidate or ads related to politically-sensitive issues.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey responded to Warren with a tweet on Tuesday, saying that the company will announce the specifics of its new ad policies on Nov. 15.

Warren has been on a crusade against Big Tech throughout her presidential campaign. In March, she proposed the breakup of companies like Facebook and Amazon, and last month she criticized Facebook for its own political ad policies, which allow candidates to run ads that include false information.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has defended his company’s political ads policy, saying in a speech at Georgetown University that “banning political ads favors incumbents and whoever the media covers.” Separately, he told Facebook employees that he would “go to the mat” and fight against anyone trying to break up the company, according to leaked audio that was published by The Verge.

This was Warren’s first time to publicly go after Twitter’s stance on political ads.

Part of Twitter’s policy bans “ads that advocate for or against legislative issues of national importance (such as: climate change, healthcare, immigration, national security, taxes),” according to a tweet from Vijaya Gadde, Twitter’s lead for legal, public policy and trust and safety lead.

Twitter did not respond to a request for comment.

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policy, company, twitter, elizabeth, fighting, climate, ads, bans, change, political, slams, saying, facebook, groups, social, warren, twitters


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US-China trade war: Donald Trump is the ‘least worst option’ for China

U.S. President Donald Trump is fighting an “all-front” trade war and that may not be a bad thing for China, said one professor at the London School of Economics on Thursday. “Trump is fighting an all-front war. If there were not such a strong alliance with Europe, which is what China’s more concerned about — everyone ganging up against China,” Jin said. “Now, Trump is not making that possible, so that’s why he’s the least worst option.” For one, China is developing its own chip industry to incre


U.S. President Donald Trump is fighting an “all-front” trade war and that may not be a bad thing for China, said one professor at the London School of Economics on Thursday.
“Trump is fighting an all-front war.
If there were not such a strong alliance with Europe, which is what China’s more concerned about — everyone ganging up against China,” Jin said.
“Now, Trump is not making that possible, so that’s why he’s the least worst option.”
For one, China is developing its own chip industry to incre
US-China trade war: Donald Trump is the ‘least worst option’ for China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-01  Authors: stella soon, arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, donald, uschina, economics, china, chinas, semiconductor, worst, jin, trade, war, option, trump, professor, fighting


US-China trade war: Donald Trump is the 'least worst option' for China

U.S. President Donald Trump is fighting an “all-front” trade war and that may not be a bad thing for China, said one professor at the London School of Economics on Thursday.

Washington has locked itself into trade disputes with multiple countries, which has weakened historical ties and prevented some of those nations from aligning themselves against China, said Keyu Jin, associate professor of economics at LSE, told CNBC at the annual Barclays Asia Forum in Singapore.

“Trump is fighting an all-front war. What could not be better for China? If there were not such a strong alliance with Europe, which is what China’s more concerned about — everyone ganging up against China,” Jin said.

“Now, Trump is not making that possible, so that’s why he’s the least worst option.”

The U.S. and China have slapped tariffs on billions of dollars of one another’s goods. But key sticking points in trade talks include other issues like intellectual property protection and forced technology transfers.

“It is pushing China’s strive for self-sufficiency, technological independence,” Jin said.

For one, China is developing its own chip industry to increase domestic semiconductor production, she said.

The country aims to produce 70% of its semiconductors locally by 2025, and is ramping up investment in the sector. The Wall Street Journal also reported that China’s government set up a $28.9 billion national semiconductor fund to invest in its chip industry.

“It’s going to take a while, and it’s very costly. China is changing the IT systems away from the West to adopting its own. We’re seeing some decoupling in some sense,” she added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-01  Authors: stella soon, arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, donald, uschina, economics, china, chinas, semiconductor, worst, jin, trade, war, option, trump, professor, fighting


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Geena Davis wins honorary Oscar for fighting onscreen gender bias

Geena Davis arrives at the Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences’ 11th Annual Governors Awards at The Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center on October 27, 2019 in Hollywood, California. U.S. actress Geena Davis was awarded an honorary Oscar at the 2019 Governors Awards on Sunday for her efforts to promote a more balanced representation of women onscreen. Davis was handed the famous statuette, representing the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, for her work as founder of the Geen


Geena Davis arrives at the Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences’ 11th Annual Governors Awards at The Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center on October 27, 2019 in Hollywood, California.
U.S. actress Geena Davis was awarded an honorary Oscar at the 2019 Governors Awards on Sunday for her efforts to promote a more balanced representation of women onscreen.
Davis was handed the famous statuette, representing the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, for her work as founder of the Geen
Geena Davis wins honorary Oscar for fighting onscreen gender bias Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wins, gender, picture, oscar, award, fighting, bias, humanitarian, davis, problem, honorary, onscreen, motion, work, geena


Geena Davis wins honorary Oscar for fighting onscreen gender bias

Geena Davis arrives at the Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences’ 11th Annual Governors Awards at The Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center on October 27, 2019 in Hollywood, California.

U.S. actress Geena Davis was awarded an honorary Oscar at the 2019 Governors Awards on Sunday for her efforts to promote a more balanced representation of women onscreen.

Davis was handed the famous statuette, representing the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, for her work as founder of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media which she established in 2004.

Previous winners of the award include Audrey Hepburn, Oprah Winfrey, Elizabeth Taylor and Angelina Jolie.

In her acceptance speech, Davis repeated a call for gender equality in film and television, saying it was a problem that “can be fixed absolutely overnight,” according to a Reuters report.

“However abysmal the numbers are in real life, it’s far worse in fiction – where you make it up,” she said. “We make it worse.”

The actress said writers could start to solve this problem by crossing out a number of the male first names on scripts and replace them with female characters.

“With one stroke, you have created some non-stereotyped characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they have a gender swap,” she added.

Davis recently appeared in six episodes of GLOW, a hit Netflix series about a group of all-female wrestlers. The comedy heavily referenced the lack of equal rights that woman can face in the work place.

Davis won an Oscar in 1989 for her supporting role in “The Accidental Tourist” but is perhaps best known for playing one of the titular characters in the 1991 film “Thelma & Louise”.

The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media aims to target children ages 11 and under with its work. According to the institute’s website, it has influenced gender portrayal in family films such as “Inside Out” and “Monsters University”.

The Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award is given to an “individual in the motion picture industry whose humanitarian efforts have brought credit to the industry” and was named after the Danish actor.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wins, gender, picture, oscar, award, fighting, bias, humanitarian, davis, problem, honorary, onscreen, motion, work, geena


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