Wall Street and finance executives place first bets on 2020 Democrats

Wall Street and finance executives placed their early 2020 bets on a variety of Democratic presidential candidates, from Pete Buttigieg to Kamala Harris, even as the contenders try to distance themselves from big-money donors. Sen. Bernie Sanders, who led the Democratic fundraising field with an $18 million haul in the first quarter, did not appear to get donations from finance executives. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, another longtime critic of Wall Street and big businesses, received few donations fr


Wall Street and finance executives placed their early 2020 bets on a variety of Democratic presidential candidates, from Pete Buttigieg to Kamala Harris, even as the contenders try to distance themselves from big-money donors. Sen. Bernie Sanders, who led the Democratic fundraising field with an $18 million haul in the first quarter, did not appear to get donations from finance executives. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, another longtime critic of Wall Street and big businesses, received few donations fr
Wall Street and finance executives place first bets on 2020 Democrats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: brian schwartz, john w schoen, emma newburger, hillary kladke, moment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finance, campaign, president, million, 2020, trump, fundraising, place, investment, 2800, executives, bets, street, wall, donations, quarter, democrats


Wall Street and finance executives place first bets on 2020 Democrats

Wall Street and finance executives placed their early 2020 bets on a variety of Democratic presidential candidates, from Pete Buttigieg to Kamala Harris, even as the contenders try to distance themselves from big-money donors.

The first-quarter fundraising totals are the latest indication that high-profile Democratic financiers are waiting for the field to thin out before they open their funding networks and checkbooks to potential challengers to President Donald Trump next year.

Some donors have also been eagerly waiting for former Vice President Joe Biden to enter the race before they open their extensive money networks to other candidates, according to people familiar with the deliberations.

Meanwhile, as Democrats vie for limited dollars in a crowded group, Trump’s campaign raised a whopping $30 million in the first quarter and has more than $40 million in cash on hand, giving the president a clear edge even as he suffers from low approval ratings.

The early fundraising totals, which were disclosed on Monday in Federal Election Commission filings, show that some players in the financial industry are interested in backing certain candidates early on, including Sens. Cory Booker and Kirsten Gillibrand and former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, who led the Democratic fundraising field with an $18 million haul in the first quarter, did not appear to get donations from finance executives. Eighty-four percent of the take came from donations of $200 or less.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, another longtime critic of Wall Street and big businesses, received few donations from people in the financial industry. Warren raised $6 million, with 70% coming from small donations.

O’Rourke rode a small-donor base to a stunning near-defeat of Republican Sen. Ted Cruz in deep red Texas last year. He has said repeatedly he will not accept any contributions from corporate PACs, lobbyists and special interest groups. However, his stance didn’t dissuade some big-money backers to send some checks his way, as he racked up $9.4 million in total donations last quarter.

Mark Gallogly, the co-founder of investment firm Centerbridge Partners, donated $2,800 to O’Rourke’s campaign. Gallogly, a major bundler for President Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012, had been telling friends he was leaning toward supporting O’Rourke’s candidacy. Bo Crowell, a managing director at investment banking firm Macquarie Capital, also sent $2,800 O’Rourke’s way. His LinkedIn page says he’s been an investment banker with 17 years of health-care experience.

Harris, Booker, Gillibrand and fellow Sen. Amy Klobuchar have echoed O’Rourke’s calls to reject money from PACs and corporations. Yet, also like O’Rourke, they have received support from corporate and finance leaders.

Beverly Anderson, an executive vice president at Wells Fargo, donated $2,800 to Harris’ campaign. Tia Breakley, a managing director at private equity behemoth Blackstone, gave Harris $1,000. Blackstone is run by Steve Schwarzman, one of Trump’s top supporters. Harris has raked in a total of $12 million since she announced her candidacy in January, putting her among the top tier of Democratic candidates.

Meanwhile, Booker received $2,800 from Mark Robinson, a partner at private equity titan Centerview Partners, which has advised pharmaceutical and biotech companies. Boaz Weinstein, the founder and chief investment officer of Saba Capital Management, donated $2,800 to Booker.

Saba’s Michael D’Angelo, a partner and chief operating officer at the firm, gave Gillibrand $2,800.

Gillibrand finished the quarter bringing in just under $3 million, while Booker saw $5 million added to his campaign coffer.

Read more: Pete Buttigieg raises $1 million within four hours of 2020 campaign announcement

Buttigieg, the South Bend, Indiana, mayor, raised just over $7 million in the first quarter. According to filings, $5,600 came from Stephen Schuler, a director at Chicago-based investment firm Wicklow Capital. During the 2018 congressional midterm elections, Schuler spent well over $1 million in support of Democrats, records show. Employees at Wicklow Capital combined to give at least $11,200 to Buttigieg throughout the most recent quarter. He has publicly sworn off support from corporate PACs and contributions from the fossil fuel industry.

While most of the fundraising for each candidate came through grassroots small donations under $200, political finance veterans say 2020 candidates shouldn’t let up in appealing to traditional big-money spenders — particularly if they don’t want to play catch-up with Trump during the general election.

“I think this period of a campaign is about building that network, and right now we are relying way too much on digital fundraising,” Rufus Gifford, Obama’s finance director during his 2012 re-election campaign, told CNBC on Tuesday. “I think we can beat Trump. But can we beat Trump … being out-raised 3 to 1? Let’s be sure that the candidate won’t have to spend so much time raising money come the general election.”

Representatives for the 2020 campaigns mentioned in this story did not return requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: brian schwartz, john w schoen, emma newburger, hillary kladke, moment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finance, campaign, president, million, 2020, trump, fundraising, place, investment, 2800, executives, bets, street, wall, donations, quarter, democrats


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Ireland is adequately prepared for a disorderly Brexit, finance minister says

Ireland is adequately prepared for a disorderly Brexit, finance minister says7 Hours AgoThe U.K.’s recently-granted Brexit extension is seen as a positive development in Ireland, but the government is encouraging Irish companies to make all necessary preparations to cope with a potential disorderly Brexit, Irish Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche during the IMF Spring Meetings in Washington, D.C.


Ireland is adequately prepared for a disorderly Brexit, finance minister says7 Hours AgoThe U.K.’s recently-granted Brexit extension is seen as a positive development in Ireland, but the government is encouraging Irish companies to make all necessary preparations to cope with a potential disorderly Brexit, Irish Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche during the IMF Spring Meetings in Washington, D.C.
Ireland is adequately prepared for a disorderly Brexit, finance minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: niall carson, pa images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prepared, minister, brexit, told, ireland, adequately, spring, uks, washington, finance, disorderly, irish


Ireland is adequately prepared for a disorderly Brexit, finance minister says

Ireland is adequately prepared for a disorderly Brexit, finance minister says

7 Hours Ago

The U.K.’s recently-granted Brexit extension is seen as a positive development in Ireland, but the government is encouraging Irish companies to make all necessary preparations to cope with a potential disorderly Brexit, Irish Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche during the IMF Spring Meetings in Washington, D.C.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: niall carson, pa images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prepared, minister, brexit, told, ireland, adequately, spring, uks, washington, finance, disorderly, irish


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says

Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says5 Hours AgoPresident Donald Trump’s comments about the transatlantic relationship between the EU and U.S. are ‘a concern’ for Ireland, whose small and open economy is already being impacted by global trade tensions and Brexit, Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche during the IMF Spring Meetings in Washington, D.C.


Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says5 Hours AgoPresident Donald Trump’s comments about the transatlantic relationship between the EU and U.S. are ‘a concern’ for Ireland, whose small and open economy is already being impacted by global trade tensions and Brexit, Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche during the IMF Spring Meetings in Washington, D.C.
Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: paul faith, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, minister, tensions, growth, washington, impact, trumps, transatlantic, told, spring, trade, having, finance, irish


Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says

Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says

5 Hours Ago

President Donald Trump’s comments about the transatlantic relationship between the EU and U.S. are ‘a concern’ for Ireland, whose small and open economy is already being impacted by global trade tensions and Brexit, Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche during the IMF Spring Meetings in Washington, D.C.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: paul faith, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, minister, tensions, growth, washington, impact, trumps, transatlantic, told, spring, trade, having, finance, irish


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

UK parliament ‘very likely’ to consider new Brexit referendum, says British finance minister

The idea of a second Brexit referendum is very likely to be put before Britain’s parliament again although the government remains opposed to any new plebiscite, the British finance minister said on Friday. But a second referendum could not be ruled out. Many Labour lawmakers are pressing their leader Jeremy Corbyn to demand a new referendum in talks with the government. He angered them again recently by describing another Brexit referendum as a “perfectly credible proposition”. Parliament has pr


The idea of a second Brexit referendum is very likely to be put before Britain’s parliament again although the government remains opposed to any new plebiscite, the British finance minister said on Friday. But a second referendum could not be ruled out. Many Labour lawmakers are pressing their leader Jeremy Corbyn to demand a new referendum in talks with the government. He angered them again recently by describing another Brexit referendum as a “perfectly credible proposition”. Parliament has pr
UK parliament ‘very likely’ to consider new Brexit referendum, says British finance minister Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, second, referendum, minister, parliament, consider, uk, british, brexit, deal, months, talks, hammond, finance, party, labour


UK parliament 'very likely' to consider new Brexit referendum, says British finance minister

The idea of a second Brexit referendum is very likely to be put before Britain’s parliament again although the government remains opposed to any new plebiscite, the British finance minister said on Friday.

Philip Hammond said he hoped parliament would break the Brexit impasse by passing a deal by the end of June, potentially ending the calls for a new referendum, and there was a “good chance” of a breakthrough in talks with the opposition Labour Party.

“I remain optimistic that over the next couple of months we will get a deal done,” he told reporters in Washington where he is attending meetings at the International Monetary Fund.

But a second referendum could not be ruled out.

“It’s a proposition that could and, on all the evidence, is very likely to be put to parliament at some stage,” Hammond said.

Prime Minister Theresa May has so far failed to get her own Conservative Party behind the Brexit divorce deal she agreed with other European Union leaders last year, forcing her to ask the bloc for a delay and to start talks with Labour about how to break the impasse in parliament.

Many Labour lawmakers are pressing their leader Jeremy Corbyn to demand a new referendum in talks with the government.

Hammond said that while the government was opposed to a new public vote, other Labour demands – such as a customs union with the EU – were up for debate.

Hammond said about six months would be needed to hold a referendum, so if parliament voted in a couple of months’ time to make one a condition of approving a Brexit deal, there would be no time before Britain is due to leave the EU on Oct. 31.

One of May’s most pro-EU ministers, Hammond has faced criticism from Brexit supporters for saying Britain should stay close to the bloc. He angered them again recently by describing another Brexit referendum as a “perfectly credible proposition”.

“(A second referendum) in the end is an issue about parliament and parliamentary numbers, and where the Labour Party ends up on this, as the Labour Party itself is deeply divided on this issue and at some point will have to decide on where it stands,” Hammond said.

Parliament has previously rejected the idea of a new referendum and other possible solutions the Brexit impasse.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, second, referendum, minister, parliament, consider, uk, british, brexit, deal, months, talks, hammond, finance, party, labour


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

People often claim their Social Security earlier than they need to

Many people who wind up with a smaller Social Security check because they claim their benefit early could have waited longer to file, thanks to funds in their individual retirement account. More than a third of beneficiaries who claim their Social Security before 66 — the current full retirement age for most people — have enough money in an IRA to finance the equivalent of at least two years of Social Security benefits, the researchers found. Delaying your Social Security is one of the best ways


Many people who wind up with a smaller Social Security check because they claim their benefit early could have waited longer to file, thanks to funds in their individual retirement account. More than a third of beneficiaries who claim their Social Security before 66 — the current full retirement age for most people — have enough money in an IRA to finance the equivalent of at least two years of Social Security benefits, the researchers found. Delaying your Social Security is one of the best ways
People often claim their Social Security earlier than they need to Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: annie nova, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ira, shah, monthly, claim, social, security, need, earlier, retirement, finance, study, researchers


People often claim their Social Security earlier than they need to

Many people who wind up with a smaller Social Security check because they claim their benefit early could have waited longer to file, thanks to funds in their individual retirement account.

That’s the finding from a recently published study in the Journal of Pension Economics & Finance.

“It seems like there is a significant portion of the population claiming early even though they have the potential to finance a delay,” said Gopi Shah Goda, a co-author of the study and deputy director and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.

More than a third of beneficiaries who claim their Social Security before 66 — the current full retirement age for most people — have enough money in an IRA to finance the equivalent of at least two years of Social Security benefits, the researchers found. A quarter of them had enough to finance at least four years.

More from Personal Finance:

Legislation would expand this student loan forgiveness program

Congress may gut the ‘stretch IRA’ wealthy people love

I owed the IRS after making this mistake in college

An IRA is a tax-advantaged investment account in which you can contribute up to $6,000 a year (older savers can put away more). You can start withdrawing from the account at 59½, without penalties, although you will owe income taxes on the amount taken out.

The researchers studied tax data on individuals between the ages of 59 and 71 from the 1940 birth cohort. They also found that other available liquid assets, including stocks, bonds and certificates of deposit, could help people postpone their claiming date further still.

Delaying your Social Security is one of the best ways to expand your retirement income. Your monthly check from the government will often be three-quarters larger if you claim at 70 instead of at 62, said Laurence Kotlikoff, an economics professor at Boston University and the author of “Get What’s Yours: The Secrets to Maxing Out Your Social Security.”

Some people might not want to drain their IRA, fearing they’ll be slapped with a large medical bill at some point, Shah Goda said. You can withdraw a lump sum from your IRA, of course, whereas your Social Security is paid in monthly installments.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: annie nova, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ira, shah, monthly, claim, social, security, need, earlier, retirement, finance, study, researchers


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Financial literacy matters. Here’s what we need to do about it

To that point, a variety of financial research and reports have made it clear that we, as a country, need to focus on financial literacy. The TIAA Institute-GFLEC Personal Finance Index, or P-Fin Index, shows that only about half of Americans grasp the concepts behind managing debt, saving for retirement or insuring against major risks. This is the knowledge needed for savvy financial decision-making. The index gauges overall personal finance knowledge and provides a nuanced analysis of eight ar


To that point, a variety of financial research and reports have made it clear that we, as a country, need to focus on financial literacy. The TIAA Institute-GFLEC Personal Finance Index, or P-Fin Index, shows that only about half of Americans grasp the concepts behind managing debt, saving for retirement or insuring against major risks. This is the knowledge needed for savvy financial decision-making. The index gauges overall personal finance knowledge and provides a nuanced analysis of eight ar
Financial literacy matters. Here’s what we need to do about it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: annamaria lusardi, getty images, -annamaria lusardi, chair of economics, accountancy at george washington university school
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, matters, index, risk, personal, literacy, needed, americans, variety, finance, knowledge, heres, reasons, need


Financial literacy matters. Here's what we need to do about it

The lack of financial understanding by consumers has been signaled as one of the main reasons behind savings and investing problems faced by many Americans. To that point, a variety of financial research and reports have made it clear that we, as a country, need to focus on financial literacy.

The TIAA Institute-GFLEC Personal Finance Index, or P-Fin Index, shows that only about half of Americans grasp the concepts behind managing debt, saving for retirement or insuring against major risks. This is the knowledge needed for savvy financial decision-making.

Too many people just don’t have it, and that does not bode well for families, their communities or the country.

The index gauges overall personal finance knowledge and provides a nuanced analysis of eight areas where individuals routinely make financial decisions.

The latest findings are sobering for two reasons. First, financial knowledge is especially low where it is most needed: in the area of risk and risk management. Second, financial literacy is not improving over time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: annamaria lusardi, getty images, -annamaria lusardi, chair of economics, accountancy at george washington university school
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, matters, index, risk, personal, literacy, needed, americans, variety, finance, knowledge, heres, reasons, need


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Italy has a $26 billion hole to fix. And it could mean another battle with the EU

The Italian finance ministry is set to release updated fiscal plans Wednesday, with analysts contemplating another dispute with the EU and volatility in the country’s bond market. According to press reports over the weekend, the plans are likely to show a revised 2019 budget deficit and growth of just 0.3% for this year — down from an earlier 1.0% prediction. For 2020, the numbers are expected to show a deficit of 2.1% of its gross domestic product, from a previous 1.8% target. After a tense cou


The Italian finance ministry is set to release updated fiscal plans Wednesday, with analysts contemplating another dispute with the EU and volatility in the country’s bond market. According to press reports over the weekend, the plans are likely to show a revised 2019 budget deficit and growth of just 0.3% for this year — down from an earlier 1.0% prediction. For 2020, the numbers are expected to show a deficit of 2.1% of its gross domestic product, from a previous 1.8% target. After a tense cou
Italy has a $26 billion hole to fix. And it could mean another battle with the EU Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: joumanna bercetche, alessia peirdomenico, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2019, fix, ministry, mean, yields, billion, 26, battle, hole, revised, eu, italian, finance, deficit, italy, bond, plans, budget


Italy has a $26 billion hole to fix. And it could mean another battle with the EU

The Italian finance ministry is set to release updated fiscal plans Wednesday, with analysts contemplating another dispute with the EU and volatility in the country’s bond market.

According to press reports over the weekend, the plans are likely to show a revised 2019 budget deficit and growth of just 0.3% for this year — down from an earlier 1.0% prediction. For 2020, the numbers are expected to show a deficit of 2.1% of its gross domestic product, from a previous 1.8% target.

The new deficit targets could be wider than the circa 2% number agreed with the European Commission — the EU’s executive arm — toward the end of last year.

Things came to a head between Rome and Brussels last fall after Italy’s coalition government announced a draft budget for 2019 of 2.4%, which would have breached Maastricht Treaty requirements and opened up the possibility of an infringement procedure.

After a tense couple of months, the Italian finance ministry eventually revised the 2019 deficit forecast to 2.04% to avoid sanctions. Financial assets recovered with 10-year bond yields falling back after hitting highs of 3.68% in October. Yields move inversely to sovereign debt prices.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: joumanna bercetche, alessia peirdomenico, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2019, fix, ministry, mean, yields, billion, 26, battle, hole, revised, eu, italian, finance, deficit, italy, bond, plans, budget


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

A new fight over tax is starting to boil over in the EU: Here’s what you need to know

Changing from unanimity to a qualified majority would bring faster tax changes, including those on big tech companies. However, the Dutch finance minister told CNBC exclusively that he is against changing the rules. Commissioner Pierre Moscovici, in charge of taxation in the EU, told CNBC last month that qualified majority would help the EU address taxation matters more urgently. “If we want a very strong Europe, we need to move from unanimity on those issues … to qualified majority … that’s dem


Changing from unanimity to a qualified majority would bring faster tax changes, including those on big tech companies. However, the Dutch finance minister told CNBC exclusively that he is against changing the rules. Commissioner Pierre Moscovici, in charge of taxation in the EU, told CNBC last month that qualified majority would help the EU address taxation matters more urgently. “If we want a very strong Europe, we need to move from unanimity on those issues … to qualified majority … that’s dem
A new fight over tax is starting to boil over in the EU: Here’s what you need to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fight, finance, majority, tax, eu, qualified, heres, boil, know, european, unanimity, taxation, dutch, need, starting, countries


A new fight over tax is starting to boil over in the EU: Here's what you need to know

Brexit is bad news for the Netherlands, Britain and Europe, Dutch finance minister says 5 Hours Ago | 03:44

The European Union is considering a new approach to taxation rules, but certain member nations are already voicing their opposition.

The European Commission, the EU’s executive body, suggested that the 28 countries should start taking decisions by a qualified majority when it comes to taxation — this means it must represent a minimum of 65 percent of the EU’s population.

At the moment, new tax rules only move forward if there is a complete consensus. Changing from unanimity to a qualified majority would bring faster tax changes, including those on big tech companies.

However, the Dutch finance minister told CNBC exclusively that he is against changing the rules.

“I think if you look back, there’s plenty of evidence that the current way of decision making actually works, also in the area of tax,” Wopke Hoekstra, head of the Dutch finance ministry, said Friday.

“I don’t think that’s very helpful,” he added.

Commissioner Pierre Moscovici, in charge of taxation in the EU, told CNBC last month that qualified majority would help the EU address taxation matters more urgently.

“If we want a very strong Europe, we need to move from unanimity on those issues … to qualified majority … that’s democracy and that is also efficiency.”

His proposal to update the rulebook came after certain EU countries blocked a new tax on digital companies, which could have affected firms such as Facebook and Alphabet’s Google. Four out of the 28 European countries, including The Netherlands, stopped the initiative in March, arguing that the first steps for a digital levy should happen at the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) level.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fight, finance, majority, tax, eu, qualified, heres, boil, know, european, unanimity, taxation, dutch, need, starting, countries


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

EU council will make decision over Brexit delay next week, Austrian finance minister says


EU council will make decision over Brexit delay next week, Austrian finance minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, finance, council, eu, week, austrian, brexit, delay, decision


EU council will make decision over Brexit delay next week, Austrian finance minister says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, finance, council, eu, week, austrian, brexit, delay, decision


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Brexit is bad news for the Netherlands, Britain and Europe, Dutch finance minister says

Brexit is bad news for the Netherlands, Britain and Europe, Dutch finance minister says5 Hours AgoDutch Finance Minister Wopke Hoekstra tells CNBC Brexit is a “soap opera” and a “tragedy,” and discusses proposals to change the way the EU makes decision.


Brexit is bad news for the Netherlands, Britain and Europe, Dutch finance minister says5 Hours AgoDutch Finance Minister Wopke Hoekstra tells CNBC Brexit is a “soap opera” and a “tragedy,” and discusses proposals to change the way the EU makes decision.
Brexit is bad news for the Netherlands, Britain and Europe, Dutch finance minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, finance, wopke, tragedy, proposals, europe, brexit, way, tells, says5, dutch, soap, bad, netherlands, britain


Brexit is bad news for the Netherlands, Britain and Europe, Dutch finance minister says

Brexit is bad news for the Netherlands, Britain and Europe, Dutch finance minister says

5 Hours Ago

Dutch Finance Minister Wopke Hoekstra tells CNBC Brexit is a “soap opera” and a “tragedy,” and discusses proposals to change the way the EU makes decision.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, finance, wopke, tragedy, proposals, europe, brexit, way, tells, says5, dutch, soap, bad, netherlands, britain


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post