US will redefine ‘service animals’ flying with their owners on flights

The U.S. Transportation Department on Wednesday proposed new rules aimed at preventing passengers from falsely claiming their pets are service animals aboard U.S. airline flights. In the biggest change, the department suggests no longer considering an emotional support animal to be a service animal. Federal law allows passengers with disabilities to travel with service animals. The administration’s proposal would consider “a psychiatric service animal to be a service animal and require the same


The U.S. Transportation Department on Wednesday proposed new rules aimed at preventing passengers from falsely claiming their pets are service animals aboard U.S. airline flights.
In the biggest change, the department suggests no longer considering an emotional support animal to be a service animal.
Federal law allows passengers with disabilities to travel with service animals.
The administration’s proposal would consider “a psychiatric service animal to be a service animal and require the same
US will redefine ‘service animals’ flying with their owners on flights Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flying, airlines, passengers, owners, transportation, flights, animal, service, proposal, department, require, support, redefine, animals


US will redefine 'service animals' flying with their owners on flights

The U.S. Transportation Department on Wednesday proposed new rules aimed at preventing passengers from falsely claiming their pets are service animals aboard U.S. airline flights.

In the biggest change, the department suggests no longer considering an emotional support animal to be a service animal. Federal law allows passengers with disabilities to travel with service animals.

The department said the proposal “is intended to ensure a safe and accessible air transportation system” and will be open for public comment, adding it “wants to ensure that individuals with disabilities can continue using their service animals.”

U.S. airlines including Southwest Airlines Co, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines and American Airlines have moved to limit emotional support animals in cabins to large dogs and cats after a growing number of passengers were bringing a wide variety of exotic pets that could pose a safety risk. Airlines in recent years reported a big jump in travelers bringing animals aboard.

Delta noted in 2018 that some passengers “attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums known as sugar gliders, snakes” and spiders, while American Airlines in 2018 said it would not allow a wide variety of creatures on flights as support animals including goats, ferrets, hedgehogs, amphibians and reptiles.

The Trump administration’s proposal would define a service animal “as a dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability.”

The administration’s proposal would consider “a psychiatric service animal to be a service animal and require the same training and treatment of psychiatric service animals as other service animals.”

Airlines would be able to require forms developed by the Transportation Department attesting to service animals good behavior, certifying the service animals good health, “and if taking a long flight attesting that the service animal has the ability to either not relieve itself, or can relieve itself in a sanitary manner.”

The administration proposal would also allow airlines to limit the number of service animals traveling with a single passenger with a disability to two service animals and could require service animals to fit within its handlers’ foot space on the aircraft.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flying, airlines, passengers, owners, transportation, flights, animal, service, proposal, department, require, support, redefine, animals


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Winter storm sweeps Midwest and Northeast, bringing snow and ice

National Weather Service forecasters issued winter weather advisories affecting much of the Midwest and into the Northeast, including heavy snow that could make travel difficult in some areas. In the Dakotas, parts of Interstate 29 and Interstate 94 were closed on Saturday. The danger on the roads was highlighted byrecorded from a delivery truck and made public by the Iowa State Patrol. Snow was expected to move across the Midwest and into the Northeast by Saturday evening. Snow totals could rea


National Weather Service forecasters issued winter weather advisories affecting much of the Midwest and into the Northeast, including heavy snow that could make travel difficult in some areas.
In the Dakotas, parts of Interstate 29 and Interstate 94 were closed on Saturday.
The danger on the roads was highlighted byrecorded from a delivery truck and made public by the Iowa State Patrol.
Snow was expected to move across the Midwest and into the Northeast by Saturday evening.
Snow totals could rea
Winter storm sweeps Midwest and Northeast, bringing snow and ice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sweeps, winter, bringing, weather, parts, interstate, northeast, midwest, flights, ice, snow, iowa, storm, expected, state


Winter storm sweeps Midwest and Northeast, bringing snow and ice

A winter storm that has already caused problems at airports in Chicago and Kansas City was expected to bring blizzard conditions to parts of the Plains and Midwest on Saturday and could dump up to a foot of snow in parts of the Northeast by Sunday.

National Weather Service forecasters issued winter weather advisories affecting much of the Midwest and into the Northeast, including heavy snow that could make travel difficult in some areas.

Forecasters also warned of blizzard conditions expected Saturday afternoon in parts of North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and Iowa, including wind gusts topping 50 mph (80 kph). Officials in those states were urging people to stay inside if possible and noted that high winds coupled even with just a few inches of snow could make it nearly impossible to see in some areas.

In the Dakotas, parts of Interstate 29 and Interstate 94 were closed on Saturday.

The danger on the roads was highlighted by

recorded from a delivery truck and made public by the Iowa State Patrol. The video shows a state trooper and a person who had been involved in a crash along Interstate 80 near Council Bluffs in western Iowa on Friday looking at the damage when another truck loses control on the slick interstate and barrels into the crash scene, barely missing the trooper and other man.

Snow was expected to move across the Midwest and into the Northeast by Saturday evening. Snow totals could reach a foot (30 centimeters) or more in parts of Vermont and New York state. But most areas in the region were expected to get just a few inches.

On Friday night, the Federal Aviation Administration halted all flights in and out of Chicago’s O’Hare Airport for several hours, and a plane slid off an icy taxiway at Kansas City International Airport. The Chicago Department of Aviation reported about 200 cancellations at O’Hare on Saturday morning out of nearly 2,000 total flights, and the FAA said some flights were being delayed by weather conditions.

After the storm, temperatures were expected to drop to the single digits and even below zero (-18 degrees Celsius) in parts of the Plains and the Midwest.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sweeps, winter, bringing, weather, parts, interstate, northeast, midwest, flights, ice, snow, iowa, storm, expected, state


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Southwest pulls Boeing Max until June as airlines dig in for delays ahead of peak summer season

Southwest Airlines said Thursday it doesn’t expect the Boeing 737 Max to be included in its flight schedule until early June, following similar moves by American and United. Ahead of the peak summer travel season, the airlines face the likelihood that pilots will have to be trained on simulators before the jets return. Regulators, who ordered airlines to stop flying, have repeatedly said they have no firm timeline to approve the planes again for commercial flights. Southwest, which operates an a


Southwest Airlines said Thursday it doesn’t expect the Boeing 737 Max to be included in its flight schedule until early June, following similar moves by American and United.
Ahead of the peak summer travel season, the airlines face the likelihood that pilots will have to be trained on simulators before the jets return.
Regulators, who ordered airlines to stop flying, have repeatedly said they have no firm timeline to approve the planes again for commercial flights.
Southwest, which operates an a
Southwest pulls Boeing Max until June as airlines dig in for delays ahead of peak summer season Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, peak, boeing, flights, southwest, dig, month, pilots, season, grounding, airlines, summer, flight, delays, max, pulls, service, jets


Southwest pulls Boeing Max until June as airlines dig in for delays ahead of peak summer season

Southwest Airlines said Thursday it doesn’t expect the Boeing 737 Max to be included in its flight schedule until early June, following similar moves by American and United.

Ahead of the peak summer travel season, the airlines face the likelihood that pilots will have to be trained on simulators before the jets return.

The problem has worsened for carriers because they had expected Boeing to deliver more jets at the time of the grounding last March, after the second of two fatal crashes that killed 346 people within five months. Regulators, who ordered airlines to stop flying, have repeatedly said they have no firm timeline to approve the planes again for commercial flights.

Boeing earlier this month said it would recommend pilots undergo simulator training before airlines start flying the planes again, a process that could further delay the Max’s return to service and one that promises to add to Boeing’s costs.

Southwest, which operates an all-Boeing 737 fleet — mostly older models — reached a compensation agreement last month with Boeing over the grounding, but it could receive more as the flight ban wears on.

Southwest is pulling the planes through June 6, an effort to “reduce last-minute flight cancellations and unexpected disruptions.” The Dallas-based carrier plans to remove 330 weekday flights from its peak-day schedules of more than 4,000 flights, 50 more flights than when it expected to have the planes back in service by early April.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, peak, boeing, flights, southwest, dig, month, pilots, season, grounding, airlines, summer, flight, delays, max, pulls, service, jets


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These are the worst (and best) airlines for 2019, based on mishandled luggage, delays and more

According to a new ranking by The Wall Street Journal released Wednesday, Delta Air Lines was the best major U.S. airline for 2019. American Airlines came in last on the Journal’s overall ranking. American mishandled more than 2,600 bags compared to Delta’s 1,345 last year. United, which ranked next to last overall, had poor rankings in two-hour tarmac delays, mishandled baggage and canceled flights but did better in involuntary bumps. Here are how U.S. airlines stack up in 2019, according to th


According to a new ranking by The Wall Street Journal released Wednesday, Delta Air Lines was the best major U.S. airline for 2019.
American Airlines came in last on the Journal’s overall ranking.
American mishandled more than 2,600 bags compared to Delta’s 1,345 last year.
United, which ranked next to last overall, had poor rankings in two-hour tarmac delays, mishandled baggage and canceled flights but did better in involuntary bumps.
Here are how U.S. airlines stack up in 2019, according to th
These are the worst (and best) airlines for 2019, based on mishandled luggage, delays and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mishandled, based, luggage, better, american, journal, according, best, delays, flights, airlines, delta, 2019, overall, worst


These are the worst (and best) airlines for 2019, based on mishandled luggage, delays and more

According to a new ranking by The Wall Street Journal released Wednesday, Delta Air Lines was the best major U.S. airline for 2019. American Airlines came in last on the Journal’s overall ranking. The Journal also found flight cancellations, long delays and customer complaints were up across the board.

Some airlines were able to handle the mishaps (mainly caused by weather and congestion) better than others, the report said.

For instance, Delta averaged 36 flight cancellations a day in 2019 while American averaged 159 a day, according to the Journal. What’s more, Delta reported bumping a total of nine passengers from its flights last year while American bumped more than 15,000.

American also ranked last in two-hour tarmac delays and mishandled baggage. American mishandled more than 2,600 bags compared to Delta’s 1,345 last year. United, which ranked next to last overall, had poor rankings in two-hour tarmac delays, mishandled baggage and canceled flights but did better in involuntary bumps. JetBlue (sixth overall) also had poor standings when it came to lost or mishandled luggage but performed better with number of canceled flights and involuntary bumps.

To compile the list, the Journal used data from masflight, a flight-data analytics unit of Global Eagle.

Here are how U.S. airlines stack up in 2019, according to the Journal.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mishandled, based, luggage, better, american, journal, according, best, delays, flights, airlines, delta, 2019, overall, worst


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Boris Johnson says UK government ‘working hard’ to save Branson-owned airline

This picture shows a Dash 8 Q400 of Flybe airline during take-off on September 24, 2019 at the airport in Duesseldorf, western Germany. U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has offered a heavy hint that his new Conservative administration will begrudgingly step in to help prevent the collapse of Europe’s biggest regional airline, Flybe. Flybe is the biggest operator of U.K. domestic flights and serves routes to 30 different airports in continental Europe. Its network serves more than half of all U.


This picture shows a Dash 8 Q400 of Flybe airline during take-off on September 24, 2019 at the airport in Duesseldorf, western Germany.
U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has offered a heavy hint that his new Conservative administration will begrudgingly step in to help prevent the collapse of Europe’s biggest regional airline, Flybe.
Flybe is the biggest operator of U.K. domestic flights and serves routes to 30 different airports in continental Europe.
Its network serves more than half of all U.
Boris Johnson says UK government ‘working hard’ to save Branson-owned airline Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hard, virgin, domestic, airline, working, step, flights, air, bransonowned, flybe, struggling, million, boris, save, johnson


Boris Johnson says UK government 'working hard' to save Branson-owned airline

This picture shows a Dash 8 Q400 of Flybe airline during take-off on September 24, 2019 at the airport in Duesseldorf, western Germany.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has offered a heavy hint that his new Conservative administration will begrudgingly step in to help prevent the collapse of Europe’s biggest regional airline, Flybe.

Last year, Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic, Stobart Air and Cyrus Capital jointly bought the airline for just $2.8 million. They promised to invest £100 million ($130 million) in the struggling firm which was set to be rebranded as Virgin Connect.

Reports have been circulating since Sunday that the airline is on the brink of collapse.

Speaking to the BBC Tuesday, Johnson said it was “not for a government to step in and save companies that simply run into trouble,” but then added that the government “recognized the importance of Flybe” and was working hard to do what it could.

Sky news reported Tuesday that the three U.K. cabinet ministers responsible for finance, transport and business will hold an emergency meeting to discuss a rescue package.

One plan on the table is to let Flybe delay payment of this year’s estimated air passenger duty (APD) bill of £106 million for three years. The government would allow the tax deferral only if Flybe’s consortium of owners committed their own funds.

Flybe is the biggest operator of U.K. domestic flights and serves routes to 30 different airports in continental Europe. According to its own figures, Flybe carries 8 million passengers a year on 74 aircraft, making it Europe’s largest fleet devoted to regional connections.

Its network serves more than half of all U.K. domestic flights that do not depart from or land in London. It’s seen as strategically crucial to regions and islands around Britain that aren’t served by rail.

In September 2019, U.K. operator Thomas Cook went into administration, which stranded thousands of passengers all over the world. Two years prior, Monarch Airlines collapsed. The U.K. government of the time refused to step in on both occasions.

Flybe itself has so far refused to comment on the need for a bailout beyond a statement that said it continued to operate as normal. It refrained from commenting on any speculation.

Travelers on U.K. domestic flights pay £13 in APD for a single flight. It was introduced with a stated impact of reducing the environmental impact of flying. Greenpeace U.K. Chief Scientist Doug Parr said on Twitter Tuesday that “cutting air passenger duty encourages flying” and should not be used to save a struggling airline.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hard, virgin, domestic, airline, working, step, flights, air, bransonowned, flybe, struggling, million, boris, save, johnson


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Philippines suspends Manila airport flights as volcano spews ash

People take photos of a phreatic explosion from the Taal volcano as seen from the town of Tagaytay in Cavite province, southwest of Manila, on January 12, 2020. The Philippine airport authority on Sunday suspended flights at Manila’s international airport after a volcano in nearby Batangas province spewed a giant plume of ash. The Taal volcano generated a 1-km (0.6 mile) high ash plume accompanied by rumbling sounds and tremors earlier in the day, indicating increased unrest that could lead to a


People take photos of a phreatic explosion from the Taal volcano as seen from the town of Tagaytay in Cavite province, southwest of Manila, on January 12, 2020.
The Philippine airport authority on Sunday suspended flights at Manila’s international airport after a volcano in nearby Batangas province spewed a giant plume of ash.
The Taal volcano generated a 1-km (0.6 mile) high ash plume accompanied by rumbling sounds and tremors earlier in the day, indicating increased unrest that could lead to a
Philippines suspends Manila airport flights as volcano spews ash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flights, volcano, taal, plume, spews, airport, philippines, suspended, province, authority, international, suspends, eruption, ash


Philippines suspends Manila airport flights as volcano spews ash

People take photos of a phreatic explosion from the Taal volcano as seen from the town of Tagaytay in Cavite province, southwest of Manila, on January 12, 2020.

The Philippine airport authority on Sunday suspended flights at Manila’s international airport after a volcano in nearby Batangas province spewed a giant plume of ash.

The Taal volcano generated a 1-km (0.6 mile) high ash plume accompanied by rumbling sounds and tremors earlier in the day, indicating increased unrest that could lead to a hazardous eruption in weeks.

“Flight operations at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport have been temporarily suspended due to the volcanic ash from the eruption of Taal Volcano,” the Manila International Airport Authority tweeted.

Passengers have been advised to coordinate with their respective airlines for details on flight schedules.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flights, volcano, taal, plume, spews, airport, philippines, suspended, province, authority, international, suspends, eruption, ash


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Virgin Galactic is seeing strong demand for tourist flights to space, will re-open ticket sales

Shares of Virgin Galactic rose 4.5% in trading from its previous close of $11.42. But Virgin Galactic froze ticket sales after a crash in 2014 killed a pilot during a test flight. Virgin Galactic said in its third-quarter results that – following those test flights – the company received 3,557 expressions of interest in flight reservations. Before that happens Virgin Galactic will move its spacecraft Unity to the company’s spaceport in New Mexico from its testing facility in Mojave, California.


Shares of Virgin Galactic rose 4.5% in trading from its previous close of $11.42.
But Virgin Galactic froze ticket sales after a crash in 2014 killed a pilot during a test flight.
Virgin Galactic said in its third-quarter results that – following those test flights – the company received 3,557 expressions of interest in flight reservations.
Before that happens Virgin Galactic will move its spacecraft Unity to the company’s spaceport in New Mexico from its testing facility in Mojave, California.

Virgin Galactic is seeing strong demand for tourist flights to space, will re-open ticket sales Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seeing, sales, reopen, told, company, virgin, tourist, test, morgan, galactic, flights, commercial, space, whitesides, ticket, strong


Virgin Galactic is seeing strong demand for tourist flights to space, will re-open ticket sales

Virgin Galactic CEO George Whitesides on Thursday revealed the company has seen steadily increasing demand from prospective space tourists, as the company edges closer to its goal of beginning commercial flights this year.

The number of people telling the company they want to fly to the edge of space “keeps ticking up by a good chunk every month,” Whitesides told CNBC’s Morgan Brennan on “Squawk on the Street.”

“Later on in the year we’ll re-open those sales,” Whitesides said.

Shares of Virgin Galactic rose 4.5% in trading from its previous close of $11.42.

The company has 603 reservations on its books, with tickets going for $250,000 per person. But Virgin Galactic froze ticket sales after a crash in 2014 killed a pilot during a test flight. After updating its spacecraft, and spending the last few years verifying its safety, Virgin Galactic has flown five people to space on two successful test flights.

Virgin Galactic said in its third-quarter results that – following those test flights – the company received 3,557 expressions of interest in flight reservations. The company reported those quarterly results in November, shortly following its public debt on the New York Stock Exchange.

Whitesides told investors at Morgan Stanley’s recent space summit that the high demand for tickets means his company could increase its prices substantially for first commercial flights.

The CEO on Thursday outlined the company’s goals for the year ahead, with Virgin Galactic’s number one priority to fly Branson to space. Before that happens Virgin Galactic will move its spacecraft Unity to the company’s spaceport in New Mexico from its testing facility in Mojave, California. Then the company will complete a series of test flights at the new location, while also finishing the design of the spacecraft’s cabin for customers.

Virgin Galactic Chairman Chamath Palihapitiya told CNBC in November that he expects Virgin Galactic to begin commercial operations in the middle of this year. The company aims to be profitable by 2021.

There are three Wall Street firms covering Virgin Galactic’s stock – Morgan Stanley, Credit Suisse and Vertical Research Partners – and all three have buy ratings.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seeing, sales, reopen, told, company, virgin, tourist, test, morgan, galactic, flights, commercial, space, whitesides, ticket, strong


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From CES to rodeos, airlines chase high-paying travelers with extra flights for special events

A United Airlines passenger airplane passes over Whittier, Calif., on its way to Los Angeles International Airport. The airline quickly added service from several cities in West Texas, including Amarillo and Lubbock, and Las Vegas, which was hosting the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo that December. An altogether new destination requires the blessing of Southwest’s CEO but planners frequently pitch service for events or popular cities, Decaire said. The airline also added capacity to Las Vegas fr


A United Airlines passenger airplane passes over Whittier, Calif., on its way to Los Angeles International Airport.
The airline quickly added service from several cities in West Texas, including Amarillo and Lubbock, and Las Vegas, which was hosting the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo that December.
An altogether new destination requires the blessing of Southwest’s CEO but planners frequently pitch service for events or popular cities, Decaire said.
The airline also added capacity to Las Vegas fr
From CES to rodeos, airlines chase high-paying travelers with extra flights for special events Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-06  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airlines, network, chase, special, travelers, vegas, added, service, seats, las, events, flights, extra, rodeos, ces, united, highpaying


From CES to rodeos, airlines chase high-paying travelers with extra flights for special events

A United Airlines passenger airplane passes over Whittier, Calif., on its way to Los Angeles International Airport. Nick Ut | AP

In 2017, Southwest’s team of network planners noticed a sudden surge in demand for flights from West Texas to Las Vegas in early December. “We were like why is West Texas to Vegas all of a sudden popping? Oh, my gosh, it’s a rodeo,'” recalled Adam Decaire, who heads network planning at Southwest Airlines. The airline quickly added service from several cities in West Texas, including Amarillo and Lubbock, and Las Vegas, which was hosting the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo that December. An altogether new destination requires the blessing of Southwest’s CEO but planners frequently pitch service for events or popular cities, Decaire said. Airlines, enjoying a decadelong stretch of profitability and better planning technology, are chasing trendy destinations and special events, an effort to capture high-paying customers that need to get to big trade shows like the Consumer Electronics Show, championship games, or even the new “it” city. Carriers are trying to make more profitable use of their aircraft, particularly in slower periods like the winter. They’re tallying traveler queries and building schedules around their searches as they edge toward crowdsourcing where and when they fly.

737 Max grounding

Getting the formula right is taking on new importance for several major U.S. airlines that can’t grow as planned because of the worldwide grounding of the Boeing 737 Max, now entering its 11th month. American, Delta and United are among the airlines that have added service or added capacity through larger aircraft to Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronics Show, which officially kicks off Tuesday. Some services extend to the airport. Delta, for example, whose CEO Ed Bastian is delivering a keynote address at CES on Tuesday, is providing CES badge pickup for attendees flying Delta at airports in Seattle, San Jose, California and at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport. The airline also added capacity to Las Vegas from London, Paris, Amsterdam, Shanghai, Tokyo and Seoul for the event. But airlines’ chase of conference-goers isn’t limited to CES. For a second year, United is adding service in February to Barcelona’s Mobile World Congress, the world’s largest telecommunications trade show that drew more than 100,000 attendees in 2019. This year, United will fly four special nonstops from San Francisco to Barcelona on a 350-seat Boeing 777-300ER, the largest aircraft in its fleet, up from two round trips on a smaller version of the 777 last year, equaling a 160% increase in seats and 150% in business-class seats from 2019.

$19,000 tickets

“We try to experiment. If the experiment fails it will fail fast.” said Patrick Quayle, head of international network planning at United. “We’re not going to be flying these flights if they lose money.” It hasn’t failed for United. Round-trip business-class seats on the nonstop San Francisco to Barcelona route as of Monday night were fetching more than $19,000, more than double the fare a week before or after the event. Coach flights are around the same $2,560 when United goes back to its regular routing that requires a stop. Round-trip fares from Newark, New Jersey, to Barcelona during that week are going for $1,960 in coach and close to $11,000 in business class, falling to $1,070 and $6,800, respectively, a week later. Over the past few years, United has been able to plan for such events thanks to better data and more specialized staff whereas before “it was more of a scramble,” said Quayle. Airlines have been refreshing their first- and business-class cabins to chase those high-paying travelers. United, for example, has been outfitting some of its Boeing 767s to include more business class seats on flights to London from its hubs at Newark and Chicago. Delta, for its part, now even breaks out its premium-class sales, as the front of the plane becomes a bigger and bigger source of revenue for the Atlanta-based airline.

Premium leisure

United’s network planners are also adding destinations based on customer searches, such as Reykjavik, which was the one of the most-searched destinations on its site before it added service to the Icelandic capital in 2018, Quayle said. The carrier also added added Porto, Portugal that summer, and last month, a nonstop from Newark to Cape Town, South Africa. “It’s a focus on premium leisure,” he said. Airlines have for decades added service for events like the Super Bowl, but they have grown more sophisticated about where and when to add service and how much to charge, said Robert Mann, a former airline executive who runs R.W. Mann & Co., an aviation consulting firm. “It’s a market based economy and when there’s a mismatch between capacity the market ought to charge higher fares,” he said. “When there’s infinite demand you don’t have to be a low-cost carrier.” United isn’t the only airline to chase such destinations or special events.

College football playoffs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-06  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airlines, network, chase, special, travelers, vegas, added, service, seats, las, events, flights, extra, rodeos, ces, united, highpaying


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How Richard Branson started Virgin Atlantic with a blackboard selling $39 flights

And for billionaire Richard Branson, it’s no different. Only when the British entrepreneur was met with a cancelled flight in the early 80s, it inspired another response, too: A new business idea. Branson — already a successful businessman, having formed Virgin Records some years earlier — was due to fly to the British Virgin Islands to be reunited with a “lovely lady” on his private Necker Island, when his American Airlines flight was suddenly cancelled. “I was livid because I hadn’t seen her f


And for billionaire Richard Branson, it’s no different.
Only when the British entrepreneur was met with a cancelled flight in the early 80s, it inspired another response, too: A new business idea.
Branson — already a successful businessman, having formed Virgin Records some years earlier — was due to fly to the British Virgin Islands to be reunited with a “lovely lady” on his private Necker Island, when his American Airlines flight was suddenly cancelled.
“I was livid because I hadn’t seen her f
How Richard Branson started Virgin Atlantic with a blackboard selling $39 flights Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flights, started, suddenly, seen, successful, solution, british, selling, richard, branson, blackboard, flight, virgin, atlantic, weeks


How Richard Branson started Virgin Atlantic with a blackboard selling $39 flights

A canceled flight, in many of us, inspires frustration and anger. And for billionaire Richard Branson, it’s no different.

Only when the British entrepreneur was met with a cancelled flight in the early 80s, it inspired another response, too: A new business idea.

Branson — already a successful businessman, having formed Virgin Records some years earlier — was due to fly to the British Virgin Islands to be reunited with a “lovely lady” on his private Necker Island, when his American Airlines flight was suddenly cancelled.

“I was livid because I hadn’t seen her for three weeks,” Branson recalled in an interview with CNBC for “The Brave Ones” podcast.

So, he did as all good entrepreneurs do, and looked for a solution.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flights, started, suddenly, seen, successful, solution, british, selling, richard, branson, blackboard, flight, virgin, atlantic, weeks


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More than 150 flights cancelled in Germany as Lufthansa’s Germanwings hit by strikes

An Airbus plane operated by Lufthansa’s Germanwings budget airline crashed in southern France on Tuesday en route from Barcelona to Duesseldorf, police and aviation officials said. Around 180 flights in Germany were cancelled on Monday due to cabin crew strikes at Lufthansa’s budget airline Germanwings, in a bid to put pressure on management in wage talks. Around 15% of flights at Eurowings needed to be cancelled, a Lufthansa spokeswoman said on Monday. The majority of the cancelled flights were


An Airbus plane operated by Lufthansa’s Germanwings budget airline crashed in southern France on Tuesday en route from Barcelona to Duesseldorf, police and aviation officials said.
Around 180 flights in Germany were cancelled on Monday due to cabin crew strikes at Lufthansa’s budget airline Germanwings, in a bid to put pressure on management in wage talks.
Around 15% of flights at Eurowings needed to be cancelled, a Lufthansa spokeswoman said on Monday.
The majority of the cancelled flights were
More than 150 flights cancelled in Germany as Lufthansa’s Germanwings hit by strikes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lufthansa, germany, cabin, germanwings, flights, lufthansas, cancelled, 150, airline, passengers, hit, eurowings, strikes


More than 150 flights cancelled in Germany as Lufthansa's Germanwings hit by strikes

A Germanwings Airbus A320 registration D-AIPX is seen at the Berlin airport in this March 29, 2014 file photo. An Airbus plane operated by Lufthansa’s Germanwings budget airline crashed in southern France on Tuesday en route from Barcelona to Duesseldorf, police and aviation officials said.

Around 180 flights in Germany were cancelled on Monday due to cabin crew strikes at Lufthansa’s budget airline Germanwings, in a bid to put pressure on management in wage talks.

The Ufo labour union on Friday announced strikes from Monday to Wednesday this week at Germanwings, which operates on behalf of Lufthansa’s Eurowings brand, saying little progress has been achieved in talks with Lufthansa management.

Around 15% of flights at Eurowings needed to be cancelled, a Lufthansa spokeswoman said on Monday.

“First 35 flights were cancelled, then 54, now 170, meaning that Germanwings will only manage 7% of its original flight operations today,” a spokesman for Ufo said, speaking at the Cologne-Bonn airport.

“That should be a sign for Lufthansa group. Your employees are really angry. You finally have to change something,” he added.

The majority of the cancelled flights were domestic, according to the Eurowings website. Stranded passengers were offered train tickets to their destinations or given a seat on flights operated by other Lufthansa airlines.

Some passengers said that while they understood cabin crew’s grievances, the timing, in the middle of the holiday season, was problematic.

“I am from France and it is worse there. I am in favour of workers expressing themselves, but I am not sure if the time is right,” said Celine Guiakam, a passenger at Cologne-Bonn airport.

“There is no good time for strikes. Every strike and every delay is one too many and in so far we regret that it has to happen at all,” a spokesman for Eurowings said.

The deadlocked collective bargaining dispute for the 22,000 cabin employees concerns pay and working conditions among other issues

Ufo held a strike for two days in November, resulting in the cancellation of one in five flights, affecting around 180,000 passengers and costing the airline 10-20 million euros ($22.39 million).


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lufthansa, germany, cabin, germanwings, flights, lufthansas, cancelled, 150, airline, passengers, hit, eurowings, strikes


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