Uber rival Bolt launches food delivery service in Europe

Trump says he’s considering payroll tax cut day after White House…Trump said he has “been thinking about payroll taxes for a long time” — and he cautioned that “whether or not we do something now, it’s not being done because of recession.” Politicsread more


Trump says he’s considering payroll tax cut day after White House…Trump said he has “been thinking about payroll taxes for a long time” — and he cautioned that “whether or not we do something now, it’s not being done because of recession.” Politicsread more
Uber rival Bolt launches food delivery service in Europe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, delivery, taxes, food, uber, white, thinking, housetrump, recessionpoliticsread, rival, payroll, tax, trump, bolt, long, hes, europe, launches, service


Uber rival Bolt launches food delivery service in Europe

Trump says he’s considering payroll tax cut day after White House…

Trump said he has “been thinking about payroll taxes for a long time” — and he cautioned that “whether or not we do something now, it’s not being done because of recession.”

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, delivery, taxes, food, uber, white, thinking, housetrump, recessionpoliticsread, rival, payroll, tax, trump, bolt, long, hes, europe, launches, service


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Weight Watchers under fire for selling diets to children as young as age eight

Kurbo app Scott Mlyn | CNBCDo your homework! Weight Watchers, which now calls itself WW, this week introduced a new app called Kurbo by WW to “help kids and teens ages 8-17 reach a healthier weight.” WW last year acquired Kurbo, a digital health start-up whose system is based on Stanford University’s pediatric obesity program. Your profile page charts your body mass index (BMI), a formula based on your weight and height. Kurbo’s program does not require kids to track calories or fat, but “they’r


Kurbo app Scott Mlyn | CNBCDo your homework! Weight Watchers, which now calls itself WW, this week introduced a new app called Kurbo by WW to “help kids and teens ages 8-17 reach a healthier weight.” WW last year acquired Kurbo, a digital health start-up whose system is based on Stanford University’s pediatric obesity program. Your profile page charts your body mass index (BMI), a formula based on your weight and height. Kurbo’s program does not require kids to track calories or fat, but “they’r
Weight Watchers under fire for selling diets to children as young as age eight Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-17  Authors: angelica lavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, young, food, goal, foods, app, parents, ww, kids, kurbo, saying, watchers, selling, children, diets, age, weight


Weight Watchers under fire for selling diets to children as young as age eight

Kurbo app Scott Mlyn | CNBC

Do your homework! Clean your room! Count your Weight Watchers points? Weight Watchers, which now calls itself WW, this week introduced a new app called Kurbo by WW to “help kids and teens ages 8-17 reach a healthier weight.” WW last year acquired Kurbo, a digital health start-up whose system is based on Stanford University’s pediatric obesity program. Adolescents track their food in Kurbo’s free app. A green, yellow, or red light grades what and how much of a food they eat. They can also consult with a digital coach for a fee, starting at $69 per month. “This is a scientifically proven way to get kids to eat healthier and move more, so we’re excited to get it into as many hands as possible,” WW’s Chief Scientific Officer Gary Foster told CNBC. Some WW loyalists applaud the move, saying the company has transformed their lives and hope it can transform children’s lives, too. But nutritionists worry Kurbo promotes an unhealthy relationship with food during an especially impressionable time. “I really do appreciate the idea that parents are signing up their children in ways that are largely well-intended, but what we know is that preoccupation with food and righteousness around food does not create healthy relationships with food,” said Anna Sweeney, dietitian and owner of Whole Life Nutrition Counseling in Concord, Massachusetts. “It does not leave people feeling good or competent in eating.”

Kurbo: lifestyle or diet?

When you sign up for Kurbo, you enter your name, height, weight and gender. You then choose a goal: eat healthier, lose weight, make parents happy, get stronger and fitter, have more energy, boost my confidence or feel better in my clothes. Abby Langer, a dietitian who owns her own practice in Toronto, Canada, said she wanted to “barf” when she heard “make parents happy” was an option. Foster said Kurbo is meant to be a “family-based approach” and that parents should not single out one child. Instead, he said parents need to set the example and involve the entire family. “Kids who are overweight know they’re overweight and already feel bad about it,” Langer said. “Giving this app to a kid is like saying there’s something wrong with you.” Once you select a goal, you rank how important the goal is to you on a scale of 0 “not important” to ten “super important” and how confident you are that you can reach your goal from 0 “not confident” to to “super confident.” Your profile page charts your body mass index (BMI), a formula based on your weight and height. You can check how many green, yellow and red foods you’ve eaten during the week. While it’s not quite counting points, it’s not that far from it. Foster dismisses the idea that Kurbo is a diet, which he defines as a program like keto or paleo that labels certain foods as bad and encourages people to avoid them. Diets, he said, lead to short-term behavior change, whereas WW focuses on establishing healthy patterns. Linda Tucker, a food and body image coach, thinks the light system is “problematic” because it “loses nuance.” She understands the intention to make it simple. Kurbo’s program does not require kids to track calories or fat, but “they’re still saying these foods are better than these foods without any context.” “It’s not realistic, and it’s not a healthy way to teach anyone about food, especially children,” said Tucker, who owns her own practice in Portland, Oregon.

Helping or hurting


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-17  Authors: angelica lavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, young, food, goal, foods, app, parents, ww, kids, kurbo, saying, watchers, selling, children, diets, age, weight


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Brexit blocking opportunities for new environmental legislation, food retail executive says

Brexit blocking opportunities for new environmental legislation, food retail executive says18 Hours AgoRichard Walker, managing director of British food retailer Iceland, discusses the company’s decision to eliminate plastic packaging from its shelves.


Brexit blocking opportunities for new environmental legislation, food retail executive says18 Hours AgoRichard Walker, managing director of British food retailer Iceland, discusses the company’s decision to eliminate plastic packaging from its shelves.
Brexit blocking opportunities for new environmental legislation, food retail executive says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, legislation, opportunities, retail, blocking, shelves, walker, says18, environmental, managing, plastic, packaging, retailer, brexit, food, executive


Brexit blocking opportunities for new environmental legislation, food retail executive says

Brexit blocking opportunities for new environmental legislation, food retail executive says

18 Hours Ago

Richard Walker, managing director of British food retailer Iceland, discusses the company’s decision to eliminate plastic packaging from its shelves.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, legislation, opportunities, retail, blocking, shelves, walker, says18, environmental, managing, plastic, packaging, retailer, brexit, food, executive


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This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no


Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no
This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


This woman sold her app for $85 million — here's the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette Lykke

Building a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. She co-founded fitness app Endomondo in 2007, developing the company for almost a decade before it gained enough interest to be acquired by American firm Under Armour. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017.

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According to Lykke, who began her career as a management consultant, a business can only experience vast growth rates if the people at its reins exercise what she calls “patient impatience.” “Every day you have to push (yourself) and you have to be willing to do that for quite a while,” she said. “I think a lot of stories about start-ups give the impression that two guys start a company in a basement and boom, two years later they change the world. That’s just not how it works – it takes years, so working hard every day is crucial.”

Be clear on your purpose

For the past two years, Lykke has been the CEO of Too Good To Go — an organization that works with restaurants and food retailers to tackle waste by selling food at a discounted price. The app has 11 million users and works with 22,000 stores across 11 countries. Her involvement with the company began around 9 months after the service was launched, when a friend who knew its founders showed her the app. “I thought it was such a cool concept,” she told CNBC. “I got invited to invest and then was asked to help the founders run the business.” She said her core driving force when it came to work was being part of a company that had a strong purpose and could make a real impact. “I work a lot and put everything into it, so I want to do something that really matters,” she explained. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and now I have an even stronger purpose in tackling food waste. I just hadn’t realized the scale of this problem, but it had always been natural to me not to throw away food.” Entrepreneurs looking to grow a company needed to follow her lead and work on something that they felt was meaningful, Lykke added. “Make sure you’re really, really passionate about what you do — that’s fundamental,” she said. “There are going to be days and nights where, if you don’t have that passion, it’s going to be too difficult.”

As well as being passionate about their business, start-up founders needed to build a team who believed in the purpose of the company. “Being clear about the company’s vision is important, (but) the people you find for your team need to believe what you believe — it’s important to establish that team really early on,” Lykke told CNBC. She noted that having a strong ethical purpose was also a big competitive advantage, helping to attract both talented employees and investors.

Seek advice — and share it too


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


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Deliveroo to end operations in Germany, focus on other markets: Spokesman

A man riding a bicycle for food delivery service Deliveroo pauses at an intersection on March 9, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. British food delivery service Deliveroo will cease operations in Germany on Friday and turn its attention to other markets, a spokesman for the Amazon-backed company said on Monday. “We’ve decided to focus on other markets,” a Deliveroo spokesman said regarding Germany, adding that the company was not ruling out returning to Europe’s largest economy in the future. Deliveroo w


A man riding a bicycle for food delivery service Deliveroo pauses at an intersection on March 9, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. British food delivery service Deliveroo will cease operations in Germany on Friday and turn its attention to other markets, a spokesman for the Amazon-backed company said on Monday. “We’ve decided to focus on other markets,” a Deliveroo spokesman said regarding Germany, adding that the company was not ruling out returning to Europe’s largest economy in the future. Deliveroo w
Deliveroo to end operations in Germany, focus on other markets: Spokesman Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, service, spokesman, company, operations, focus, markets, deliveroo, delivery, food, takeawaycom, end, germany, rival


Deliveroo to end operations in Germany, focus on other markets: Spokesman

A man riding a bicycle for food delivery service Deliveroo pauses at an intersection on March 9, 2018 in Berlin, Germany.

British food delivery service Deliveroo will cease operations in Germany on Friday and turn its attention to other markets, a spokesman for the Amazon-backed company said on Monday.

The withdrawal of Deliveroo — which says it has 1,100 riders in five cities and just under 100 employees in Germany — reduces competition for Dutch rival Takeaway.com, which last year agreed to buy larger competitor Delivery Hero’s business in the German food delivery market.

Deliveroo’s decision comes as Takeaway.com and British rival Just Eat have just finalized the terms of their deal to create a global food delivery company that will be a market leader in Britain, Germany, the Netherlands and Canada.

“We’ve decided to focus on other markets,” a Deliveroo spokesman said regarding Germany, adding that the company was not ruling out returning to Europe’s largest economy in the future.

Deliveroo will shift its resources and investment towards boosting growth and expanding in markets around Europe and the Asia-Pacific region, the spokesman said.

Deliveroo said “appropriate compensation and goodwill packages” would be available for riders, employees and restaurants.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, service, spokesman, company, operations, focus, markets, deliveroo, delivery, food, takeawaycom, end, germany, rival


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China’s surging food prices won’t weaken its hand in the trade war, economists say

The rising price of food — which may only get worse with a halt on U.S. agricultural imports — won’t have major ramifications for Beijing as it continues its tit-for-tat trade war with Washington, according to experts. New data Friday showed China’s July food prices jumped 9.1% from a year ago. The figures come as China announced this week that it would suspend imports of agricultural products from the U.S. “China has a price control mechanism on necessities to slow down food price increase, and


The rising price of food — which may only get worse with a halt on U.S. agricultural imports — won’t have major ramifications for Beijing as it continues its tit-for-tat trade war with Washington, according to experts. New data Friday showed China’s July food prices jumped 9.1% from a year ago. The figures come as China announced this week that it would suspend imports of agricultural products from the U.S. “China has a price control mechanism on necessities to slow down food price increase, and
China’s surging food prices won’t weaken its hand in the trade war, economists say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, trade, agricultural, wont, inflation, weaken, economists, imports, prices, china, surging, beijing, war, price, rise, products, food, hand


China's surging food prices won't weaken its hand in the trade war, economists say

The rising price of food — which may only get worse with a halt on U.S. agricultural imports — won’t have major ramifications for Beijing as it continues its tit-for-tat trade war with Washington, according to experts.

New data Friday showed China’s July food prices jumped 9.1% from a year ago. A key contributor was the 27% rise in pork prices amid an outbreak of African swine fever, while fresh fruit prices also climbed 39.1%.

The figures come as China announced this week that it would suspend imports of agricultural products from the U.S. This was in retaliation to President Donald Trump slapping a 10% tariff on an additional $300 billion in Chinese goods.

While economists suggest inflation could rise further in the short term, they believe Beijing has a series of options to mitigate the effects before it starts to impact politically.

“China has a price control mechanism on necessities to slow down food price increase, and there are government inventories that could soothe food price inflation,” Iris Pang, Greater China economist at ING, told CNBC via email.

“The plan is to grow more agricultural products that are currently imported from the rest of the world,” she added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, trade, agricultural, wont, inflation, weaken, economists, imports, prices, china, surging, beijing, war, price, rise, products, food, hand


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Uber CEO reveals it considered buying food delivery app Caviar before rival DoorDash did

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told CNBC on Friday that the ride-hailing, freight and delivery giant considered a deal with on-demand food delivery service Caviar but decided to pass. Khosrowshahi said Uber’s food delivery service, Uber Eats, will focus on organic growth rather than acquisitions. On Aug 1, Square announced an agreement to sell Caviar to Uber Eats’ formidable rival DoorDash for $410 million. While declining to comment further on Caviar, Khosrowshahi did say that he sees food delivery


Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told CNBC on Friday that the ride-hailing, freight and delivery giant considered a deal with on-demand food delivery service Caviar but decided to pass. Khosrowshahi said Uber’s food delivery service, Uber Eats, will focus on organic growth rather than acquisitions. On Aug 1, Square announced an agreement to sell Caviar to Uber Eats’ formidable rival DoorDash for $410 million. While declining to comment further on Caviar, Khosrowshahi did say that he sees food delivery
Uber CEO reveals it considered buying food delivery app Caviar before rival DoorDash did Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: jessica bursztynsky, jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, street, khosrowshahi, considered, eats, ceo, buying, rival, service, uber, square, doordash, delivery, caviar, reveals, secondquarter


Uber CEO reveals it considered buying food delivery app Caviar before rival DoorDash did

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told CNBC on Friday that the ride-hailing, freight and delivery giant considered a deal with on-demand food delivery service Caviar but decided to pass.

“We took a look at Caviar. It’s a great brand,” Khosrowshahi said in a “Squawk on the Street ” interview, as Uber shares were sinking after disappointing second-quarter results. “It wasn’t the right deal for us.”

Khosrowshahi said Uber’s food delivery service, Uber Eats, will focus on organic growth rather than acquisitions.

On Aug 1, Square announced an agreement to sell Caviar to Uber Eats’ formidable rival DoorDash for $410 million. Square had bought Caviar for just over $44 million in 2014. The Caviar service specializes in premium restaurants.

While declining to comment further on Caviar, Khosrowshahi did say that he sees food delivery as a real battle this year and next. “The Eats market continues to be very competitive.”

Khosrowshahi said that if Uber were to seek any acquisitions, he’s not worried. “We’re Uber, everyone wants to talk to us.”

After the Wall Street close Thursday, Uber posted a much wider-than-expected second-quarter loss of $4.72 per share. Revenue of $3.17 billion was also missed analyst estimates.

Uber’s core ride-hailing business saw better-than-expected gross bookings for the quarter, while the newer Uber Eats unit’s gross bookings fell short of forecasts.

“So with rides, I say the competitive environment is stable and getting better,” Khosrowshahi said during Friday’s CNBC interview. “We see a lot of competition with Eats,” he reiterated.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: jessica bursztynsky, jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, street, khosrowshahi, considered, eats, ceo, buying, rival, service, uber, square, doordash, delivery, caviar, reveals, secondquarter


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Climate change could trigger an international food crisis, UN panel warns

A report from the United Nations’ scientific panel on climate change warns that it will be impossible to keep worldwide temperatures at safe levels unless humans change the way they produce food and use land. The report, issued on Wednesday by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, describes how global warming is already exacerbating food insecurity by destroying crop yields, decreasing livestock productivity and increasing pests and diseases on farmland. The IPCC said that warming start


A report from the United Nations’ scientific panel on climate change warns that it will be impossible to keep worldwide temperatures at safe levels unless humans change the way they produce food and use land. The report, issued on Wednesday by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, describes how global warming is already exacerbating food insecurity by destroying crop yields, decreasing livestock productivity and increasing pests and diseases on farmland. The IPCC said that warming start
Climate change could trigger an international food crisis, UN panel warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, land, celsius, change, projected, crisis, emissions, panel, food, warming, trigger, warns, report, climate, continue, international, global


Climate change could trigger an international food crisis, UN panel warns

In this May 29, 2019 photo, a partially flooded field he farms near Shenandoah, Iowa.

A report from the United Nations’ scientific panel on climate change warns that it will be impossible to keep worldwide temperatures at safe levels unless humans change the way they produce food and use land. Simply cutting carbon emissions from automobiles and factories alone won’t be enough to avert a worldwide food crisis.

The report, issued on Wednesday by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, describes how global warming is already exacerbating food insecurity by destroying crop yields, decreasing livestock productivity and increasing pests and diseases on farmland.

The IPCC said that warming starting at 2 degrees Celsius could trigger an international food crisis in upcoming years. This July was the hottest month ever recorded, with global temperatures up 1.2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. If greenhouse gas emissions continue at the current rate, in roughly 20 years the atmosphere will warm up by 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

“This is not the distant future. People should be nervous,” said Tim Searchinger, a senior fellow at the World Resources Report.

In fact, the temperature over land is warming at twice the speed of the global average, and has already reached over the 1.5 Celsius mark, according to the report.

The global food system contributes up to 37% of global greenhouse gas emissions, mainly through raising cattle, cultivating rice and adding fertilizer to farmland. Agriculture and other land use, which produce about 23% of human-caused emissions, has increased soil erosion, while deforestation and significant food waste has further increased carbon emissions.

The looming crisis is made worse by more frequent extreme weather events triggered by rising temperatures.

In the just the past month, a heat wave scorched Europe, then moved to Greenland to cause record ice melt there; fires tore across Russia and the Arctic; Hurricane Barry flooded parts of Louisiana, and U.S. farmers got hit with a heatwave after suffering from a year of record flooding and trade war tariffs.

“We’re understanding better how the intensity, frequency and duration of extreme events translates into economic impacts,” said Louis Verchot, a lead author of the report.

Climate change is already impacting food security in dry lands, mainly in Africa and mountainous regions of Asia and South America.

More intense and frequent droughts are also projected to increase in most drastically in the Mediterranean region and southern Africa, while wildfires are projected to hit North America, South America, Mediterranean, southern Africa and central Asia, according to the report. The tropics and subtropics are projected to be most vulnerable to crop yield decline.

“As we continue to pour more CO2 into the atmosphere, the earth’s system continues to absorb more and more. This additional gift from nature is limited. It’s not going to continue forever,” said Verchot.

“If we continue to degrade our ecosystems, to deforest, to destroy our soils, we’re going to lose this natural subsidy we’re getting that’s protecting us from ourselves as we pump more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, land, celsius, change, projected, crisis, emissions, panel, food, warming, trigger, warns, report, climate, continue, international, global


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Here’s how much to tip when you order food on a delivery app

After its controversial tipping policy provoked ire among its customers, food delivery service DoorDash is making changes. Now, company’s delivery men and women will receive the full amount of their tips in addition to payment for the food delivery. On average, customers were willing to pay a maximum of $8.50 for the tip, delivery fee and service fee combined, according to U.S. Foods’ report. Though deliverers don’t see the service fee or small order fee, customers are unlikely to make the disti


After its controversial tipping policy provoked ire among its customers, food delivery service DoorDash is making changes. Now, company’s delivery men and women will receive the full amount of their tips in addition to payment for the food delivery. On average, customers were willing to pay a maximum of $8.50 for the tip, delivery fee and service fee combined, according to U.S. Foods’ report. Though deliverers don’t see the service fee or small order fee, customers are unlikely to make the disti
Here’s how much to tip when you order food on a delivery app Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, service, fee, uber, food, heres, order, doordash, app, delivery, tip, customers, deliverers


Here's how much to tip when you order food on a delivery app

After its controversial tipping policy provoked ire among its customers, food delivery service DoorDash is making changes. Now, company’s delivery men and women will receive the full amount of their tips in addition to payment for the food delivery.

The New York Times published a first-person account from a DoorDash deliveryman which detailed how the company guaranteed deliverers an order minimum for each delivery. But, if the deliverer was tipped via the app, the tip would be counted toward the minimum, rather than as an additional payment. If DoorDash guaranteed $8 and the deliverer was tipped $2 by the customer, the company paid out $6.

The practice sparked debate about how companies such as DoorDash, Postmates, Uber Eats and even Amazon compensate workers. But it also left customers wondering how much they should tip.

Customers and deliverers agree that a tip should be around $4 for a typical order, according to a recent study from U.S. Foods, a foodservice distributor, which asked customers and food deliverers how they feel about using apps like Grubhub and UberEats, with an emphasis on tipping.

Other sources support that conclusion: Consumer Reports notes that $3 to $5 is standard, or around 20% of the total bill, whichever is higher.

On average, customers were willing to pay a maximum of $8.50 for the tip, delivery fee and service fee combined, according to U.S. Foods’ report. However, it’s worth noting that the delivery apps themselves can eat up a large chunk of that $8.50, leaving little to the food deliverers.

Earlier in the year, Uber Eats announced that it would be levying delivery fees, service fees of 15% of the order cost and an additional fee of $2 on orders of less than $10. Though deliverers don’t see the service fee or small order fee, customers are unlikely to make the distinction, and might tip less as a result.

Of the 500 food deliverers surveyed, “weak tipping” was the most common complaint of the job, followed by poor communication with the customer.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, service, fee, uber, food, heres, order, doordash, app, delivery, tip, customers, deliverers


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Widespread blackout hits Venezuela, government blames ‘electromagnetic attack’

More than half of Venezuela’s 23 states lost power on Monday, according to Reuters witnesses and reports on social media, a blackout the government blamed on an “electromagnetic attack.” Venezuelan Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said the outage on Monday was caused by an “electromagnetic attack,” without providing evidence. The oil-rich country’s hyperinflationary economic crisis has led to widespread shortages in food and medicine, prompting over 4 million Venezuelans to leave the country


More than half of Venezuela’s 23 states lost power on Monday, according to Reuters witnesses and reports on social media, a blackout the government blamed on an “electromagnetic attack.” Venezuelan Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said the outage on Monday was caused by an “electromagnetic attack,” without providing evidence. The oil-rich country’s hyperinflationary economic crisis has led to widespread shortages in food and medicine, prompting over 4 million Venezuelans to leave the country
Widespread blackout hits Venezuela, government blames ‘electromagnetic attack’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, venezuela, electromagnetic, parts, blackout, states, hits, opposition, attack, blames, food, power, caracas, widespread, state, venezuelas


Widespread blackout hits Venezuela, government blames 'electromagnetic attack'

People wait at the parking of a shopping centre in Caracas on July 22, 2019 as the capital and other parts of Venezuela are being hit by a massive power cut.

More than half of Venezuela’s 23 states lost power on Monday, according to Reuters witnesses and reports on social media, a blackout the government blamed on an “electromagnetic attack.”

It was the first blackout to include the capital, Caracas, since March, when the government blamed the opposition and United States for a series of power outages that left millions of people without running water and telecommunications.

The blackouts exacerbated an economic crisis that has halved the size of the economy.

Venezuelan Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said the outage on Monday was caused by an “electromagnetic attack,” without providing evidence. He added that authorities were in the process of re-establishing service.

Power returned for about 10 minutes to parts of southeastern Bolivar state, site of the Guri hydroelectric dam – the source of most of Venezuela’s generation – but went out again, according to a Reuters witness. Electricity was still out throughout Caracas.

“It terrifies me to think we are facing a national blackout again,” said Maria Luisa Rivero, a 45-year-old business owner from the city of Valencia, in the central state of Carabobo.

“The first thing I did was run to freeze my food so that it does not go bad like it did like the last time in March. It costs a lot to buy food just to lose it,” she said.

The oil-rich country’s hyperinflationary economic crisis has led to widespread shortages in food and medicine, prompting over 4 million Venezuelans to leave the country.

Venezuela’s national power grid has fallen into disrepair after years of inadequate investment and maintenance, according to the opposition and power experts.

“These blackouts are catastrophic,” said 51-year-old janitor Bernardina Guerra, who lives in Caracas. “I live in the eastern part of the city and there the lights go out every day. Each day things are worse.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, venezuela, electromagnetic, parts, blackout, states, hits, opposition, attack, blames, food, power, caracas, widespread, state, venezuelas


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