Europe’s $8 billion food delivery deal delayed as UK launches competition probe

Takeaway.com’s £6.2 billion ($8.1 billion) takeover of rival food delivery firm Just Eat has been delayed after the U.K.’s antitrust regulator launched an initial probe into the deal. The CMA investigation is a blow to the planned combination of Netherlands-based Takeaway.com and U.K.-headquartered Just Eat, two major players in Europe’s fast-growing food delivery industry. It arrives just months after the U.K. competition watchdog said it would launch a formal investigation into Amazon’s minori


Takeaway.com’s £6.2 billion ($8.1 billion) takeover of rival food delivery firm Just Eat has been delayed after the U.K.’s antitrust regulator launched an initial probe into the deal.
The CMA investigation is a blow to the planned combination of Netherlands-based Takeaway.com and U.K.-headquartered Just Eat, two major players in Europe’s fast-growing food delivery industry.
It arrives just months after the U.K. competition watchdog said it would launch a formal investigation into Amazon’s minori
Europe’s $8 billion food delivery deal delayed as UK launches competition probe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, takeawaycom, food, deal, competition, firm, cma, delivery, europes, eat, billion, delayed, probe, investigation, launches


Europe's $8 billion food delivery deal delayed as UK launches competition probe

Takeaway.com’s £6.2 billion ($8.1 billion) takeover of rival food delivery firm Just Eat has been delayed after the U.K.’s antitrust regulator launched an initial probe into the deal.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) said on Friday that it had opened a review into the merger of the two companies, which will look into whether the deal could result in a “substantial lessening of competition” in the U.K. The CMA says it’s inviting comments on the transaction from interested parties until Feb. 6.

On Thursday, Takeaway.com said it had been informed that the CMA had “reconsidered its position” on the takeover and believed a merger investigation was now warranted. A further statement from the company on Friday said Takeaway.com would now delay its planned all-stock deal by a week as a result of the probe.

The CMA investigation is a blow to the planned combination of Netherlands-based Takeaway.com and U.K.-headquartered Just Eat, two major players in Europe’s fast-growing food delivery industry. Takeaway.com spent months fighting off rival bids for Just Eat from fellow Dutch firm Prosus, the little-known tech investment arm of Naspers.

It arrives just months after the U.K. competition watchdog said it would launch a formal investigation into Amazon’s minority investment in U.K. food delivery start-up Deliveroo. The e-commerce giant led a $575 million funding round for the buzzy online takeout app last year. Deliveroo is one of Britain’s top tech success stories, with a valuation north of $2 billion.

Food delivery has proven a hot sector for investors and one on the brink of significant consolidation. Uber earlier this week announced it would sell its Eats business in India to local operator Zomato, taking a minority stake in the Ant Financial-backed firm. Following the deal, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said “consolidation has got to happen.”

Takeaway.com said that over 90% of shareholders in Just Eat had agreed to sell their stake. It said the combined company will be named “Just Eat Takeaway.com NV” on Jan. 31, but that due to its updated timetable shares of the firm now won’t be listed until Feb. 3.

Shares of Takeaway.com and Just Eat fell about 3% and 4% respectively following the announcement of the CMA’s competition probe.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, takeawaycom, food, deal, competition, firm, cma, delivery, europes, eat, billion, delayed, probe, investigation, launches


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Grubhub unveils tech for restaurants aimed at easing customer pickup orders

Founder and CEO Matt Maloney said the food delivery company is focusing on marketing the technology to small- and medium-sized restaurants. Industry-wide orders for pickup account for more than 50% of takeout sales and 58% of all digital orders, according to market researcher the NPD Group. Pickup orders are growing faster than dine-in orders, with sales improving by 32% last year compared to 15.5% for digital delivery, NPD said. Providing a new tool for pickup orders could help it to grab more


Founder and CEO Matt Maloney said the food delivery company is focusing on marketing the technology to small- and medium-sized restaurants.
Industry-wide orders for pickup account for more than 50% of takeout sales and 58% of all digital orders, according to market researcher the NPD Group.
Pickup orders are growing faster than dine-in orders, with sales improving by 32% last year compared to 15.5% for digital delivery, NPD said.
Providing a new tool for pickup orders could help it to grab more
Grubhub unveils tech for restaurants aimed at easing customer pickup orders Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: frank holland jr reed, frank holland, jr reed
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, easing, food, digital, customer, delivery, aimed, share, pickup, orders, grubhub, tech, market, unveils, order, restaurants


Grubhub unveils tech for restaurants aimed at easing customer pickup orders

The delivery wars have a new battleground: digital pickup.

Grubhub announced Thursday it is launching Ultimate, which uses software and hardware to allow restaurants to offer customers the ability to order their food online or through an app for pickup.

Founder and CEO Matt Maloney said the food delivery company is focusing on marketing the technology to small- and medium-sized restaurants.

“Diners have come to expect ordering ahead for pickup to breeze through busy rush hour crowds and grab their morning coffee or lunch, but currently they can only enjoy this convenience at large QSRs. Ultimate now gives restaurants of any size this ability to please diners with an easy, digital pickup experience,” said Maloney, in a press release.

Ultimate is being tested at three Chick-fil-A locations, Ohio State University and more than 100 restaurants in the New York City and Chicago areas, according to the company.

Industry-wide orders for pickup account for more than 50% of takeout sales and 58% of all digital orders, according to market researcher the NPD Group.

Pickup orders are growing faster than dine-in orders, with sales improving by 32% last year compared to 15.5% for digital delivery, NPD said. However, similar to delivery, the growth of the average order has fallen in recent years, declining 1.5% last year for pickup compared with flat growth for delivery.

According to Morgan Stanley, $350 billion is spent every year on food purchased from restaurants.

Grubhub had been the leader in the food delivery market, according to data from Second Measure, but it slipped to a 32% share of the market. That put it behind rival DoorDash, which had a 33% share, but ahead of Uber Eats, which had a 19% share, and Postmates with 10%. DoorDash saw sales grow by 143% year-over-year, catapulting it past Grubhub, which had controlled 43% of the market in 2018, according to Second Measure.

Providing a new tool for pickup orders could help it to grab more market share. Less than 10% of current Grubhub orders are pickup, the company said.

This new offering comes as restaurants are increasingly focusing on pickup orders. Domino’s Pizza, for example, has been well known for delivery but is inceasingly promoting its carryout business, which can be more profitable for it because it doesn’t require drivers to deliver the food.

Grubhub is slated to report earnings on Feb. 4. The company’s stock, which has a market value of $5.2 billion, is down 24% over the past year.

Ultimate has been under development for five years, the company said. It started as a queue on the app, allowing students at Ohio State to place a food order while in class and get details on when it would be ready.

That queue and order completion timer are part of a four-part system for restaurants that includes point-of-sale hardware that integrates to the Grubhub app, customer displays that show real-time order estimates, software for kitchen staff to receive orders and kiosks for customers to place orders in the restaurant.

“It’s a continuation of connecting the diners to the restaurant. But it is a completely different experience,” said Padma Rao, vice president special projects at Grubhub. “The customer can actually see where their order lives in context to the kitchen. It’s about owning the customer and all the different ways they want to interact with the restaurant.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: frank holland jr reed, frank holland, jr reed
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, easing, food, digital, customer, delivery, aimed, share, pickup, orders, grubhub, tech, market, unveils, order, restaurants


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

GrubHub CEO leaves open the door for potential mergers: We would ‘evaluate any offer’

GrubHub is not actively in the market to be acquired, but the food delivery provider is open ears, CEO Matt Maloney told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Thursday. The comments come as competition in the digital food delivery space is reaching a tipping point. Morgan Stanley projects digital food delivery will grow 31% to a $467 billion market over the next five years. There has been some consolidation in food delivery in recent years. Amazon ditched its own on-demand restaurant food delivery service last summ


GrubHub is not actively in the market to be acquired, but the food delivery provider is open ears, CEO Matt Maloney told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Thursday.
The comments come as competition in the digital food delivery space is reaching a tipping point.
Morgan Stanley projects digital food delivery will grow 31% to a $467 billion market over the next five years.
There has been some consolidation in food delivery in recent years.
Amazon ditched its own on-demand restaurant food delivery service last summ
GrubHub CEO leaves open the door for potential mergers: We would ‘evaluate any offer’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grubhub, door, maloney, mergers, doordash, food, market, delivery, going, ceo, think, offer, billion, leaves, evaluate, open, potential, service


GrubHub CEO leaves open the door for potential mergers: We would 'evaluate any offer'

GrubHub is not actively in the market to be acquired, but the food delivery provider is open ears, CEO Matt Maloney told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Thursday.

GrubHub shares surged double digits earlier this month on reports that a possible sale was on the table, and of interest from four grocers, though the company later denied rumors. The door does appear to be open.

“We would totally evaluate any offer, but we haven’t had one yet,” Maloney said in a “Mad Money” interview. “I think [reporters] were barking up the wrong tree.”

The comments come as competition in the digital food delivery space is reaching a tipping point. Third-party delivery aggregators have been a boon for restaurants, but the business is a low-margin one, which makes it challenging to grow profits without hiking prices for the service. Morgan Stanley projects digital food delivery will grow 31% to a $467 billion market over the next five years.

Maloney said “there’s a reckoning coming to the industry” and flagged that it could come within the next 12 months.

“I think it’s going to be 2020,” he said when asked if consolidation is necessary.

The host also posed if the collapse of WeWork in 2019 was a warning sign for the food delivery industry, which Maloney agreed.

“I think so,” he said. “I think we’re already like two steps — I mean, we’re in the early innings, but what happens this year is going to be interesting.”

Cramer, who sat with Maloney for a discussion inside of New York City’s Grand Central Terminal, proposed if GrubHub would have any interest in acquiring its unprofitable rival DoorDash, the leading third-party digital food delivery provider.

DoorDash holds 33% market share, followed by GrubHub at 32%, Uber Eats at 10% and Postmates at 10%, according to analytics firm Second Measure. GrubHub commanded 43% of the market in 2018, but was surpassed by DoorDash after sales improved by triple digits lead last year.

GrubHub, who has turned full-year profits in each of the past six years, is valued by the market as roughly $5 billion. The private, SoftBank-backed DoorDash was valued at nearly $13 billion in November.

In response, Maloney said private valuations are “based on nothing,” adding “if you’re selling dollars for 80 cents, I feel like that’s unsustainable, but it grows fast.”

“If you double your business with a highly unprofitable [one], you’re going — you’re going to screw up your unit economics,” Maloney said. “So you’ve got to figure out how to reconcile the business before you really see the benefits of consolidation.”

There has been some consolidation in food delivery in recent years. Square left the space after selling Caviar to DoorDash for $410 million last August. Amazon ditched its own on-demand restaurant food delivery service last summer, and Uber sold off its India program to a competitor earlier this week.

GrubHub on Thursday revealed that it is offering a new service that targets restaurant pickups. With its new platform called Ultimate, the program is a step toward “revolutionizing pickup,” Maloney told Cramer.

The service has gone through years of in testing at 10 major universities, including the campuses of Ohio State University and the University of Arizona, and local diners, he said. GrubHub is looking to sign stadium deals to let event goers order from their seats.

“The days of walking into a restaurant and seeing those 10 people, and in line, and having to stand there, and wait, and wait, and wait until you can talk to someone — they’re gone,” Maloney said.

Maloney is banking on Ultimate to separate the app from the alternatives.

“It’s widely documented that over $250 billion [is] in U.S. domestic take out. Over half of that is pickup, and by the way none of my competitors are addressing pick up,” he said.

GrubHub shares rose 2.4% to $57.74 in Thursday’s session.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grubhub, door, maloney, mergers, doordash, food, market, delivery, going, ceo, think, offer, billion, leaves, evaluate, open, potential, service


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Uber keeps chasing profitability by ditching businesses in countries it doesn’t dominate

On Tuesday, the company announced it sold its Uber Eats food delivery business in India to Zomato, its competitor backed by Alibaba affiliate Ant Financial. The deal could leave Uber out of a significant chunk of the food delivery market. “It is increasingly clear that Uber has a strong ride-sharing business and a food delivery business that is rationalizing,” they wrote. Uber’s market value is now around $63 billion. In September, Uber said it would end its food delivery service in South Korea.


On Tuesday, the company announced it sold its Uber Eats food delivery business in India to Zomato, its competitor backed by Alibaba affiliate Ant Financial.
The deal could leave Uber out of a significant chunk of the food delivery market.
“It is increasingly clear that Uber has a strong ride-sharing business and a food delivery business that is rationalizing,” they wrote.
Uber’s market value is now around $63 billion.
In September, Uber said it would end its food delivery service in South Korea.
Uber keeps chasing profitability by ditching businesses in countries it doesn’t dominate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, food, ubers, ditching, company, uber, doesnt, countries, keeps, business, dominate, stock, morning, delivery, chasing, market, businesses, profitability


Uber keeps chasing profitability by ditching businesses in countries it doesn't dominate

Dara Khosrowshahi, chief executive officer of Uber Technologies Inc., speaks on a webcast during the company’s initial public offering (IPO) on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Friday, May 10, 2019.

Uber just cut back from another market where it doesn’t dominate.

On Tuesday, the company announced it sold its Uber Eats food delivery business in India to Zomato, its competitor backed by Alibaba affiliate Ant Financial. The all-stock deal gives Uber a 9.99% stake in the business.

The deal could leave Uber out of a significant chunk of the food delivery market. Asia’s market has become the largest for online food delivery in the world, with over $45 billion in revenue in 2018, according to an October report from Frost & Sullivan. India holds the second-largest percentage of that market share at 13.2%, after China’s 73%, according to the report.

But Uber’s decision falls in line with its stated strategy to dominate or ditch. In a November earnings call, CFO Nelson Chai told analysts that Uber would “look at both disposing as well as using M&A as potential levers” in markets where they are not already one of the top two players.

“Our commitment is to lean in if we think we can win or be one or two,” Chai said. “And if we think we can’t, we’re going to be good stewards of capital, and so we will make the appropriate choices.”

Uber has taken on this aggressive strategy as investors continue to push for a path to profitability. The company still reported over $1 billion in net losses in its latest quarterly earnings report and has announced hundreds of layoffs. Uber will report its results for the fourth quarter of 2019 on Feb. 6.

In a note Tuesday morning, Raymond James analysts said Uber’s sale “demonstrates discipline” given the road to food delivery domination in India “would likely take years and significant investment.” The move frees up funds for Uber to investment in other, more promising markets, the analysts wrote.

“It is increasingly clear that Uber has a strong ride-sharing business and a food delivery business that is rationalizing,” they wrote. “As Uber continues these initiatives over the next 12 months, we anticipate both positive revisions and multiple expansions.”

CNBC’s Jim Cramer also praised the move Tuesday morning on “Squawk on the Street.”

“This stock is undervalued,” Cramer said. “As they get out of bad Uber Eatses (sic), it is just going to go higher because it’s an ecosystem.”

Uber’s stock price was up more than 5% Tuesday morning, adding about $3 billion to its market cap. Uber’s market value is now around $63 billion.

It’s not the first time Uber has scaled back in a market it’s failed to top. In September, Uber said it would end its food delivery service in South Korea. The company did not manage to crack rival Woowa Brothers’ 75% market share in the South Korean food delivery space, according to Reuters. While its ride-hailing business faced legal trouble and push back from the taxi industry in the region, Uber has continued to operate that service, as it will in India.

Uber’s market exits aren’t always its choice. Uber will end operations in Colombia at the end of the month, the company said, after a local judge sided with the country’s competition authority that found the company broke market rules with its ride-hailing business, as Reuters reported in December. The crackdown followed protests of Uber and similar services by taxi drivers who believed the services received an unfair advantage due to lack of regulation.

In London, Uber was stripped of its license to operate in November after the city’s transport regulator said the company has displayed a “patter of failures” putting riders at risk. Uber has appealed the ruling and is still currently operating in the region.

-CNBC’s Saheli Roy Choudhury contributed to this report.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

WATCH: Here’s how Uber loses money


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, food, ubers, ditching, company, uber, doesnt, countries, keeps, business, dominate, stock, morning, delivery, chasing, market, businesses, profitability


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘We have never served one gram of caviar’: Meet the man feeding the Davos elite

DAVOS, Switzerland — Between 6,000 and 8,000 people, including world leaders, staff, security and the media are fed every day from the Davos kitchen during the World Economic Forum (WEF). Well, they are not eating in a Michelin star restaurant — there is no caviar or foie gras — the man feeding the Davos elite told CNBC Monday. “Everybody thinks we are serving caviar, we have never served one gram of caviar,” said Christophe Guiraud, food and beverage manager at the annual meeting, of the twelve


DAVOS, Switzerland — Between 6,000 and 8,000 people, including world leaders, staff, security and the media are fed every day from the Davos kitchen during the World Economic Forum (WEF).
Well, they are not eating in a Michelin star restaurant — there is no caviar or foie gras — the man feeding the Davos elite told CNBC Monday.
“Everybody thinks we are serving caviar, we have never served one gram of caviar,” said Christophe Guiraud, food and beverage manager at the annual meeting, of the twelve
‘We have never served one gram of caviar’: Meet the man feeding the Davos elite Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meet, food, feeding, switzerland, normal, caviar, guiraud, man, waste, served, davos, world, gram, wef, told, elite


'We have never served one gram of caviar': Meet the man feeding the Davos elite

DAVOS, Switzerland — Between 6,000 and 8,000 people, including world leaders, staff, security and the media are fed every day from the Davos kitchen during the World Economic Forum (WEF). But what do they eat? Well, they are not eating in a Michelin star restaurant — there is no caviar or foie gras — the man feeding the Davos elite told CNBC Monday. “Everybody thinks we are serving caviar, we have never served one gram of caviar,” said Christophe Guiraud, food and beverage manager at the annual meeting, of the twelve years he has worked at the event.

Christophe Guiraud, the food and beverage manager at the Annual Meeting in Davos.

“We serve very simple things. People are here to share ideas, to meet, they are not here to have a fantastic dinner with a Michelin-star chef … They are here to work,” Guiraud told CNBC. One of this week’s lunch menus, served to representatives from companies such as BP, Goldman Sachs and Facebook includes pumpkin soup, broccoli mousse with nuts, smoked halloumi and chocolate cake. But according to Guiraud, world leaders can easily be seen eating a “normal sandwich.”

“The top leaders in Davos are very easy to handle because they don’t have so many people around (them), making things difficult,” he said. “For example, you can find a head of state eating a normal sandwich or a normal salad at the bar — this is Davos,” Guiraud told CNBC. WEF has been taking steps to make its kitchen more environmentally friendly. This means the food that is served daily is mostly from Switzerland. 97% of the cheese served is from Davos itself. WEF has also restarted purchases of salmon recently, only after securing a Swiss supplier.

The main kitchen at Davos

“One difficult thing is the region is quite small. Switzerland is quite a small country in the mountains so you really have to define the products that you can find in enough quantities to feed all of these people,” Guiraud said, explaining that he struggled to find enough apples last year because local production was insufficient. WEF is also looking to reduce food waste by using artificial intelligence. The AI technology is installed on several trash cans in the main building that photographs waste and weighs food that has been disposed. The system then provides a report on the different types, weight, costs and sources of the food that has been binned. This information is then used to analyze and organize future food orders which can help reduce waste.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meet, food, feeding, switzerland, normal, caviar, guiraud, man, waste, served, davos, world, gram, wef, told, elite


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Uber just sold its food delivery business in India to local rival Zomato

Ride-hailing giant Uber said Tuesday it sold its food delivery business in India to its competitor Zomato in an all-stock transaction. The sale gives Uber a 9.99% stake in the Indian restaurant aggregator and food delivery start-up. Uber Eats is set to discontinue operations starting Tuesday, and it will direct restaurants, delivery partners and users to the Zomato app. Uber will continue competing in the Indian ride-hailing market against start-up Ola. Previously, Uber ceded ground in China and


Ride-hailing giant Uber said Tuesday it sold its food delivery business in India to its competitor Zomato in an all-stock transaction.
The sale gives Uber a 9.99% stake in the Indian restaurant aggregator and food delivery start-up.
Uber Eats is set to discontinue operations starting Tuesday, and it will direct restaurants, delivery partners and users to the Zomato app.
Uber will continue competing in the Indian ride-hailing market against start-up Ola.
Previously, Uber ceded ground in China and
Uber just sold its food delivery business in India to local rival Zomato Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rival, business, food, stake, market, local, valuation, ridehailing, zomato, uber, sold, million, india, delivery


Uber just sold its food delivery business in India to local rival Zomato

Ride-hailing giant Uber said Tuesday it sold its food delivery business in India to its competitor Zomato in an all-stock transaction.

The sale gives Uber a 9.99% stake in the Indian restaurant aggregator and food delivery start-up.

Zomato is backed by Alibaba affiliate Ant Financial, which recently agreed to invest up to $150 million at a pre-money valuation of $3 billion, according to official filings from Zomato-shareholder Info Edge.

Based on that valuation, Uber’s stake in Zomato would be worth around $300 million. Uber declined to comment on the deal’s value.

Uber Eats is set to discontinue operations starting Tuesday, and it will direct restaurants, delivery partners and users to the Zomato app.

“India remains an exceptionally important market to Uber and we will continue to invest in growing our local Rides business, which is already the clear category leader,” CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said in a statement.

The tech giant is under pressure from investors to turn its business around. Last year, the company reported a $5.2 billion loss in its second-quarter earnings and laid off hundreds of employees in 2019.

Uber will continue competing in the Indian ride-hailing market against start-up Ola. Previously, Uber ceded ground in China and Southeast Asia to local players Didi Chuxing and Grab, respectively and exited its Eats business in South Korea.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rival, business, food, stake, market, local, valuation, ridehailing, zomato, uber, sold, million, india, delivery


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

What it’s really like to be a food scientist at a big company like Kraft Heinz

Inside the consumer science labKimmins, 43, is the senior manager of sensory and consumer science at Kraft Heinz sensory testing labs in Glenview, Illinois. Kimmins makes six figures working with marketing insights specialists at Kraft Heinz. Kraft Heinz. Kraft Heinz. Courtesy Kraft Heinz


Inside the consumer science labKimmins, 43, is the senior manager of sensory and consumer science at Kraft Heinz sensory testing labs in Glenview, Illinois.
Kimmins makes six figures working with marketing insights specialists at Kraft Heinz.
Kraft Heinz.
Kraft Heinz.
Courtesy Kraft Heinz
What it’s really like to be a food scientist at a big company like Kraft Heinz Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-18  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, consumer, try, product, big, heinz, company, really, scientist, ideas, working, kimmins, kraft, food, science


What it's really like to be a food scientist at a big company like Kraft Heinz

For most of human history, people ate what was available: Root vegetables that could easily be collected, wild game that could easily be trapped or hunted, livestock that was easily domesticated and bred. Even if you were to go grocery shopping 150 years ago, your options would have been limited to products like beans and dried meat. These days, a walk through a grocery store is like a jaunt through Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory — at least compared to the past. Almost anything you could want is readily available, and it’s often quite affordable. Products that were unimaginable a century ago are now commonplace, like Cocoa Puffs cereal, Hot Pockets, and Fruit by the Foot. That’s in part because of people like Emily Kimmins.

Inside the consumer science lab

Kimmins, 43, is the senior manager of sensory and consumer science at Kraft Heinz sensory testing labs in Glenview, Illinois. Kimmins makes six figures working with marketing insights specialists at Kraft Heinz. She’s been there since 2018, taking cues from interviews and roundtables with consumers (some of whom are professional taste-testers), and turning those ideas into marketable products. Her job is to literally come up with new foods.

Kraft Heinz. Courtesy Kraft Heinz

A typical day might include brainstorming new ideas, taking feedback from the company’s product marketing professionals, and directing product development teams who devise and design new recipes and product names by turning those ideas into reality. “Our role is to help the product development teams understand how to make the best product … to help them understand the target consumer — what they’re looking for,” says Kimmins. A large part of that is putting yourself in the consumer’s shoes and thinking about a product’s physical dimensions and what it looks, tastes, and smells like. Her team usually juggles several projects at once. One recent example: Kimmins and her team set out to create a fast, healthy, and hot breakfast product that people could make in a few minutes. They decided on ingredients (eggs and veggies), and a way to package and cook it. The result is Just Crack an Egg, a refrigerated bowl of potatoes, vegetables, and cheese that a consumer adds an egg to and then microwaves. The result is a hot breakfast scramble in a bowl that requires minimal effort. From idea to shelf, Just Crack an Egg took two years. “That [product] went through the whole process,” Kimmins says. “We had an idea that we wanted to give people a fresh breakfast — we tried a lot of different options, and that’s the one that ended up going to market.” Some products, though, take as little as six months.

How creating flavors became ‘a really good playground’

Though Kimmins has been working at Kraft Heinz for only a couple of years, she’s worked in the industry for more than 18 years. An Illinois native, she moved to Ohio with her family as a young teenager and attended the University of Toledo, where she earned a biology degree. She loved science and decided to build a career earning six figures as a scientist. But food wasn’t at the forefront of her mind — in fact, she didn’t know what she wanted to do, so she signed up with a temp agency, figuring she could try out various science-based jobs to see what she liked best. The first position she got was at a four-week stint at Procter & Gamble lab in Cincinnati working on dentures. “I had to make really strong coffee and tea to try and stain the dentures, and try to keep the panelists entertained,” she says. That gave her a taste of how product developers work with consumers, though, and she took a job at Givaudan, a Swiss company that creates flavors and fragrances for food manufacturers, where she worked for eight years.

Kraft Heinz. Courtesy Kraft Heinz


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-18  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, consumer, try, product, big, heinz, company, really, scientist, ideas, working, kimmins, kraft, food, science


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

DoorDash takes the lead in the food delivery wars as the landscape dramatically shifts in 2019

Doordash captured a third of all digital food delivery sales in the U.S. market last year, Second Measure said. DoorDash’s rapid growth in 2019 allowed it to edge past Grubhub to become the leader in digital food delivery, according to data from analytics firm Second Measure. Digital food delivery is projected to grow into a $467 billion business over the next five years, a 31% increase, according to Morgan Stanley. But companies in the digital delivery industry have to contend with thin margins


Doordash captured a third of all digital food delivery sales in the U.S. market last year, Second Measure said.
DoorDash’s rapid growth in 2019 allowed it to edge past Grubhub to become the leader in digital food delivery, according to data from analytics firm Second Measure.
Digital food delivery is projected to grow into a $467 billion business over the next five years, a 31% increase, according to Morgan Stanley.
But companies in the digital delivery industry have to contend with thin margins
DoorDash takes the lead in the food delivery wars as the landscape dramatically shifts in 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: frank holland jr reed, frank holland, jr reed
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, wars, delivery, sales, grubhub, industry, similar, landscape, lead, 2019, digital, food, second, takes, shifts, doordash, according, dramatically


DoorDash takes the lead in the food delivery wars as the landscape dramatically shifts in 2019

Doordash captured a third of all digital food delivery sales in the U.S. market last year, Second Measure said. That put it on top of Grubhub , which had 32% of sales in the category. Uber Eats followed with a 20% share, and was trailed by Postmates, with 10%.

DoorDash’s rapid growth in 2019 allowed it to edge past Grubhub to become the leader in digital food delivery, according to data from analytics firm Second Measure.

Doordash saw its sales grow by 143% year over year, creating a dramatic shift in the landscape from 2018, when GrubHub was the leader, with 43% of the market.

Digital food delivery is projected to grow into a $467 billion business over the next five years, a 31% increase, according to Morgan Stanley. But companies in the digital delivery industry have to contend with thin margins and a sometimes rocky path to profitability.

While digital delivery sales overall have increased at a double-digit pace in each of the past five years, according to data from the NPD Group, the growth of the average check has fallen sharply from more than 4% in 2015 to zero growth in 2019.

The use of aggregator sites for food delivery could also impact the future of the industry. FoodBoss, for example, is a site that allows users to compare the price and speed of digital delivery services for the restaurant of their choice, similar to aggregators in the travel industry like Expedia and Trivago. Google Maps now also offers similar functions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: frank holland jr reed, frank holland, jr reed
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, wars, delivery, sales, grubhub, industry, similar, landscape, lead, 2019, digital, food, second, takes, shifts, doordash, according, dramatically


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The EU is backing taxi app Bolt to help it compete with Uber

Bolt, the European challenger to ride-hailing giant Uber, has secured 50 million euros ($56 million) in debt financing from the lending arm of the EU. Tallinn, Estonia-based Bolt is one of several firms looking to chip away at Uber’s dominance in the ride-hailing space. Founded in 2013, the firm was initially called Taxify but since changed its branding to offer more services like scooter sharing and food delivery. That also means investing in Bolt’s main line of business, ride hailing, as well


Bolt, the European challenger to ride-hailing giant Uber, has secured 50 million euros ($56 million) in debt financing from the lending arm of the EU.
Tallinn, Estonia-based Bolt is one of several firms looking to chip away at Uber’s dominance in the ride-hailing space.
Founded in 2013, the firm was initially called Taxify but since changed its branding to offer more services like scooter sharing and food delivery.
That also means investing in Bolt’s main line of business, ride hailing, as well
The EU is backing taxi app Bolt to help it compete with Uber Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, european, app, services, compete, bolt, ridehailing, uber, food, delivery, million, backing, financing, taxi, eib


The EU is backing taxi app Bolt to help it compete with Uber

Bolt, the European challenger to ride-hailing giant Uber, has secured 50 million euros ($56 million) in debt financing from the lending arm of the EU.

The European Investment Bank, or EIB, has invested in Bolt through a venture loan, which is used as an alternative to taking equity in a start-up to avoid diluting existing shareholders’ ownership.

Tallinn, Estonia-based Bolt is one of several firms looking to chip away at Uber’s dominance in the ride-hailing space. Founded in 2013, the firm was initially called Taxify but since changed its branding to offer more services like scooter sharing and food delivery. It currently has 30 million users in 150 cities across Europe and Africa.

The strategic financing from the EIB will help Bolt ramp up spending on research and development to make its services safer and more sustainable while also maintaining operational efficiency, Bolt and the EIB said in a joint statement Thursday.

That also means investing in Bolt’s main line of business, ride hailing, as well as food delivery, which it added to its platform last year. Both services are key to the company’s bid to take on Uber, its Silicon Valley competitor.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, european, app, services, compete, bolt, ridehailing, uber, food, delivery, million, backing, financing, taxi, eib


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

New York AG files lawsuit to stop new Trump administration food stamp rule

The new rule would limit states from waiving those standards, instead restricting their use to those areas that have a 6% unemployment rate or higher. The national unemployment rate in October was 3.6% . The coalition said the rule undermines Congress’ intent for SNAP and that the USDA violated the federal rulemaking process. They also argue that the rule would impose significant regulatory burdens on states and harm states’ economies and residents. In the lawsuit, the states argue that the admi


The new rule would limit states from waiving those standards, instead restricting their use to those areas that have a 6% unemployment rate or higher.
The national unemployment rate in October was 3.6% .
The coalition said the rule undermines Congress’ intent for SNAP and that the USDA violated the federal rulemaking process.
They also argue that the rule would impose significant regulatory burdens on states and harm states’ economies and residents.
In the lawsuit, the states argue that the admi
New York AG files lawsuit to stop new Trump administration food stamp rule Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: sunny kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, files, usda, rate, stop, states, trump, stamps, food, unemployment, lawsuit, snap, administration, rule, vulnerable, stamp


New York AG files lawsuit to stop new Trump administration food stamp rule

New York’s Attorney General Letitia James filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration on Thursday for what she called “unlawful changes” to the nation’s food stamp program that would “deny over 700,000 Americans access to basic food assistance.”

The lawsuit, joined by 13 attorneys general and the City of New York, challenges a United States Department of Agriculture rule that would limit states’ ability to extend benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, otherwise known as food stamps, beyond a three-month period for certain adults.

The USDA and the White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment from CNBC.

The rule change, set to go into effect on April 1, impacts people between the ages of 18 and 49 who are childless and not disabled. Under current rules, this group is required to work at least 20 hours a week for more than three months over a 36-month period to qualify for food stamps, but states have been able to create waivers for areas that face high unemployment.

The new rule would limit states from waiving those standards, instead restricting their use to those areas that have a 6% unemployment rate or higher. The national unemployment rate in October was 3.6% .

The coalition said the rule undermines Congress’ intent for SNAP and that the USDA violated the federal rulemaking process. They also argue that the rule would impose significant regulatory burdens on states and harm states’ economies and residents.

In the lawsuit, the states argue that the administration’s rule change would raise healthcare and homelessness costs.

“The federal government’s latest assault on vulnerable individuals is cruel to its core,” said James in a press release. “Denying access to vital SNAP benefits would only push hundreds of thousands of already vulnerable Americans into greater economic uncertainty. In so doing, states will have to grapple with rising healthcare and homelessness costs that will result from this shortsighted and ill-conceived policy.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: sunny kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, files, usda, rate, stop, states, trump, stamps, food, unemployment, lawsuit, snap, administration, rule, vulnerable, stamp


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post