Cambodia denies deal to allow armed Chinese forces at its naval base

China will be able to place armed forces at a Cambodian naval base under a secret agreement the two nations have reached, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, although Cambodian officials denied such a deal had been struck. Chinese and Cambodian officials denied such an agreement existed, according to the Journal. “This is the worst-ever made up news against Cambodia,” Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen told the pro-government news site Fresh News on Monday. “No such thing could happen beca


China will be able to place armed forces at a Cambodian naval base under a secret agreement the two nations have reached, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, although Cambodian officials denied such a deal had been struck. Chinese and Cambodian officials denied such an agreement existed, according to the Journal. “This is the worst-ever made up news against Cambodia,” Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen told the pro-government news site Fresh News on Monday. “No such thing could happen beca
Cambodia denies deal to allow armed Chinese forces at its naval base Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, base, military, naval, denies, allow, chinese, china, cambodia, officials, southeast, forces, armed, minister, deal, foreign, asia, cambodian


Cambodia denies deal to allow armed Chinese forces at its naval base

China’s Defence Minister Wei Fenghe (right) shakes hands with Cambodia’s Defence Minister Tea Banh during a visit to a military exhibition in Phnom Penh on June 19, 2018.

China will be able to place armed forces at a Cambodian naval base under a secret agreement the two nations have reached, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, although Cambodian officials denied such a deal had been struck.

The agreement, reached this spring but not made public, gives China exclusive access to part of Cambodia’s Ream Naval Base on the Gulf of Thailand, the Journal reported, citing U.S. and allied officials familiar with the matter.

Such an arrangement would give China an enhanced ability to assert contested territorial claims and economic interests in the South China Sea, challenging U.S. allies in Southeast Asia. Chinese and Cambodian officials denied such an agreement existed, according to the Journal.

“This is the worst-ever made up news against Cambodia,” Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen told the pro-government news site Fresh News on Monday.

“No such thing could happen because hosting foreign military bases is against the Cambodian constitution,” he said.

Cambodian defense ministry spokesman Chhum Socheat told Reuters the report was “made up and baseless”.

China, Hun Sen’s strongest regional ally, has poured billions of dollars in development assistance and loans into Cambodia through bilateral frameworks and China’s Belt and Road initiative.

The initiative, unveiled by Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2013, aims to bolster a sprawling network of land and sea links with Southeast Asia, Central Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Africa.

It has attracted a flood of Chinese commercial ventures in Cambodia, including casinos and special economic zones.

The U.S. Defense Department suggested earlier this month China may be attempting to gain a military foothold in Cambodia in a letter to Cambodia asking why the nation had turned down an offer to repair a naval base.

The State Department urged Cambodia in a statement to reject such an arrangement, saying the nation had a “constitutional commitment to its people to pursue an independent foreign policy.”

“We are concerned that any steps by the Cambodian government to invite a foreign military presence in Cambodia would threaten the coherence and centrality of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in coordinating regional developments, and disturb peace and stability in Southeast Asia,” the statement said.

Cambodia denied reports last November that Beijing had been lobbying the Southeast Asian country since 2017 for a naval base that could host frigates, destroyers and other vessels of China’s People’s Liberation Army Navy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, base, military, naval, denies, allow, chinese, china, cambodia, officials, southeast, forces, armed, minister, deal, foreign, asia, cambodian


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Schumer wants FBI to investigate FaceApp, DNC warns against using it: Here’s what you need to know

Todd Haselton | CNBCEveryone’s talking about FaceApp, the app that can show you what you look like when you’re old. FaceApp originally didn’t tell people it was uploading the pictures to its servers, which raised concerns. Here’s the latest on what’s going on with FaceApp and what you need to know. Given Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election, people have a right to be concerned about what it might mean if millions of us are uploading our selfies to foreign servers. Chuck Schumer calls on the FB


Todd Haselton | CNBCEveryone’s talking about FaceApp, the app that can show you what you look like when you’re old. FaceApp originally didn’t tell people it was uploading the pictures to its servers, which raised concerns. Here’s the latest on what’s going on with FaceApp and what you need to know. Given Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election, people have a right to be concerned about what it might mean if millions of us are uploading our selfies to foreign servers. Chuck Schumer calls on the FB
Schumer wants FBI to investigate FaceApp, DNC warns against using it: Here’s what you need to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: todd haselton
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Schumer wants FBI to investigate FaceApp, DNC warns against using it: Here's what you need to know

A filter that makes me look older. Todd Haselton | CNBC

Everyone’s talking about FaceApp, the app that can show you what you look like when you’re old. People love the effects, but they’re also concerned about how the Russian developer behind the app might use the pictures that are being uploaded. FaceApp originally didn’t tell people it was uploading the pictures to its servers, which raised concerns. But it started to alert users on Thursday. Here’s the latest on what’s going on with FaceApp and what you need to know.

Privacy concerns

I’m a hipster. Todd Haselton | CNBC

People are worried about FaceApp largely because the developer, Yaroslav Goncharov, is based in Russia. Given Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election, people have a right to be concerned about what it might mean if millions of us are uploading our selfies to foreign servers. After all, pictures are often used for fake profiles or for identity theft. Still, there’s no evidence yet that Goncharov is anything more than a Russian developer making a fun app. But, even if there is no ill intent, there are very valid fears that photos uploaded to the servers could be shared with foreign governments. CNBC spoke with FaceApp on Wednesday. The company said the application only uploads the picture you want to edit, and it only holds most pictures for 48 hours. While there’s no proof the photo is actually deleted, security experts like Will Strafach, who goes by Chronic on Twitter, have confirmed that just the picture — and not your whole photo library — is uploaded when you use the app: Yes, FaceApp owns that photo after you upload it, but other companies, like Snapchat, have similar terms when you post public images and video to its app. But we only have the developer’s word to go by, and there’s no way for consumers to ask that their pictures be deleted permanently. And that’s what has a lot of people worried.

Chuck Schumer calls on the FBI and FTC

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., March 27, 2019. Joshua Roberts | Reuters

Sen. Chuck Schumer on Wednesday sent a letter to the FBI and the FTC expressing his concerns with FaceApp, noting that he’s worried it would “post national security and privacy risks for millions of U.S. citizens.” “In particular, FaceApp’s location in Russia raises questions regarding how and when the company provides access to the data of U.S. citizens to third parties, including potentially foreign governments,” Schumer said in the letter. “As FBI Director Wray himself pointed out earlier this year, Russia remains a significant intelligence threat. It would be deeply troubling if the sensitive personal information of U.S. citizens was provided to a hostile foreign power actively engaged in cyber hostilities against the United States.” Schumer has a point. Even if Goncharov just wants to make a fun app, what’s to stop the Russian government from asking him to hand the data over, or him providing it willingly? Schumer said he wants the FBI to “assess whether the personal data uploaded by millions of Americans onto FaceApp may be finding its way into the hands of the Russian government, or entities with ties to the Russian government. If so, I would urge that steps be immediately taken by the FBI to mitigate the risk presented by the aggregation of this data.” He also called on the FTC to make sure there are safeguards in place for Americans and “government personnel and military service members from being compromised” and, if not, the FTC should let Americans know of any risks.

DNC warning

Democratic presidential hopefuls (fromL) US Senator from New Jersey Cory Booker, US Senator from Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren and former US Representative for Texas’ 16th congressional district Beto O’Rourke arrive to participate in the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season hosted by NBC News at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida, June 26, 2019. Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images

The Democratic National Committee is also concerned. CNN reported Wednesday that the DNC sent an email to all 2020 presidential campaigns with a warning not to use FaceApp. The committee’s national security officer, Bob Lord, reportedly said that “it’s not clear at this point what the privacy risks are, but what is clear is that the benefits of avoiding the app outweigh the risks.” “If you or any of your staff have already used the app, we recommend that they delete the app immediately,” Lord said, according to CNN, also noting that he and other security experts have “significant concerns about the app having access to your photos.” Russian operators were able to hack into the DNC network ahead of the 2016 election using several techniques, including phishing attempts, which lure people into giving up their passwords by logging into fake sites or servers that look real.

The reality

Use the free trial. Todd Haselton | CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, know, investigate, warns, pictures, fbi, using, foreign, app, wants, russian, security, faceapp, schumer, heres, servers, uploaded, need


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Iranian forces seize foreign oil tanker, crew: Iran state TV

Iran’s paramilitary Revolutionary Guard forces seized a foreign oil tanker accused of smuggling oil, Iran’s state TV reported Thursday. The vessel appears to be a United Arab Emirates-based tanker that had disappeared off trackers in Iranian territorial waters over the weekend. It said the oil tanker had 12 foreign crew members on board and was involved in smuggling some 1 million liters (264,000 gallons) of fuel from Iranian smugglers to foreign customers. The report said the oil tanker was int


Iran’s paramilitary Revolutionary Guard forces seized a foreign oil tanker accused of smuggling oil, Iran’s state TV reported Thursday. The vessel appears to be a United Arab Emirates-based tanker that had disappeared off trackers in Iranian territorial waters over the weekend. It said the oil tanker had 12 foreign crew members on board and was involved in smuggling some 1 million liters (264,000 gallons) of fuel from Iranian smugglers to foreign customers. The report said the oil tanker was int
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Iranian forces seize foreign oil tanker, crew: Iran state TV

Iran’s paramilitary Revolutionary Guard forces seized a foreign oil tanker accused of smuggling oil, Iran’s state TV reported Thursday. The vessel appears to be a United Arab Emirates-based tanker that had disappeared off trackers in Iranian territorial waters over the weekend.

The seizure was the latest in a series of dramatic developments as tensions mount between the United States and Iran over the unravelling nuclear deal between Tehran and world powers.

The Panamanian-flagged oil tanker MT Riah stopped transmitting its location early Sunday near Qeshm Island, which has a Revolutionary Guard base on it, according to data listed on tracking site Maritime Traffic.

Iran’s state television did not identify the seized vessel or nationalities of the crew, but said it was intercepted on Sunday. It said the oil tanker had 12 foreign crew members on board and was involved in smuggling some 1 million liters (264,000 gallons) of fuel from Iranian smugglers to foreign customers.

The report said the oil tanker was intercepted south of Iran’s Larak Island in the Strait of Hormuz. Larak is a smaller island just southeast of the larger Qeshm Island.

Crude prices, which had been falling since last week, ticked higher almost immediately after reports of the incident.

The seizure of the ship does not immediately appear to directly target any one particular country and shows the Revolutionary Guard cracking down on illegal smuggling of Iranian oil.

If the MT Riah was indeed the ship seized, the move directly singles out UAE-bound and based vessels. The 58-meter (190-foot) Riah typically made trips from Dubai and Sharjah on the UAE’s west coast before going through the strait and heading to Fujairah on the UAE’s east coast.

The UAE has been calling for a de-escalation of tensions between the U.S. and Iran in past weeks, but has also lobbied for tougher U.S. policies on Iran and supports the maximum pressure campaign of sanctions imposed by the Trump administration since the U.S. unilaterally pulled out of Iran’s nuclear deal with world powers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iran, tv, seized, seize, foreign, iranian, irans, state, oil, crew, smuggling, riah, revolutionary, island, tanker, forces


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Foreign purchases of American homes plunge 36% as Chinese buyers flee the market

Challenging conditions in the U.S. housing market, along with tighter currency controls by the Chinese government, caused a stunning drop in foreign demand for American homes. The dollar volume of homes purchased by foreign buyers from April 2018 through March 2019 dropped 36% from the previous year, according to the National Association of Realtors. Yet that was a 56% decline from the previous 12 months and comparatively the biggest percentage drop of all foreign buyers. The Chinese government


Challenging conditions in the U.S. housing market, along with tighter currency controls by the Chinese government, caused a stunning drop in foreign demand for American homes. The dollar volume of homes purchased by foreign buyers from April 2018 through March 2019 dropped 36% from the previous year, according to the National Association of Realtors. Yet that was a 56% decline from the previous 12 months and comparatively the biggest percentage drop of all foreign buyers. The Chinese government
Foreign purchases of American homes plunge 36% as Chinese buyers flee the market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: diana olick
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homes, real, chinese, previous, purchases, property, demand, buyers, 36, drop, estate, flee, foreign, plunge, american, market


Foreign purchases of American homes plunge 36% as Chinese buyers flee the market

Challenging conditions in the U.S. housing market, along with tighter currency controls by the Chinese government, caused a stunning drop in foreign demand for American homes.

The dollar volume of homes purchased by foreign buyers from April 2018 through March 2019 dropped 36% from the previous year, according to the National Association of Realtors. The decline was due to a drop in the number and average price of purchases. Foreigners bought 183,100 properties with a total value of about $77.9 billion, down from 266,800 valued at $121 billion in the previous period.

They paid a median price of $280,600, which is higher than the median for all existing homebuyers ($259,600), but it was down from $290,400 the previous year.

“A confluence of many factors — slower economic growth abroad, tighter capital controls in China, a stronger U.S. dollar and a low inventory of homes for sale — contributed to the pullback of foreign buyers,” said Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “However, the magnitude of the decline is quite striking, implying less confidence in owning a property in the U.S.”

The Chinese were the leading buyers for the seventh consecutive year, purchasing an estimated $13.4 billion worth of residential property. Yet that was a 56% decline from the previous 12 months and comparatively the biggest percentage drop of all foreign buyers. Chinese economic growth slowed to 6.3% in 2019 compared with 6.9% in 2017, when the previous buyer survey began. The Chinese government also tightened its grip on the outflow of cash to purchase foreign property.

The Chinese may also be souring on U.S. real estate due to the current political climate. Anecdotally, real estate agents in California have seen a pullback in Chinese buyer demand. Southern California had been particularly popular with Chinese parents hoping to send their children to American colleges.

In the first quarter of this year, Chinese buyer inquiries for U.S. properties on Juwai.com, a Chinese real estate site, were down 27.5% from a year ago. Inquiries have been down in four of the last five quarters.

“We call it the Trump effect. It’s a combination of anti-Chinese political rhetoric, a clampdown on visa processing, and of course tariffs,” Carrie Law, CEO and director of Juwai.com, said in a recent interview. “The Trump effect is undercutting some of the primary drivers of Chinese demand for U.S. property, including buying homes for students who are studying in the U.S. and the country’s reputation as a safe investment.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: diana olick
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homes, real, chinese, previous, purchases, property, demand, buyers, 36, drop, estate, flee, foreign, plunge, american, market


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Peter Thiel’s comments about spies in Silicon Valley have some basis in reality, but no evidence

Facebook board member and Trump supporter Peter Thiel made explosive comments Sunday about Google at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington D.C., setting off a wave of skepticism and drawing attention from the president. Among other things, Thiel said that the FBI and CIA should investigate Google and ask whether any foreign spies, particularly Chinese spies, have infiltrated its research into artificial intelligence. It was a fiery political speech by a firebrand with an interest in


Facebook board member and Trump supporter Peter Thiel made explosive comments Sunday about Google at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington D.C., setting off a wave of skepticism and drawing attention from the president. Among other things, Thiel said that the FBI and CIA should investigate Google and ask whether any foreign spies, particularly Chinese spies, have infiltrated its research into artificial intelligence. It was a fiery political speech by a firebrand with an interest in
Peter Thiel’s comments about spies in Silicon Valley have some basis in reality, but no evidence Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peter, drawing, attention, silicon, evidence, comments, worked, reality, valley, chinese, thiel, facebook, thiels, basis, google, intelligence, spies, foreign


Peter Thiel's comments about spies in Silicon Valley have some basis in reality, but no evidence

Facebook board member and Trump supporter Peter Thiel made explosive comments Sunday about Google at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington D.C., setting off a wave of skepticism and drawing attention from the president.

Among other things, Thiel said that the FBI and CIA should investigate Google and ask whether any foreign spies, particularly Chinese spies, have infiltrated its research into artificial intelligence.

It was a fiery political speech by a firebrand with an interest in deflecting regulators’ attention from Facebook. Facebook is under scrutiny for its privacy lapses and initiative to build a new cryptocurrency, and drawing it toward Google, which competes with Facebook for billions of dollars in advertising revenue.

Google has said repeatedly that it does not work with the Chinese military.

But the rhetoric about foreign spies infiltrating U.S. companies is not new or surprising to people in the intelligence community, and it based in reality.

Facebook’s former chief security officer Alex Stamos honed in those realities Tuesday, tweeting that it’s “completely reasonable” to imagine Chinese intelligence has worked to recruit technology employees at big companies.

It’s important to separate this very real threat from Thiel’s allegations about Google, which were presented without specifics or proof, and from his claims that Google has participated in “treasonous” activity.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peter, drawing, attention, silicon, evidence, comments, worked, reality, valley, chinese, thiel, facebook, thiels, basis, google, intelligence, spies, foreign


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Here’s one reason why Americans abroad want to give up their citizenship

More than 20% of the Americans abroad polled by Greenback Expat Tax Services said they are “seriously considering” giving up their U.S. citizenship. Among the participants who said they would give up their citizenship, close to four in 10 cited the tax burden they face as a reason. Americans holding certain foreign financial accounts also need to report them to the proper federal authorities. This is known as a statement of specified foreign assets. Those thresholds are lower for Americans who l


More than 20% of the Americans abroad polled by Greenback Expat Tax Services said they are “seriously considering” giving up their U.S. citizenship. Among the participants who said they would give up their citizenship, close to four in 10 cited the tax burden they face as a reason. Americans holding certain foreign financial accounts also need to report them to the proper federal authorities. This is known as a statement of specified foreign assets. Those thresholds are lower for Americans who l
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, foreign, americans, reason, financial, submit, assets, report, tax, heres, file, form, value, abroad, citizenship, jointly


Here's one reason why Americans abroad want to give up their citizenship

Tetra Images | Getty Images

You can head for the farthest reaches of the Earth, but you’ll never escape the U.S. tax man. More than 20% of the Americans abroad polled by Greenback Expat Tax Services said they are “seriously considering” giving up their U.S. citizenship. The firm polled more than 3,100 U.S. expats from March through May. Among the participants who said they would give up their citizenship, close to four in 10 cited the tax burden they face as a reason. In all, 1,018 U.S. citizens renounced their citizenship between Jan. 1 and March 31, according to the Internal Revenue Service. U.S. citizens and resident aliens abroad must file income, estate and gift tax returns, as well as paying U.S. income taxes on worldwide income.

Americans holding certain foreign financial accounts also need to report them to the proper federal authorities. Civil penalties for willfully failing to do so can be steep: the greater of $129,210 or 50% of the account balance. “The reporting requirements can carry some life-changing penalties for people,” said David McKeegan, co-founder of Greenback Expat Tax Services. Indeed, 20% of those polled were unfamiliar with the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act or FATCA — the law that requires them to tell federal authorities about their foreign accounts.

Familiarity with the FBAR

Did you hold an interest in or a signature authority over at least one foreign account and the aggregate value of your overseas accounts exceeded $10,000 at any time during the year? If so, you must file a report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts with the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. The so-called FBAR is due on April 15, but you get an automatic extension to Oct. 15, if you miss the date. If you flout the law, you could be subject to the financial civil penalty. Criminal penalties could also apply.

Telling the IRS

The Internal Revenue Services offices in Washington, D.C. Adam Jeffery | CNBC

Citizens who file an FBAR may also need to submit Form 8938 to the IRS. This is known as a statement of specified foreign assets. Whether you’re required to submit this form depends on where you reside and whether your foreign asset holdings meet a set threshold. Single taxpayers living abroad must file Form 8938 if the total value of their foreign financial assets exceeds $200,000 on the last day of the tax year ($400,000 for spouses who file jointly) or if it exceeds $300,000 at any time during the year ($600,000 for spouses filing jointly). More from Personal Finance:

The Secure Act may flood your 401(k) with annuities

California kicks off its state retirement savings plan

What super savers who plan to retire early do differently Married taxpayers residing in a foreign country and filing jointly must submit the form if their foreign assets are valued at more than $400,000 on the last day of the tax year or if they exceed $600,000 at any time during the year. Those thresholds are lower for Americans who live stateside and have foreign assets. In that case, singles must report their foreign assets to the IRS if the value of those holdings exceeds $50,000 on the last day of the tax year ($100,000 for joint filers) or if they go over $75,000 at any time during that year ($150,000 for spouses filing jointly). Failure to report carries a penalty of $10,000, and you could be on the hook for an additional $50,000 penalty if you continue to miss your reporting requirements.

Voluntary disclosure

Douglas Sacha | Moment | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: darla mercado
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Foreign exchange is our Brexit hedge, strategist says

Foreign exchange is our Brexit hedge, strategist says15 Hours AgoChris Wyllie, chief investment officer at Connor Broadley Wealth Management, discusses his views on the British pound amid ongoing Brexit uncertainty.


Foreign exchange is our Brexit hedge, strategist says15 Hours AgoChris Wyllie, chief investment officer at Connor Broadley Wealth Management, discusses his views on the British pound amid ongoing Brexit uncertainty.
Foreign exchange is our Brexit hedge, strategist says Cached Page below :
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Foreign exchange is our Brexit hedge, strategist says

Foreign exchange is our Brexit hedge, strategist says

15 Hours Ago

Chris Wyllie, chief investment officer at Connor Broadley Wealth Management, discusses his views on the British pound amid ongoing Brexit uncertainty.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27
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Hong Kong activists call on G-20 leaders to help ‘liberate’ city

Holding placards including “Please Liberate Hong Kong” and chanting “Help Hong Kong,” the demonstrators, some wearing masks, marched to a succession of consulates represented at the Group of 20 major economies summit in Japan’s Osaka this weekend. “We want to make some noise during the G-20 meeting, to let other countries discuss the issues in Hong Kong.” At the U.S. consulate, protesters handed over a petition asking president Donald Trump to “Back Hong Kong at the G-20 Summit.” The protesters,


Holding placards including “Please Liberate Hong Kong” and chanting “Help Hong Kong,” the demonstrators, some wearing masks, marched to a succession of consulates represented at the Group of 20 major economies summit in Japan’s Osaka this weekend. “We want to make some noise during the G-20 meeting, to let other countries discuss the issues in Hong Kong.” At the U.S. consulate, protesters handed over a petition asking president Donald Trump to “Back Hong Kong at the G-20 Summit.” The protesters,
Hong Kong activists call on G-20 leaders to help ‘liberate’ city Cached Page below :
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Hong Kong activists call on G-20 leaders to help 'liberate' city

Protesters leave the U.S. consulate during a march to deliver letters to local G-20 consulates urging global intervention against a proposed extradition bill in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, June 26, 2019.

More than a thousand protesters marched to major foreign consulates on Wednesday calling on leaders at the upcoming G-20 summit to raise the plight of Hong Kong with China and to support the full scrapping of a controversial extradition bill.

Holding placards including “Please Liberate Hong Kong” and chanting “Help Hong Kong,” the demonstrators, some wearing masks, marched to a succession of consulates represented at the Group of 20 major economies summit in Japan’s Osaka this weekend.

Over the past three weeks, millions of Hong Kong people have protested against an extradition bill that would have allowed individuals, including foreigners, to be extradited to mainland China to face trial in courts controlled by the Communist Party.

Hong Kong’s Beijing-appointed leader Carrie Lam, eventually caved in after some of the worst violence seen in decades on the city’s streets, with police firing tear gas and rubber bullets.

But Lam stopped short of protester demands to scrap the bill altogether, saying it would be suspended indefinitely.

“As long as the government doesn’t withdraw the bill, and they refuse to respond, then we will keep on fighting,” said Aslee Tam, a 19-year-old university student in the march.

“We want to make some noise during the G-20 meeting, to let other countries discuss the issues in Hong Kong.”

At the U.S. consulate, protesters handed over a petition asking president Donald Trump to “Back Hong Kong at the G-20 Summit.” They urged Trump to raise Hong Kong with China’s leader Xi Jinping, and to support a full withdrawal of the extradition bill and to set up an independent investigation into Hong Kong police brutality against protesters.

The protesters, some wearing “Liberate Hong Kong” T-shirts, also marched to the British consulate where their petition was received by a senior diplomat. Britain’s Foreign Minister Jeremy Hunt told parliament on Tuesday that London would ban sales of tear gas to Hong Kong and called for an independent probe into the recent violence.

The raising of Hong Kong’s extradition saga could prove to be an embarrassment for China’s leader Xi, at a delicate time of rising trade tensions with the United States, and pile further pressure on Hong Kong’s leader amid reports Beijing now harbors serious doubts about her capabilities.

An assistant Chinese Foreign Minister Zhang Jun said earlier this week that China won’t allow Hong Kong to be discussed at the G-20.

But Hong Kong activists have raised more than HK$5 million ($640,606) in a crowdfunding campaign to take out newspaper ads in major foreign media like the New York Times in a bid to raise awareness of Hong Kong’s plight at the G-20. Some Hong Kong activists have also traveled to Osaka.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, city, protesters, g20, kong, extradition, activists, bill, kongs, leaders, foreign, liberate, leader, china, hong


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‘No evidence’ Russia tried to influence Brexit vote using Facebook, exec says

An executive at Facebook has said that there is “absolutely no evidence” that users of the social network were targeted by Russia in a bid to influence the 2016 Brexit referendum. “We have found no evidence of a significant attempt by outside forces” to sway the vote, Nick Clegg, Facebook’s vice president of global affairs and communications, told the BBC on Monday. Likewise, the U.K. government has said in the past that it’s seen no evidence of foreign actors like Russia managing to influence t


An executive at Facebook has said that there is “absolutely no evidence” that users of the social network were targeted by Russia in a bid to influence the 2016 Brexit referendum. “We have found no evidence of a significant attempt by outside forces” to sway the vote, Nick Clegg, Facebook’s vice president of global affairs and communications, told the BBC on Monday. Likewise, the U.K. government has said in the past that it’s seen no evidence of foreign actors like Russia managing to influence t
‘No evidence’ Russia tried to influence Brexit vote using Facebook, exec says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, evidence, influence, foreign, brexit, tried, using, facebook, facebooks, communications, vote, russia, exec, uk


'No evidence' Russia tried to influence Brexit vote using Facebook, exec says

An executive at Facebook has said that there is “absolutely no evidence” that users of the social network were targeted by Russia in a bid to influence the 2016 Brexit referendum.

“We have found no evidence of a significant attempt by outside forces” to sway the vote, Nick Clegg, Facebook’s vice president of global affairs and communications, told the BBC on Monday.

Clegg said the company ran two studies using data it had in the run-up to the EU withdrawal vote to see if there was evidence of foreign interference, using the same methodology that was used to identify potential Russian activity during the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Russia has denied meddling in the Brexit referendum. Likewise, the U.K. government has said in the past that it’s seen no evidence of foreign actors like Russia managing to influence the British democratic process successfully.

The former deputy prime minister of the U.K., Clegg was appointed as Facebook’s communications lead late last year. He had previously led the centrist Liberal Democrats party, and is known to be in favor of the U.K. remaining in the EU.

British politics is in a fragile state currently, with both the public and Westminster divided over issue of the U.K.’s membership of the bloc. Brexit has been a central theme of the U.K. leadership contest, which sees hardline Brexiteer Boris Johnson as the favorite to win.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, evidence, influence, foreign, brexit, tried, using, facebook, facebooks, communications, vote, russia, exec, uk


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Investors favor US stocks amid political tensions overseas

As tensions with other countries climb, American investors are sticking close to home. While 66% of Americans said foreign equities could diversify their portfolios, just 48% of investors hold 1% to 25% allocations to these stocks in their portfolios. Baby boomers, who grew up when the U.S. represented a greater portion of the world’s economy, tend to have fewer foreign holdings. Baby boomers were particularly concerned with foreign countries’ instability and equity volatility, while millennials


As tensions with other countries climb, American investors are sticking close to home. While 66% of Americans said foreign equities could diversify their portfolios, just 48% of investors hold 1% to 25% allocations to these stocks in their portfolios. Baby boomers, who grew up when the U.S. represented a greater portion of the world’s economy, tend to have fewer foreign holdings. Baby boomers were particularly concerned with foreign countries’ instability and equity volatility, while millennials
Investors favor US stocks amid political tensions overseas Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, td, political, amid, portfolios, countries, stocks, survey, foreign, investors, favor, holdings, denerstein, overseas, tensions, clients


Investors favor US stocks amid political tensions overseas

As tensions with other countries climb, American investors are sticking close to home. While 66% of Americans said foreign equities could diversify their portfolios, just 48% of investors hold 1% to 25% allocations to these stocks in their portfolios. And almost half — 48% — said political tension between the U.S. and other countries is what holds them back from ramping up their foreign exposure.

A U.S. flag flutters in the wind. Gary Hershorn | Corbis News | Getty Images

That is according to a new survey from TD Ameritrade, conducted in February. The reasons for staying away from overseas investments are varied. Baby boomers, who grew up when the U.S. represented a greater portion of the world’s economy, tend to have fewer foreign holdings. The survey found that 59% of this generation have 1% to 25% foreign exposure. Millennials, on the other hand, are more open to international investing. The survey found 53% of this younger cohort has 25% to 50% of their holdings in these stocks. Baby boomers were particularly concerned with foreign countries’ instability and equity volatility, while millennials were more likely to complain about a lack of information on foreign equities.

“We’ve seen over the course of the past few years, but really increasing in momentum, a desire for our clients to exhibit a home-country bias in terms of their investing,” said Keith Denerstein, director of investment product and guidance at TD Ameritrade. “There are advantages to focusing domestically, focusing globally and ultimately we want the client or the investors to be the ones to decide,” Denerstein said. TD Ameritrade is launching a new product next month within its personalized portfolios business, which lets clients get 100% exposure to U.S.-based investments. The investment minimum for that service is $250,000. But that won’t stop the firm’s other clients, including those in its robo-advisor service, which has a $5,000 minimum, from heavily weighting their holdings toward domestic equities if they want to, Denerstein said. “If it’s their preference, we certainly want to be able to cater to it,” Denerstein said. More from Personal Finance:

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Why Ted Cruz may be holding up retirement bill in Senate Financial advisor Scott Hanson, co-founder of Allworth Financial, said his firm and investors are leaning more toward domestic holdings, given U.S. domination of many markets over the past decade. “People just don’t want as much foreign stocks than they used to,” Hanson said, citing issues in Europe and slower growth in China. “I think a lot of people are questioning what’s the point of taking that risk.”

Avoid individual stocks


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, td, political, amid, portfolios, countries, stocks, survey, foreign, investors, favor, holdings, denerstein, overseas, tensions, clients


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