Glossier founder keeps a gratitude journal, dabbled in the keto diet and froze her eggs to be a mom when she’s ready

For Glossier CEO Emily Wiess, it includes gratitude journaling, walking to work, toying with a buzzy diet and freezing her eggs, according to a new interview with Vanity Fair. As far as diet trends go, Weiss said she briefly tried the ketogenic diet, a low-carb high-fat diet, “but it made me feel kind of dead inside,” she told Vanity Fair. Weiss told Vanity Fair the process of injecting herself with hormones, which is standard in order to stimulate the ovaries before an egg-retrieval procedure,


For Glossier CEO Emily Wiess, it includes gratitude journaling, walking to work, toying with a buzzy diet and freezing her eggs, according to a new interview with Vanity Fair. As far as diet trends go, Weiss said she briefly tried the ketogenic diet, a low-carb high-fat diet, “but it made me feel kind of dead inside,” she told Vanity Fair. Weiss told Vanity Fair the process of injecting herself with hormones, which is standard in order to stimulate the ovaries before an egg-retrieval procedure,
Glossier founder keeps a gratitude journal, dabbled in the keto diet and froze her eggs to be a mom when she’s ready Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eggs, told, weiss, ready, mom, keto, gratitude, journal, founder, keeps, according, diet, vanity, shes, glossier, froze, company, beauty


Glossier founder keeps a gratitude journal, dabbled in the keto diet and froze her eggs to be a mom when she's ready

What does the founder of a unicorn beauty start-up do for her wellness routine? For Glossier CEO Emily Wiess, it includes gratitude journaling, walking to work, toying with a buzzy diet and freezing her eggs, according to a new interview with Vanity Fair.

Weiss told the magazine she has a gratitude practice that involves writing in a journal for five minutes each day, and that actually has mental health benefits: Studies have shown that gratitude can counteract depression, boost sleep, lower stress levels and improve relationships.

Weiss also lives so close to Glossier’s New York City office that she can see it from her living room window, so she sleeps in since she’s not a morning person and walks to work.

In the past, Weiss has talked about taking long walks, barre class at Physique57 and Katonah yoga class, a gentle form of yoga that emphasizes holding postures rather than flowing through them, at the studio Sky Ting for exercise.

As far as diet trends go, Weiss said she briefly tried the ketogenic diet, a low-carb high-fat diet, “but it made me feel kind of dead inside,” she told Vanity Fair.

When it comes to work-balance, Weiss admits she is privileged. The 34-year-old froze her eggs in May.

“I plan on being a great mom, but I’m not ready now, and I certainly wasn’t ready in my twenties,” she said in a May 15 Instagram post. She calls the choice a “luxury not only from a price perspective, but from a family planning—timing—perspective.”

While it is expensive — egg-freezing procedures cost $30,000 to $40,000 on average, according to FertilityIQ — harvesting and storing eggs for later fertilization and implantation does not guarantee an eventual pregnancy. The chances of getting pregnant this way are about 30% to 60%, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Weiss told Vanity Fair the process of injecting herself with hormones, which is standard in order to stimulate the ovaries before an egg-retrieval procedure, was challenging.

“I was super bloated and looked four months pregnant. I gained 10 pounds during a three-week period,” she said.

Weiss launched Glossier five years ago in October 2014, after running a successful beauty blog called “Into The Gloss.” In March 2019, the beauty company raised $100 million in Series D funding (led by Sequoia Capital) at a valuation $1.2 billion, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Today, Glossier has two brick-and-mortar stores in New York and Los Angeles, and hosts pop-up stores in other cities around the States and in the United Kingdom.

When asked about whether Glossier is a tech company or a beauty company, Weiss often says both, she told Vanity Fair. As a founder, it’s important for her to maintain that duality, she added.

“Women are so hungry to have more role models who have achieved what they want in their careers,” she told Vanity Fair.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eggs, told, weiss, ready, mom, keto, gratitude, journal, founder, keeps, according, diet, vanity, shes, glossier, froze, company, beauty


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25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in


Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in
25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Like a lot of kids, Myles Gage was into sneakers when he was growing up. But his mom suggested an unusual rule: For every pair of Nikes that Gage owned, he should own a share of Nike stock. Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. The platform makes a game out of the markets: Users get $10,000 fictitious dollars to buy and sell stocks, which helps them learn how the markets work and start to experience the excitement and potential benefit of investing. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future.

Learning early to be ‘financially literate’

Gage says his parents made a lot of financial mistakes and they wanted to make sure their kids didn’t follow in their footsteps: “They wanted us to be financially literate and in a position to make better decisions.” That’s partly why Gage’s mother, who worked for the Chicago Parks District, found a way to get him and his brother, Mario, into Ariel Community Academy, a specialized public school for students K-8 with a focus on financial education. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience investing in stocks. Attending Ariel made a huge difference in Gage’s life: “The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy,” he says.

The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy. Myles Gage CFO, Rapunzl Investments

That knowledge paid off: It helped Gage win a full-ride scholarship to the University of Chicago Laboratory School, a prestigious private high school. “I wrote an essay about how I planned to finance my college tuition. And the main point of that was that I was going to liquidate my stock portfolio,” he says. “I don’t think the judges were expecting a 14-year-old to be talking about liquidating a portfolio, let alone one from the south side of Chicago.”

The origins of Rapunzl

As a high school freshman in 2008, Gage immediately bonded with another student, Brian Curcio. While discussing the stock market and the budding financial crisis, the two came up with the idea of a stock market game, using fictional money, to teach people how the markets work. Over the next few years, the economy recovered. Some investors, who had money to buy stocks when the markets bottomed out, started to see strong returns. Average Americans, however, were often missing out. Gage didn’t think that profits should belong only to a select few, hidden away at the top of a tower like the character of Rapunzel in the 1812 Brothers Grimm fairy tale. Rapunzl the app, Gage and Curcio decided, would make investing accessible. It would give anybody the chance to learn, to figure out how the stock markets work. Then, when users were comfortable, they could actually start investing.

How the app got funded

Through their college years, the two met frequently to refine the concept for Rapunzl. They settled on an idea that would allow users to simulate a stock portfolio without risking real money. But to make their idea come to life, real money is exactly what the two young entrepreneurs needed. So, after graduating in 2016, they organized their ideas and started looking around for seed funding.

Myles Gage with Rapunzl cofounder Brian Curcio. Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC

“We put a mini-pitch deck together and shopped it around to our friends and family, and were able to muster up funds to develop a prototype,” Gage says. They hired a Canadian developer who created an early version of the app and made it available for download in April 2017. Around that time, Rapunzl also did another round of fundraising, which netted the company enough money to continue perfecting the platform. Several months later, the founders brought in a third partner, Chris Thomas, as the company’s CTO.

‘Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl’

To attract users and take aim at their mission of creating a new generation of confident, financially literate investors, Gage and the team headed back to school — literally. Rapunzl partnered with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and started sponsoring conferences, plus essay and investing competitions at schools around the Chicago area. The team also met with John Rogers, the chairman and CEO of Ariel Investments — which also funds and sponsors Ariel Community Academy — who agreed to sponsor the competitions and provide prize money. In 2018, Rapunzl was involved in competitions in more than 70 Chicago-area schools, comprising more than 2,000 students.

Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap. Arne Duncan Former U.S. Secretary of Education

Rapunzl is building on its success in Chicago schools by expanding. Last year, it sponsored competitions in Los Angeles, Boston, and New York, with plans for more cities next year, and colleges, too. It has even managed to catch the attention of former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap,” Duncan said, following an announcement about Rapunzl partnering with investing firm Wedbush. Duncan, who doesn’t have any current connection to the app, did play a role in developing the curriculum at Ariel Community Academy.

The app and its founders hope to make a difference

So far, the Rapunzl team has focused their efforts on generating interest in the platform and getting young users hooked on trading. The app doesn’t currently drive revenue, though, and Gage is hopeful that will change. He says at some point in 2020, the platform will be monetized through affiliate marketing and premium subscriptions.

Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


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This founder says some of her best hires are people who’ve never had a job before—here’s how they got her attention

Katerina Schneider learned early on not to hire people based on their resumes. These days, she doesn’t care for resumes much at all, and she doesn’t hire based on someone’s experience. In fact, she’s said some of her best hires have been people with no work history at all. Interested job-seekers have also stopped by the wellness company’s Los Angeles office to apply for a role in person. “We’ve had people come to the office and drop off their resumes; we’ve had someone make us cookies,” Schneide


Katerina Schneider learned early on not to hire people based on their resumes. These days, she doesn’t care for resumes much at all, and she doesn’t hire based on someone’s experience. In fact, she’s said some of her best hires have been people with no work history at all. Interested job-seekers have also stopped by the wellness company’s Los Angeles office to apply for a role in person. “We’ve had people come to the office and drop off their resumes; we’ve had someone make us cookies,” Schneide
This founder says some of her best hires are people who’ve never had a job before—here’s how they got her attention Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hires, attention, weve, job, schneider, best, whove, founder, office, beforeheres, person, hired, hire, based, jobseekers, resumes


This founder says some of her best hires are people who've never had a job before—here's how they got her attention

Katerina Schneider learned early on not to hire people based on their resumes. The founder and CEO of Ritual, named one of LinkedIn’s top start-ups of 2019, says focusing too much on a candidate’s previous experience hasn’t worked in her favor.

“I’d say, ‘Oh, this person has an MBA and Ph.D. and works for this big company — that’s awesome! They’re probably great,'” she tells CNBC Make It. “And I got burned a couple of times doing that.”

These days, she doesn’t care for resumes much at all, and she doesn’t hire based on someone’s experience. In fact, she’s said some of her best hires have been people with no work history at all.

“Some of the best people we’ve hired have never had a job before: a designer, some marketers, the woman that runs our supply chain now, were all hired right out of college based on their innate abilities,” Schneider says. Instead, she looks for qualities that can’t be taught, like adaptability and perseverance.

The company, which now has upwards of 70 employees, is still small enough that the best way to kick off the interview process is through employee referral. Interested job-seekers have also stopped by the wellness company’s Los Angeles office to apply for a role in person. Schneider credits her marketing team for creating a recognizable, personable brand that spurs interest among consumers and job-seekers alike.

“We’ve had people come to the office and drop off their resumes; we’ve had someone make us cookies,” Schneider adds. “There’s no end in sight.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hires, attention, weve, job, schneider, best, whove, founder, office, beforeheres, person, hired, hire, based, jobseekers, resumes


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Oculus founder Palmer Luckey’s defense start-up is now making attack drones

PepsiCo CFO: The consumer is doing ‘just fine’ right now ‘as far…As recession fears drag down the stock market, PepsiCo CFO Hugh Johnston said that the consumer is doing “just fine” right now. Food & Beverageread more


PepsiCo CFO: The consumer is doing ‘just fine’ right now ‘as far…As recession fears drag down the stock market, PepsiCo CFO Hugh Johnston said that the consumer is doing “just fine” right now. Food & Beverageread more
Oculus founder Palmer Luckey’s defense start-up is now making attack drones Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, founder, making, startup, recession, attack, cfo, consumer, pepsico, fine, right, oculus, drones, stock, defense, doing, nowfood, palmer, market, luckeys


Oculus founder Palmer Luckey's defense start-up is now making attack drones

PepsiCo CFO: The consumer is doing ‘just fine’ right now ‘as far…

As recession fears drag down the stock market, PepsiCo CFO Hugh Johnston said that the consumer is doing “just fine” right now.

Food & Beverage

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, founder, making, startup, recession, attack, cfo, consumer, pepsico, fine, right, oculus, drones, stock, defense, doing, nowfood, palmer, market, luckeys


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An investor told this founder she to choose between launching a company and starting a family. She ‘used it as fuel’

It was her pregnancy, after all, that led Schneider on a mission to create a better multivitamin for women. As for the investor meeting, she decided to be transparent about the pregnancy that sparked the idea in the first place. Instead of letting the negative response weigh on her, “I used it as fuel, and that became one of our values as a company: embracing the no’s.” “We had so many people telling us ‘no’ along the way,” Schneider says. Or an editor might say, ‘We don’t want to write about yo


It was her pregnancy, after all, that led Schneider on a mission to create a better multivitamin for women. As for the investor meeting, she decided to be transparent about the pregnancy that sparked the idea in the first place. Instead of letting the negative response weigh on her, “I used it as fuel, and that became one of our values as a company: embracing the no’s.” “We had so many people telling us ‘no’ along the way,” Schneider says. Or an editor might say, ‘We don’t want to write about yo
An investor told this founder she to choose between launching a company and starting a family. She ‘used it as fuel’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, founder, launching, women, ingredients, led, schneider, used, starting, company, choose, investor, pregnancy, told, fuel, trying, create, way, tell, family


An investor told this founder she to choose between launching a company and starting a family. She 'used it as fuel'

Katerina Schneider had her investor pitch locked down. She was ready to share her vision for creating a wellness company focused on delivering clean, science-backed, vegan-certified multivitamins made for women, by women, with completely traceable ingredients and radical transparency at its core.

One big question hung in the balance, though. Should she tell investors she was four months pregnant?

It was her pregnancy, after all, that led Schneider on a mission to create a better multivitamin for women. During her pregnancy, she became more aware of what she was surrounded by and purged her home of products that contained potentially harmful ingredients. When she took a closer look at the prenatal vitamins she was taking, she was shocked to find they contained some of the same ingredients she was trying to avoid. A search for a replacement that she felt was up to standard came up empty. So she set off to create her own.

As for the investor meeting, she decided to be transparent about the pregnancy that sparked the idea in the first place. The response was exactly what she needed to hear — but not in the way you’d expect.

“He said, ‘You have two choices: You can either grow a company or you can start a family, but you can’t do both,'” Schneider tells CNBC Make It. Instead of letting the negative response weigh on her, “I used it as fuel, and that became one of our values as a company: embracing the no’s.”

Schneider, who holds a degree in applied mathematics and economics from Brown University, started her career in investment banking with Lehman Brothers before getting into the Los Angeles start-up scene. She’s led digital strategy and high-level technology partnerships for musicians and brands. This led her to join Troy Carter’s investment fund, AF Square, where she managed an active portfolio of over 70 investments including Dropbox, Warby Parker, Spotify, Uber and Lyft.

Simply put, she had the business acumen to realize she was on to something. She didn’t have a product or a team just yet, but her idea led her to quit her job and launch Ritual with hopes to disrupt the $36 billion vitamin industry.

“We had so many people telling us ‘no’ along the way,” Schneider says. “A big manufacturer didn’t want to work with us early on to create the product we really wanted. Or an editor might say, ‘We don’t want to write about you because you’re a supplement company, and supplement companies are snake oil.’ And we’d tell them we’re trying to change the industry. So all of these hurdles have helped us build a more meaningful company.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, founder, launching, women, ingredients, led, schneider, used, starting, company, choose, investor, pregnancy, told, fuel, trying, create, way, tell, family


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Here’s how to answer Ritual founder Katerina Schneider’s favorite interview question

So Katerina Schneider, the founder and CEO of Ritual, has one question she loves to ask to help her spot a good hire for her wellness company. The question speaks to one of Ritual’s core values, which Schneider wrote with her team when they reached 50 employees. The company’s growth and its ability to attract top talent from major companies helped Ritual be named one of LinkedIn’s top start-ups in 2019. Ritual launched in 2016 as a monthly subscription service to deliver a daily multivitamin for


So Katerina Schneider, the founder and CEO of Ritual, has one question she loves to ask to help her spot a good hire for her wellness company. The question speaks to one of Ritual’s core values, which Schneider wrote with her team when they reached 50 employees. The company’s growth and its ability to attract top talent from major companies helped Ritual be named one of LinkedIn’s top start-ups in 2019. Ritual launched in 2016 as a monthly subscription service to deliver a daily multivitamin for
Here’s how to answer Ritual founder Katerina Schneider’s favorite interview question Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, question, schneider, ritual, katerina, heres, wants, answer, growth, schneiders, founder, told, know, companys, favorite, interview


Here's how to answer Ritual founder Katerina Schneider's favorite interview question

When you’re building a start-up, every new hire counts.

So Katerina Schneider, the founder and CEO of Ritual, has one question she loves to ask to help her spot a good hire for her wellness company.

As a founder who was told “no” many times early on, even from an investor who told her she’d have to choose between starting a family and launching a company, Schneider wants to know that people who work for her have a specific response to rejection.

That’s why she asks candidates: When have you been told “no”? How did you rise above it, and how did it make you a better employee?

The question speaks to one of Ritual’s core values, which Schneider wrote with her team when they reached 50 employees. “That challenges the ’embrace the no’s’ value,” Schneider tells CNBC Make It of her favorite interview question, “which I think is ultimately the most important one — the hustle and ability to turn something around.”

Overcoming rejection is an essential part of nearly every successful person’s journey, from high-profile journalists to media moguls to globally influential entrepreneurs.

Billionaire Alibaba founder Jack Ma was famously rejected from a string of jobs, including one at a KFC and another as a cop, and was turned down by Harvard 10 times. By the time he founded Chinese e-commerce site Alibaba in 1999, he was used to hearing “no,” but continued growing his company despite having no technical or business background. In 2005 , Yahoo bought a majority stake in Alibaba, and it issued a record-breaking $25 billion IPO by 2014. Today, the company has a market capitalization of over $396 billion, and Ma is worth $35 billion.

Schneider says she used rejection from investors, manufacturers and people within the wellness industry “as fuel” to continue building her company, which to date has sold 1 million bottles of multivitamins and has raised $40.5 million in funding. The company’s growth and its ability to attract top talent from major companies helped Ritual be named one of LinkedIn’s top start-ups in 2019.

Schneider also wants to know that people who come into Ritual are excited about its rapid growth, which is why she thinks asking questions about a company’s future is a good trait in a potential hire.

Ritual launched in 2016 as a monthly subscription service to deliver a daily multivitamin for women. It has since expanded its product offerings to include a prenatal vitamin and has plans to release another multivitamin product designed for women over the age of 50.

“I love when people ask me the vision beyond vitamins — how do you grow from being a vitamin company to personal care [company] or broader than that?” Schneider says. She wants to know that people who join the team are excited about the company’s growth and also have their own ideas to help it venture into new ideas, products and services.

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Don’t miss: How to answer this Facebook exec’s simple go-to interview question about failure


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, question, schneider, ritual, katerina, heres, wants, answer, growth, schneiders, founder, told, know, companys, favorite, interview


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Real estate is still the best investment you can make today, millionaires say—here’s why

Billionaire Andrew Carnegie famously said that 90% of millionaires got their wealth by investing in real estate. According to these nine advisors at The Oracles who made millions by investing in real estate, the answer is a resounding yes. “Investing in real estate is a great idea if you are in it for the long haul, not a quick return. “Real estate is real, and it’s always a good idea to put your money in real assets. —Daniel Lesniak, founder of Orange Line Living, broker at the Keri Shull Team,


Billionaire Andrew Carnegie famously said that 90% of millionaires got their wealth by investing in real estate. According to these nine advisors at The Oracles who made millions by investing in real estate, the answer is a resounding yes. “Investing in real estate is a great idea if you are in it for the long haul, not a quick return. “Real estate is real, and it’s always a good idea to put your money in real assets. —Daniel Lesniak, founder of Orange Line Living, broker at the Keri Shull Team,
Real estate is still the best investment you can make today, millionaires say—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, today, investment, buy, properties, tax, real, founder, sayheres, best, market, millionaires, money, estate, rent


Real estate is still the best investment you can make today, millionaires say—here's why

Billionaire Andrew Carnegie famously said that 90% of millionaires got their wealth by investing in real estate. We wanted to know: Is this still true? Is investing in real estate still a good idea? According to these nine advisors at The Oracles who made millions by investing in real estate, the answer is a resounding yes.

1. ‘Owning made me rich.’

“Buying real estate has made me rich — mostly through necessity, not by design. I bought my first itty-bitty studio after scraping together a few bucks because I needed to live somewhere anyway. A few years later, the studio doubled in value, giving me enough cash to plunk down 50% on a one-bedroom apartment. That soon rolled into a two-bedroom, then a three-bedroom, and finally landed me in my 10-room penthouse on Fifth Avenue in New York City. Buying that tiny studio was the most important decision I made because it got me in the game.” —Barbara Corcoran, founder of The Corcoran Group, podcast host of “Business Unusual,” judge on “Shark Tank”

2. ‘Residential properties can generate income year-round.’

“Investing in real estate is a great idea if you are in it for the long haul, not a quick return. Your best bet is investing in residential properties that produce rental income year-round. Just make sure you understand all of the associated legal fees and are prepared for unexpected costs.” —Bethenny Frankel, entrepreneur, philanthropist, founder of Skinnygirl and BStrong. Follow her on Instagram

3. ‘The right investment will continue to appreciate.’

“Real estate is real, and it’s always a good idea to put your money in real assets. But let me be clear: That doesn’t mean that all real estate is a good idea. I only buy certain types of properties, generally multifamily ones in upscale locations that provide consistent cash flow and great potential for future appreciation. I stay away from low-income areas and single-family homes. But even those assets are probably a better place to store your money than letting cash depreciate while sitting in the bank!” —Grant Cardone, sales expert, New York Times best-selling author. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube

4. ‘Buying is smarter than renting.’

“Most millionaires I know made more money from owning real estate than any other investment. Real estate consistently increases in value over time and outperforms other investments. Plus, it isn’t as vulnerable to short-term fluctuations as the stock market. You get a tangible, usable asset, whether you’re renting out an apartment or commercial building for income or buying a home. And there can also be tax benefits for investment properties. It’s always a good time to buy real estate. In fact, the real wealth is made by buying when everyone else is selling and vice versa. While many are talking about a recession, the market is strong, with increasing prices and transactions. Renting a one-bedroom apartment can cost $5,000 a month in certain neighborhoods today, yet you can buy a $1 million house with just $4,000 a month in mortgage payments. And the rate is fixed for 30 years — the best kind of rent control. So why would you rent? Besides, if you rent your property to someone else, you can cover your mortgage or better.” —Peter Hernandez, president of the Western Region at Douglas Elliman, founder and president of Teles Properties

5. ‘You get six-figure tax breaks.’

“Real estate has incredible tax benefits. In certain situations, you don’t have to pay taxes on your gains from investment properties. You can also get a $250,000 tax break as an individual and $500,000 as a married couple. The wealthiest people collect property the way they used to collect cars. Interest rates are low, prices have fallen, and you don’t have to tie up a lot of cash in the investment. At the same time, more people are choosing to rent instead of own. You can have a lucrative rental property using other peoples’ money to cover the mortgage, taxes, and upkeep. With sites like Vrbo and Airbnb, you can also find short-term renters to subsidize your overhead. While I suggest diversifying your investments, there is no better place to park your money than brick-and-mortar investments you can live in and enjoy. When you invest in your surroundings, you invest in yourself!” —Holly Parker, founder and CEO of The Holly Parker Team at Douglas Elliman, award-winning broker who made over $8 billion in sales. Follow her on LinkedIn and Instagram

6. ‘It doesn’t tie up a lot of cash.’

“Real estate is a bankable asset, so you can always leverage it. It also doesn’t tie up a lot of cash. You can put down as little as 10% and use banks’ money to grow your investment. With such low interest rates, that’s like free money. Unlike the stock market, where many factors are out of your control, your investment can’t disappear overnight. You can also build your wealth with excellent return rates and tax advantages. The only people who lose money in real estate are those who bought at the height of the market and sold at the wrong time or took too much equity out of their home, leaving no profit margin when they sold it. It often takes time to see big appreciations, but if you hold on to your investment, you will. —Dottie Herman, CEO of Douglas Elliman, a real estate brokerage empire with more than $27 billion in annual sales. Follow her on Facebook and Instagram

7. ‘Real estate offers unlimited options.’

“Real estate is always a great investment because you have more options than with other types of investments. If you invest in stocks, bonds, or a private offering, your success is completely dependent on factors outside of your control. At most, your options are to hold or sell. With real estate, you have unlimited options. You can buy a house with the intent of flipping it, then rent it if the market turns south. If you buy a rental that appreciates in value significantly, you can sell it. Real estate can be refinanced, rehabbed, and rezoned. You can develop it, lease it, subdivide it, or add parcels to it. These are just a few of your options. This flexibility is one of the reasons it has created more millionaires than any other asset class.” —Daniel Lesniak, founder of Orange Line Living, broker at the Keri Shull Team, co-founder of real estate coaching business HyperFast Agent, author of “The HyperLocal, HyperFast Real Estate Agent”

8. ‘People will always need a place to live.’

“There’s an opportunity for greater and more consistent returns with real estate than with other investments. When a property is built, it’s because a group of people see a population large enough to justify it. “The sheer number of new properties each year is a testament to the growing real estate market. Supply follows demand, and demand is continuing to rise. Populations almost never decrease, which is why the need for housing increases year over year. The market for multifamily apartments in particular is growing. As apartments become more attractive, people are less likely to buy houses. With multifamily apartments, you continue to generate increasing income over time. Once the property stabilizes, you can collect returns for your investors until you decide to sell. There’s also demand year-round wherever you go.” —Robert Martinez, founder and CEO of Rockstar Capital, a real estate investment firm with $335 million in assets under management and $71 million in investor capital, host of “The Apartment Rockstar” podcast. Follow him on YouTube and Instagram

9. ‘You can invest in land that produces income.’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, today, investment, buy, properties, tax, real, founder, sayheres, best, market, millionaires, money, estate, rent


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Ritual founder Katerina Schneider isn’t interested in resumes—here’s how she spots a good hire

Katerina Schneider’s resume is impressive. But if there’s one thing Schneider has learned while building her team as founder and CEO of Ritual, it’s that a resume isn’t the best way to determine a good hire. “I learned early on that I was hiring based on resume,” Schneider tells CNBC Make It. I’d say, ‘Oh, this person has an MBA and Ph.D. and works for this big company — that’s awesome! “I realized that some of the best people we’ve hired embody the same values as the early people in the company


Katerina Schneider’s resume is impressive. But if there’s one thing Schneider has learned while building her team as founder and CEO of Ritual, it’s that a resume isn’t the best way to determine a good hire. “I learned early on that I was hiring based on resume,” Schneider tells CNBC Make It. I’d say, ‘Oh, this person has an MBA and Ph.D. and works for this big company — that’s awesome! “I realized that some of the best people we’ve hired embody the same values as the early people in the company
Ritual founder Katerina Schneider isn’t interested in resumes—here’s how she spots a good hire Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, values, isnt, interested, good, learned, company, schneider, katerina, ritual, resumesheres, resume, founder, team, hire, schneiders, spots, think, thats, investment


Ritual founder Katerina Schneider isn't interested in resumes—here's how she spots a good hire

Katerina Schneider’s resume is impressive. She holds a degree in applied mathematics and economics from Brown University, started her career in investment banking with Lehman Brothers, led global digital innovation at Universal Music Group, and managed an active portfolio of over 70 investments at Troy Carter’s investment fund, including Dropbox, Warby Parker, Spotify, Uber and Lyft.

But if there’s one thing Schneider has learned while building her team as founder and CEO of Ritual, it’s that a resume isn’t the best way to determine a good hire.

In fact, she doesn’t think a resume is necessary at all to get hired at her wellness company. “I learned early on that I was hiring based on resume,” Schneider tells CNBC Make It. “I think that’s a mistake a lot of first-time founders often make. I’d say, ‘Oh, this person has an MBA and Ph.D. and works for this big company — that’s awesome! They’re probably great.’ And I got burned a couple of times doing that.”

These days, educational background and previous experience aren’t what catch Schneider’s eye in a potential hire. Instead, she looks for people who match the company values she established along with her team when they reached 50 employees.

“I realized that some of the best people we’ve hired embody the same values as the early people in the company,” Schneider says. Those core values include principles like embracing the no’s, getting gritty and making an impact.

Ritual was named one of LinkedIn’s top start-ups of the year, due to high interest among job seekers on the search platform, as well as the company’s ability to attract talent from other major companies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, values, isnt, interested, good, learned, company, schneider, katerina, ritual, resumesheres, resume, founder, team, hire, schneiders, spots, think, thats, investment


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Why this falafel business founder turned down $300,000 from Mark Cuban on ‘Shark Tank’

To be a startup founder in a make-or-break moment and turn down $300,000 from billionaire Mark Cuban means you are either deluded — or you have another, better offer. In the first episode of the show’s 11th season, the 43-year-old founder of TaDah Foods received investment offers from both Cuban and Daniel Lubetzky, founder the snack company Kind and a guest “shark” on the show. When Sorial entered the “tank,” he was looking for $300,000 in exchange for 10% ownership of his company. Lubetzky off


To be a startup founder in a make-or-break moment and turn down $300,000 from billionaire Mark Cuban means you are either deluded — or you have another, better offer. In the first episode of the show’s 11th season, the 43-year-old founder of TaDah Foods received investment offers from both Cuban and Daniel Lubetzky, founder the snack company Kind and a guest “shark” on the show. When Sorial entered the “tank,” he was looking for $300,000 in exchange for 10% ownership of his company. Lubetzky off
Why this falafel business founder turned down $300,000 from Mark Cuban on ‘Shark Tank’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hummus, mark, falafel, daniel, shark, business, tank, 300000, kind, million, think, sorial, tadah, founder, turned, cuban, lubetzky


Why this falafel business founder turned down $300,000 from Mark Cuban on 'Shark Tank'

To be a startup founder in a make-or-break moment and turn down $300,000 from billionaire Mark Cuban means you are either deluded — or you have another, better offer.

John Sorial found himself on the latter on Sunday’s episode of “Shark Tank.” In the first episode of the show’s 11th season, the 43-year-old founder of TaDah Foods received investment offers from both Cuban and Daniel Lubetzky, founder the snack company Kind and a guest “shark” on the show.

Sorial turned down Cuban and took Lubetzky’s offer instead.

“Choosing between Daniel and Mark was one of the most difficult decisions I’ve ever made, but Daniel is an icon in our industry,” Sorial said. “To have him in our corner — supporting us, not just financially, but working with us and helping us to grow TaDah — we hope to be a national brand. It’s just the best outcome I could have hoped for.”

TaDah makes and sells frozen falafel street wraps in four flavors — fresh lemon garlic hummus, sweet-spicy harissa and lebni, feta green pepper salsa and spicy brown sugar harissa hummus — and bite-size falafel poppers filled with either cucumber dill yogurt, lemony roasted garlic hummus or harissa hummus. The wraps retail for $3.99, and the poppers retail for $4.99.

Sorial, the son of Egyptian immigrants, was inspired by the food of his heritage. “The problem is my grandmother doesn’t ship nationwide,” he said on the show, which was taped in June.

With TaDah Foods, Sorial also hopes to help people around the world. According to the company website, more than 25% of profits go to organizations that are “actively engaged in social change.” One of those organizations is Meant 2 Live Foundation, which aims to fight poverty and homelessness.

Sorial graduated from Johns Hopkins University with a degree in chemical engineering in 1998, according to his LinkedIn profile. From there, he worked as a chemical engineer, and then as a marketing executive.

As of June, TaDah had done $8.2 million in sales. Annual sales had been as high as $2.3 million, but were down to $1 million in the 12 months prior to the June taping. That was because a partner in the production process “became financially insolvent,” Sorial explained to the judges.

During that time, they only had four people on the production floor; usually, the process requires “dozens of people,” according to Sorial. “I would stay all night with the staff. I would suit up and shovel the chickpeas myself,” he said.

At the same time, Sorial was “flying all over the country trying to source new co-packers.” The staff shortage problem has since been fixed, he said.

Lubetzky related to Sorial’s story. In his early years of building Kind, he also faced a production problem, and it almost forced the business to shut down.

“I lost about $1 million in sales because one of my manufacturers had changed the ingredient and we were this far away from closing,” Lubetzky said, using his finger and thumb to indicate how close Kind was to shutting down.

“It’s fascinating to me, when I think back — that we, Kind, grew out of one of the toughest years of my life, and out of that darkness came incredible light,” he continued. “Kind today sells in 300,000 stores, over $1 billion a year at retail.”

Sorial said he was deeply motivated by Lubetsky’s story. So much, in fact, that when describing his reason for working through trying times to keep the business alive, he began to cry.

“When you go to other parts of the world and see how people live, you realize that people are fighting for their lives,” Sorial said. “[Building TaDah] has been difficult, but I think about my family and the people who are struggling, and I want this to be a success because it will impact their lives.”

When Sorial entered the “tank,” he was looking for $300,000 in exchange for 10% ownership of his company. Lubetzky, inspired both by Sorial’s passion and product, said he was interested in investing, but didn’t think Sorial understood how much money he would need to get TaDah back on track.

Lubetzky offered Sorial $300,000 for a 20% stake, or $500,000 for 25%, and indicated that he would be open to extending Sorial a line of credit. Cuban jumped in and offered Sorial $300,000 for 20%, with another $500,000 line of credit.

In an effort to take both up on their offers, Sorial asked if “there is any way” to structure a deal with both Cuban and Lubetzky. But that wasn’t an option.

So Sorial, who said he felt “extremely blessed,” decided to take Lubetzky’s offer of $500,000 for 25% of the business.

In the months since the show was taped, Sorial said the partnership with Lubetzky has been beneficial for TaDah Foods.

“Daniel has been extremely hands-on in the best possible way, and the momentum has been building by leaps and bounds,” Sorial told CNBC Make It, through a Kind spokesperson.

“While I have a great deal of respect for Mark and think he would be a great partner, Daniel is a natural food icon, and he shares my passion for using business as an agent for change to improve people’s lives,” he added. “The fact that he’s also walked in my shoes and already experienced many similar challenges made it the right choice for me.”

Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to “Shark Tank.”

See also:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hummus, mark, falafel, daniel, shark, business, tank, 300000, kind, million, think, sorial, tadah, founder, turned, cuban, lubetzky


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Huawei CEO says it’s working on 6G — but the technology is still some 10 years off

Ren Zhengfei, founder and chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies, left, speaks during an interview at the company’s headquarters in Shenzhen, China, in January. Huawei has begun research on 6G — the successor to 5G mobile networks which are not yet widespread, according to its CEO Ren Zhengfei. 5G is the name of next-generation mobile networks that promises super-fast data speeds and the ability to underpin new technologies like driverless cars. These networks are slowly rolling out in p


Ren Zhengfei, founder and chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies, left, speaks during an interview at the company’s headquarters in Shenzhen, China, in January. Huawei has begun research on 6G — the successor to 5G mobile networks which are not yet widespread, according to its CEO Ren Zhengfei. 5G is the name of next-generation mobile networks that promises super-fast data speeds and the ability to underpin new technologies like driverless cars. These networks are slowly rolling out in p
Huawei CEO says it’s working on 6G — but the technology is still some 10 years off Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technologies, huawei, widespread, technology, ceo, founder, zhengfei5g, mobile, zhengfei, china, working, ren, networks


Huawei CEO says it's working on 6G — but the technology is still some 10 years off

Ren Zhengfei, founder and chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies, left, speaks during an interview at the company’s headquarters in Shenzhen, China, in January.

Huawei has begun research on 6G — the successor to 5G mobile networks which are not yet widespread, according to its CEO Ren Zhengfei.

5G is the name of next-generation mobile networks that promises super-fast data speeds and the ability to underpin new technologies like driverless cars. These networks are slowly rolling out in places such as South Korea, the U.K. and soon China. However, they are not yet available on a large scale.

However, Huawei’s founder Ren is already talking about 6G.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technologies, huawei, widespread, technology, ceo, founder, zhengfei5g, mobile, zhengfei, china, working, ren, networks


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