Amazon’s ant-size competition in designing the warehouse of the future

Attabotics’ system reduces warehouse space by 85% and requires just 20% of the workforce that traditional fulfillment centers need. The rapid growth of e-commerce has pushed Amazon and other businesses to speed up delivery by opening more, but smaller, fulfillment centers near major metropolitan areas. Growth of e-commerceThe growth of e-commerce has put enormous demands on warehouses and fulfillment centers. Attabotics system resembles a 3-D grid, evenly spaced like grid paper, that goes from f


Attabotics’ system reduces warehouse space by 85% and requires just 20% of the workforce that traditional fulfillment centers need.
The rapid growth of e-commerce has pushed Amazon and other businesses to speed up delivery by opening more, but smaller, fulfillment centers near major metropolitan areas.
Growth of e-commerceThe growth of e-commerce has put enormous demands on warehouses and fulfillment centers.
Attabotics system resembles a 3-D grid, evenly spaced like grid paper, that goes from f
Amazon’s ant-size competition in designing the warehouse of the future Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: ellen sheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, system, gravelle, amazons, space, centers, warehouse, designing, antsize, ventures, warehouses, items, competition, traditional, future, fulfillment, attabotics


Amazon's ant-size competition in designing the warehouse of the future

Attabotic

Scott Gravelle, the chief executive of Attabotics, a Calgary-based 3-D robotics supply chain maker, had an aha moment while watching a documentary about the interior structure of a fire ant colony. Gravelle, who has a background in manufacturing automation, had been grappling with how to reconfigure warehouse space when he saw researcher Walter Tschinkel pour aluminum into an ant colony and then excavate the structure. What he learned is that ants access their storage vertically. People, by contrast, are more two-dimensional. “We walk on the ground; we drive on the ground. In warehouses, we need rows and aisles because you have to act up and horizontally from the floor. Forklifts give you vertical access, but it’s still this horizontal distribution of goods,” he said. Inspired by what he saw the ants do, Gravelle and a team of engineers created a new system of storage that replaces rows and aisles of traditional fulfillment centers with a structure that maximizes horizontal and vertical space using robotic shuttles. Attabotics’ system reduces warehouse space by 85% and requires just 20% of the workforce that traditional fulfillment centers need. More from Upstart 100:

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Amazon has triggered an arms race in this technology

How railroads are keeping trains safe from hackers Attabotics — which made the — is part of a growing industry providing automation technology that allows companies to store and handle goods more efficiently. The rapid growth of e-commerce has pushed Amazon and other businesses to speed up delivery by opening more, but smaller, fulfillment centers near major metropolitan areas. Attabotics’ efficient footprint appeals to retailers and brands that are looking to place so-called micro fulfillment centers near expensive, high-density urban areas. The company has customers across North America, including a luxury retailer in Los Angeles and a medical supplies company in the Greater Toronto area.

Growth of e-commerce

The growth of e-commerce has put enormous demands on warehouses and fulfillment centers. E-commerce orders are typically made up of a random assortment of individual items. Consumers can easily compare prices before placing an order and then expect the items on their doorstep within a few days. All these shifts are forcing change in the traditional retail supply chain. “People aren’t buying a lot of one thing but a collection of things. You have to have systems that can pull all those items together and then ship them to somebody in a small window. Today’s warehouse automation systems aren’t set up to do that,” said Murray Grainger, managing director and head of Honeywell Ventures. Honeywell Ventures, along with Coatue Management, Comcast Ventures, Forerunner Ventures and Werklund Growth Fund, invested $25 million in Attabotics earlier this year.

“E-commerce providers have moved the goal post as far as getting products to customers. They’ve invested a lot in robots,” said Rian Whitton, senior analyst at ABI Research. ABI forecasts 4 million commercial robots will be installed in 50,000 warehouses by 2025, up from 4,000 warehouses using robots in 2018. Attabotics system resembles a 3-D grid, evenly spaced like grid paper, that goes from floor to ceiling. Each square space can hold a plastic tote that is 2 ft x 2 ft and then either 4 in., 10 in. or 16 in. high. The fixed size is intentional and designed to hold individual items — a piece of clothing, a single cosmetic, some tennis balls. Gravelle says the bins can hold 99.8% of items that are sold online. Robotic shuttles then move the totes up, down and across to deliver them to stations located at the perimeter of the structure. One out of every five spaces is left empty so goods can move in and out. In addition to being smaller, the system is also much faster than traditional fulfillment centers, which center around conveyor belts. Traditional fulfillment systems can take about 60 to 90 minutes to collate and package an order, but Gravelle says Attabotics’ system can finish a job in 60 to 90 seconds. Automation in warehouses is needed not only to meet the demands of e-commerce but to create growth. “For a lot of companies, any form of economic growth means doing more with less. People only get fired if output stays the same. The hope is that output increases with productivity,” Whitton said.

Attabotics is operating in a fast-growing logistics market, full of third-party logistics providers that help companies compete against the likes of Amazon. There are also numerous robotics companies in the space, offering varied solutions from automated forklifts to shelf picking robots that can take objects off shelves and put them in bins. Attabotics’ system stands out as unique in this space, said Whitton, but it’s still early days and he expects the company will be targeting third-party logistics providers or retailers — any company that can afford Attabotics’ very large pieces of machinery. Attabotics’ system costs more than most average storage and retrieval systems, but says it costs less when considering the total suite of functions, which include sequencing, circulation, buffering, and conveyance. “If you compare us to all that functionality, there are dramatically less capital costs than those other solutions combined,” he said. Gravelle also emphasized the flexibility of the system, which can be scaled up or down depending on the size of the company. “Our goal is to create a platform that enables retailers of any size to be competitive,” he said. Honeywell Venture’s Grainger emphasizes that companies need to weigh the cost of the system with other factors, such as the cost of real estate and transport. Warehouses are traditionally very large buildings but Attabotics can maximize a smaller footprint in an expensive urban area. “If you think about where most of the population is, it’s in urban centers where they don’t have big distribution center space. It’s a trade-off between having a huge distribution center way outside an urban area that ships everything to where the people are or a smaller distribution center that’s closer. That’s the way to think about the total cost. It’s quite efficient and actually cheap in that context,” Grainger said.

Expanding the ant colony


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: ellen sheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, system, gravelle, amazons, space, centers, warehouse, designing, antsize, ventures, warehouses, items, competition, traditional, future, fulfillment, attabotics


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Here’s how Amazon employees get health care through a new app — a glimpse of the future of medicine

Amazon has now launched its Amazon Care app into major app stores as part of its strategy to help its Seattle-area employees get more convenient and affordable health care. Amazon Care, which CNBC uncovered this fall, has been in the works for a few years. What it’s like to use Amazon CareTo get started with Amazon Care, users need a Amazon corporate alias and must be based in the Seattle area. Amazon employees are told they can get health care on callAccording to screenshots shared with CNBC, A


Amazon has now launched its Amazon Care app into major app stores as part of its strategy to help its Seattle-area employees get more convenient and affordable health care.
Amazon Care, which CNBC uncovered this fall, has been in the works for a few years.
What it’s like to use Amazon CareTo get started with Amazon Care, users need a Amazon corporate alias and must be based in the Seattle area.
Amazon employees are told they can get health care on callAccording to screenshots shared with CNBC, A
Here’s how Amazon employees get health care through a new app — a glimpse of the future of medicine Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, app, company, information, medicine, care, future, glimpse, medical, service, amazon, theyre, employees, health, heres


Here's how Amazon employees get health care through a new app — a glimpse of the future of medicine

Amazon Care is a pilot medical clinic for employees.

Amazon has now launched its Amazon Care app into major app stores as part of its strategy to help its Seattle-area employees get more convenient and affordable health care. Amazon Care, which CNBC uncovered this fall, has been in the works for a few years. A website — Amazon.care — is live, and the company recently released apps that offer health advice, virtual medical visits and in-person support via a health professional that shows up at an employee’s home or office. Some giant companies like Amazon are moving into primary care to clamp down on rising health care costs, hoping it can help avoid costly emergency visits by catching health problems earlier. The program could also help Amazon recruit and retain talent, as many companies will offer telemedicine apps but few — with the notable exception of Apple — put their own spin on the service. In addition, Amazon has hired a mix of technical, product and analytics talent, not just clinicians, suggesting that that Amazon could use the service to collect and analyze health data about a large population, which could be useful as it pushes deeper into the $3.5 trillion health care space. A company spokesperson did not have any further information to share about the Amazon Care apps, but an insider walked us through what it’s like to use them.

What it’s like to use Amazon Care

To get started with Amazon Care, users need a Amazon corporate alias and must be based in the Seattle area. The program is not currently available to employees working in Amazon’s fulfillment centers, but may expand over time. Employees download the Care app and sign up with their Amazon login credentials. They’re then asked to agree to allow Amazon’s health and welfare plan “for the use and disclosure of protected health information.” That might include their employee email, name, date of birth, and so on. Amazon then indicates that it contracts with a third party medical group called Oasis Medical, which is a separate legal entity from the parent company. “Neither the plan nor Oasis will receive financial or in-kind compensation or remuneration in exchange for using or disclosing the PHI (personal health information) as described above,” a disclosure form notes. This is meant to reassure Amazon employees that their health information won’t be sold.

A step to enroll in the Amazon Care app

Amazon then guides the user to indicate whether they are the primary insurance holder or a dependent with an invitation code, and informs them that anyone over the age of 18 must have an Amazon account, indicating that Amazon Care may be linked to Amazon’s other services. Next up, the app lets them know about all the ways they can use Amazon Care instead of an in-person clinic. Similarly to the website, Amazon Care bills its service as “healthcare built around you,” with “no more waiting rooms.” It is also marketed as a “first stop for healthcare” for employees, who can use it for services ranging from minor colds to sexual health services, like contraception.

Amazon employees are told they can get health care on call

According to screenshots shared with CNBC, Amazon employees trying the service out get a welcome kit including a mobile phone holder and digital thermometer. From there, they’re asked whether they would prefer a free chat with a nurse via messenger (“CareChat”) or a video chat (“VideoCare”) with a medical provider. An employee might share that they’re feeling unwell, and a provider would follow up within minutes to ask a set of questions and figure out whether the patient needs to be seen in person. If so, a practicioner will be dispatched, and a map in the app shows their location and estimated arrival time. Amazon employees can also set up a profile with their payment methods, care history and their dependents. Their care summary will include a potential diagnosis, with notes from the doctor and the treatment plan. So far, the company has received dozens of positive ratings and reviews, implying that employees are happy about the quality of care and the convenience. There are also some survey questions about the quality of the experience, suggesting that Amazon is actively collecting feedback.

Amazon Care is billed as a first stop for health care CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, app, company, information, medicine, care, future, glimpse, medical, service, amazon, theyre, employees, health, heres


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Warming climate, population sprawl threaten California’s future with more destructive wildfires

Wildfires have gotten bigger and more destructive in the Golden State, with 10 of California’s most destructive fires occurring in the past decade alone. California’s Mediterranean climate keeps forests without rainfall for months at a time, which leads to a drying out of vegetation. According to the Fourth National Climate Assessment, climate change has doubled the area of forest burned in the western United States between 1984 to 2015. That population swell has leaked out of the urban confines


Wildfires have gotten bigger and more destructive in the Golden State, with 10 of California’s most destructive fires occurring in the past decade alone.
California’s Mediterranean climate keeps forests without rainfall for months at a time, which leads to a drying out of vegetation.
According to the Fourth National Climate Assessment, climate change has doubled the area of forest burned in the western United States between 1984 to 2015.
That population swell has leaked out of the urban confines
Warming climate, population sprawl threaten California’s future with more destructive wildfires Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: john w schoen jordan mcdonald, john w schoen, jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, dry, wildfires, acres, population, threaten, californias, thousands, forest, climate, california, destructive, sprawl, fires, warming


Warming climate, population sprawl threaten California's future with more destructive wildfires

A firefighter calls for water as a mobile home park burns in the Sylmar Fire in Sylmar, California. David McNew | Getty Images News | Getty Images

A recent spate of devastating wildfires has rocked California, causing billions of dollars of property damage, burning hundreds of thousands of acres, and displacing thousands from their communities. Wildfires have gotten bigger and more destructive in the Golden State, with 10 of California’s most destructive fires occurring in the past decade alone. Recent blazes like the Getty, Kincaide and Saddle Ridge fires may be under control now, but as conditions continue to dry due to a heating climate, California’s future is under threat from even more disastrous fires.

Dry Climates and Wild Fires

Wildfires are not a new phenomenon to the California ecosystem, which has tracked wildfire data since the early 1900s. Native Americans used to burn forests to maintain forest health. California’s Mediterranean climate keeps forests without rainfall for months at a time, which leads to a drying out of vegetation. Droughts are commonplace, with the state finally getting relief from a seven year drought earlier this year. Dry summers lead to wet winters, but the interval between the two becomes the prime season for wildfires. With temperatures warming due to climate change, vegetation is drier for longer periods than in years past. A heavy accumulation of “fuel,” the low shrubs, dry grass, and young trees that act as a ladder between the forest floor and large canopy overhead, become tinder when wildfire season comes in the fall. In combination with hot, dry, 60 to 70 mph Santa Ana and Diablo winds traveling from the east, this fuel creates the apocalyptic fires that swallow communities and forests whole. “These are not really best described as wildfires. Most people describe them as fire storms,” says Jon Keeley, a research scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey. “It is not something that firefighters have much chance of putting out until the wind dies down.” According to the Fourth National Climate Assessment, climate change has doubled the area of forest burned in the western United States between 1984 to 2015. In some cases, these firestorms can burn 10,000 acres worth of forest within an hour. Storms of that intensity are practically impossible for firefighters to contain, often leaving them with no choice but to let the fire run its course as officials concentrate on getting anyone in danger out of the way. However, climate change is just part of the reason wildfires have become a bigger threat. A growing population, spread out into forested regions largely uninhabited until recently, is placing people and nature more at risk of being burned.

A Growing Population

California is the most populous state in the nation, with over 39 million. The population has swelled in the past century, with 1 in 8 Americans calling California home. That population swell has leaked out of the urban confines along the coast and into California’s forest regions further inland. As communities encroach on historically uninhabited wildlands, the line between nature and society blurs. In the case of California, it means that people are increasingly finding themselves in fire prone areas. Estimates suggest that at least 25% of California’s residents, or 11 million people, live in fire prone areas. “Population growth is making (wildfires) more deadly but it’s also making them more likely,” says Keeley. “The more people on the landscape means more opportunity for a fire during one of these wind events.” Fires can burn hundreds of thousands of acres under the right conditions, but every fire needs a spark. 95% of California’s wildfires are caused by humans, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. These fires don’t need to be started with malicious intent, such as arson. Fires can be caused by much more innocuous events, like a discarded cigarette butt, a lawnmower riding over a big rock, or a spark from a car. Recent wildfires, such as the Kincaide fire in Sonoma County that burned over 77,000 acres, are often caused by downed power lines that land on trees and spark a blaze.

Preventative Measures


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: john w schoen jordan mcdonald, john w schoen, jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, dry, wildfires, acres, population, threaten, californias, thousands, forest, climate, california, destructive, sprawl, fires, warming


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Disney’s ESPN is caught in strategic limbo as the company moves slowly toward streaming

At the same time, Disney is betting its future on Disney+, its $6.99-a-month family-oriented streaming service, which goes live on Nov. 12. Disney has a separate sports streaming product, the nascent $4.99-per-month ESPN+, which has some live sports, including UFC, but airs zero NBA or NFL games. But it’s an non-factor for Disney+, the product by which investors will judge Bob Iger’s company going forward. And that means fewer ESPN subscribers. One plan to boost ESPN+ while keeping ESPN steady m


At the same time, Disney is betting its future on Disney+, its $6.99-a-month family-oriented streaming service, which goes live on Nov. 12.
Disney has a separate sports streaming product, the nascent $4.99-per-month ESPN+, which has some live sports, including UFC, but airs zero NBA or NFL games.
But it’s an non-factor for Disney+, the product by which investors will judge Bob Iger’s company going forward.
And that means fewer ESPN subscribers.
One plan to boost ESPN+ while keeping ESPN steady m
Disney’s ESPN is caught in strategic limbo as the company moves slowly toward streaming Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: alex sherman jabari young, alex sherman, jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slowly, caught, future, subscribers, disneys, strategic, live, moves, espns, espn, company, disney, ticket, product, limbo, rights, according, streaming


Disney's ESPN is caught in strategic limbo as the company moves slowly toward streaming

Quarterback Tom Brady #12 of the New England Patriots looks to pass against the Baltimore Ravens during the first quarter at M&T Bank Stadium on November 3, 2019 in Baltimore, Maryland.

The future of Disney is streaming, and the past is linear cable television. But the present is a weird mix of the two.

Disney’s high-profile asset ESPN is awkwardly caught in the middle.

The Disney-owned sports network has been a profit engine for decades, earning billions of dollars each year from advertising and cable affiliate fees. At the same time, Disney is betting its future on Disney+, its $6.99-a-month family-oriented streaming service, which goes live on Nov. 12. It will include a nearly full library of old Disney and Pixar movies, “Star Wars” and Marvel films, original programming, library episodes of shows like “The Simpsons” and quite a bit more.

What consumers won’t find in Disney+ is sports.

Disney has a separate sports streaming product, the nascent $4.99-per-month ESPN+, which has some live sports, including UFC, but airs zero NBA or NFL games. ESPN+ has only 2.4 million subscribers after launching in April 2018. By way of comparison, Disney+ will probably have about 2 million subscribers after just one day on the market, according to LightShed analyst Rich Greenfield (in part because Verizon wireless subscribers will get a year of Disney+ for free).

The result puts Disney in a bit of a dilemma when it comes to ESPN. The sports network is an economic juggernaut that generates about $10.3 billion in annual revenue, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence. But it’s an non-factor for Disney+, the product by which investors will judge Bob Iger’s company going forward.

Iger’s plan seems to be to thread the needle, preparing for a day when ESPN+ is a stronger product with popular sports rights, while not rocking the boat on ESPN’s value for the next few years. He’s basically been forced into this strategy, as rights for nearly every major U.S. sports league are tied up until 2021 or 2022. It’s also a good strategy: ESPN continues to be able to raise affiliate fees and advertising rates as it becomes more and more essential to the cable bundle with its event-driven live programming. Nevertheless, UBS estimates more than 12 million American households will ditch traditional pay-TV by the end of next year. And that means fewer ESPN subscribers.

One plan to boost ESPN+ while keeping ESPN steady may involve the NFL Sunday Ticket, which shows every out-of-market NFL game each Sunday. Several Disney executives covet Sunday Ticket and would like to own the rights to it, bundling it with ESPN+, according to people familiar with the matter. This could happen in 2022 if Sunday Ticket ends its deal with AT&T’s DirecTV, which currently charges more than $300 for the annual product to help offset the cost — about $1.5 billion per year for 8 years.

Meanwhile, Disney is juggling two opposing viewpoints internally about ESPN’s future as a linear TV network, according to people familiar with the matter. The first camp, which includes longtime TV executive Norby Williamson, favors focusing on sports highlights — a “back to the future” play centered around “SportsCenter.” The second, which includes executive producer Erik Rydholm, believes riskier and edgier shows are necessary to draw younger and more diverse audiences.

Complicating the scene further, a slew of new entrants could bid for live sports rights in the coming years, including Amazon, Google and Apple. This would give the leagues more choice in terms of potential partners, which could heighten ESPN’s aversion to say anything about controversial topics like China’s relationship with the NBA, the NFL’s problems addressing concussions or political issues such as Colin Kaepernick’s kneeling during the National Anthem. “SportsCenter” may be ESPN’s most non-controversial programming.

Disney reports its fourth-quarter earnings after Thursday’s market close. Analysts estimate the company will generate revenue of about $19 billion for the quarter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: alex sherman jabari young, alex sherman, jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slowly, caught, future, subscribers, disneys, strategic, live, moves, espns, espn, company, disney, ticket, product, limbo, rights, according, streaming


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CEO says Boeing will be quicker to ground planes in the event of future crashes

Boeing’s embattled CEO expressed regret Wednesday over not grounding its 737 Max planes after the first deadly crash a year ago and said the company would more readily ground planes in the event of future problems. When asked whether the company would change its approach if something similar occurred on its planes, Muilenburg replied: “I think you’re going to see us lean even heavier in that direction. A Lion Air 737 Max crashed in Indonesia in October 2018, killing all 189 people aboard. Five m


Boeing’s embattled CEO expressed regret Wednesday over not grounding its 737 Max planes after the first deadly crash a year ago and said the company would more readily ground planes in the event of future problems.
When asked whether the company would change its approach if something similar occurred on its planes, Muilenburg replied: “I think you’re going to see us lean even heavier in that direction.
A Lion Air 737 Max crashed in Indonesia in October 2018, killing all 189 people aboard.
Five m
CEO says Boeing will be quicker to ground planes in the event of future crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: leslie josephs thomas franck, leslie josephs, thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ground, yorkwhen, ceo, going, muilenburg, grounded, event, killing, boeing, max, company, crashes, youre, future, planes, 737, quicker


CEO says Boeing will be quicker to ground planes in the event of future crashes

Boeing’s embattled CEO expressed regret Wednesday over not grounding its 737 Max planes after the first deadly crash a year ago and said the company would more readily ground planes in the event of future problems.

“If we knew everything back then that we know now, we would have grounded the airplanes after the first accident,” Dennis Muilenburg said at The New York Times DealBook conference in New York.

When asked whether the company would change its approach if something similar occurred on its planes, Muilenburg replied: “I think you’re going to see us lean even heavier in that direction. We’re always going to be a company that’s going to look at the data behind what occurs and make good, solid decisions.”

A Lion Air 737 Max crashed in Indonesia in October 2018, killing all 189 people aboard. Five months later, an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max went down in Ethiopia, killing all 157 people on the plane. All 737 Maxes have been grounded since then as Boeing works to redesign a flight-control system blamed in the crashes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: leslie josephs thomas franck, leslie josephs, thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ground, yorkwhen, ceo, going, muilenburg, grounded, event, killing, boeing, max, company, crashes, youre, future, planes, 737, quicker


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How nuclear power will drive our energy future

Think of nuclear power and you may imagine the worst — atomic bombs, reactors melting down and radioactive waste. But while its history is checkered, nuclear energy mostly operates out of sight, generating about 10% of the world’s total electricity and 29% of the world’s low-carbon power. Nuclear reactors generate energy day and night, and produce no greenhouse gasses. That’s because nuclear power plants are expensive to build, construction often takes longer than expected and public opposition


Think of nuclear power and you may imagine the worst — atomic bombs, reactors melting down and radioactive waste.
But while its history is checkered, nuclear energy mostly operates out of sight, generating about 10% of the world’s total electricity and 29% of the world’s low-carbon power.
Nuclear reactors generate energy day and night, and produce no greenhouse gasses.
That’s because nuclear power plants are expensive to build, construction often takes longer than expected and public opposition
How nuclear power will drive our energy future Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-02  Authors: katie brigham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reactors, energy, power, waste, fusion, drive, lowcarbon, worst, nuclear, worlds, wind, future


How nuclear power will drive our energy future

Think of nuclear power and you may imagine the worst — atomic bombs, reactors melting down and radioactive waste. But while its history is checkered, nuclear energy mostly operates out of sight, generating about 10% of the world’s total electricity and 29% of the world’s low-carbon power.

Nuclear reactors generate energy day and night, and produce no greenhouse gasses. Still, the growth of nuclear is slowing in comparison to other low-carbon sources like wind and solar.

That’s because nuclear power plants are expensive to build, construction often takes longer than expected and public opposition is strong.

For nuclear power to be effective in the future, one key lies in upgrading technology, designing safer and more efficient fission reactors with the support of philanthropists like Bill Gates.

Government labs, private investors, and intergovernmental organizations are also devoting vast resources to what many consider the holy grail of energy — nuclear fusion. Fusion is the process that powers our sun and every other star in the universe. And if we figure out how to harness that power here on earth, it would be a game changer.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-02  Authors: katie brigham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reactors, energy, power, waste, fusion, drive, lowcarbon, worst, nuclear, worlds, wind, future


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Nuclear fission and fusion could be integral to a carbon-free future

How nuclear power will drive our energy futureNuclear power has a controversial history, but many energy experts say it will play a major role in our energy future. Some in the industry are working to make standard fission power safer and cheaper. Others are pursuing the holy grail of energy — nuclear fusion. Fusion is the process that powers the sun and the stars, and if we figure out how to harness that power here on earth, it would be a game changer.


How nuclear power will drive our energy futureNuclear power has a controversial history, but many energy experts say it will play a major role in our energy future.
Some in the industry are working to make standard fission power safer and cheaper.
Others are pursuing the holy grail of energy — nuclear fusion.
Fusion is the process that powers the sun and the stars, and if we figure out how to harness that power here on earth, it would be a game changer.
Nuclear fission and fusion could be integral to a carbon-free future Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, working, carbonfree, fission, power, say, safer, standard, fusion, stars, future, integral, energy, nuclear, role


Nuclear fission and fusion could be integral to a carbon-free future

How nuclear power will drive our energy future

Nuclear power has a controversial history, but many energy experts say it will play a major role in our energy future. Some in the industry are working to make standard fission power safer and cheaper. Others are pursuing the holy grail of energy — nuclear fusion. Fusion is the process that powers the sun and the stars, and if we figure out how to harness that power here on earth, it would be a game changer.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, working, carbonfree, fission, power, say, safer, standard, fusion, stars, future, integral, energy, nuclear, role


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Volkswagen faces a careful ‘balancing act’ to reach its electric future

Volkswagen’s top finance executive has underlined how important it is for the automaker to carefully transition to electric vehicles while not hurting its ability to make money. “We gave guidance for 2020 and 2025, it is a balancing act with more electric vehicles coming to market and the different level of profitability,” he told CNBC. But in May, Witter said that electric vehicles would “put substantial pressure on the overall group margin,” according to Reuters. That facility is currently und


Volkswagen’s top finance executive has underlined how important it is for the automaker to carefully transition to electric vehicles while not hurting its ability to make money.
“We gave guidance for 2020 and 2025, it is a balancing act with more electric vehicles coming to market and the different level of profitability,” he told CNBC.
But in May, Witter said that electric vehicles would “put substantial pressure on the overall group margin,” according to Reuters.
That facility is currently und
Volkswagen faces a careful ‘balancing act’ to reach its electric future Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zwickau, volkswagen, act, witter, vehicles, billion, electrification, product, careful, vehicle, electric, market, faces, reach, future, balancing


Volkswagen faces a careful 'balancing act' to reach its electric future

Volkswagen’s top finance executive has underlined how important it is for the automaker to carefully transition to electric vehicles while not hurting its ability to make money.

In an interview with CNBC’s Carolin Roth on Wednesday, Chief Financial Officer Frank Witter was asked how the firm would offset the negative impact that its shift to electrification might have on its targets for profit margins.

“We gave guidance for 2020 and 2025, it is a balancing act with more electric vehicles coming to market and the different level of profitability,” he told CNBC.

“We have efficiency programs for all brands and everybody is committed to deliver on it, but what’s key is that the product is appealing.”

The German carmaker is planning to launch “almost 70 new electric models” by the year 2028. In March, it said it would spend over 30 billion euros ($33.46 billion) on the electrification of its vehicle portfolio by 2023. But in May, Witter said that electric vehicles would “put substantial pressure on the overall group margin,” according to Reuters.

In his interview with CNBC this week, Witter also acknowledged that electric vehicles were “not for everybody in the first instance.”

“We also offer hybrids for those who don’t want to go the whole nine yards on electrification, but (the) product will make a difference and we feel very strongly about those products we are bringing to market,” he added.

Witter’s comments come as Volkswagen gets ready to start series production of the ID.3, an all-electric vehicle, at its Zwickau plant next week.

That facility is currently undergoing a conversion from being a 100% internal combustion engine factory to one that produces only electric vehicles. According to Volkswagen, from 2021 Zwickau will have the capacity to produce 330,000 all-electric vehicles annually.

Volkswagen is one of many major automobile firms making plays in the electric vehicle sector.

The Hyundai Motor Group recently said it would launch 23 battery electric vehicles over the next few years, while Volvo Cars wants 50% of the cars it sells to be fully electric by 2025.

On the topic of infrastructure for electric vehicles, Witter admitted that things were “not yet perfect,” going on to add that both government and industry were “all committed to improve the situation.” He went on to state that “charging infrastructure will improve over time, there is no doubt.”

On Wednesday, Volkswagen said that sales revenue between January and September hit 186.6 billion euros, a 6.9% increase year-on-year.

It added that vehicle markets in “many regions of the world” were expected to “contract faster than previously anticipated.” Deliveries to customers for 2019 are now expected to “be on a level” with 2018, despite previous expectations for a moderate increase.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zwickau, volkswagen, act, witter, vehicles, billion, electrification, product, careful, vehicle, electric, market, faces, reach, future, balancing


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Grocery stores are no longer the future for some consumer goods brands, says new VC founder

Getting mass distribution on the shelves of huge retailers may not be the best way forward for new consumer-goods brands, according to the co-founder of a new venture capital (VC) business The Craftory. Elio Leoni Sceti, a former Reckitt Benckiser and Procter & Gamble executive, founded the company in May 2018, and its website describes it as “counter-corporate and anti-traditional VC,” with a focus on cause-driven consumer goods. And the reason is very simple, which is that in consumer goods, t


Getting mass distribution on the shelves of huge retailers may not be the best way forward for new consumer-goods brands, according to the co-founder of a new venture capital (VC) business The Craftory.
Elio Leoni Sceti, a former Reckitt Benckiser and Procter & Gamble executive, founded the company in May 2018, and its website describes it as “counter-corporate and anti-traditional VC,” with a focus on cause-driven consumer goods.
And the reason is very simple, which is that in consumer goods, t
Grocery stores are no longer the future for some consumer goods brands, says new VC founder Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, founder, large, brands, sceti, grow, mass, consumer, shelf, future, website, leoni, stores, grocery, goods, longer, retailers


Grocery stores are no longer the future for some consumer goods brands, says new VC founder

Getting mass distribution on the shelves of huge retailers may not be the best way forward for new consumer-goods brands, according to the co-founder of a new venture capital (VC) business The Craftory.

Elio Leoni Sceti, a former Reckitt Benckiser and Procter & Gamble executive, founded the company in May 2018, and its website describes it as “counter-corporate and anti-traditional VC,” with a focus on cause-driven consumer goods.

It invests in “challenger” companies that have at least $10 million in sales, aiming to grow them to $100 million-plus, but Leoni Sceti advises against doing deals with large retailers, for fear of compromising their standards, being pushed to reduce their selling prices, or being squashed by brands owned by the large consumer-goods companies.

“We think that the moment that somebody wants to go on (the) Tesco shelf (for example), very often is the beginning of the end. And the reason is very simple, which is that in consumer goods, the big guys, the big companies are setting the agenda of what’s on shelf,” Leoni Sceti told CNBC last week.

If a smaller brand that uses ingredients that are in limited supply gets a listing at a large store, for example, it may have to cut back or replace that ingredient to be able to compete on price, he said. Writing on The Craftory’s website, co-founder Ernesto Schmitt stated: “It’s hard to be the champion of healthy nutrition when you’re one bottle facing against 75 Coca-Colas on the shelf, whereas you can stand free and bold, noteworthy all because of yourself, online.”

Smaller, new brands are “cool because I know about it and you don’t,” Leoni Sceti said. “Then you spend money (on distribution in mass retail), you grow it, and then it loses his cool. So, it’s a vicious cycle,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, founder, large, brands, sceti, grow, mass, consumer, shelf, future, website, leoni, stores, grocery, goods, longer, retailers


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Saudi Arabia’s Sabic plots a course for its future after Aramco’s planned IPO

“I am very optimistic,” Sabic Vice Chairman and CEO, Yousef Al Benyan, told a small roundtable of reporters at its headquarters in Riyadh on Sunday. “We don’t use the word integration,” Al Benyan said. “There are some misconceptions around the relationship in the future between Aramco and Sabic, but Sabic will remain a publicly-listed company,” he added. “I’m not worried about how Sabic is going to operate in the future,” Al Benyan added. The successful IPO of Aramco is seen as critical for Saud


“I am very optimistic,” Sabic Vice Chairman and CEO, Yousef Al Benyan, told a small roundtable of reporters at its headquarters in Riyadh on Sunday.
“We don’t use the word integration,” Al Benyan said.
“There are some misconceptions around the relationship in the future between Aramco and Sabic, but Sabic will remain a publicly-listed company,” he added.
“I’m not worried about how Sabic is going to operate in the future,” Al Benyan added.
The successful IPO of Aramco is seen as critical for Saud
Saudi Arabia’s Sabic plots a course for its future after Aramco’s planned IPO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: dan murphy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arabias, aramco, benyan, future, aramcos, ipo, kingdom, going, saudi, course, company, planned, sabic, plots


Saudi Arabia's Sabic plots a course for its future after Aramco's planned IPO

The Kingdom Tower, operated by Kingdom Holding, left, stands alongside the King Fahd highway, illuminated by the light trails of passing traffic, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016. Waseem Obaidi | Bloomberg | Getty Images

RIYADH — A high-level committee of Saudi Basic Industry Corporation (Sabic) executives are working on a post-Aramco IPO (initial public offering) strategy, including possible acquisitions, as the kingdom puts the final touches on the critical stock market offering. “I am very optimistic,” Sabic Vice Chairman and CEO, Yousef Al Benyan, told a small roundtable of reporters at its headquarters in Riyadh on Sunday. “If Aramco becomes 70% shareholder of the company and Sabic becomes the chemical arm of Aramco and the kingdom, this is going to push the company out in front,” he said. Sabic, the world’s third-largest chemical company with 33,000 employees in 50 countries, is looking to boost its own transparency, find synergies and drive growth after the Aramco IPO. In a series of closed room briefings at its headquarters, senior executives — including the firm’s corporate finance and petrochemicals boss — worked to clarify the future structure for the business once Aramco goes live. “We don’t use the word integration,” Al Benyan said. “There are some misconceptions around the relationship in the future between Aramco and Sabic, but Sabic will remain a publicly-listed company,” he added.

Antitrust review

Aramco agreed to buy a 70% stake in Sabic from Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund (PIF) in March for $69.1 billion, providing a major cash injection for the PIF and a potential boost for Aramco’s downstream operations if the two were to combine. The share purchase remains subject to various closing conditions and regulatory approvals. The deal between the three entities was seen as moving money from one pocket of the Saudi state to another, given the government will remain their ultimate owner.

“We will be negotiating with Aramco on which of their assets will be acquired by Sabic,” Al Benyan said, suggesting instead there will be a clear division between the chemical operations of Saudi Arabia’s two largest companies. “We have not been able to identify them at this point because we have no access to them, and we are going through the antitrust right now,” he added. “As soon as the antitrust is completed, we need to sit down together and create a synergy committee that is going to drive the value between both companies,” he said, saying the review should be completed no later than the first quarter of 2020. “I’m not worried about how Sabic is going to operate in the future,” Al Benyan added. The successful IPO of Aramco is seen as critical for Saudi Arabia’s economy and society. However, progress has slowed in recent months with international investors questioning its touted $2 trillion valuation.

Africa investment


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: dan murphy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arabias, aramco, benyan, future, aramcos, ipo, kingdom, going, saudi, course, company, planned, sabic, plots


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