If you are a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian

While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app. High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free. The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. While users


While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app. High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free. The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. While users
If you are a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, source, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, course, valyrian, thrones, speak, peterson, game, teach, created, develop, app, high, feinberg, fan, duolingo, language, languages


If you are a 'Game of Thrones' fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian

“Skorverdon zaldrīzoti Daenerys ēza?”

Translation: How many dragons does Daenerys have? It’s not a ridiculous question if you’re a fan of the HBO hit series “Game of Thrones,” which returns for its eighth and final season on Sunday. The language? It’s called High Valyrian, the tongue of the ruined Valyrian Freehold empire, and it’s one of four languages created by linguist David J. Peterson spoken on the show.

While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app.

Duolingo first offered lessons in High Valyrian in 2017 and, since then, 1.2 million people have started the course. In the last two weeks leading up to the premier of the final season, Duolingo has seen a near 65% increase in people taking the course, said Sam Dalsimer, a spokesman for Duolingo.

High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. Star Trek fans can find Klingon, a language constructed by Marc Okrand and centered around spacecraft, warfare and weaponry.

To offer languages on Duolingo, the company usually relies on hundreds of volunteers and employees to develop course material and monitor users’ experiences. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free.

“We teach over 30 languages and most have thousands of people who speak them and are capable of helping us teach them.” Dalsimer said. “There’s only one person on planet Earth who knows the language, and that’s David Peterson.”

The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. Martin. Peterson won a contest to develop the more common language used on “Game of Thrones” called Dothraki but was asked to build High Valyrian later in the series. His goal was to create a classic language that could give birth to many others, similar to Romance languages, and Peterson noted it had to fit with the names Martin created for the book, such as Daenerys, Viserys and Rhaella.

There are now 824 words of High Valyrian that users can learn on Duolingo, and that number continues to grow. Peterson said there are now 2,000 words in the full version of the language he maintains.

“With every single language I create I keep working on it for the rest of my life or until I’m not happy with it,” said Peterson, who has created more than 50 languages. “It will basically just be another one of my languages, it’s not like it’s going to get any special treatment.”

When Peterson first encountered Duolingo, he felt it could revolutionize the way people learned languages. It had a great interface, it was free and, as a linguist, it’s the dream for people like him to create languages people would have access to, although he didn’t foresee how popular High Valyrian would become.

Today, High Valyrian has 822,000 active learners, or those who have used the course in the last 12 months. That’s more than Czech, Norwegian, Vietnamese and Hungarian.

“I imagined it would attract casual interest, but I never imagined there would be that many people who would actually be interested in taking the course,” Peterson said.

There is one statistic Peterson is particularly proud of: 44% of users who came to Duolingo to learn High Valyrian went on to practice other languages. While users may not perfect High Valyrian, Peterson sees the language as a “gateway drug” to learners discovering other cultures.

“As we become more economically focused, people view language as a tool as opposed to an art piece in and of itself or cultural history,” Peterson said.

More than 40% of the world speaks one of eight languages, although there are more than 7,000 worldwide. UNESCO, The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, has labeled 2,680 languages in danger as it celebrates the International Year of Indigenous Languages, designed to raise awareness to disappearing languages.

“It’s nice that the UN is putting this emphasis on indigenous languages because people need to start addressing this issue,” Peterson said. “We’re losing them and we’re losing them quickly, and once they’re lost, they’re lost.”

Duolingo has worked with communities and volunteers like Peterson to develop courses in endangered languages, such as offering lessons in Hawaiian, Irish and Navajo, Dalsimer said.

“Those courses are driven entirely by volunteer contributors and for them it’s more about a desire to preserve their language and their culture because they see it as being endangered, and it is,” Dalsimer said. “Languages die every year and Duolingo can help them preserve it.”

More from CNBC Disruptor 50:

Uber releases its long awaited IPO filing

Apple slams Spotify’s claims about App Store

“I remember thinking that if David Peterson ever taught the ‘Game of Thrones’ language I would definitely check it out,” said Andrew Feinberg, a volunteer for Duolingo who has used the app since its beta version nearly seven years ago.

Except when Duolingo announced it would offer High Valyrian courses, Feinberg thought it was a joke. He helped Duolingo develop its Norwegian and Japanese platforms, and he’s witnessed the company’s pranks in the past, like when it offered pirate and zombie languages.

But Feinberg noticed the only contributor to the course was Peterson. That’s when he realized it wasn’t a joke.

Peterson, dubbed by the Los Angeles Times as “Hollywood’s go-to language guy” has created languages for many film and television projects, including the movies “Thor: The Dark World” and “Doctor Strange.”

“I had sort of stalked him on YouTube and watched all those videos on how he created those languages,” Feinberg said. “I was really excited for it. I knew that he was a serious linguist who had complimented Duolingo before.”

Now Feinberg manages learning groups on Facebook for Japanese, Chinese, Norwegian and, a day after its introduction, High Valyrian, which has amassed over 200 members learning alongside Peterson himself, who encourages people to use and develop the language in conversation with each other even if that means moving beyond what he imagined.

“It’s always a little different since I did create High Valyrian and, in a sense, there is an arbiter to determine what is right and what is wrong,” Peterson said. “But as long as I’m here I feel like not only do I want to, but I should be there to try to help people out.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, source, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, course, valyrian, thrones, speak, peterson, game, teach, created, develop, app, high, feinberg, fan, duolingo, language, languages


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Here’s what you should know about the IPO process

Some high-profile, privately held companies — including Uber, Lyft, Pinterest and Airbnb — are about to break into the public market by launching an initial public offering. An IPO is the process by which a private company issues its first shares of stock for public sale. Beyond structuring a firm’s shares for sale, the process includes establishing stakeholders and creating regulatory compliance aimed at financial disclosures and transparency. This process exists, experts say, to protect the in


Some high-profile, privately held companies — including Uber, Lyft, Pinterest and Airbnb — are about to break into the public market by launching an initial public offering. An IPO is the process by which a private company issues its first shares of stock for public sale. Beyond structuring a firm’s shares for sale, the process includes establishing stakeholders and creating regulatory compliance aimed at financial disclosures and transparency. This process exists, experts say, to protect the in
Here’s what you should know about the IPO process Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-23  Authors: annie nova, ali balikci, anadolu agency, getty images, martin barraud, hutton supancic, getty images entertainment, george kavallines, -jay r ritter, corporate finance professor at the warrington coll
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stakeholders, shares, uber, structuring, process, transparency, stock, heres, ipo, know, public, sale


Here's what you should know about the IPO process

Some high-profile, privately held companies — including Uber, Lyft, Pinterest and Airbnb — are about to break into the public market by launching an initial public offering.

So, what exactly is an IPO?

An IPO is the process by which a private company issues its first shares of stock for public sale. This is also known as “going public.” Beyond structuring a firm’s shares for sale, the process includes establishing stakeholders and creating regulatory compliance aimed at financial disclosures and transparency. This process exists, experts say, to protect the investor public from purchasing shares in fraudulent companies.

Here’s what else you should know about the IPO process.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-23  Authors: annie nova, ali balikci, anadolu agency, getty images, martin barraud, hutton supancic, getty images entertainment, george kavallines, -jay r ritter, corporate finance professor at the warrington coll
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stakeholders, shares, uber, structuring, process, transparency, stock, heres, ipo, know, public, sale


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Here are the trends that will shape the next generation of disruptive start-ups

The category that saw the biggest jump in funding last year was artificial intelligence: Those start-ups saw a 72 percent jump in funding, to $9.3 billion. As AI companies become more mature, the number of AI companies drawing funding actually decreased from the prior year as the average funding amount grew higher. These start-ups in the financial services space saw a 38 percent jump in funding, to $11 billion, with more companies drawing backing than in prior years. Corporate VC funds invested


The category that saw the biggest jump in funding last year was artificial intelligence: Those start-ups saw a 72 percent jump in funding, to $9.3 billion. As AI companies become more mature, the number of AI companies drawing funding actually decreased from the prior year as the average funding amount grew higher. These start-ups in the financial services space saw a 38 percent jump in funding, to $11 billion, with more companies drawing backing than in prior years. Corporate VC funds invested
Here are the trends that will shape the next generation of disruptive start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-25  Authors: julia boorstin, george kavallines, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, chris ratcliffe, samyukta lakshmi, andrew innerarity, the washington post, stephen lam
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trends, according, corporate, disruptive, companies, billion, generation, jump, saw, shape, funding, startups, drawing, number


Here are the trends that will shape the next generation of disruptive start-ups

5G, expected to roll out nationwide in the next year, provides new opportunities for entrepreneurs to build connectivity into devices, to bring the Internet of Things to life. Artificial intelligence and machine learning will further automate so many things in our world and those we don’t see — from customer support to smarter manufacturing. And the rise of blockchain is enabling all sorts of new transparent, global interactions.

One sign of what’s next: venture capital funding. Overall VC funding increased 30 percent in the United States last year, to nearly $100 billion. The trend was bigger investment rounds, on average, but a smaller number of deals, according to the PwC Money Tree Report.

The category that saw the biggest jump in funding last year was artificial intelligence: Those start-ups saw a 72 percent jump in funding, to $9.3 billion. As AI companies become more mature, the number of AI companies drawing funding actually decreased from the prior year as the average funding amount grew higher.

The category drawing the second-largest piece of the venture capital pie was fintech. These start-ups in the financial services space saw a 38 percent jump in funding, to $11 billion, with more companies drawing backing than in prior years. In third place, funding of digital health companies jumped 21 percent, to $8.6 billion, with the number of deals pretty much flat from 2017, according to the PWC Money Tree Report.

One other notable trend, which speaks to established giants’ interest in avoiding disruption themselves, is the fact that corporate America is betting even more on start-ups. Corporate VC funds invested nearly $67 billion in start-ups last year. That’s an 83 percent increase from 2017, according to PitchBook.

As we look ahead to the next generation of growth, it seems what it’ll take for start-ups to be successful is changing. It’s not just a fresh use for an emerging technology. As we saw with the fall and then rise again of Uber, and the persistent success of companies such as Warby Parker, which value giving back, we’re seeing other factors play into companies’ long-term success. Increasingly we’re seeing the importance of management that embraces diversity, an inclusive corporate culture and the value of listening to consumers. We’ll see what other additional management values become crucial if the economy hits a downturn and resources become more scarce.

Here’s a look at the guidelines for the Disruptor 50 list and the track record of past companies on the list.

More from CNBC Disruptor 50:

Tech unicorns are accelerating 2019 IPO plans

Get ready for the $200 billion IPO shakeup


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-25  Authors: julia boorstin, george kavallines, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, chris ratcliffe, samyukta lakshmi, andrew innerarity, the washington post, stephen lam
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Call for nominations now open for the 2019 CNBC Disruptor 50

Less than three years later the stock is trading closer to $100 per share, riding a massive 278 percent gain in 2018. When it was first named to the Disruptor 50 List in 2013, it was barely known. The same will be true of some of the companies that earn a spot on the 2019 Disruptor 50 List, and our new 15-year age limit gives CNBC even more capacity to identify the next generation of groundbreaking start-ups. In the end, 50 companies, with a combined valuation of more than $350 billion, made the


Less than three years later the stock is trading closer to $100 per share, riding a massive 278 percent gain in 2018. When it was first named to the Disruptor 50 List in 2013, it was barely known. The same will be true of some of the companies that earn a spot on the 2019 Disruptor 50 List, and our new 15-year age limit gives CNBC even more capacity to identify the next generation of groundbreaking start-ups. In the end, 50 companies, with a combined valuation of more than $350 billion, made the
Call for nominations now open for the 2019 CNBC Disruptor 50 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-15  Authors: david spiegel, george kavallines, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, lucas jackson, saeed khan afp, chris ratcliffe, marcio jose sanchez, vcg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2016, share, stock, company, disruptor, list, york, 2019, nominations, companies, open, 50, named


Call for nominations now open for the 2019 CNBC Disruptor 50

There is, perhaps, no better example of this than Twilio. The company, which provides voice, text, chat and video services to millions of app developers, was named to the Disruptor 50 List for four straight years, from 2013 to 2016, and then debuted at the New York Stock Exchange in June 2016 at $15 per share. Less than three years later the stock is trading closer to $100 per share, riding a massive 278 percent gain in 2018.

Twilio is an 11-year-old company. When it was first named to the Disruptor 50 List in 2013, it was barely known. The same will be true of some of the companies that earn a spot on the 2019 Disruptor 50 List, and our new 15-year age limit gives CNBC even more capacity to identify the next generation of groundbreaking start-ups.

So who’s next?

The competition will be tough. In 2018, 981 companies submitted nominations from the United States and around the world. In the end, 50 companies, with a combined valuation of more than $350 billion, made the final cut.

Nominees will be put through a comprehensive and rigorous process of researching and scoring across a wide range of quantitative and qualitative criteria. Winners will be notified in April, and the list will be published in May across CNBC’s TV and digital platforms.

To stay part of the conversation, follow @CNBCDisruptors on Twitter and look for updates at disruptor50.cnbc.com.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-15  Authors: david spiegel, george kavallines, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, lucas jackson, saeed khan afp, chris ratcliffe, marcio jose sanchez, vcg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2016, share, stock, company, disruptor, list, york, 2019, nominations, companies, open, 50, named


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SoFi CEO Anthony Noto: Our loans ‘have really strong risk controls’

Noto, formerly the chief operating officer of Twitter, said that when he joined SoFi — a CNBC Disruptor 50 company whose name stands for “Social Finance” — “the No. 1 priority was making sure that we focused on quality of loans over quantity of loans.” Knowing that the Fed would soon start raising interest rates in earnest, Noto knew that his millennial-facing company would have to adjust to ensure that the loans it made were secure and appropriately backed. More from CNBC Disruptor 50:SoFi CEO


Noto, formerly the chief operating officer of Twitter, said that when he joined SoFi — a CNBC Disruptor 50 company whose name stands for “Social Finance” — “the No. 1 priority was making sure that we focused on quality of loans over quantity of loans.” Knowing that the Fed would soon start raising interest rates in earnest, Noto knew that his millennial-facing company would have to adjust to ensure that the loans it made were secure and appropriately backed. More from CNBC Disruptor 50:SoFi CEO
SoFi CEO Anthony Noto: Our loans ‘have really strong risk controls’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-29  Authors: elizabeth gurdus, george kavallines, kim white, mike segar, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, michael short
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, really, anthony, volatility, wanted, loans, controls, risk, rates, disruptor, usmoneyball, ensure, sofi, strong, company, noto


SoFi CEO Anthony Noto: Our loans 'have really strong risk controls'

Noto, formerly the chief operating officer of Twitter, said that when he joined SoFi — a CNBC Disruptor 50 company whose name stands for “Social Finance” — “the No. 1 priority was making sure that we focused on quality of loans over quantity of loans.”

Knowing that the Fed would soon start raising interest rates in earnest, Noto knew that his millennial-facing company would have to adjust to ensure that the loans it made were secure and appropriately backed.

More from CNBC Disruptor 50:

SoFi CEO Anthony Noto: Market volatility, rising rates create ‘opportunity for us’

‘Moneyball’ mastermind Billy Beane predicts health tech and AI will transform pro sports

Airbnb booked more than $1 billion in third-quarter revenue

“We wanted to focus on per-loan economics for two reasons: one, we wanted the loans that we created to be great investments for our asset-backed security investors, but also if we keep them on our balance sheet,” he told Cramer. “So we made that pivot when I got to the company to ensure that we prepared for the longer-term rising-rate environment.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-29  Authors: elizabeth gurdus, george kavallines, kim white, mike segar, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, michael short
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, really, anthony, volatility, wanted, loans, controls, risk, rates, disruptor, usmoneyball, ensure, sofi, strong, company, noto


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Skillz hands out prize money to gamers: What that means for esports

If you’re one of the 18 million users registered on Skillz, chances are that on any given day, you’re collecting winnings from a electronic sports (esports) prize pool totaling over half a million dollars. Skillz is a mobile multiplayer gaming platform that runs about 2 million tournaments daily featuring online games of solitaire, mahjong and a number of sports-related mobile titles. Skillz co-founder and CEO Andrew Paradise sees the company’s growth accelerating thanks to the rapid development


If you’re one of the 18 million users registered on Skillz, chances are that on any given day, you’re collecting winnings from a electronic sports (esports) prize pool totaling over half a million dollars. Skillz is a mobile multiplayer gaming platform that runs about 2 million tournaments daily featuring online games of solitaire, mahjong and a number of sports-related mobile titles. Skillz co-founder and CEO Andrew Paradise sees the company’s growth accelerating thanks to the rapid development
Skillz hands out prize money to gamers: What that means for esports Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: annie pei, george kavallines, kieran gibbs, espat media, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, told, prize, gamers, hands, means, tournaments, money, paradise, esports, youre, technology, skillz, users, mobile, number


Skillz hands out prize money to gamers: What that means for esports

If you’re one of the 18 million users registered on Skillz, chances are that on any given day, you’re collecting winnings from a electronic sports (esports) prize pool totaling over half a million dollars.

As part of Skillz’ “State of the Union” report released this week, the company told CNBC that players collectively earn over $675,000 in prizes on average, every single day.

Skillz is a mobile multiplayer gaming platform that runs about 2 million tournaments daily featuring online games of solitaire, mahjong and a number of sports-related mobile titles. Essentially, users can compete in both casual and formal tournaments to earn cash prizes, giving them a platform to enter the competitive gaming scene even on an amateur level.

Skillz co-founder and CEO Andrew Paradise sees the company’s growth accelerating thanks to the rapid development of the mobile technology market. Paradise sees the Skillz player base ballooning to “hundreds of millions” in the next two years judging by the company’s current rate of growth.

In September, Skillz revealed that the company had also doubled its revenue run rate from $200 million to $400 million, over the course of five months.

“When you think about where we are now, video games and software have always been a really derivative of the hardware scene,” he told CNBC. Paradise cited the rapidly increasing number of smartphone users – 8 billion by 2025 according to Chinese telecom giant Huawei — as an indication of how quickly the technology is developing. Huawei also projects that the number of PC and tablet users will increase to 3 billion by 2025.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: annie pei, george kavallines, kieran gibbs, espat media, getty images
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3 surprising reasons workers, start-ups are leaving tech’s home base

Jorge Mazal, vice president of product at language-learning start-up Duolingo, worked at several companies in Silicon Valley, including a giant and a start-up. He ended up at Pittsburgh-based Duolingo, a company that has taken out snarky billboards in California to send that quality-of-life recruiting message to tech talent. “They are not always looking for the next start-up to go,” he said. For me what resonated was housing and prices, but for others it is about cool neighborhoods, the food sce


Jorge Mazal, vice president of product at language-learning start-up Duolingo, worked at several companies in Silicon Valley, including a giant and a start-up. He ended up at Pittsburgh-based Duolingo, a company that has taken out snarky billboards in California to send that quality-of-life recruiting message to tech talent. “They are not always looking for the next start-up to go,” he said. For me what resonated was housing and prices, but for others it is about cool neighborhoods, the food sce
3 surprising reasons workers, start-ups are leaving tech’s home base Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-02  Authors: eric rosenbaum, source, george kavallines, abigail stevenson, david a grogan, scott mlyn, michael phillips, getty images, david paul morris
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talent, pittsburgh, duolingo, surprising, techs, candidate, companies, silicon, workers, reasons, base, startup, leaving, valley, startups, sell, tech


3 surprising reasons workers, start-ups are leaving tech's home base

Jorge Mazal, vice president of product at language-learning start-up Duolingo, worked at several companies in Silicon Valley, including a giant and a start-up. His last job was as a manager at MyFitnessPal, the Under Armour-funded fitness app, and although he said he would never regret the time in California, he knew when it was time to move away.

“The decision to go to San Francisco was to find mentors in areas I cared about, but I needed to go somewhere to raise a family and have a better lifestyle. I was looking for anywhere in the U.S. — not New York or San Francisco,” Mazal said on the panel with Hall at the CNBC Disruptor 50 Road Show.

He ended up at Pittsburgh-based Duolingo, a company that has taken out snarky billboards in California to send that quality-of-life recruiting message to tech talent.

No city is going to have the density of talent that exists in Silicon Valley, and so it is harder to recruit, but Hall said that challenge is offset by two factors: It can often be significantly less expensive to hire talent, and companies can generate a better return on investment on the talent. “They are not always looking for the next start-up to go,” he said.

Mazal said when it comes to bringing talent to Pittsburgh, it is not as simple as the Duolingo billboard makes it seem, and the company does have to tailor its pitch to each candidate. “It depends on the person, how we sell it. We have to find the right story for each candidate. For me what resonated was housing and prices, but for others it is about cool neighborhoods, the food scene.”

Mazal said it is getting easier for Pittsburgh to make a case because of, rather than in spite of, the biggest tech companies: Google, Amazon, Uber and Facebook all have offices in Pittsburgh now, and that “helps someone take the plunge of moving,” he said.

Hall said there is an obvious psychological “tell” — to use a poker phrase — which lets him know when to not even try to sell a candidate on a city or invest in a firm. “We look for swagger, someone not apologetic about being in Pittsburgh.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-02  Authors: eric rosenbaum, source, george kavallines, abigail stevenson, david a grogan, scott mlyn, michael phillips, getty images, david paul morris
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talent, pittsburgh, duolingo, surprising, techs, candidate, companies, silicon, workers, reasons, base, startup, leaving, valley, startups, sell, tech


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Beating Bezos: How top online retailers are offering what Amazon can’t

The first step in online retail success: Accept there are some things that Amazon does that your company could never possibly compete with. Scope of product offering and price are big ones to concede to Jeff Bezos’ retail killer. He didn’t look to Amazon, but to a site called Bodybuilding.com. “We looked at customer service and curated content and community — that was the moat,” Bucci said. Maureen Sullivan, Rent the Runway’s chief operating officer, said consumers are buying more clothes than e


The first step in online retail success: Accept there are some things that Amazon does that your company could never possibly compete with. Scope of product offering and price are big ones to concede to Jeff Bezos’ retail killer. He didn’t look to Amazon, but to a site called Bodybuilding.com. “We looked at customer service and curated content and community — that was the moat,” Bucci said. Maureen Sullivan, Rent the Runway’s chief operating officer, said consumers are buying more clothes than e
Beating Bezos: How top online retailers are offering what Amazon can’t Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-27  Authors: eric rosenbaum, david a grogan, george kavallines, scott mlyn, michael phillips, getty images, brendan smialowski, afp, bobyip
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bezos, retailers, beating, amazon, bucci, started, motorcycle, service, retail, offering, cant, online, lower, price, stuff, sullivan


Beating Bezos: How top online retailers are offering what Amazon can't

The first step in online retail success: Accept there are some things that Amazon does that your company could never possibly compete with. Scope of product offering and price are big ones to concede to Jeff Bezos’ retail killer.

For fashion start-up Rent the Runway and motorcycle gear retailer Revzilla, the business moats that help to keep Amazon out are constructed using a level of customer service, and creating a consumer community, that would not be possible for Jeff Bezos’ low-cost model.

“At the time we started in 2008, we started thinking about how communities worked in retail,” said Anthony Bucci, founder and former CEO of Revzilla, speaking at the CNBC Disruptor 50 Road Show in Philadelphia on Oct. 24. He didn’t look to Amazon, but to a site called Bodybuilding.com. “We looked at customer service and curated content and community — that was the moat,” Bucci said. “Everything else was sold elsewhere. Speed, price and selection were commoditized. Amazon had already won that.”

“There was no great [motorcycle] retailer other than moms and pops and flighty online shops, so we started a business to solve our own pain point,” Bucci, a motorcycle enthusiast since his teens, said. “We realized all the questions we were asking were questions not being adequately addressed in the market. … How do we help [the consumers] through the purchase life cycle? Understanding becoming a resource was the origin.”

Maureen Sullivan, Rent the Runway’s chief operating officer, said consumers are buying more clothes than ever before but of lower quality, lower price and lower use. “In 1990 the average woman bought 40 articles of clothing, and today it is 68 items, but the spend level hasn’t gone up,” Sullivan said. “Eighty percent of a closet is worn less than three times a year. Amazon is getting you to buy a lot of stuff. We don’t want you to buy stuff. … It does not make sense to own all this stuff.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-27  Authors: eric rosenbaum, david a grogan, george kavallines, scott mlyn, michael phillips, getty images, brendan smialowski, afp, bobyip
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bezos, retailers, beating, amazon, bucci, started, motorcycle, service, retail, offering, cant, online, lower, price, stuff, sullivan


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Disruptor 50 Roadshow takes Philly: transforming the economy and changing industries

The Disruptor 50 Roadshow brings together executives from CNBC Disruptor 50 companies, along with leading voices in business, to deliver engaging discussions on a range of issues that are top of mind for entrepreneurs and small business owners who are trying to grow their businesses, find investors, and attract and retain top talent. Watch the video highlights to discover how companies and leaders are transforming the economy and changing industries. Philly Fanatics: Changing the Fan Apparel Gam


The Disruptor 50 Roadshow brings together executives from CNBC Disruptor 50 companies, along with leading voices in business, to deliver engaging discussions on a range of issues that are top of mind for entrepreneurs and small business owners who are trying to grow their businesses, find investors, and attract and retain top talent. Watch the video highlights to discover how companies and leaders are transforming the economy and changing industries. Philly Fanatics: Changing the Fan Apparel Gam
Disruptor 50 Roadshow takes Philly: transforming the economy and changing industries Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-25  Authors: david a grogan, george kavallines, scott mlyn, michael phillips, getty images, stephen lam, jim watson, afp, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roadshow, fanatics, companies, michael, transforming, business, disruptor, philly, 50, takes, rubin, philadelphia, leaders, industries, changing, economy


Disruptor 50 Roadshow takes Philly: transforming the economy and changing industries

The Disruptor 50 Roadshow brings together executives from CNBC Disruptor 50 companies, along with leading voices in business, to deliver engaging discussions on a range of issues that are top of mind for entrepreneurs and small business owners who are trying to grow their businesses, find investors, and attract and retain top talent.

The second event in the Roadshow series, presented by CNBC on October 24 in Philadelphia, included Kevin O’Leary, Chairman, O’Shares Investments; Michael Rubin, Founder and Executive Chairman, Fanatics; Co-Owner, Philadelphia 76ers and New Jersey Devils; and Maureen Sullivan, COO, Rent the Runway.

Watch the video highlights to discover how companies and leaders are transforming the economy and changing industries.

Philly Fanatics: Changing the Fan Apparel Game and Rebuilding the 76ers

Philadelphia native Michael Rubin disrupted the market for official sports team apparel. Fanatics, the company he created just 7 years ago, pulls in more than $2 billion in annual sales, turning celebratory sports moments into real-time global merchandising opportunities. Rubin is also one of the front-office leaders responsible for the resurgence of the Philadelphia 76ers – an inspiring sports business turnaround story.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-25  Authors: david a grogan, george kavallines, scott mlyn, michael phillips, getty images, stephen lam, jim watson, afp, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roadshow, fanatics, companies, michael, transforming, business, disruptor, philly, 50, takes, rubin, philadelphia, leaders, industries, changing, economy


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Why Kevin O’Leary says Trump has ‘100 percent’ chance of getting reelected in 2020

Kevin O’Leary said he’s going to continue investing heavily in small private businesses in America, because the environment “just keeps getting better.” But the policy that’s come out of there in the last two years has ripped all that stuff out,” O’Leary said. “If you think this administration is getting voted out in the next election, you are 100 percent wrong. Where I go to Amarillo, Texas; Champaign; Urbana; Fargo, his name is painted on the barn, and I see it for miles around. I’m just telli


Kevin O’Leary said he’s going to continue investing heavily in small private businesses in America, because the environment “just keeps getting better.” But the policy that’s come out of there in the last two years has ripped all that stuff out,” O’Leary said. “If you think this administration is getting voted out in the next election, you are 100 percent wrong. Where I go to Amarillo, Texas; Champaign; Urbana; Fargo, his name is painted on the barn, and I see it for miles around. I’m just telli
Why Kevin O’Leary says Trump has ‘100 percent’ chance of getting reelected in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-25  Authors: barbara booth, george kavallines, scott mlyn, david a grogan, michael phillips, getty images, stephen lam, jim watson, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, stuff, think, oleary, america, thats, 2020, im, kevin, reelected, 100, environment, dont, chance, small, getting


Why Kevin O'Leary says Trump has '100 percent' chance of getting reelected in 2020

Kevin O’Leary said he’s going to continue investing heavily in small private businesses in America, because the environment “just keeps getting better.”

At the CNBC Disruptor 50 Roadshow in Philadelphia on Wednesday, the financial expert and “Shark Tank” star blamed past administrations’ regulation-heavy policies and applauded Trump’s push to eliminate the red tape for companies nationwide, facilitating the lives of America’s small-business owners.

“Like him or hate him — don’t care. But the policy that’s come out of there in the last two years has ripped all that stuff out,” O’Leary said. “You don’t see it; we never talk about that stuff. But it’s small things like that that all of a sudden my restaurant business that I invested in — a company called Wine and Design — now we can open up in all these strip malls and sell franchises like crazy because the regulatory environment has changed.”

“If you think this administration is getting voted out in the next election, you are 100 percent wrong. Where I go to Amarillo, Texas; Champaign; Urbana; Fargo, his name is painted on the barn, and I see it for miles around. And look, I’m not trying to advocate here for it. I’m just telling you, if you think sitting in Boston or Philly or New York or LA that’s America, that’s not America. I go to America, and they love what’s happening,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-25  Authors: barbara booth, george kavallines, scott mlyn, david a grogan, michael phillips, getty images, stephen lam, jim watson, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, stuff, think, oleary, america, thats, 2020, im, kevin, reelected, 100, environment, dont, chance, small, getting


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