Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world’s biggest toy store. Then, they lost it.

Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. In its heyday in th


Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. In its heyday in th
Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world’s biggest toy store. Then, they lost it. Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-26  Authors: lauren hirsch, eduardo munoz, jacques m chenet, corbis, getty images, scott mlyn, peter foley, bloomberg, jason alden
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, written, toy, biggest, toys, worlds, built, went, store, lost, stores, lazarus, world, week, kingdom, important


Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world's biggest toy store. Then, they lost it.

The toy emporium that Charles P. Lazarus envisioned has been reduced to dusty floors and empty shelves.

Much has been said about the demise of the toy empire, which this week announced its plan to liquidate. There have been fingers pointed at corporate raiders, Amazon and big-box stores. All contributed to its undoing.

Ultimately, though, Toys R Us’ collapse is a story of loyalty run dry. The store in its early days fostered devotion from customers and toymakers. In the end, it lost hold on both.

Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. It didn’t invest in its stores, even as it was adding to the fleet, leaving it vulnerable when new competition moved in.

The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. By 1978, he had created a toy superstore large enough to become a public company.

In its heyday in the 1980s and 1990s, it was the most important toy store in the country, if not the world. Its strength grew as competitors Kiddie City and Child World went out of business.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-26  Authors: lauren hirsch, eduardo munoz, jacques m chenet, corbis, getty images, scott mlyn, peter foley, bloomberg, jason alden
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, written, toy, biggest, toys, worlds, built, went, store, lost, stores, lazarus, world, week, kingdom, important


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Jack Ma sticks to his goals by repeating 3 questions to himself

The ability to stay the course can make or break a business — and that’s something that self-made billionaire Jack Ma knows well. Under his watch, the company grew into a major tech juggernaut to make Ma one of the richest men in China. One of the top reasons why those companies fail, according to CB Insights, is a loss of focus. Speaking at the annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, Ma shared how he remains focused in his pursuit of success. “Whether young people


The ability to stay the course can make or break a business — and that’s something that self-made billionaire Jack Ma knows well. Under his watch, the company grew into a major tech juggernaut to make Ma one of the richest men in China. One of the top reasons why those companies fail, according to CB Insights, is a loss of focus. Speaking at the annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, Ma shared how he remains focused in his pursuit of success. “Whether young people
Jack Ma sticks to his goals by repeating 3 questions to himself Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-23  Authors: yen nee lee, wang he, getty images, -jack ma, co-founder of alibaba
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ma, jack, ask, cb, billionaire, willing, goals, repeating, questions, world, according, young, sticks, fail


Jack Ma sticks to his goals by repeating 3 questions to himself

The ability to stay the course can make or break a business — and that’s something that self-made billionaire Jack Ma knows well.

The iconic entrepreneur has led Alibaba since its inception in 1999. Under his watch, the company grew into a major tech juggernaut to make Ma one of the richest men in China.

Ma’s track record comes at a time when statistics point to a sobering reality about the survival rate of young businesses: 70 percent of start-ups fail around 20 months after raising their first funding, according to an August report by research firm CB Insights.

One of the top reasons why those companies fail, according to CB Insights, is a loss of focus.

Speaking at the annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, Ma shared how he remains focused in his pursuit of success.

“Whether young people, old people, ask three questions,” the billionaire told a packed conference hall in Bali, Indonesia.

“I keep asking myself these three questions,” he said. “What do you have? What do you want? What will you give up?”

Many people usually fail to ask themselves what they are willing to give up because they tend to think they don’t have much to start with, Ma said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-23  Authors: yen nee lee, wang he, getty images, -jack ma, co-founder of alibaba
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ma, jack, ask, cb, billionaire, willing, goals, repeating, questions, world, according, young, sticks, fail


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Intel shares gain after Nomura upgrade

Nomura Instinet upgraded Intel shares to buy from neutral on Monday, saying the company is the only chip stock that will raise estimates in October and November. “We believe that Intel will remain supply constrained until the ramp [in production] of 10nm,” Nomura’s Romit Shah said in a note. Despite the delays, Nomura sees Intel beginning to ramp 10nm production. Nomura maintained its Intel price target of $50 a share. Intel shares rose 1.1 percent in premarket trading from Friday’s close of $44


Nomura Instinet upgraded Intel shares to buy from neutral on Monday, saying the company is the only chip stock that will raise estimates in October and November. “We believe that Intel will remain supply constrained until the ramp [in production] of 10nm,” Nomura’s Romit Shah said in a note. Despite the delays, Nomura sees Intel beginning to ramp 10nm production. Nomura maintained its Intel price target of $50 a share. Intel shares rose 1.1 percent in premarket trading from Friday’s close of $44
Intel shares gain after Nomura upgrade Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: michael sheetz, jp black, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shares, upgrade, shah, gain, ramp, nanometer, share, 10nm, nomura, production, processors, intel


Intel shares gain after Nomura upgrade

Nomura Instinet upgraded Intel shares to buy from neutral on Monday, saying the company is the only chip stock that will raise estimates in October and November.

“We believe that Intel will remain supply constrained until the ramp [in production] of 10nm,” Nomura’s Romit Shah said in a note.

Intel is working to mass produce its 10-nanometer chip after years of delays. One nanometer is equal to one-billionth of a meter. Historically, smaller nanometer technologies have allowed companies to create faster, more power-efficient chips.

Intel has fallen behind Samsung, which is already manufacturing 10nm chips. Despite the delays, Nomura sees Intel beginning to ramp 10nm production.

“Every U.S. and foreign-based equipment supplier we’ve spoken with recently is seeing 10nm volumes become more meaningful,” Shah said.

Shah also said interim CEO Bob Swan is prioritizing Intel’s production of its Xeon and Core processors. Shah said those processors “serve the high-performance segments,” which “bodes well for earnings and specifically gross margin” despite conservative forecasts for Intel’s next two quarters across the rest of Wall Street.

Nomura maintained its Intel price target of $50 a share. Intel shares rose 1.1 percent in premarket trading from Friday’s close of $44 a share.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: michael sheetz, jp black, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shares, upgrade, shah, gain, ramp, nanometer, share, 10nm, nomura, production, processors, intel


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Don’t believe the doves: US trade disputes are likely to escalate after the midterms

Instead of opting for a combination of quick results and a negotiating process seeking longer-term structural policy changes, Washington has chosen a path of litigation and imposition of reforms that China and the EU find unacceptable. Germans, to be fair, were ready for concessions and actively seeking ways to initiate that process. China, for its part, had a standing negotiating platform — “a win-win cooperation” — that could have served as a starting point. Some observers now see a silver lin


Instead of opting for a combination of quick results and a negotiating process seeking longer-term structural policy changes, Washington has chosen a path of litigation and imposition of reforms that China and the EU find unacceptable. Germans, to be fair, were ready for concessions and actively seeking ways to initiate that process. China, for its part, had a standing negotiating platform — “a win-win cooperation” — that could have served as a starting point. Some observers now see a silver lin
Don’t believe the doves: US trade disputes are likely to escalate after the midterms Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, trillion, trade, escalate, dont, disputes, doves, believe, process, midterms, negotiating, second, washington, china, seeking, net, likely


Don't believe the doves: US trade disputes are likely to escalate after the midterms

What can the U.S. do now? The answer is: Not much. Instead of opting for a combination of quick results and a negotiating process seeking longer-term structural policy changes, Washington has chosen a path of litigation and imposition of reforms that China and the EU find unacceptable.

Anybody looking at the magnitude of U.S. trade deficits could have concluded that Washington had an excellent chance of using political leverage to quickly narrow its yawning trade gaps with China and the German-led EU — especially since neither the Chinese nor the Europeans were contesting the need that their systematic and excessive trade surpluses with the U.S. had to be reduced.

Germans, to be fair, were ready for concessions and actively seeking ways to initiate that process. It is not clear why things were allowed to go nowhere.

China, for its part, had a standing negotiating platform — “a win-win cooperation” — that could have served as a starting point. Instead of that, Washington and Beijing ended up trading blows in an escalating tariff fight.

Some observers now see a silver lining: They believe that a negotiating process will be unlocked after the mid-term Congressional elections early next month.

Let’s hope they are right. But one thing is clear: Washington cannot allow the continuation of huge leakages of its domestic spending to Europe and China. At the moment, the strengthening household and business outlays in the U.S. are driving $670 billion of European and Chinese exports to the U.S.

That export volume is an 11 percent increase from the first eight months of last year, and a great gift to celebrate a revival of U.S. economic activity.

It’s a gift because the combined European and Chinese surplus of $372.1 billion so far this year will go to their growing international creditor position, while the U.S. will have to keep issuing IOUs — that China and Europe don’t want to buy anymore — to finance its $8.6 trillion of net foreign liabilities that the U.S. Department of Treasury reported at the end of the second quarter.

If you find that number chilling, here’s more ice to the wound: America’s net foreign liabilities increased by nearly $1 trillion during the second quarter of this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, trillion, trade, escalate, dont, disputes, doves, believe, process, midterms, negotiating, second, washington, china, seeking, net, likely


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Investors can enjoy tax savings on advisor fees by using this strategy

Yet much of this worry is needless because many clients can still get a tax savings on some fees by using an equivalent strategy. The IRS has long held that qualified retirement accounts, such as traditional and other types of individual retirement accounts, can pay their own expenses. As funds in these accounts are tax-deferred, there are no tax consequences to using this money to pay advisory fees related to the management of these accounts. Roth IRAs are funded with post-tax income, so there’


Yet much of this worry is needless because many clients can still get a tax savings on some fees by using an equivalent strategy. The IRS has long held that qualified retirement accounts, such as traditional and other types of individual retirement accounts, can pay their own expenses. As funds in these accounts are tax-deferred, there are no tax consequences to using this money to pay advisory fees related to the management of these accounts. Roth IRAs are funded with post-tax income, so there’
Investors can enjoy tax savings on advisor fees by using this strategy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: david robinson, founder ceo of rts private wealth management, skynesher, getty images, sam edwards, shago dela cruz, eyeem, source, louis barajas, danielle barnum
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, assets, strategy, tax, plans, savings, fees, enjoy, advisor, advisory, pay, advisors, retirement, deduction, accounts, using


Investors can enjoy tax savings on advisor fees by using this strategy

When investors sit down with their financial advisor to prepare their tax returns next year, they’ll be confronted with new rules that for many mean an increase in the cost of having an advisor.

The new tax law passed by Congress last year ends deductions on some types of advisory fees, including those based on the value of assets under management (AUM), a common way advisors charge clients.

For both the client and advisor, this change is causing quite a bit of angst. Yet much of this worry is needless because many clients can still get a tax savings on some fees by using an equivalent strategy.

The IRS has long held that qualified retirement accounts, such as traditional and other types of individual retirement accounts, can pay their own expenses. As funds in these accounts are tax-deferred, there are no tax consequences to using this money to pay advisory fees related to the management of these accounts.

More from FA Playbook:

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Keep emotions under control when investing

(Money taken out of these accounts usually triggers ordinary income tax and, for those under age 59½, a hurtful 10 percent penalty — but not in this case, because the IRS doesn’t consider these payments to be distributions.)

To the extent that an individual’s assets are in a traditional IRA, IRA rollover or other tax-deferred account (including Simplified Employee Pension IRAs or pension plans) and are under an advisor’s care, you can pay the advisor the proportionate amount of fees directly out of these accounts with pretax dollars.

This strategy serves as an effective tax deduction. Roth IRAs are funded with post-tax income, so there’s no tax advantage to paying advisory fees out of these accounts. This merely diminishes retirement assets, so it’s usually best to pay Roth fees out of a taxable account.

This alternative strategy has long been available, but many weren’t aware of it because advisory clients were happy to get the deduction on AUM fees, often about 1 percent annually. Now that this straight-out deduction is gone, advisors are receiving calls from nervous clients who say they can no longer afford their services, and advisors are alerting them to the alternative strategy. Investors who want to take this route should talk to their advisors about it.

Many Americans have a significant portion of their assets in tax-deferred, employer-sponsored retirement plans, including 401(k) plans, 403(b) plans for teachers and pension plans. Their portion of advisory fees and other expenses is often taken directly from their accounts, so these account holders are already getting the effective deduction.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: david robinson, founder ceo of rts private wealth management, skynesher, getty images, sam edwards, shago dela cruz, eyeem, source, louis barajas, danielle barnum
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, assets, strategy, tax, plans, savings, fees, enjoy, advisor, advisory, pay, advisors, retirement, deduction, accounts, using


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Chinese stocks surge, but looming uncertainties could drag markets down again

Chinese stocks surged more than 4 percent on Monday, but experts warned the markets could fall again due to future uncertainty. The strong gains on Monday came after a series of reassuring statements from Chinese authorities over the weekend, which helped Chinese stocks extend Friday’s gains. In the medium term, Chinese stocks could be of “good value,” Shane Oliver, head of investment strategy and chief economist at AMP Capital, told CNBC. AMP’s Oliver said that Chinese shares are “cheap and (of


Chinese stocks surged more than 4 percent on Monday, but experts warned the markets could fall again due to future uncertainty. The strong gains on Monday came after a series of reassuring statements from Chinese authorities over the weekend, which helped Chinese stocks extend Friday’s gains. In the medium term, Chinese stocks could be of “good value,” Shane Oliver, head of investment strategy and chief economist at AMP Capital, told CNBC. AMP’s Oliver said that Chinese shares are “cheap and (of
Chinese stocks surge, but looming uncertainties could drag markets down again Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: weizhen tan, greg baker, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, report, drag, market, investment, markets, growth, surge, tensions, looming, uncertainties, stocks, bank, tax


Chinese stocks surge, but looming uncertainties could drag markets down again

Chinese stocks surged more than 4 percent on Monday, but experts warned the markets could fall again due to future uncertainty.

The strong gains on Monday came after a series of reassuring statements from Chinese authorities over the weekend, which helped Chinese stocks extend Friday’s gains.

The Shanghai composite jumped by 4.09 percent while the Shenzhen composite surged 4.9 percent. The Nasdaq-style Chinext leaped by more than 5 percent, while Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index closed 2.4 percent higher.

In the medium term, Chinese stocks could be of “good value,” Shane Oliver, head of investment strategy and chief economist at AMP Capital, told CNBC. However, he cautioned that there’s too much uncertainty around trade tensions and the growth slowdown to “say they have bottomed with any confidence.”

“We have seen a few false bottoms this year,” he added.

Vasu Menon, senior investment strategist at OCBC Bank told CNBC that trade tensions may continue to cast a shadow over China and it “doesn’t look like it’s going to end anytime soon.”

“So you see a rebound today, but does it mean that the markets have turned a corner and you know, will hit higher? I’m not sure, I don’t think so,” Menon said.

Some market observers, however, found the valuations to be attractive.

AMP’s Oliver said that Chinese shares are “cheap and (of) good value” for investors in the next five years.

“After the recent market pullback, Chinese equities’ valuations may be getting attractive, given Chinese corporates’ resilient sales and earnings growth,” Deutsche Bank Wealth Management said in a report on Monday. The bank added that other factors — such as the easing of tensions after the U.S. midterm elections in November — could come into play to support the market in the medium term.

There are also signs of a recovery in Chinese infrastructure investment in November, according to the report, with the country’s fiscal policy stance turning more supportive of growth since July this year.

Finally, tax cuts could also play a role.

“There have been growing discussions in China whether the government should cut tax more aggressively to support growth … but tax cut would be one possible catalyst for Chinese stock markets, if they happen,” said the Deutsche Bank report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: weizhen tan, greg baker, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, report, drag, market, investment, markets, growth, surge, tensions, looming, uncertainties, stocks, bank, tax


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Silicon Valley’s dirty secret: Using a shadow workforce of contract employees to drive profits

As the gig economy grows, the ratio of contract workers to regular employees in corporate America is shifting. This year at Google, contract workers outnumbered direct employees for the first time in the company’s 20-year history. Spokespersons at Facebook and Alphabet declined to disclose the number of contract workers they employ. A spokesperson at Alphabet cited two main reasons for hiring contract or temporary workers. Another reason is a need for temporary workers when there is a sudden spi


As the gig economy grows, the ratio of contract workers to regular employees in corporate America is shifting. This year at Google, contract workers outnumbered direct employees for the first time in the company’s 20-year history. Spokespersons at Facebook and Alphabet declined to disclose the number of contract workers they employ. A spokesperson at Alphabet cited two main reasons for hiring contract or temporary workers. Another reason is a need for temporary workers when there is a sudden spi
Silicon Valley’s dirty secret: Using a shadow workforce of contract employees to drive profits Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: ellen sheng, aytac unal, anadolu agency, getty images, -brian hoffmeyer, senior vice president at beeline, a tech company that helps companies manage their c
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, valley, valleys, workers, google, drive, dirty, vendor, secret, workforce, silicon, according, facebook, temporary, contract, shadow, profits, employees, using


Silicon Valley's dirty secret: Using a shadow workforce of contract employees to drive profits

As the gig economy grows, the ratio of contract workers to regular employees in corporate America is shifting. Google, Facebook, Amazon, Uber and other Silicon Valley tech titans now employ thousands of contract workers to do a host of functions — anything from sales and writing code to managing teams and testing products. This year at Google, contract workers outnumbered direct employees for the first time in the company’s 20-year history.

It’s not only in Silicon Valley. The trend is on the rise as public companies look for ways to trim HR costs or hire in-demand skills in a tight labor market. The U.S. jobless rate dropped to 3.7 percent in September, the lowest since 1969, down from 3.9 percent in August, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Some 57.3 million Americans, or 36 percent of the workforce, are now freelancing, according to a 2017 report by Upwork. In San Mateo and Santa Clara counties alone, there are an estimated 39,000 workers who are contracted to tech companies, according to one estimate by University of California Santa Cruz researchers.

Spokespersons at Facebook and Alphabet declined to disclose the number of contract workers they employ. A spokesperson at Alphabet cited two main reasons for hiring contract or temporary workers. One reason is when the company doesn’t have or want to build out expertise in a particular area such as doctors, food service, customer support or shuttle bus drivers. Another reason is a need for temporary workers when there is a sudden spike in workload or to cover for an employee who is on leave.

“At the end of the day, TVC (temporary, vendor and contractual workers) are an important part of the workforce, but they are not Google employees and not privy to the same confidential company information that full-time Googlers are,” the spokesperson said.

“Our vendor workers are valued members of our Facebook community, and we are committed to providing a safe, fair work environment to everyone who helps Facebook bring the world together,” said Anthony Harrison, director of media relations at Facebook. Spokespersons at Amazon and Netflix did not respond to requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: ellen sheng, aytac unal, anadolu agency, getty images, -brian hoffmeyer, senior vice president at beeline, a tech company that helps companies manage their c
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Gorbachev says Trump’s nuclear treaty withdrawal ‘not the work of a great mind’

Mikhail Gorbachev, the former president of the Soviet Union, criticized President Donald Trump’s threat to withdraw from an international nuclear disarmament treaty, saying the move “is not the work of a great mind.” Trump announced at a rally Saturday that he will pull the U.S. from the “Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty,” (INF) citing Russian violations of the deal, although he did not give further details. Gorbachev, who led the Soviet Union from 1985 until its dissolution in 1991, had


Mikhail Gorbachev, the former president of the Soviet Union, criticized President Donald Trump’s threat to withdraw from an international nuclear disarmament treaty, saying the move “is not the work of a great mind.” Trump announced at a rally Saturday that he will pull the U.S. from the “Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty,” (INF) citing Russian violations of the deal, although he did not give further details. Gorbachev, who led the Soviet Union from 1985 until its dissolution in 1991, had
Gorbachev says Trump’s nuclear treaty withdrawal ‘not the work of a great mind’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: holly ellyatt, mikhail svetlov, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gorbachev, work, president, russia, withdrawal, world, trumps, treaty, great, russian, mind, nuclear, union, soviet


Gorbachev says Trump's nuclear treaty withdrawal 'not the work of a great mind'

Mikhail Gorbachev, the former president of the Soviet Union, criticized President Donald Trump’s threat to withdraw from an international nuclear disarmament treaty, saying the move “is not the work of a great mind.”

Trump announced at a rally Saturday that he will pull the U.S. from the “Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty,” (INF) citing Russian violations of the deal, although he did not give further details.

The 1987 treaty prohibits Russia and the U.S. from possessing, producing or test-flying a ground-launched cruise missile having a range of 500 to 5,500 kilometers or “to possess or produce launchers of such missiles.”

Gorbachev, who led the Soviet Union from 1985 until its dissolution in 1991, had signed the treaty with then-U.S. President Ronald Reagan.

Now 87-years-old, Gorbachev said Trump’s decision was “very strange” and a mistake.

“Do they really not understand in Washington what this can lead to?” Gorbachev told Russian news agency Interfax on Sunday, adding that the decision “will undermine all the efforts that were made by the leaders of the USSR and the United States themselves to achieve nuclear disarmament.”

Gorbachev said that “Washington’s aspiration to turn politics back cannot be supported, this must be declared not only by Russia, but by all who cherish the world, especially the world without nuclear weapons.”

The treaty marked a historic shift in U.S.-Russian relations and came at a time of Gorbachev-led reforms in Russia — most notably, his policies of “perestroika” and “glasnost” — essentially, a series of political and economic reforms and “openness.”

Gorbachev said Sunday that “all agreements aimed at nuclear disarmament and the limitation of nuclear weapons must be preserved for the sake of life on Earth.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: holly ellyatt, mikhail svetlov, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gorbachev, work, president, russia, withdrawal, world, trumps, treaty, great, russian, mind, nuclear, union, soviet


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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey writes a ‘won’t do’ list every morning — and you should, too

That’s why Jack Dorsey, the CEO of Square and Twitter, lists out what he will and won’t do at the start of each day. On that particular day, Dorsey listed some priorities. Dorsey’s morning checklists show he’s deliberate and mindful about what he will and won’t work on, helping him take control and better organize his day. “The “won’t do” list is often more important than the “do” list. The “won’t do” list he shared during that talk included being late, avoiding eye contact and setting expectati


That’s why Jack Dorsey, the CEO of Square and Twitter, lists out what he will and won’t do at the start of each day. On that particular day, Dorsey listed some priorities. Dorsey’s morning checklists show he’s deliberate and mindful about what he will and won’t work on, helping him take control and better organize his day. “The “won’t do” list is often more important than the “do” list. The “won’t do” list he shared during that talk included being late, avoiding eye contact and setting expectati
Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey writes a ‘won’t do’ list every morning — and you should, too Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: zameena mejia, justin tallis, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, write, twitter, dorsey, ceo, today, work, writes, jack, wont, day, dont, morning, items, list, lists


Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey writes a 'won't do' list every morning — and you should, too

A productive day isn’t just about what you will do, but also what you won’t do. That’s why Jack Dorsey, the CEO of Square and Twitter, lists out what he will and won’t do at the start of each day.

Dorsey shared the strategy in a recent tweet. On that particular day, Dorsey listed some priorities. He decided he would meditate, read the bestselling non-fiction book “Winners Take All,” consider Twitter’s metrics and write his notes regarding the dining experience for users of Caviar, the delivery platform Square bought in 2014.

His “won’t do” list included drinking alcohol (for Sober October, a cancer awareness challenge) and making a decision on an initiative labeled “#fast team initiatives.”

Commented Dorsey: “Every morning I write a checklist of work I intend to do today, and work I won’t do today,” explaining that he’s more “focused on more strategic efforts rather than calendar stuff.”

He added that the “won’t do” section of his list is checked out before he goes to sleep. Eventually, many of these items are moved into a “do” list.

“To-do” lists can often get a bad rap since they don’t “distinguish between urgent and important,” noted bestselling author Kevin Kruse and author of “15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management.”

These lists also don’t often acknowledge other tasks and activities that can compete for your time. As a result, “to do” lists don’t always mirror the decisions you need to make in a given day to move forward on key priorities.

Dorsey’s morning checklists show he’s deliberate and mindful about what he will and won’t work on, helping him take control and better organize his day. In fact, ruling out the unimportant tasks is often essential for boosting productivity.

“The “won’t do” list is often more important than the “do” list. Setting the intention to deliberately not work on something gives me clearer space to think and work, and be less reactive,” tweeted Dorsey.

Dorsey has talked about his “won’t do” lists several times in the past decade, including during a speech at Y Combinator Startup School in 2013. The “won’t do” list he shared during that talk included being late, avoiding eye contact and setting expectations he couldn’t meet.

Many items on the list have become part of a routine for the billionaire CEO. As Dorsey explained, “some items stay on the lists for days/weeks/months, some I want to make sure I do every day.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: zameena mejia, justin tallis, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, write, twitter, dorsey, ceo, today, work, writes, jack, wont, day, dont, morning, items, list, lists


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Germany urges other EU states to also stop arms exports to Saudi Arabia

Germany wants other European Union member states to follow its example in stopping arms exports to Saudi Arabia as long as uncertainty remains over the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Economy Minister Peter Altmaier said on Monday. Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Sunday that Germany would stop arms exports to Saudi Arabia as long as the uncertainty around Khashoggi’s death persisted. Altmaier said other EU states should stop arms exports to Saudi Arabia in order to increase pressure on R


Germany wants other European Union member states to follow its example in stopping arms exports to Saudi Arabia as long as uncertainty remains over the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Economy Minister Peter Altmaier said on Monday. Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Sunday that Germany would stop arms exports to Saudi Arabia as long as the uncertainty around Khashoggi’s death persisted. Altmaier said other EU states should stop arms exports to Saudi Arabia in order to increase pressure on R
Germany urges other EU states to also stop arms exports to Saudi Arabia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: nirodesign, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, uncertainty, german, urges, stop, germany, eu, arms, arabia, european, altmaier, saudi, exports


Germany urges other EU states to also stop arms exports to Saudi Arabia

Germany wants other European Union member states to follow its example in stopping arms exports to Saudi Arabia as long as uncertainty remains over the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Economy Minister Peter Altmaier said on Monday.

Riyadh has given multiple and conflicting accounts on what led to Khashoggi’s death on Oct. 2 at its consulate in Istanbul. On Sunday, Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir called the killing a “huge and grave mistake” but sought to shield Saudi Arabia’s powerful crown prince.

Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Sunday that Germany would stop arms exports to Saudi Arabia as long as the uncertainty around Khashoggi’s death persisted.

Altmaier, a close ally of Merkel, said Riyadh’s explanations on the case so far had not been satisfactory. “The government is in agreement that we will not approve further arms exports for the moment because we want to know what happened,” Altmaier told ZDF broadcaster.

So far this year the German government had approved weapons exports worth more than 400 million euros ($462 million) to Saudi Arabia, making it the second-biggest recipient of German arms after Algeria.

Asked whether Germany would roll back previously agreed arms deals with Saudi, he said a decision would be made “very soon”.

Altmaier said other EU states should stop arms exports to Saudi Arabia in order to increase pressure on Riyadh over the Khashoggi case.

“For me it would be important that we come to a joint European stance,” Altmaier said.

“Because only if all European countries are in agreement, it will make an impression on the government in Riyadh. It will not have any positive consequences if we halt arms exports but other countries at the same time fill the gap.”

Senior German politicians have also urged Siemens CEO Joe Kaeser over the weekend to pull out of an investment conference in Saudi Arabia later this week.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: nirodesign, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, uncertainty, german, urges, stop, germany, eu, arms, arabia, european, altmaier, saudi, exports


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