Samsung’s Galaxy Buds look less silly than Apple AirPods and are just as good

Samsung’s Galaxy Buds are the company’s take on Apple AirPods, and they’re really good. Apple’s AirPods have become incredibly successful since their launch in 2017. While they work with Android phones, the target audience has mostly been for Apple products, since they pair so easily with them. Samsung has tried to compete with its own version AirPods for several years now, but its latest attempt is its best yet and is the best option I’ve found for Android users. Plus, they look a lot less sill


Samsung’s Galaxy Buds are the company’s take on Apple AirPods, and they’re really good. Apple’s AirPods have become incredibly successful since their launch in 2017. While they work with Android phones, the target audience has mostly been for Apple products, since they pair so easily with them. Samsung has tried to compete with its own version AirPods for several years now, but its latest attempt is its best yet and is the best option I’ve found for Android users. Plus, they look a lot less sill
Samsung’s Galaxy Buds look less silly than Apple AirPods and are just as good Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-20  Authors: todd haselton, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, best, tried, silly, samsungs, themsamsung, theyre, users, look, android, work, version, galaxy, airpods, good, buds


Samsung's Galaxy Buds look less silly than Apple AirPods and are just as good

Samsung’s Galaxy Buds are the company’s take on Apple AirPods, and they’re really good.

There’s a reason why Samsung continues to play in this market. Apple’s AirPods have become incredibly successful since their launch in 2017. While they work with Android phones, the target audience has mostly been for Apple products, since they pair so easily with them.

Samsung has tried to compete with its own version AirPods for several years now, but its latest attempt is its best yet and is the best option I’ve found for Android users. Plus, they look a lot less silly than AirPods, which makes them a fine alternative even for people who own iPhones.

Here’s what you need to know.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-20  Authors: todd haselton, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, best, tried, silly, samsungs, themsamsung, theyre, users, look, android, work, version, galaxy, airpods, good, buds


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Samsung’s Galaxy Buds look less silly than Apple AirPods and are just as good

Samsung’s Galaxy Buds are the company’s take on Apple AirPods, and they’re really good. Apple’s AirPods have become incredibly successful since their launch in 2017. While they work with Android phones, the target audience has mostly been for Apple products, since they pair so easily with them. Samsung has tried to compete with its own version AirPods for several years now, but its latest attempt is its best yet and is the best option I’ve found for Android users. Plus, they look a lot less sill


Samsung’s Galaxy Buds are the company’s take on Apple AirPods, and they’re really good. Apple’s AirPods have become incredibly successful since their launch in 2017. While they work with Android phones, the target audience has mostly been for Apple products, since they pair so easily with them. Samsung has tried to compete with its own version AirPods for several years now, but its latest attempt is its best yet and is the best option I’ve found for Android users. Plus, they look a lot less sill
Samsung’s Galaxy Buds look less silly than Apple AirPods and are just as good Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-20  Authors: todd haselton, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, best, tried, silly, samsungs, themsamsung, theyre, users, look, android, work, version, galaxy, airpods, good, buds


Samsung's Galaxy Buds look less silly than Apple AirPods and are just as good

Samsung’s Galaxy Buds are the company’s take on Apple AirPods, and they’re really good.

There’s a reason why Samsung continues to play in this market. Apple’s AirPods have become incredibly successful since their launch in 2017. While they work with Android phones, the target audience has mostly been for Apple products, since they pair so easily with them.

Samsung has tried to compete with its own version AirPods for several years now, but its latest attempt is its best yet and is the best option I’ve found for Android users. Plus, they look a lot less silly than AirPods, which makes them a fine alternative even for people who own iPhones.

Here’s what you need to know.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-20  Authors: todd haselton, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, best, tried, silly, samsungs, themsamsung, theyre, users, look, android, work, version, galaxy, airpods, good, buds


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Why this strategist says the sterling could remain buoyant

Why this strategist says the sterling could remain buoyant4 Hours AgoRodrigo Catril of NAB says there is “clearly no appetite” for a hard Brexit from the U.K. and Europe, which is likely to be good for the pound.


Why this strategist says the sterling could remain buoyant4 Hours AgoRodrigo Catril of NAB says there is “clearly no appetite” for a hard Brexit from the U.K. and Europe, which is likely to be good for the pound.
Why this strategist says the sterling could remain buoyant Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, strategist, nab, hard, good, uk, hours, buoyant, pound, remain, likely, sterling


Why this strategist says the sterling could remain buoyant

Why this strategist says the sterling could remain buoyant

4 Hours Ago

Rodrigo Catril of NAB says there is “clearly no appetite” for a hard Brexit from the U.K. and Europe, which is likely to be good for the pound.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, strategist, nab, hard, good, uk, hours, buoyant, pound, remain, likely, sterling


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This is the No. 1 reason Americans file for bankruptcy—here’s how to make sure you’re in good shape

Even with health insurance, more and more individuals are finding that they cannot afford their medical bills. The data showed that an estimated 530,000 families turn to bankruptcy each year because of high medical bills. (Other reasons behind bankruptcy included high mortgages or foreclosure, spending or living beyond one’s means, student loans and divorce.) If you’re drowning in medical bills, the important thing here is to know that you have options. Here are some helpful tips to help you cop


Even with health insurance, more and more individuals are finding that they cannot afford their medical bills. The data showed that an estimated 530,000 families turn to bankruptcy each year because of high medical bills. (Other reasons behind bankruptcy included high mortgages or foreclosure, spending or living beyond one’s means, student loans and divorce.) If you’re drowning in medical bills, the important thing here is to know that you have options. Here are some helpful tips to help you cop
This is the No. 1 reason Americans file for bankruptcy—here’s how to make sure you’re in good shape Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: jennifer streaks, caitlin rhea spaulding
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, bankruptcyheres, youre, shape, high, bills, bankruptcy, insurance, american, pay, reason, file, sure, bankruptcies, good, medical, health, americans


This is the No. 1 reason Americans file for bankruptcy—here's how to make sure you're in good shape

Even with health insurance, more and more individuals are finding that they cannot afford their medical bills.

A recent study published as an editorial in the American Journal of Public Health found that 66.5 percent of all bankruptcies filed by Americans were tied to medical issues (due to high costs or time out of work). The data showed that an estimated 530,000 families turn to bankruptcy each year because of high medical bills.

(Other reasons behind bankruptcy included high mortgages or foreclosure, spending or living beyond one’s means, student loans and divorce.)

“Despite gains in coverage and access to care from the Affordable Care Act, our findings suggest that it did not change the proportion of bankruptcies with medical causes,” the authors wrote.

Even worse, 57 percent of American adults say they’ve been surprised by a medical bill they thought would be covered by insurance, according to a survey from the research group NORC at the University of Chicago. This leaves many scrambling to find a way to pay their bills — on top essential expenses like mortgage, food and utility costs.

Unfortunately, those who can’t pay off debt fast enough eventually have their bills turned over to a collection agency, which is bad news for their credit score. If you’re drowning in medical bills, the important thing here is to know that you have options. Here are some helpful tips to help you cope with high medical bills:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: jennifer streaks, caitlin rhea spaulding
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, bankruptcyheres, youre, shape, high, bills, bankruptcy, insurance, american, pay, reason, file, sure, bankruptcies, good, medical, health, americans


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Mark Mobius says Brexit could be ‘terrific’ for emerging markets

The prospect of Britain leaving the European Union without a Withdrawal Agreement over the coming days could be “terrific” for emerging markets, according to veteran fund manager Mark Mobius. His comments come as British Prime Minister Theresa May considers whether to put her embattled Brexit deal before Parliament for the third time. Everybody can come into our country, everybody can trade free of problems,’ then (Brexit) is going to be terrific,” Mark Mobius, founding partner at Mobius Capital


The prospect of Britain leaving the European Union without a Withdrawal Agreement over the coming days could be “terrific” for emerging markets, according to veteran fund manager Mark Mobius. His comments come as British Prime Minister Theresa May considers whether to put her embattled Brexit deal before Parliament for the third time. Everybody can come into our country, everybody can trade free of problems,’ then (Brexit) is going to be terrific,” Mark Mobius, founding partner at Mobius Capital
Mark Mobius says Brexit could be ‘terrific’ for emerging markets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: sam meredith, reuters tv via reuters
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, terrific, good, mark, uk, emerging, mobius, markets, trade, going


Mark Mobius says Brexit could be 'terrific' for emerging markets

The prospect of Britain leaving the European Union without a Withdrawal Agreement over the coming days could be “terrific” for emerging markets, according to veteran fund manager Mark Mobius.

His comments come as British Prime Minister Theresa May considers whether to put her embattled Brexit deal before Parliament for the third time.

May has urged U.K. lawmakers to make an “honourable compromise” on her twice-rejected Brexit deal, with less than 12 days to go before the world’s fifth-largest economy is set to leave the bloc.

“If the U.K. says: ‘Look, we are free trade. Everybody can come into our country, everybody can trade free of problems,’ then (Brexit) is going to be terrific,” Mark Mobius, founding partner at Mobius Capital Partners, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Monday.

“It is going to be good for England, it is going to be good for the rest of the world and particularly for emerging countries,” Mobius said.

“Don’t forget, the U.K. has very close ties with a lot of these great emerging markets.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: sam meredith, reuters tv via reuters
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, terrific, good, mark, uk, emerging, mobius, markets, trade, going


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After comeback, the stock market is aligned with a historical pattern with perfect track record

Stocks hit a new high for the year this week, back on track to match a post-election pattern that has stood the test of time. The stock market has risen in the year after all 18 midterm elections since World War II, with the S&P 500 delivering an average return of 14.5 percent, according to LPL Financial Research. After this week’s rally, the stock market has bounced back from December’s steep sell-off with the S&P 500 up more than 12 percent year to date. President Donald Trump, ‘glued’ to the


Stocks hit a new high for the year this week, back on track to match a post-election pattern that has stood the test of time. The stock market has risen in the year after all 18 midterm elections since World War II, with the S&P 500 delivering an average return of 14.5 percent, according to LPL Financial Research. After this week’s rally, the stock market has bounced back from December’s steep sell-off with the S&P 500 up more than 12 percent year to date. President Donald Trump, ‘glued’ to the
After comeback, the stock market is aligned with a historical pattern with perfect track record Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-16  Authors: yun li, johannes eisele, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, record, sp, pattern, stocks, 500, stock, comeback, election, track, aligned, week, good, historical, market, perfect


After comeback, the stock market is aligned with a historical pattern with perfect track record

Stocks hit a new high for the year this week, back on track to match a post-election pattern that has stood the test of time.

The stock market has risen in the year after all 18 midterm elections since World War II, with the S&P 500 delivering an average return of 14.5 percent, according to LPL Financial Research. The pattern is pointing to a longer bull run even after this year’s epic rebound.

“With the S&P 500 up only 1.3 percent since the midterm election last November, there indeed could still be room for stocks to run in 2019,” LPL’s Ryan Detrick said in a note on Wednesday.

After this week’s rally, the stock market has bounced back from December’s steep sell-off with the S&P 500 up more than 12 percent year to date. And there are a couple catalysts that could send stocks even higher, including a China trade deal that could take the uncertainty out of the market and a helping hand from the Federal Reserve that already signaled a more “patient” approach to rate hikes and it is prepared to “adjust” balance sheet unwind if needed.

President Donald Trump, ‘glued’ to the stock market’s fluctuations, is a big champion of this market pattern as he views a booming market as his way to re-election. CNBC reported last week Trump is pushing hard to strike a trade deal with China in the hope of lifting the stock market ahead of his re-election bid.

“The third year leading up to an election tends to be a very good one for the market because the president is trying to have the economy and the party in power looking good for getting re-elected,” Andrew Slimmon, senior portfolio manager at Morgan Stanley Investment Management, said on CNBC’s Power Lunch.

The year prior to a presidential election has almost always been a good one — in the last 19 such years, the market is up on average 15 percent and 18 out of 19 times it’s been positive, according to Slimmon.

The pattern can also be explained by the gridlock situation often seen after an election, where lawmakers and the President are unlikely to do harm or remove any bullish policy that is already in place.

— With reporting from CNBC’s Michael Bloom


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-16  Authors: yun li, johannes eisele, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, record, sp, pattern, stocks, 500, stock, comeback, election, track, aligned, week, good, historical, market, perfect


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These tech companies aim to cure pain without pills

In 1992, doctors told Sana Health founder and CEO Richard Hanbury that he had just five years to live. It was a 1990’s movie — “Hudson Hawk” — that led Hanbury to develop a cure. In the film, Hawk, played by Bruce Willis, is just out of prison and gets pulled back into a series of heists, including stealing famous works of art. “Bruce Willis did literally save my life with that film,” Hanbury said in an interview. “The film went from good and bad to good and bad the whole way through.


In 1992, doctors told Sana Health founder and CEO Richard Hanbury that he had just five years to live. It was a 1990’s movie — “Hudson Hawk” — that led Hanbury to develop a cure. In the film, Hawk, played by Bruce Willis, is just out of prison and gets pulled back into a series of heists, including stealing famous works of art. “Bruce Willis did literally save my life with that film,” Hanbury said in an interview. “The film went from good and bad to good and bad the whole way through.
These tech companies aim to cure pain without pills Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: lora kolodny, katie schoolov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hanbury, film, pain, good, cure, hawk, morphine, worse, bad, aim, companies, willis, yemen, pills, tech


These tech companies aim to cure pain without pills

In 1992, doctors told Sana Health founder and CEO Richard Hanbury that he had just five years to live.

A Jeep accident in Yemen at age 19 left him in a wheelchair and in such intense pain that he was rarely able to sleep, he recalls. Prescription drugs, even morphine, lost their effectiveness and the chronic pain from nerve damage only got worse, to the point that it threatened to kill him.

It was a 1990’s movie — “Hudson Hawk” — that led Hanbury to develop a cure. In the film, Hawk, played by Bruce Willis, is just out of prison and gets pulled back into a series of heists, including stealing famous works of art.

“Bruce Willis did literally save my life with that film,” Hanbury said in an interview. “The film went from good and bad to good and bad the whole way through. As I was watching, I realized that had changed my pain levels more than morphine. That’s where the whole idea of using a visual stimulus to create a different state of consciousness came from.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: lora kolodny, katie schoolov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hanbury, film, pain, good, cure, hawk, morphine, worse, bad, aim, companies, willis, yemen, pills, tech


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There’s ‘no good solution’ to Brexit, professor says

There’s ‘no good solution’ to Brexit, professor says2 Hours AgoThe “best compromise” for the U.K. and EU would be to revoke Article 50, but that is not likely to happen, says Antonio Fatas of INSEAD.


There’s ‘no good solution’ to Brexit, professor says2 Hours AgoThe “best compromise” for the U.K. and EU would be to revoke Article 50, but that is not likely to happen, says Antonio Fatas of INSEAD.
There’s ‘no good solution’ to Brexit, professor says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, professor, theres, likely, good, solution, brexit, insead, uk, says2, happen, revoke, hours


There's 'no good solution' to Brexit, professor says

There’s ‘no good solution’ to Brexit, professor says

2 Hours Ago

The “best compromise” for the U.K. and EU would be to revoke Article 50, but that is not likely to happen, says Antonio Fatas of INSEAD.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, professor, theres, likely, good, solution, brexit, insead, uk, says2, happen, revoke, hours


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U.S. stocks are sinking on worries about Europe’s growth—here are 5 experts’ reactions

• UBS’ Art Cashin said Thursday’s drop was a sign “that things are slowing down. And this morning, when the market began to erode, they broke through those lows, and that’s when selling accelerated. You’ve got things like industrials taking part, financials, small-cap; that’s healthy for a market as well. I don’t think that we’re going to suffer from that. And I visited with him yesterday and I was very much reminded of that, and I think the U.S. absolutely can remain strong.


• UBS’ Art Cashin said Thursday’s drop was a sign “that things are slowing down. And this morning, when the market began to erode, they broke through those lows, and that’s when selling accelerated. You’ve got things like industrials taking part, financials, small-cap; that’s healthy for a market as well. I don’t think that we’re going to suffer from that. And I visited with him yesterday and I was very much reminded of that, and I think the U.S. absolutely can remain strong.
U.S. stocks are sinking on worries about Europe’s growth—here are 5 experts’ reactions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: lizzy gurdus, alexander shcherbak, tass, getty images, thomas lohnes, john greim, lightrocket, adam jeffery, kcna, thomas barwick getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sinking, worries, europes, bounce, thats, recession, reactions, growthhere, stocks, experts, good, europe, growth, things, think, dont, market


U.S. stocks are sinking on worries about Europe's growth—here are 5 experts' reactions

U.S. stocks took a hit Thursday on concerns around global growth after the European Central Bank cut its forecast for 2019 and announced plans to stimulate the European economy, but Wall Street experts say it’s not all bad.

Even as weaker growth and inflation in Europe typically don’t help the U.S. economy, some see the decision by ECB President Mario Draghi as a welcome reprieve for a U.S. stock market that has seen especially volatile trading in recent months.

Here are five experts’ takes on Thursday’s moves:

• Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities, saw the action as the beginning of U.S. stocks digesting their recent rally: “Our clients very much are attuned to the fact that we went down too far, too fast in the fourth quarter of last year, particularly in December. So, therefore, that V-shaped recovery has probably been too quick. And I think we’re at a point where investors understand that when you move that quickly in one direction, you have to take some time to digest that move. I think we’re at that period now, so I’m not surprised at all [that we’re] finding ourselves spending some time between 2,750 and 2,800, unless and until we actually see the manifestation of good news coming out of the things we’ve started to price in, things like the trade war being over. We need to see that turn into good news and economic data.”

• UBS’ Art Cashin said Thursday’s drop was a sign “that things are slowing down. We’re getting more and more reports that this face-off between the U.S. and China is beginning to affect global trade as a whole, and Europe seems to be floundering a bit. You’ve got nothing good from Draghi. You’re at important technical levels. Monday, you had gone down and had a nice bounce. Yesterday, we retested those lows, but we didn’t get a bounce. And this morning, when the market began to erode, they broke through those lows, and that’s when selling accelerated. People said, ‘I don’t want this risk profile here.’ So, you went through 25,611 and now you’re trying to bounce off 25,360. And we’ll see. So far, it’s not terribly inspiring a bounce.”

• Liz Young, director of market strategy at BNY Mellon, said recession worries were probably overblown: “The data doesn’t go back very far, but since the ’70s, it’s never been the case that somebody else leads us into a global recession. The U.S. always leads that. So there’s no signs of recession in the U.S. right now, or at least very soft signs, and we’re not expecting that to come to fruition anytime soon. […] We had 70 percent of the market make a one-month high recently. … That doesn’t happen in a bear market. We’ve had [a] broadening of this rally. You’ve got things like industrials taking part, financials, small-cap; that’s healthy for a market as well. So we’re hoping that it continues to prod along. When a market is up 10, 11, 12 percent in two months, the first two months of the year, it was a lot easier to make a case for it to pull back.”

• Gilman Hill Asset Management’s Jenny Harrington agreed, contending that maybe it’s time for the U.S. market to simply “bump along” for a while: “I think we can make new highs. They just don’t have to be made every day. […] I don’t see it as a storm gathering in Europe. There’s still positive growth, expectations. Yeah, it’s almost nothing. It’s, like, 1 percent. But you have the ECB really working hard to protect the banks and to protect the economy, I think, in a way that they hadn’t done in past recessions in Europe. So … I don’t think that we’re going to suffer from that. I’m just reminded of one quick thing: I have this wonderful client, an older British guy, and he always says, ‘One bets against the U.S. at one’s own peril.’ And I visited with him yesterday and I was very much reminded of that, and I think the U.S. absolutely can remain strong. I think that earnings were down in the first quarter [and] I think that estimates could pick up towards [the] later half of the year.”

• Jon Najarian, of the Najarian Family Office, backed up those points, calling the ECB’s forecast cut a “short-term negative”: “People weren’t sure that this would be a move that he would make and that the ECB in general would push for this. Now that they have and they’ve put it in writing, held a press conference, talked about it, I think, overall, that’s going to be a good thing for Europe. It might not be good for some of the debt that they’re building up with it, but just like our debt, they’re not thinking about that right now.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: lizzy gurdus, alexander shcherbak, tass, getty images, thomas lohnes, john greim, lightrocket, adam jeffery, kcna, thomas barwick getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sinking, worries, europes, bounce, thats, recession, reactions, growthhere, stocks, experts, good, europe, growth, things, think, dont, market


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Why stocks surging in January and February is a good sign for March

Through the first two months of this year, the S&P 500 gained more than 11%. Since 1990, when the S&P has gained 7.5% or more January through February, all three major indices have continued higher in March. The S&P – along with the Dow and Nasdaq – all gained an additional average of 2-4 percent, according to a CNBC analysis using Kensho. But several individual sectors have outperformed during those March periods. The top three were Financials, Consumer Discretionary and Consumer Staples.


Through the first two months of this year, the S&P 500 gained more than 11%. Since 1990, when the S&P has gained 7.5% or more January through February, all three major indices have continued higher in March. The S&P – along with the Dow and Nasdaq – all gained an additional average of 2-4 percent, according to a CNBC analysis using Kensho. But several individual sectors have outperformed during those March periods. The top three were Financials, Consumer Discretionary and Consumer Staples.
Why stocks surging in January and February is a good sign for March Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: cnbccom staff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sign, consumer, return, sectors, good, gained, periodsthe, using, surging, staples, nasdaq, stocks, sp, outperformed


Why stocks surging in January and February is a good sign for March

Through the first two months of this year, the S&P 500 gained more than 11%.

That’s its best return in three decades.

Since 1990, when the S&P has gained 7.5% or more January through February, all three major indices have continued higher in March.

The S&P – along with the Dow and Nasdaq – all gained an additional average of 2-4 percent, according to a CNBC analysis using Kensho.

But several individual sectors have outperformed during those March periods.

The top three were Financials, Consumer Discretionary and Consumer Staples.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: cnbccom staff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sign, consumer, return, sectors, good, gained, periodsthe, using, surging, staples, nasdaq, stocks, sp, outperformed


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