Google announces plans for a new data center in Denmark

Alphabet’s Google is to invest 600 million euros ($685.98 million) to build its first data center in Denmark. “The Fredericia data center will be among the most energy efficient data centers in Denmark to date, taking advantage of advanced machine learning to make sure every watt of electricity counts,” Kava added. Denmark is something of a world leader in wind energy. The Fredericia data center is set to be Google’s fifth in Europe. In October 2017, Amazon announced that its Amazon Wind Farm Te


Alphabet’s Google is to invest 600 million euros ($685.98 million) to build its first data center in Denmark. “The Fredericia data center will be among the most energy efficient data centers in Denmark to date, taking advantage of advanced machine learning to make sure every watt of electricity counts,” Kava added. Denmark is something of a world leader in wind energy. The Fredericia data center is set to be Google’s fifth in Europe. In October 2017, Amazon announced that its Amazon Wind Farm Te
Google announces plans for a new data center in Denmark Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: anmar frangoul, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wind, center, million, energy, google, fredericia, solar, plans, amazon, announces, denmark, kava, data


Google announces plans for a new data center in Denmark

Alphabet’s Google is to invest 600 million euros ($685.98 million) to build its first data center in Denmark.

In a blog post Tuesday, Google’s Vice President for Global Data Centers, Joe Kava, said the facility would be located just outside Fredericia, in the west of the country. Kava added that Google was “committed to matching its energy use with 100 percent carbon-free energy” in Fredericia.

The business was therefore “pursuing new investment opportunities” in Danish renewable energy projects such as solar energy and onshore and offshore wind. It did not name any other companies that it would partner with.

“The Fredericia data center will be among the most energy efficient data centers in Denmark to date, taking advantage of advanced machine learning to make sure every watt of electricity counts,” Kava added.

Denmark is something of a world leader in wind energy. Over one third of the country’s electricity production comes from wind turbines, according to the Danish Energy Agency.

The Fredericia data center is set to be Google’s fifth in Europe. It currently has sites in Belgium, Finland, Ireland and the Netherlands. Google is among a number of tech giants turning to renewable energy as they look to green their operations.

In July, for example, Facebook said its Prineville Data Center in Oregon would be supported by 100 percent solar power under a new partnership with Pacific Power. In October 2017, Amazon announced that its Amazon Wind Farm Texas was operational. At the time, Amazon said that the facility, located in Scurry County, would add over 1 million megawatt hours of clean energy to the grid each year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: anmar frangoul, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wind, center, million, energy, google, fredericia, solar, plans, amazon, announces, denmark, kava, data


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Google walkouts inspired push for disability accommodation change

When Google changed the wording of its internal process for granting disability accommodation late last week, employee Cathy Fitzpatrick took it as proof that you can effect change by speaking out. She says Google’s policy appeared to require employees with disabilities to provide medical documentation before it would discuss accommodation. Fitzpatrick first brought up her issues with the process internally about a year ago, but the company wouldn’t budge. So Fitzpatrick posted a long thread on


When Google changed the wording of its internal process for granting disability accommodation late last week, employee Cathy Fitzpatrick took it as proof that you can effect change by speaking out. She says Google’s policy appeared to require employees with disabilities to provide medical documentation before it would discuss accommodation. Fitzpatrick first brought up her issues with the process internally about a year ago, but the company wouldn’t budge. So Fitzpatrick posted a long thread on
Google walkouts inspired push for disability accommodation change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: jillian donfro, aly song
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, medical, disability, googles, accommodation, workplace, push, walkouts, inspired, internal, google, company, fitzpatrick, change, process


Google walkouts inspired push for disability accommodation change

When Google changed the wording of its internal process for granting disability accommodation late last week, employee Cathy Fitzpatrick took it as proof that you can effect change by speaking out.

In the past year, the tech industry generally and Google employees in particular have shown an unusually high level of labor organizing, with employees sounding off about multiple workplace issues, including diversity and controversial company business contracts. Google made changes to its sexual harassment and misconduct policies after employees staged massive walkouts earlier this month (though the company ignored several of the organizers’ demands like adding an employee representative to Alphabet’s board).

Fitzpatrick’s complaint had to do with Google’s policy around providing special accommodation for employees with disabilities, like providing workspace adjustments for someone with an injury or tailored communication resources for an autistic person. She says Google’s policy appeared to require employees with disabilities to provide medical documentation before it would discuss accommodation.

She says that an anonymous internal mailing list for employees experiencing mental illness was rife with complaints about Google’s process, and that one co-worker waited seven months to request accommodation because the documentation requirement was intimidating.

Fitzpatrick first brought up her issues with the process internally about a year ago, but the company wouldn’t budge. So Fitzpatrick posted a long thread on Twitter laying out why she thought the process violated state and federal law.

Google softened its language about the process on its internal site soon after Fitzpatrick complained publicly. Instead of beginning with “Discuss your workplace barriers with your medical provider,” the revised site begins with “Where appropriate, we may ask you to provide information about your condition from a third party (e.g., your medical provider)….”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: jillian donfro, aly song
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, medical, disability, googles, accommodation, workplace, push, walkouts, inspired, internal, google, company, fitzpatrick, change, process


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A second ‘FAANG’ stock just went red for the year as popular tech trade dies

While Facebook turned negative a few months ago, Alphabet became the second major tech company to go negative. Tech stocks overall were hit hard Tuesday as the Nasdaq Composite Index slid another 1.2 percent. Facebook and Alphabet are just two of the companies that make up the group of large tech stocks commonly known as FAANG. Still, the three other FAANG stocks hung onto their gains for the year. Clarification: This story was revised to clarify the timing of the decline of more than $1 trillio


While Facebook turned negative a few months ago, Alphabet became the second major tech company to go negative. Tech stocks overall were hit hard Tuesday as the Nasdaq Composite Index slid another 1.2 percent. Facebook and Alphabet are just two of the companies that make up the group of large tech stocks commonly known as FAANG. Still, the three other FAANG stocks hung onto their gains for the year. Clarification: This story was revised to clarify the timing of the decline of more than $1 trillio
A second ‘FAANG’ stock just went red for the year as popular tech trade dies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: lauren feiner, anindito mukheriee, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, faang, stocks, trade, apple, popular, tech, trillion, stock, second, went, dies, alphabet, google, company, netflix, red, facebook


A second 'FAANG' stock just went red for the year as popular tech trade dies

Facebook and Google parent company Alphabet stocks are now down for the year. While Facebook turned negative a few months ago, Alphabet became the second major tech company to go negative.

Tech stocks overall were hit hard Tuesday as the Nasdaq Composite Index slid another 1.2 percent. Facebook and Alphabet are just two of the companies that make up the group of large tech stocks commonly known as FAANG. The others are Amazon, Apple and Netflix. As of Tuesday, the FAANG stocks have lost more than $1 trillion from their recent highs.

Still, the three other FAANG stocks hung onto their gains for the year. As of Tuesday, Amazon was up 30 percent year to date, Apple was up 5.7 percent and Netflix was up nearly 42 percent.

Facebook was down more than 25 percent this year and Alphabet was down more than 2 percent as of Tuesday. The year has been tumultuous for Facebook, which has faced a series of scandals involving misinformation on its platform and questions over data privacy. Google employees walked out of offices around the world earlier this month after The New York Times reported that the company had paid out a $90 million exit package to a former executive who was accused of sexual misconduct.

Clarification: This story was revised to clarify the timing of the decline of more than $1 trillion in market value for FAANG stocks.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: lauren feiner, anindito mukheriee, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, faang, stocks, trade, apple, popular, tech, trillion, stock, second, went, dies, alphabet, google, company, netflix, red, facebook


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Google warns its news site could shut down in Europe if a new ‘link tax’ goes ahead

The future of Google News in Europe could be uncertain if European Union plans for a “link tax” for using news stories go ahead. The so-called link tax is part of proposed European legislation that grants publishers copyright over content that is shared online via Facebook or YouTube and applies to sites that aggregate articles such as Google News. If the legislation goes ahead, Google would have to compensate publishers when articles appear in search results on its news pages. In Spain, Google


The future of Google News in Europe could be uncertain if European Union plans for a “link tax” for using news stories go ahead. The so-called link tax is part of proposed European legislation that grants publishers copyright over content that is shared online via Facebook or YouTube and applies to sites that aggregate articles such as Google News. If the legislation goes ahead, Google would have to compensate publishers when articles appear in search results on its news pages. In Spain, Google
Google warns its news site could shut down in Europe if a new ‘link tax’ goes ahead Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-19  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shut, goes, site, link, rule, tax, europe, google, publishers, ahead, warns, told, spain, guardian, legislation


Google warns its news site could shut down in Europe if a new 'link tax' goes ahead

The future of Google News in Europe could be uncertain if European Union plans for a “link tax” for using news stories go ahead.

The so-called link tax is part of proposed European legislation that grants publishers copyright over content that is shared online via Facebook or YouTube and applies to sites that aggregate articles such as Google News. If the legislation goes ahead, Google would have to compensate publishers when articles appear in search results on its news pages.

But Google’s Vice President of News Richard Gingras told the Guardian that the company is very concerned about the possible payment rule and would not rule out shutting down Google News in EU countries if the legislation goes ahead in its current form.

In Spain, Google closed its news service in 2014 because of a similar requirement for it to pay royalties to Spanish publishers. “We would not like to see that happen in Europe,” Gingras told the Guardian. “Right now, what we want to do is work with stakeholders.” However, as Spain is a much smaller jurisdiction than the EU as a whole, there are doubts about whether Google would take such action.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-19  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shut, goes, site, link, rule, tax, europe, google, publishers, ahead, warns, told, spain, guardian, legislation


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Tim Cook explains why Apple accepts billions from Google despite privacy concerns

Apple CEO Tim Cook didn’t name names when he spoke out against the privacy practices of big tech companies during a keynote speech in Brussels last month. And these stockpiles of personal data serve only to enrich the companies that collect them,” Cook said in the October 24 speech. Those comments were primarily directed at Facebook and Google, the two biggest tech companies that make most of their money from advertising based on user data. Both of those companies have battled a public reckoning


Apple CEO Tim Cook didn’t name names when he spoke out against the privacy practices of big tech companies during a keynote speech in Brussels last month. And these stockpiles of personal data serve only to enrich the companies that collect them,” Cook said in the October 24 speech. Those comments were primarily directed at Facebook and Google, the two biggest tech companies that make most of their money from advertising based on user data. Both of those companies have battled a public reckoning
Tim Cook explains why Apple accepts billions from Google despite privacy concerns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-18  Authors: steve kovach, aris oikonomou, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, accepts, cook, reckoning, apple, google, companies, user, tim, privacy, practices, despite, tech, speech, facebook, concerns, billions, explains


Tim Cook explains why Apple accepts billions from Google despite privacy concerns

Apple CEO Tim Cook didn’t name names when he spoke out against the privacy practices of big tech companies during a keynote speech in Brussels last month. But he didn’t have to.

“We shouldn’t sugarcoat the consequences. This is surveillance. And these stockpiles of personal data serve only to enrich the companies that collect them,” Cook said in the October 24 speech. “This should make us very uncomfortable. It should unsettle us.”

Those comments were primarily directed at Facebook and Google, the two biggest tech companies that make most of their money from advertising based on user data. Both of those companies have battled a public reckoning over their user privacy practices over the last few years, and that reckoning is far from over.

But that hasn’t stopped Apple from working with the companies it disagrees with. Facebook and Google’s apps are available in Apple’s App Store, for example, and Apple accepts billions of dollars a year from Google so Google can be the default search engine in the Safari web browser.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-18  Authors: steve kovach, aris oikonomou, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, accepts, cook, reckoning, apple, google, companies, user, tim, privacy, practices, despite, tech, speech, facebook, concerns, billions, explains


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Tim Cook explains why Apple accepts billions from Google despite privacy concerns

Apple CEO Tim Cook didn’t name names when he spoke out against the privacy practices of big tech companies during a keynote speech in Brussels last month. And these stockpiles of personal data serve only to enrich the companies that collect them,” Cook said in the Oct. 24 speech. Those comments were primarily directed at Facebook and Google, the two biggest tech companies that make most of their money from advertising based on user data. Both of those companies have battled a public reckoning ov


Apple CEO Tim Cook didn’t name names when he spoke out against the privacy practices of big tech companies during a keynote speech in Brussels last month. And these stockpiles of personal data serve only to enrich the companies that collect them,” Cook said in the Oct. 24 speech. Those comments were primarily directed at Facebook and Google, the two biggest tech companies that make most of their money from advertising based on user data. Both of those companies have battled a public reckoning ov
Tim Cook explains why Apple accepts billions from Google despite privacy concerns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-18  Authors: steve kovach, aris oikonomou, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, reckoning, privacy, tim, user, despite, explains, google, apple, concerns, tech, cook, practices, accepts, speech, billions, didnt


Tim Cook explains why Apple accepts billions from Google despite privacy concerns

Apple CEO Tim Cook didn’t name names when he spoke out against the privacy practices of big tech companies during a keynote speech in Brussels last month. But he didn’t have to.

“We shouldn’t sugarcoat the consequences. This is surveillance. And these stockpiles of personal data serve only to enrich the companies that collect them,” Cook said in the Oct. 24 speech. “This should make us very uncomfortable. It should unsettle us.”

Those comments were primarily directed at Facebook and Google, the two biggest tech companies that make most of their money from advertising based on user data. Both of those companies have battled a public reckoning over their user privacy practices over the last few years, and that reckoning is far from over.

But that hasn’t stopped Apple from working with the companies it disagrees with. Facebook’s and Google’s apps are available in Apple’s app store, for example, and Apple accepts billions of dollars a year from Google so Google can be the default search engine in the Safari web browser.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-18  Authors: steve kovach, aris oikonomou, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, reckoning, privacy, tim, user, despite, explains, google, apple, concerns, tech, cook, practices, accepts, speech, billions, didnt


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Google Pixel phones can now take amazing pictures in the dark — here’s a look

That’s why the latest camera update for Google’s Pixel phones feels so incredible. The app essentially takes a burst of sharp, dark photos and merges them together, while automatically rebalancing the colors to make them more accurate. While I took most of the following shots on the latest version of Google’s Pixel, the camera update is also available for its two earlier models. That’s what makes Night Sight particularly revolutionary: Google made these drastic improvements in low-light photogra


That’s why the latest camera update for Google’s Pixel phones feels so incredible. The app essentially takes a burst of sharp, dark photos and merges them together, while automatically rebalancing the colors to make them more accurate. While I took most of the following shots on the latest version of Google’s Pixel, the camera update is also available for its two earlier models. That’s what makes Night Sight particularly revolutionary: Google made these drastic improvements in low-light photogra
Google Pixel phones can now take amazing pictures in the dark — here’s a look Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-17  Authors: jillian donfro, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, update, dark, version, phones, pictures, look, camera, sight, photos, night, heres, taking, pixel, google, amazing, youre, latest


Google Pixel phones can now take amazing pictures in the dark — here's a look

Taking pictures on your smartphone in the dark is usually a lousy experience.

The photos often come out dull, discolored, or blurry, unless you use a flash, in which case you’re stuck with an artificial shininess and red eyes. Without a tripod and the know-how to manually adjust your phone’s camera settings, capturing a dark scene that looks clear and authentic is tough. That’s why the latest camera update for Google’s Pixel phones feels so incredible.

Google’s just-launched Night Sight feature makes taking bright, crisp photos in the dark as easy as waiting a few extra moments after you press the shutter button. The app essentially takes a burst of sharp, dark photos and merges them together, while automatically rebalancing the colors to make them more accurate. After a couple evenings of testing, some of the results truly amazed me.

While I took most of the following shots on the latest version of Google’s Pixel, the camera update is also available for its two earlier models. That’s what makes Night Sight particularly revolutionary: Google made these drastic improvements in low-light photography simply using software.

To use it, make sure that you’ve downloaded the latest version of the Pixel’s camera app. The option to use Night Sight will either pop up automatically if you’re taking a picture in a dark setting, or you can access it by hitting the “more” button:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-17  Authors: jillian donfro, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, update, dark, version, phones, pictures, look, camera, sight, photos, night, heres, taking, pixel, google, amazing, youre, latest


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Subscription news services flourish as Google, Facebook dominate ads

Comcast Ventures had seen enough. “Starting an ad-supported business is really, really tough,” said Daniel Gulati, a Comcast Ventures partner, in an interview. (Comcast Ventures is owned by Comcast, which also owns CNBC parent company NBCUniversal.) This week alone, New York Media, the owner of New York Magazine, announced its sites would be paywalled. The New York Times, Wall Street Journal (owned by News Corp), The Financial Times (owned by Nikkei) and The Washington Post (owned by Amazon CEO


Comcast Ventures had seen enough. “Starting an ad-supported business is really, really tough,” said Daniel Gulati, a Comcast Ventures partner, in an interview. (Comcast Ventures is owned by Comcast, which also owns CNBC parent company NBCUniversal.) This week alone, New York Media, the owner of New York Magazine, announced its sites would be paywalled. The New York Times, Wall Street Journal (owned by News Corp), The Financial Times (owned by Nikkei) and The Washington Post (owned by Amazon CEO
Subscription news services flourish as Google, Facebook dominate ads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-17  Authors: alex sherman, courtesy of the information, cameron costa, source, alex mather, reuters brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, subscription, flourish, companies, ads, media, comcast, times, dominate, york, google, venture, ventures, owned, facebook, services, shift


Subscription news services flourish as Google, Facebook dominate ads

Comcast Ventures had seen enough. Years of researching business models, seeing their portfolio’s performance and watching digital media startups struggle had made an impression. For 2018, the venture capital firm made a decision: unless it found an extraordinary idea or entrepreneur, it would no longer put seed money behind advertising-driven media companies.

“Starting an ad-supported business is really, really tough,” said Daniel Gulati, a Comcast Ventures partner, in an interview. “As a general thesis, we are not actively looking to invest in seed companies that have an advertising-based business model.”

It’s a shift in thinking for Comcast Ventures, which has put money behind advertising-based models before, including 2009 and 2010 investments in Vox Media and a small 2016 funding of finance news network Cheddar. (Comcast Ventures is owned by Comcast, which also owns CNBC parent company NBCUniversal.)

The reason for the shift comes down to two tech giants: Facebook and Google. The duopoly has dominated digital advertising and both companies are only increasing in scale and market share.

Their targeting capabilities, given all of their data, is “second to none,” Gulati said. “As their growth accelerates, the opportunity for new companies diminish.”

As a result, subscription fees are hot — a return to how most media (newspapers, magazines, cable TV) prospered for decades.

This week alone, New York Media, the owner of New York Magazine, announced its sites would be paywalled. That was soon followed by paywall announcements by Verizon’s Yahoo Finance and Atlantic Media’s Quartz. Bloomberg, Axel Springer’s Business Insider, Conde Nast’s Vanity Fair and Wired, and a bunch of other online magazines introduced or hardened their paywalls this year. The New York Times, Wall Street Journal (owned by News Corp), The Financial Times (owned by Nikkei) and The Washington Post (owned by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos) made that decision even earlier.

“For many years, the popular narrative has been that readers simply weren’t willing to pay for content online,” said Eric Stromberg, a venture capitalist at Bedrock Capital.

“The only way to win was to build an engine of free articles that were monetized through ads and shared on social networks. Paywalls wouldn’t scale. You were destined to have a niche audience if you had a paywall. We’re starting to see a shift. I expect we’ll see it more powerfully over the next few years.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-17  Authors: alex sherman, courtesy of the information, cameron costa, source, alex mather, reuters brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, subscription, flourish, companies, ads, media, comcast, times, dominate, york, google, venture, ventures, owned, facebook, services, shift


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This is what Google learned after interviewing one job candidate 16 times, according to Eric Schmidt

Very early hiring strategies largely involved hiring co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin’s friends from Stanford University. “They were super smart, somewhat disorganized kinds of people,” Schmidt told Tyler Cowen on the “Conversations with Tyler” podcast. My favorite example is that we would interview people to death,” Schmidt told Cowen. In selecting candidates to consider, Google didn’t look for prior related experience, Schmidt said. “They hired a bunch of managers, and then they decided


Very early hiring strategies largely involved hiring co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin’s friends from Stanford University. “They were super smart, somewhat disorganized kinds of people,” Schmidt told Tyler Cowen on the “Conversations with Tyler” podcast. My favorite example is that we would interview people to death,” Schmidt told Cowen. In selecting candidates to consider, Google didn’t look for prior related experience, Schmidt said. “They hired a bunch of managers, and then they decided
This is what Google learned after interviewing one job candidate 16 times, according to Eric Schmidt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-17  Authors: catherine clifford, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, learned, times, way, experience, 16, google, strategies, hiring, candidate, managers, interviewing, job, told, schmidt, didnt, according, eric


This is what Google learned after interviewing one job candidate 16 times, according to Eric Schmidt

Eric Schmidt joined Google as CEO in 2001 and led the tech company for the next decade as the company grew from a start-up to a corporate behemoth, whose parent company, Alphabet, now has a market cap of over $740 billion.

Very early hiring strategies largely involved hiring co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin’s friends from Stanford University.

“They were super smart, somewhat disorganized kinds of people,” Schmidt told Tyler Cowen on the “Conversations with Tyler” podcast.

But as the company grew, hiring strategies evolved.

“The recruiting started off as informal, but it ultimately became very, very structured,” Schmidt said.

There were fumbles along the way. “We did all sorts of things [wrong]. My favorite example is that we would interview people to death,” Schmidt told Cowen.

“We interviewed this one gentleman 16 times, and we couldn’t decide.”

That was way too many interviews, of course. “So I picked a random number, which was half, and I said, ‘We should have a max of eight,'” Schmidt recalled.

“We’ve since done a statistical analysis,” said Schmidt, who is now a technical adviser to Alphabet, “and the answer today is four to five interviews.”

In selecting candidates to consider, Google didn’t look for prior related experience, Schmidt said.

“We were famously focused on the school you went to and your GPA and not your experience. This caused all sorts of consternation, but it produced people who were both young in a sense of inexperienced in business,” Schmidt said. “It produced people that were aggressive and ignorant of what they were doing, so they didn’t know what they were doing, but they could make mistakes.”

Google needed a team that was willing to change direction nimbly.

“Our argument was that, in a fast-growing company, we need people who can pivot around whatever the new challenge is, and we weren’t convinced that the people who had experience — since this was a new field — that that experience would allow them to pivot into the new problems,” Schmidt said.

And hiring from elite schools was a way of piggybacking on the work admissions departments had already done, Schmidt said.

“In our model of the world, the fact that top universities had sorted through these people was a pretty good piece of data for us to understand whether we should spend,” Schmidt said. “It was a good selection process.”

But Google has updated its hiring strategies. “Today, we are not quite as snooty as we were back then,” Schmidt said. “But in the early days, we were quite rigorous about this.”

Yet Google (like other Silicon Valley tech companies) still seems to have trouble diversifying its largely white male workforce.

Also in the first years of Google, Page and Brin didn’t believe there was a need for managers.

“They hired a bunch of managers, and then they decided they didn’t like the managers, so they got rid of all the managers,” Schmidt told Cowen. “This is called ‘the disorg.'”

Page and Brin thought management got in the way of work being done. (Eventually managers were again brought in.)


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-17  Authors: catherine clifford, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, learned, times, way, experience, 16, google, strategies, hiring, candidate, managers, interviewing, job, told, schmidt, didnt, according, eric


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Google Cloud CEO Diane Greene is out, to be replaced by former Oracle exec Thomas Kurian

A year ago, Greene announced that Diane Bryant, formerly the head of Intel’s data center business and a potential CEO candidate at the chipmaker, was joining Google Cloud as its operating chief. Thomas Kurian, a respected technologist and executive, will be joining Google Cloud on November 26th and transitioning into the Google Cloud leadership role in early 2019. The Google Cloud team has accomplished amazing things over the last three years, and I’m proud to have been a part of this transforma


A year ago, Greene announced that Diane Bryant, formerly the head of Intel’s data center business and a potential CEO candidate at the chipmaker, was joining Google Cloud as its operating chief. Thomas Kurian, a respected technologist and executive, will be joining Google Cloud on November 26th and transitioning into the Google Cloud leadership role in early 2019. The Google Cloud team has accomplished amazing things over the last three years, and I’m proud to have been a part of this transforma
Google Cloud CEO Diane Greene is out, to be replaced by former Oracle exec Thomas Kurian Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: jordan novet, ari levy, steve jennings, getty images, david paul morris, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, replaced, oracle, team, thomas, google, ceo, helping, diane, enterprise, kurian, great, technology, customers, work, greene, cloud, exec


Google Cloud CEO Diane Greene is out, to be replaced by former Oracle exec Thomas Kurian

Earlier this year, Greene faced an internal and external outcry over a controversial Department of Defense contract — dubbed Project Maven — to analyze and interpret drone videos via AI technology. Word of the deal led several thousand employees to sign a petition urging Pichai to keep Google out of the “business of war,” while dozens resigned in protest.

In taking over for Greene, Kurian faces a significant cultural challenge that’s been a consistent source of tension at Google. It’s a consumer-focused, engineering-driven company with some of the highest profits margins in technology that’s never been able to fully embrace the realities of selling to the enterprise.

No company is more closely associated with the enterprise than Oracle, but getting thousands of engineers and sales people on board is a tall task. A year ago, Greene announced that Diane Bryant, formerly the head of Intel’s data center business and a potential CEO candidate at the chipmaker, was joining Google Cloud as its operating chief. Seven months later she was gone.

Here’s Greene’s full blog post:

Transitioning Google Cloud after three great years

Hello All,

When I joined Google full-time to run Cloud in December 2015, I told my family and friends that it would be for two years. Now, after an unbelievably stimulating and productive three years, it’s time to turn to the passions I’ve long had around mentoring and education.

The mentoring will include investing in and helping female founder CEOs who have engineering or science backgrounds. I want to encourage every woman engineer and scientist to think in terms of building their own company someday. The world will be a better place with more female founder CEOs.

The work in education will especially be initiatives that combine technology with in-person teaching to make high-quality education that is low-cost, scalable and personalized. When bebop was purchased by Google, I committed all of my proceeds to philanthropy, it is high time to put that money to work!

Thomas Kurian, a respected technologist and executive, will be joining Google Cloud on November 26th and transitioning into the Google Cloud leadership role in early 2019. Sundar, Urs and I all interviewed Thomas, and I believe that he’ll do an amazing job helping to take Google Cloud to the next level.Thomas has 22 years of experience at Oracle; most recently he was President of Product Development.

I will continue as CEO through January, working with Thomas to ensure a smooth transition. I will remain a Director on the Alphabet board.

The Google Cloud team has accomplished amazing things over the last three years, and I’m proud to have been a part of this transformative work. We have moved Google Cloud from having only two significant customers and a collection of startups to having major Fortune 1000 enterprises betting their future on Google Cloud, something we should accept as a great compliment as well as a huge responsibility.

We’ve built a strong business together—set up by integrating sales, marketing, Google Cloud Platform (GCP), and Google Apps/G Suite into what is now called Google Cloud.

We established a training and professional services organization and partnering organizations. We revamped customer engineering and added a team of experts in the Office of the CTO. We also pioneered a way to help enterprises adopt AI through our Advanced Solutions Lab. We built out a full marketing organization that in just three years has received many recognitions including Cannes Lions awards. We set up our industry verticals org where we have achieved massive traction in health, financial services, retail, gaming and media, energy and manufacturing, and transportation. We set up the Cloud ML and the Cloud IoT groups. We acquired Apigee, Kaggle, qwiklabs and several great small startups. Our technology development has been recognized throughout the industry, and Google Cloud is differentiated in security, AI, open hybrid application modernization, G Suite, and many other areas. We are now recognized as a leader in 11 Gartner Magic Quadrants and Forrester Waves.

But here’s what I’m most proud of: the phenomenal team assembled and how we together have built out all of our functions for customer-facing enterprise readiness and engineering enterprise execution. When this journey started, some people would say that Google had great technology but they weren’t sure that customers would rely on Google as their enterprise partner. At our recent Google Cloud Next event in San Francisco, we had over 23,000 attendees, representing 10x growth from 2016. With nearly 300 customers speaking about how Google Cloud is helping to transform their businesses, no one was questioning our seriousness or our abilities.

The cloud space is early and there is an enormous opportunity ahead. I have loved working with everyone. I am especially grateful to all of our customers, partners, and employees for an amazing three years of getting to work with you.

—Diane


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: jordan novet, ari levy, steve jennings, getty images, david paul morris, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, replaced, oracle, team, thomas, google, ceo, helping, diane, enterprise, kurian, great, technology, customers, work, greene, cloud, exec


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