5 things to know before the stock market opens Wednesday

In comments from the NATO summit, President Donald Trump said Wednesday trade talks are going well and he’ll see what happens. ET, investors look to the Institute for Supply Management’s November nonmanufacturing index to see if services are slipping like manufacturing. Sergey Brin, who started Google with Page in 1998, is stepping down as president of Alphabet and that role will be eliminated. Tuesday evening, several NATO leaders were caught in an unguarded exchange on camera apparently gossip


In comments from the NATO summit, President Donald Trump said Wednesday trade talks are going well and he’ll see what happens.
ET, investors look to the Institute for Supply Management’s November nonmanufacturing index to see if services are slipping like manufacturing.
Sergey Brin, who started Google with Page in 1998, is stepping down as president of Alphabet and that role will be eliminated.
Tuesday evening, several NATO leaders were caught in an unguarded exchange on camera apparently gossip
5 things to know before the stock market opens Wednesday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, merkel, know, things, trump, president, stock, nato, report, market, york, impeachment, google, page, trade, opens


5 things to know before the stock market opens Wednesday

1. Dow to rise on encouraging report on US-China trade talks

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange as U.S. President Donald Trump meets with France’s President Emmanuel Macron on the television, shortly after the opening bell, in New York, U.S., December 3, 2019. Lucas Jackson | REUTERS

U.S. stock futures turned around from early morning declines and were pointing to a strong Wall Street open Wednesday after Bloomberg reported the U.S. and China were edging closer to cementing a “phase one” trade deal before new U.S. tariffs go into effect against Chinese goods on Dec. 15. In comments from the NATO summit, President Donald Trump said Wednesday trade talks are going well and he’ll see what happens. The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank for a third straight session Tuesday after Trump suggested he may want to delay a trade agreement with China until after the 2020 presidential election. However, the Dow still remains less than 2.5% away from record highs.

2. First of two major jobs reports is released before the bell

Ahead of the government’s latest monthly employment report on Friday, the ADP’s November private sector data showed job growth at U.S. companies slowing to 67,000 new positions, way below estimates for 150,000. November’s tally also was a sharp decline from the 121,000 in October, which was revised down from an initially reported 125,000. At 10 a.m. ET, investors look to the Institute for Supply Management’s November nonmanufacturing index to see if services are slipping like manufacturing. The service sector has been expanding for 117 straight months.

3. There’s a change at the top of Google-parent Alphabet

Google CEO Larry Page holds a press annoucement at Google headquarters in New York on May 21, 2012. Google announced that it will allocate 22,000 square feet of its New York headquarters to CornellNYC Tech university, free of charge for five years and six month or until the university completes its campus in New York. EMMANUEL DUNAND | AFP | Getty Images

Larry Page is stepping down as CEO of Google-parent Alphabet, with Google head Sundar Pichai taking over as chief executive officer of the entire company in addition to his current duties. Sergey Brin, who started Google with Page in 1998, is stepping down as president of Alphabet and that role will be eliminated. Page became CEO of Alphabet in 2015 when Google reorganized to form the new parent company to oversee its “Other Bets” outside of its main search and digital ads businesses. Both Page and Brin will remain “actively involved” as members of Alphabet’s board.

4. Trump impeachment inquiry moves into a new phase

Democrats publicly released a new report accusing Trump of soliciting Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election for his benefit and obstructing the impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives. The report, written by the Democratic members of the House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees, came on the eve of the next phase of the impeachment probe, where the House Judiciary Committee is expected to draft formal articles of impeachment against the president. House Republicans released their own report, asserting Democrats were attempting to tank Trump’s reelection chances and “undo the will of the American people.”

5. Trump meets with Germany’s Angela Merkel at NATO summit

France’s President Emmanuel Macron (2nd L) and Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel (R) look at US President Donald Trump (front L) and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (front R) walking past them during a family photo as part of the NATO summit at the Grove hotel in Watford, northeast of London on December 4, 2019. Christian Hartman | AFP | Getty Images

Trump was meeting Wednesday with German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the NATO gathering to celebrate 70 years of the military alliance. Tuesday evening, several NATO leaders were caught in an unguarded exchange on camera apparently gossiping about Trump’s behavior. Without mentioning Trump by name, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was seen standing in a huddle with French President Emmanuel Macron, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson seemingly to be talking about Trump’s long and unscheduled question-and-answer session with journalists earlier Tuesday. In comments Wednesday, sitting next to Merkel, Trump called Trudeau “two faced,” adding the Canadian leader is probably upset about being called out on underpaying NATO contributions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, merkel, know, things, trump, president, stock, nato, report, market, york, impeachment, google, page, trade, opens


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Inside Google founders’ garage office from 1998

Inside Google founders’ garage office from 1998Check out the original Google garage in Menlo Park, California in this clip courtesy of Google.


Inside Google founders’ garage office from 1998Check out the original Google garage in Menlo Park, California in this clip courtesy of Google.
Inside Google founders’ garage office from 1998 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, office, inside, original, garage, google, menlo, clip, founders, courtesy, park, 1998


Inside Google founders' garage office from 1998

Inside Google founders’ garage office from 1998

Check out the original Google garage in Menlo Park, California in this clip courtesy of Google.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04
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Sundar Pichai just got the worst job in Silicon Valley

But even as the new leader of Alphabet, Pichai is stuck between a rock and a hard place. (In fact, some Other Bets like the smart home company Nest and cybersecurity company Chronicle have been folded back into Google.) If Pichai decides it’s time to cut back on some Other Bets, he could still be outvoted by Page and Brin. Beyond the power dynamic between Page, Brin and Pichai, Google faces crisis after crisis, ranging from employee protests to antitrust investigations that threaten to break up


But even as the new leader of Alphabet, Pichai is stuck between a rock and a hard place.
(In fact, some Other Bets like the smart home company Nest and cybersecurity company Chronicle have been folded back into Google.)
If Pichai decides it’s time to cut back on some Other Bets, he could still be outvoted by Page and Brin.
Beyond the power dynamic between Page, Brin and Pichai, Google faces crisis after crisis, ranging from employee protests to antitrust investigations that threaten to break up
Sundar Pichai just got the worst job in Silicon Valley Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, sundar, silicon, bets, job, google, alphabet, employees, pichai, valley, page, brin, business, company, googles


Sundar Pichai just got the worst job in Silicon Valley

And poor Pichai has been tasked with navigating Alphabet through all of it, while Page and Brin get to shield themselves from all of the scrutiny and challenges.

Now, after spending the last several years effectively AWOL from the public and much of Alphabet, Page and Brin, both 46, are out just in time for the company to muddle through its biggest challenges in its history.

The move comes over four years after Page orchestrated the most genius retirement plan in the history of business. Growing bored of Google’s day to day chores, he split the company into several “Other Bets,” or separate companies exploring science projects like self-driving cars and smart cities, while leaving the main internet search business to his trusted deputy Pichai. That freed Page to explore his passion projects.

On Tuesday, Google’s parent company Alphabet dropped the bombshell that co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin are stepping down as CEO and president , respectively, and that the 47-year-old Pichai will become CEO of all of Alphabet.

But even as the new leader of Alphabet, Pichai is stuck between a rock and a hard place. And Page and Brin will still loom over all of it.

The rock: Pichai is now in charge of a focus-free smattering of money-losing Other Bets that are noodling around with everything from curing death to beaming the internet to the Earth from high-altitude balloons. But none of those Other Bets has turned into the major businesses Alphabet hoped for.

Google is still Alphabet’s cash cow, generating effectively all of its revenue thanks to its lucrative digital ads business. There are no signs that the “next Google” will grow out of an Other Bet any time soon. (In fact, some Other Bets like the smart home company Nest and cybersecurity company Chronicle have been folded back into Google.)

Pichai’s task will now be to decide what to do with Alphabet’s duds. Do they spin back into Google? Do they pack it all up and call it quits? Does Alphabet invest less in them?

But that brings us to …

The hard place: Page and Brin may have stepped down from their day jobs, but they’re still lurking. They have controlling stakes in the company and said they’d remain “active” board members. If Pichai decides it’s time to cut back on some Other Bets, he could still be outvoted by Page and Brin. Good luck to Pichai if he ever wants to persuade them to put their favorite science projects on ice and focus on ways to keep Google growing instead.

But wait, there’s more.

Beyond the power dynamic between Page, Brin and Pichai, Google faces crisis after crisis, ranging from employee protests to antitrust investigations that threaten to break up the company.

Google’s employees are openly revolting over the company’s handling of sexual harassment and controversial executives hires like Miles Taylor, the former Department of Homeland Security chief of staff who defended the Trump administration’s Muslim travel ban. Last month, 200 employees in San Francisco protested Google’s various contentious decisions. Shortly after, four of the protesters were fired. Google has denied that the employees were fired for organizing. Now those former employees, dubbed the “Thanksgiving Four” plan to file charges against Google with the National Labor Relations Board.

Meanwhile, Google is investigating its own executives over inappropriate relationships they may have had with subordinates, CNBC first reported last month. That includes Chief Legal Officer David Drummond, who recently married an employee in Google’s legal department and faces a string of damaging allegations from another former employee with whom he had an extramarital affair.

Next, there’s YouTube, which has faced controversy after controversy in recent years, ranging from pedophiles lurking in video comments where underage children appear, to the spread of conspiracy theories about victims of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, last year. (We’d be here all day if I listed every recent YouTube crisis and failure.)

And then there are the dollars and cents. Growth in Google’s core digital advertising business is slowing, and the pressure is mounting for the company to find new areas of expansion. While its cloud and hardware businesses are showing some promise, they still make up a tiny fraction of Google’s overall revenue. At its core, Google is still an advertising company.

But that’s just the internal stuff. Outside the company, nearly every state attorney general in the country is looking into antitrust violations related to Google’s ad business. CNBC reported last month that the probes may expand into Google’s search business as well. The FTC and Department of Justice are also said to be looking at Google’s potential antitrust violations.

With so much scrutiny from regulators and attorneys general, there will almost certainly be some sort of action taken, and Pichai is now the one who has to steer the ship as various government agencies seek to punish his company. Page and Brin picked the perfect time to step down and protect themselves.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, sundar, silicon, bets, job, google, alphabet, employees, pichai, valley, page, brin, business, company, googles


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Google’s ‘Thanksgiving Four’ plan to file unfair labor practice charges with a federal agency

Four former Google employees who were fired days before Thanksgiving plan to file unfair labor practice charges with the National Labor Relations Board, the group wrote Tuesday. The former employees, dubbed the “Thanksgiving Four,” announced their plans to file charges in a Medium post. Google has said it fired the employees for sharing confidential documents and breaching security. In Tuesday’s post, the dismissed employees say they were fired after engaging in labor organizing efforts. Google


Four former Google employees who were fired days before Thanksgiving plan to file unfair labor practice charges with the National Labor Relations Board, the group wrote Tuesday.
The former employees, dubbed the “Thanksgiving Four,” announced their plans to file charges in a Medium post.
Google has said it fired the employees for sharing confidential documents and breaching security.
In Tuesday’s post, the dismissed employees say they were fired after engaging in labor organizing efforts.
Google
Google’s ‘Thanksgiving Four’ plan to file unfair labor practice charges with a federal agency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, labor, fired, google, workplace, policies, thanksgiving, googles, federal, employees, file, practice, post, unfair, plan, agency, charges


Google's 'Thanksgiving Four' plan to file unfair labor practice charges with a federal agency

Silhouettes of people holding laptops are seen in front of the logo of ‘Google’ technology company.

Four former Google employees who were fired days before Thanksgiving plan to file unfair labor practice charges with the National Labor Relations Board, the group wrote Tuesday.

The former employees, dubbed the “Thanksgiving Four,” announced their plans to file charges in a Medium post. Google has said it fired the employees for sharing confidential documents and breaching security. But the group disputes this claim, saying their dismissal was a form of retaliation for their organizing efforts.

In a memo to employees after the firings, Google said the dismissed workers had breached policies by “searching for, accessing and distributing business information outside the scope of their jobs — repeating this conduct even after they were met with and reminded about our data security policies.”

In Tuesday’s post, the dismissed employees say they were fired after engaging in labor organizing efforts. The firings followed a New York Times report that Google hired anti-union consulting firm IRI Consultants to advise its management.

Google declined to comment on the impending unfair labor practice charges from the former employees, but did say it prohibits workplace retaliation.

Google already has come under scrutiny from the NLRB for its policies regarding employee activists. Once known for its unusually open workplace culture that welcomed activism, Google has more recently tried to rein in some of its standards to fit a more traditional corporate model. In August, Google revised its community guidelines to ban political discussions on internal mailing lists, among other restrictions.

The company ended up reaching a settlement with the NLRB over those policies, forcing Google to remind employees they are within their rights to debate political and workplace issues. Google said in September it would post a list of more than 20 employees’ rights and protections at its offices as a result of the agreement. Among the protections, Google agreed to share that employees have the right to form or join a union under federal law and that the company would not retaliate against employees if they engaged in “protected activity” with other employees regarding working conditions and pay.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, labor, fired, google, workplace, policies, thanksgiving, googles, federal, employees, file, practice, post, unfair, plan, agency, charges


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Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over

More recently, a group of former Google employees known as the “Thanksgiving Four” have claimed their pre-holiday dismissal amounted to retaliation for their attempts to organize workers. The company is not conventional and continues to make ambitious bets on new technology, especially with our Alphabet structure. Going forward, Sundar will be the CEO of both Google and Alphabet. He’s worked closely with us for 15 years, through the formation of Alphabet, as CEO of Google, and a member of the Al


More recently, a group of former Google employees known as the “Thanksgiving Four” have claimed their pre-holiday dismissal amounted to retaliation for their attempts to organize workers.
The company is not conventional and continues to make ambitious bets on new technology, especially with our Alphabet structure.
Going forward, Sundar will be the CEO of both Google and Alphabet.
He’s worked closely with us for 15 years, through the formation of Alphabet, as CEO of Google, and a member of the Al
Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steps, google, technology, bets, employees, structure, sundar, larry, letter, googles, page, person, alphabet, company, ceo, pichai


Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over

Google has been forced to back off of certain projects have pushback from employees. In 2018, Google’s cloud chief at the time said the company would not renew its contract with the Department of Defense after it was set to expire in March 2019. The decision followed a petition signed by thousands of employees urging Pichai to keep Google out of the “business of war.” Google employees have also urged the company to back off its plans to build a censored search engine for China after The Intercept reported on the plans cryptically called Project Dragonfly.

More recently, a group of former Google employees known as the “Thanksgiving Four” have claimed their pre-holiday dismissal amounted to retaliation for their attempts to organize workers. The former employees have promised to file charges with the National Labor Relations Board, claiming unfair labor practices. Google denies any retaliation and has insisted the workers were let go for sharing confidential documents and breaching security.

Here is the full letter from Page and Brin:

Our very first founders’ letter in our 2004 S-1 began:

“Google is not a conventional company. We do not intend to become one. Throughout Google’s evolution as a privately held company, we have managed Google differently. We have also emphasized an atmosphere of creativity and challenge, which has helped us provide unbiased, accurate and free access to information for those who rely on us around the world.”

We believe those central tenets are still true today. The company is not conventional and continues to make ambitious bets on new technology, especially with our Alphabet structure. Creativity and challenge remain as ever-present as before, if not more so, and are increasingly applied to a variety of fields such as machine learning, energy efficiency and transportation. Nonetheless, Google’s core service—providing unbiased, accurate, and free access to information—remains at the heart of the company.

However, since we wrote our first founders’ letter, the company has evolved and matured. Within Google, there are all the popular consumer services that followed Search, such as Maps, Photos, and YouTube; a global ecosystem of devices powered by our Android and Chrome platforms, including our own Made by Google devices; Google Cloud, including GCP and G Suite; and of course a base of fundamental technologies around machine learning, cloud computing, and software engineering. It’s an honor that billions of people have chosen to make these products central to their lives—this is a trust and responsibility that Google will always work to live up to.

And structurally, the company evolved into Alphabet in 2015. As we said in the Alphabet founding letter in 2015:

“Alphabet is about businesses prospering through strong leaders and independence.”

Since we wrote that, hundreds of Phoenix residents are now being driven around in Waymo cars—many without drivers! Wing became the first drone company to make commercial deliveries to consumers in the U.S. And Verily and Calico are doing important work, through a number of great partnerships with other healthcare companies. Some of our “Other Bets” have their own boards with independent members, and outside investors.

Those are just a few examples of technology companies that we have formed within Alphabet, in addition to investment subsidiaries GV and Capital G, which have supported hundreds more. Together with all of Google’s services, this forms a colorful tapestry of bets in technology across a range of industries—all with the goal of helping people and tackling major challenges.

Our second founders’ letter began:

“Google was born in 1998. If it were a person, it would have started elementary school late last summer (around August 19), and today it would have just about finished the first grade.”

Today, in 2019, if the company was a person, it would be a young adult of 21 and it would be time to leave the roost. While it has been a tremendous privilege to be deeply involved in the day-to-day management of the company for so long, we believe it’s time to assume the role of proud parents—offering advice and love, but not daily nagging!

With Alphabet now well-established, and Google and the Other Bets operating effectively as independent companies, it’s the natural time to simplify our management structure. We’ve never been ones to hold on to management roles when we think there’s a better way to run the company. And Alphabet and Google no longer need two CEOs and a President. Going forward, Sundar will be the CEO of both Google and Alphabet. He will be the executive responsible and accountable for leading Google, and managing Alphabet’s investment in our portfolio of Other Bets. We are deeply committed to Google and Alphabet for the long term, and will remain actively involved as Board members, shareholders and co-founders. In addition, we plan to continue talking with Sundar regularly, especially on topics we’re passionate about!

Sundar brings humility and a deep passion for technology to our users, partners and our employees every day. He’s worked closely with us for 15 years, through the formation of Alphabet, as CEO of Google, and a member of the Alphabet Board of Directors. He shares our confidence in the value of the Alphabet structure, and the ability it provides us to tackle big challenges through technology. There is no one that we have relied on more since Alphabet was founded, and no better person to lead Google and Alphabet into the future.

We are deeply humbled to have seen a small research project develop into a source of knowledge and empowerment for billions—a bet we made as two Stanford students that led to a multitude of other technology bets. We could not have imagined, back in 1998 when we moved our servers from a dorm room to a garage, the journey that would follow.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steps, google, technology, bets, employees, structure, sundar, larry, letter, googles, page, person, alphabet, company, ceo, pichai


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An early Google employee filmed inside the company’s garage office in 1998—take a look

On Tuesday, Larry Page and Sergey Brin announced they will step down from their respective roles as CEO and president at Alphabet, Google’s parent company, which today has a market cap of over $890 billion and over 100,000 employees. “We are deeply humbled to have seen a small research project develop into a source of knowledge and empowerment for billions—a bet we made as two Stanford students that led to a multitude of other technology bets,” Page and Brin wrote in a blog post Tuesday, announc


On Tuesday, Larry Page and Sergey Brin announced they will step down from their respective roles as CEO and president at Alphabet, Google’s parent company, which today has a market cap of over $890 billion and over 100,000 employees.
“We are deeply humbled to have seen a small research project develop into a source of knowledge and empowerment for billions—a bet we made as two Stanford students that led to a multitude of other technology bets,” Page and Brin wrote in a blog post Tuesday, announc
An early Google employee filmed inside the company’s garage office in 1998—take a look Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, google, video, filmed, employee, brin, small, inside, office, stanford, page, wrote, alphabet, look, early, 1998take, companys, garage


An early Google employee filmed inside the company's garage office in 1998—take a look

On Tuesday, Larry Page and Sergey Brin announced they will step down from their respective roles as CEO and president at Alphabet, Google’s parent company, which today has a market cap of over $890 billion and over 100,000 employees.

“We are deeply humbled to have seen a small research project develop into a source of knowledge and empowerment for billions—a bet we made as two Stanford students that led to a multitude of other technology bets,” Page and Brin wrote in a blog post Tuesday, announcing the change.

“We could not have imagined, back in 1998 when we moved our servers from a dorm room to a garage, the journey that would follow.”

Indeed, before there was Alphabet and before googling was a verb, Google was a fledgling internet search engine that Page and Brin, then Ph.D. students at Stanford University, ran out of a small, messy garage in Menlo Park, California.

That year, one of the first Google employees filmed a video tour of that garage office, embedded below.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, google, video, filmed, employee, brin, small, inside, office, stanford, page, wrote, alphabet, look, early, 1998take, companys, garage


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Music site Genius sues Google, claiming it caught the company ‘red-handed’ copying lyrics

In a new lawsuit, music site Genius Media claims it caught Google “red-handed” copying lyrics for its own benefit at the expense of Genius’ business. Genius claims Google and Canada-based lyric licensing company LyricFind misappropriated lyrics from its website. Google claims in the post that it licenses lyrics from third parties when music publishers don’t have digital copies of the text. “We do not crawl or scrape websites to source these lyrics,” Google wrote at the time. LyricFind suggested


In a new lawsuit, music site Genius Media claims it caught Google “red-handed” copying lyrics for its own benefit at the expense of Genius’ business.
Genius claims Google and Canada-based lyric licensing company LyricFind misappropriated lyrics from its website.
Google claims in the post that it licenses lyrics from third parties when music publishers don’t have digital copies of the text.
“We do not crawl or scrape websites to source these lyrics,” Google wrote at the time.
LyricFind suggested
Music site Genius sues Google, claiming it caught the company ‘red-handed’ copying lyrics Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, sues, music, watermark, boxes, site, lyricfind, search, company, redhanded, content, copying, claims, lyrics, genius, claiming


Music site Genius sues Google, claiming it caught the company 'red-handed' copying lyrics

In a new lawsuit, music site Genius Media claims it caught Google “red-handed” copying lyrics for its own benefit at the expense of Genius’ business.

Genius claims Google and Canada-based lyric licensing company LyricFind misappropriated lyrics from its website. Genius alleges that Google, through LyricFind, displayed lyrics at the top of search results in its “Information Boxes” that were stripped directly from Genius without attribution. Genius is seeking at least $50 million in combined damages from the companies, according to the lawsuit, filed in state court in Brooklyn.

The lawsuit adds to a an already noisy field of Google critics who claim the company employs anti-competitive practices to keep users on its own sites instead of sending them directly to those providing the content. Yelp has been among the loudest voices alleging Google favors its own search services over competitors’ and stunts web traffic to other sites with its text boxes that serve users key information on their own search pages.

Google’s treatment of competitive services is likely to become a focus for federal and state investigators probing the company for potential antitrust violations. State attorneys general investigating Google are planning to expand their probe beyond its original focus on advertising into search, CNBC reported last month.

After suspecting Google was ripping off its transcriptions, the complaint says, Genius placed a digital watermark in its lyrics made up of different styles of apostrophes that spelled out “red-handed” in Morse Code. If Google’s lyric boxes contained the watermark, the suit claims, “there would be no explanation other than that the lyrics were copied from Genius’s website, e.g., by using the copy/paste functionality or a computer program.”

After notifying Google that it had found its watermarks in its lyric boxes, Genius alleges multiple Google executives said they were looking into the issue but would not explain how the watermark showed up in its results. Genius designed a second experiment in 2018 to determine how widespread the issue had become, applying the watermark to a random sample of songs. Of the 271 songs to which Genius applied the watermark and that appeared in Google’s info box between October and December of that year, 43% “showed clear evidence of matching” the watermark, according to the complaint.

In response to a request for comment, a Google spokesperson pointed to a June blog post explaining how the company provides lyrics in its info boxes. Google claims in the post that it licenses lyrics from third parties when music publishers don’t have digital copies of the text. The company pledged to add third party attribution for digital lyrics and have its lyrics partner ensure it was following industry standards.

“We do not crawl or scrape websites to source these lyrics,” Google wrote at the time. “The lyrics that you see in information boxes on Search come directly from lyrics content providers, and they are updated automatically as we receive new lyrics and corrections on a regular basis.”

The post followed a Wall Street Journal report where Genius first went public with its claims against Google. The complaint alleges this was the first time Google had tried to “to address their misappropriation of content from Genius’s website.”

LyricFind did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but the company wrote in a June blog post responding to the original Journal story that it does not knowingly copy content from Genius. LyricFind said its content teams often begin with a copy of lyrics from “numerous sources” and then corrects them. After Genius notified LyricFind that it believed Genius lyrics were coming up in its database, LyricFind asked its content team not to consult Genius as a source “[a]s a courtesy.” LyricFind suggested the content team may have “unknowingly sourced Genius lyrics from another location” where they were also available.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, sues, music, watermark, boxes, site, lyricfind, search, company, redhanded, content, copying, claims, lyrics, genius, claiming


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Sundar Pichai will have to step it up to become the wartime CEO Alphabet needs

Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Google Inc., attends a news conference in New Delhi, India, on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017. But after less than five years in the top spot, he reorganized the entire company, turning Google into a subsidiary of a bigger holding company, Alphabet. Page thrust an engineer-turned-manager named Sundar Pichai into the Google CEO role, giving him responsibility for search, Android, YouTube, Chrome, hardware, cloud computing and all of its other core businesses. He


Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Google Inc., attends a news conference in New Delhi, India, on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017.
But after less than five years in the top spot, he reorganized the entire company, turning Google into a subsidiary of a bigger holding company, Alphabet.
Page thrust an engineer-turned-manager named Sundar Pichai into the Google CEO role, giving him responsibility for search, Android, YouTube, Chrome, hardware, cloud computing and all of its other core businesses.
He
Sundar Pichai will have to step it up to become the wartime CEO Alphabet needs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, wartime, alphabet, page, computing, employees, search, step, company, pichai, revenue, entire, needs, ceo, sundar


Sundar Pichai will have to step it up to become the wartime CEO Alphabet needs

Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Google Inc., attends a news conference in New Delhi, India, on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017. Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images

When prominent venture capitalist and Silicon Valley figure Ben Horowitz wrote a notable blog post about “wartime” CEOs in 2011, he predicted Google co-founder Larry Page would take over as the company’s wartime CEO, seizing the reins from Eric Schmidt. “This will be a profound change for Google and the entire high-tech industry,” he wrote. Not exactly. Page indeed took over from Schmidt. But after less than five years in the top spot, he reorganized the entire company, turning Google into a subsidiary of a bigger holding company, Alphabet. Page thrust an engineer-turned-manager named Sundar Pichai into the Google CEO role, giving him responsibility for search, Android, YouTube, Chrome, hardware, cloud computing and all of its other core businesses. Page became Alphabet’s CEO and retreated from the spotlight to focus on esoteric longer-term projects like internet-delivery balloons and self-driving cars, which were reorganized into separate companies and rolled up into a financial segment called “Other Bets.” He disappeared from earnings calls and public appearances, and stopped talking to the press. On Tuesday, four years after the Alphabet reorganization, Pichai got an even bigger job as Page and his co-founder, Alphabet President Sergey Brin, announced they would be stepping down. He will now be the CEO of the entire company, not just Google. Pichai is a mild-mannered political type who’s held the respect of both engineers and non-technical workers — a former engineer with calm, technical expertise and charisma. He has often surprised employees at various team events with a big smile, and many consider him one of them. But the value of being seen as “one of the people” may be coming to an end, as Google faces huge changes that could alter the entire course of the company.

Containing workers

Pichai gave the first clear hint that the scene had changed at a company-wide all-hands meeting in October. “We are genuinely struggling with some issues — transparency at scale,” he said in a video of the event acquired by the Washington Post. The company soon after scaled back those weekly all-hands meetings, turning them into a monthly event instead. That moment was a capstone to more than a year of increasingly vocal employee unrest. It kicked off last fall when the New York Times reported that execs, including Pichai, signed off on a massive $90 million golden parachute paid out to Android co-founder Andy Rubin, despite credible allegations of sexual misconduct, with similar treatment for other favored execs in the past. That triggered a company-wide walkout where 20,000 employees walked out of their respective Google offices last fall. It also started an activism within the company that has protested every problematic policy, government contract and hire since. Over the summer, the company dropped a partnership with the Pentagon called Project Maven after employees protested its use for surveillance tools to analyze drone footage. Then, in October, Google dropped out of the competition for a different Pentagon cloud computing contract that could be worth $10 billion, saying the contract could conflict with its values. Employees also protested the company’s plans to build a censored search tool called Project Dragonfly, which resulted in the company scrapping those plans to re-enter the Chinese market. In the wake of all this activity, the company has shut down its historically “open” lines of communication, such as banning political discussions and canceling its weekly TGIF meetings in favor of monthly meetings and separate forums. Fast forward to today and employee trust is so low, some Googlers are now sleuthing their own human resources department, accusing leaders creating a tool to spy on them, according to a Bloomberg report. Pichai faces the threat of unionization and lawsuits from employees the company fired for allegedly leaking confidential information; they claim they were fired for trying to organize.

Government pressure

Pichai will also have to contend with being under more regulatory scrutiny than ever before. Under Eric Schmidt, Google was able to fend off an FTC probe in 2011 with few lasting repercussions. But today is a very different story as politicians on both sides of the aisle are increasingly teeing off on Silicon Valley. In the last few months, U.S. and foreign antitrust regulators have increasingly scrutinized Google, naming Pichai along the way. The U.S. Department of Justice announced last quarter that it’s opening a broad antitrust review of big tech companies including Google, while the DOJ launched a separate antitrust probe into Google. A potential DOJ case, backed by nearly 50 state attorney generals, multiplies that challenge. Meanwhile, after Google withdrew from Project Maven, and Facebook board member Peter Thiel claimed without evidence that Google might have been infiltrated by Chinese intelligence, President Trump and other conservative leaders began to question the company’s loyalty to the U.S. and the military. Pichai had to move into action, immediately meeting with Trump in attempts to smooth things over. The 2020 presidential candidates have also piled on, mentioning the company by name in the Democratic debates as being too powerful. If Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren, an expected front-runner, gets the nomination and then wins the election, Google will have to contend with a president who promised to break the company into pieces.

The search for Alphabet’s “next act”

While the company isn’t weeks away from bankruptcy the way Apple was when Steve Jobs returned to be its wartime CEO, the company faces its biggest direct business challenge in its history: finding its next act. Alphabet is preparing for a slowdown in its core digital advertising business, which still accounts for the vast majority of its revenue. The company showed slowing ad revenue in its first quarter of 2019 and a decline in profit from the previous year in the third quarter. The company has struggled to reel in material revenue from its hardware line despite several attempts and acquisitions. YouTube is a juggernaut in terms of audience, but the company has never disclosed how much revenue it generates, and the video platform is under constant scrutiny for promoting misleading content, underpaying creators and more. Google also has fumbled around for years in the cloud computing market, where it lags in a distant third behind Microsoft and Amazon. A recent cloud deal with hospital chain Ascension that should have been a triumph instead turned into a public relations debacle, as outsiders questioned how Google would use and safeguard any patient data it collected along the way. Even after Google clarified that it wasn’t using any patient information for its own purposes, the suspicion continued, resulting in more questions from Congress. That same perception is threatening its acquisitions. Privacy groups and congress members are calling on federal regulators to give more examination to Google’s proposed $2 billion purchase of Fitbit, which the company hoped would close in early 2020. CNBC found that people started getting rid of their Fitbit devices as soon as the announcement was made. While casting about for material new businesses, the company has offered strange new business announcements that have little to do with its bottom line, like search algorithm updates and quantum computing milestones.

Meet the new boss…


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, wartime, alphabet, page, computing, employees, search, step, company, pichai, revenue, entire, needs, ceo, sundar


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How Google uses A.I. to help businesses increase profits from online shopping

Artificial intelligence can help businesses make more money from online shopping, Carrie Tharp, Google Cloud’s head of retail, told CNBC on Monday. “We’re helping retailers with Google A.I. to help drive their ability to do promotions, recommendations, improve their margins with dynamic pricing,” Tharp said on “Squawk Alley.” While it’s not clear if Google is providing all these services to businesses whose websites are hosted on its cloud, Tharp said some of its partners include Home Depot and


Artificial intelligence can help businesses make more money from online shopping, Carrie Tharp, Google Cloud’s head of retail, told CNBC on Monday.
“We’re helping retailers with Google A.I.
to help drive their ability to do promotions, recommendations, improve their margins with dynamic pricing,” Tharp said on “Squawk Alley.”
While it’s not clear if Google is providing all these services to businesses whose websites are hosted on its cloud, Tharp said some of its partners include Home Depot and
How Google uses A.I. to help businesses increase profits from online shopping Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, profits, cyber, sales, uses, google, businesses, retail, increase, online, shopping, cloud, weekend, help, retailers, websites, tharp


How Google uses A.I. to help businesses increase profits from online shopping

Artificial intelligence can help businesses make more money from online shopping, Carrie Tharp, Google Cloud’s head of retail, told CNBC on Monday.

“We’re helping retailers with Google A.I. to help drive their ability to do promotions, recommendations, improve their margins with dynamic pricing,” Tharp said on “Squawk Alley.” “So it’s really helping that retail C-suite deliver on all of their financial goals.”

While it’s not clear if Google is providing all these services to businesses whose websites are hosted on its cloud, Tharp said some of its partners include Home Depot and Kohl’s.

Tharp’s comments on the retail landscape come on Cyber Monday, the annual e-commerce bonanza that is on pace to generate more than $9 billion in sales, according to Adobe Analytics.

Online sales on Black Friday hit a record $7.4 billion, according to Adobe. Meanwhile, store foot traffic fell by about 6%, ShopperTrak found.

Tharp, who joined Google Cloud in July, previously served as chief digital officer at Neiman Marcus Group, where she oversaw the luxury retailer’s push to embrace data and digital analysis.

“We also think that the future of retail is driven by retail intelligence,” Tharp said,.

For Cyber Monday and the Thanksgiving shopping weekend, in particular, Google Cloud has placed an intense focus on making sure websites do not crash — especially with the record sales that had been expected, Tharp said.

A Google survey from July found 10% of companies had their websites crash during Black Friday or Cyber Monday in 2018, while 40% said it happened during the last three years.

That represents a potential loss of revenue for businesses, which is why Tharp said her team has engineers “sitting with them through the actual weekend in their war rooms, making sure their systems scale no matter what happens so that there’s never a break-the-internet moment for one of the retailers hosted on Google Cloud.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, profits, cyber, sales, uses, google, businesses, retail, increase, online, shopping, cloud, weekend, help, retailers, websites, tharp


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Facebook addresses antitrust concerns with new tool that lets you transfer photos to Google

Facebook on Monday announced a new feature that lets users take their photos and videos to other services, including Google Photos. Facebook has previously written about the importance of letting users transfer their data to other platforms, a feature known as data portability. Facebook already lets users download a file containing all their data, but it’s not easy to transfer that data to a rival social network. The new tool does all the work for you, at least for photos and videos you want to


Facebook on Monday announced a new feature that lets users take their photos and videos to other services, including Google Photos.
Facebook has previously written about the importance of letting users transfer their data to other platforms, a feature known as data portability.
Facebook already lets users download a file containing all their data, but it’s not easy to transfer that data to a rival social network.
The new tool does all the work for you, at least for photos and videos you want to
Facebook addresses antitrust concerns with new tool that lets you transfer photos to Google Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feature, facebook, google, transfer, lets, portability, addresses, require, photos, tool, antitrust, services, concerns, data, videos, users


Facebook addresses antitrust concerns with new tool that lets you transfer photos to Google

Facebook on Monday announced a new feature that lets users take their photos and videos to other services, including Google Photos.

The launch follows proposed legislation that would require large platforms like Facebook to let their users easily move their data to other services. Democratic Sens. Mark Warner of Virginia and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut and Republican Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri introduced the bill, known as the ACCESS Act, in October.

Facebook has previously written about the importance of letting users transfer their data to other platforms, a feature known as data portability. The company released a white paper on the topic in September after CEO Mark Zuckerberg asked for regulation guaranteeing data portability in a March op-ed in The Washington Post.

Facebook already lets users download a file containing all their data, but it’s not easy to transfer that data to a rival social network. The new tool does all the work for you, at least for photos and videos you want to transfer to Google.

The new feature also comes as Facebook faces multiple investigations into its competitive practices from federal regulators and a large group of state attorneys general. Since anti-monopoly action has traditionally been determined based on harm to consumers, Facebook’s introduction of data portability tools could assuage some antitrust concerns by giving users the option to freely and easily leave if they are unhappy with Facebook’s services. The company might argue that the feature will make it easier for new competitors to spring up if users can take their Facebook data elsewhere.

The new tool will launch in Ireland and be available worldwide in the first half of 2020, Facebook said in a blog post. Users will be able to transfer their information from settings under “Your Facebook Information,” where data downloads are already available. Data transferred through the tool will be encrypted and will require users to reenter their passwords, according to the announcement.

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WATCH: How US antitrust law works, and what it means for Big Tech


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feature, facebook, google, transfer, lets, portability, addresses, require, photos, tool, antitrust, services, concerns, data, videos, users


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