Republican megadonors Sheldon Adelson and wife give a whopping $213,000 to Senate GOP fundraising committee

The GOP will defend 22 Senate seats next year. Republican strategists, however, tried to brush off the donation as only a sign of the Adelsons being consistent, big-dollar supporters. “Very consistent supporters,” Josh Holmes, a former chief of staff to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, told CNBC. The Adelsons had been relatively quiet so far in the current election cycle. The two combined to give over $120 million to Republican causes throughout the 2018 congressional midterm cycle.


The GOP will defend 22 Senate seats next year. Republican strategists, however, tried to brush off the donation as only a sign of the Adelsons being consistent, big-dollar supporters. “Very consistent supporters,” Josh Holmes, a former chief of staff to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, told CNBC. The Adelsons had been relatively quiet so far in the current election cycle. The two combined to give over $120 million to Republican causes throughout the 2018 congressional midterm cycle.
Republican megadonors Sheldon Adelson and wife give a whopping $213,000 to Senate GOP fundraising committee Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whopping, cycle, fundraising, committee, seats, sheldon, party, election, adelson, donation, republican, senate, majority, gop, megadonors, million, wife


Republican megadonors Sheldon Adelson and wife give a whopping $213,000 to Senate GOP fundraising committee

Republican megadonor and Las Vegas Sands CEO Sheldon Adelson and his wife, Miriam, gave the Senate’s GOP fundraising arm over $200,000 last month as the party works to protect its majority in the chamber during next year’s elections.

Their massive donations came in July, with each writing checks worth $106,500 to the National Republican Senatorial Committee, according to a new Federal Election Commission disclosure filed Tuesday.

The early contribution may reflect that the GOP donor class are concerned about the upcoming 2020 elections, with political analysts already labeling at least three seats as toss-ups. The GOP will defend 22 Senate seats next year. The party has a 53-47 edge in the Senate.

The NRSC finished July raising $4.3 million and has $11.7 million on hand.

Republican strategists, however, tried to brush off the donation as only a sign of the Adelsons being consistent, big-dollar supporters.

“Very consistent supporters,” Josh Holmes, a former chief of staff to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, told CNBC. “I think it reflects their continued support of Senate Republicans. Not sure I can make any more of it than that.”

The Adelsons had been relatively quiet so far in the current election cycle. They’ve given directly to a variety of candidates, but this six figure donation would mark their highest contribution so far.

The two combined to give over $120 million to Republican causes throughout the 2018 congressional midterm cycle.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whopping, cycle, fundraising, committee, seats, sheldon, party, election, adelson, donation, republican, senate, majority, gop, megadonors, million, wife


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GOP Sen. Rick Scott: Americans should get tax cuts in return for tariffs paid on Chinese goods

Republican Sen. Rick Scott told CNBC on Monday the U.S. government should return money collected from China tariffs to Americans as tax relief. President Donald Trump, earlier this month announced an impeding 10% tariff on the remaining $300 billion of Chinese goods that had not been previously taxed. Back In May, Trump hiked tariffs to 25% from 10% on $200 billion in Chinese goods. “We have to help American companies … and get more American jobs and stop helping China,” Scott said. “I’m not s


Republican Sen. Rick Scott told CNBC on Monday the U.S. government should return money collected from China tariffs to Americans as tax relief. President Donald Trump, earlier this month announced an impeding 10% tariff on the remaining $300 billion of Chinese goods that had not been previously taxed. Back In May, Trump hiked tariffs to 25% from 10% on $200 billion in Chinese goods. “We have to help American companies … and get more American jobs and stop helping China,” Scott said. “I’m not s
GOP Sen. Rick Scott: Americans should get tax cuts in return for tariffs paid on Chinese goods Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, tariffs, american, sen, gop, scott, paid, trump, sure, tariff, stop, billion, return, trade, goods, rick, cuts


GOP Sen. Rick Scott: Americans should get tax cuts in return for tariffs paid on Chinese goods

Republican Sen. Rick Scott told CNBC on Monday the U.S. government should return money collected from China tariffs to Americans as tax relief.

“Anything we raise in tariffs, we should give back to the rank and public in tax reductions,” the Florida senator said in a “Squawk Box ” interview, acknowledging there’s been some “short-term pain.”

“We have to help American farmers open up more markets around the world,” said Scott, who did not elaborate on what such relief might look like.

Data from U.S. Customs and Border Protection, which collects taxes on imports, showed the U.S. had assessed $23.7 billion in tariffs from early 2018 through May 1. According to a Reuters report, total tariff revenue rose 73% in the first half of 2019 from a year earlier.

The trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies has been escalating in recent months, with investors fearing that it could slow global and U.S. economic growth. In fact, Goldman Sachs lowered its fourth-quarter U.S. growth forecast by 0.2% to 1.8%, with the cumulative drag on gross domestic product of 0.6%.

President Donald Trump, earlier this month announced an impeding 10% tariff on the remaining $300 billion of Chinese goods that had not been previously taxed. Back In May, Trump hiked tariffs to 25% from 10% on $200 billion in Chinese goods.

“We have to help American companies … and get more American jobs and stop helping China,” Scott said. “Stop acting like they are a partner,” adding he doesn’t see how a trade deal can be reached.

“I’m not sure what else we can do, other than stand up for American interests and American values,” he wondered. “I’m not sure what the president can do otherwise than the tariffs he is doing.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, tariffs, american, sen, gop, scott, paid, trump, sure, tariff, stop, billion, return, trade, goods, rick, cuts


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Trump says he’ll call Congress back to Washington if GOP and Dems get ‘close’ on gun reform plan

US President Donald Trump speaks to the press as he departs the White House in Washington, DC, on August 7 2019. And let’s say all good people, but two sides are very different,” Trump told reporters outside the White House. “I’m looking to do background checks, I think background checks are important,” he said. He added that “I think both Republicans and Democrats are getting close” to “doing something on background checks.” Neither a spokesman for McConnell nor the White House immediately resp


US President Donald Trump speaks to the press as he departs the White House in Washington, DC, on August 7 2019. And let’s say all good people, but two sides are very different,” Trump told reporters outside the White House. “I’m looking to do background checks, I think background checks are important,” he said. He added that “I think both Republicans and Democrats are getting close” to “doing something on background checks.” Neither a spokesman for McConnell nor the White House immediately resp
Trump says he’ll call Congress back to Washington if GOP and Dems get ‘close’ on gun reform plan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: kevin breuninger, jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, white, congress, reform, washington, background, dems, president, house, texas, checks, senate, gun, trump, close, gop, hell


Trump says he'll call Congress back to Washington if GOP and Dems get 'close' on gun reform plan

US President Donald Trump speaks to the press as he departs the White House in Washington, DC, on August 7 2019.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that he will bring lawmakers back to Washington from their August recess if Republicans and Democrats can “get close” on a gun reform proposal.

Trump, en route to visit the Ohio and Texas cities in which back-to-back mass shootings over the weekend left 31 dead, also pledged his support for background checks and “red flag” laws preventing mentally ill people from accessing firearms.

“We’re going to see where we are. We’re dealing with leadership right now. And you know, you have two sides that are very different on this issue. And let’s say all good people, but two sides are very different,” Trump told reporters outside the White House.

“If we get close, I will bring them back, but it has to be — you know, we have to see where we are with leadership. Normally, this has been really a decision — Congress gets together and they try to do something, but if you look over the last 30 years, not a lot has been done,” Trump said.

The president and first lady Melania Trump were traveling to Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, to meet with first responders, survivors and victims’ families following the two deadly mass shootings. Some Democrats, including presidential candidates such as former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, have said that Trump’s rhetoric bears at least some of the blame for the shootings.

Trump tweeted in response that O’Rourke “should respect the victims & law enforcement – & be quiet!”

A gunman toting an AK-47-style assault rifle and extra magazines of ammunition killed 22 people and injured dozens more at an El Paso Walmart on Saturday morning, after apparently posting a racist screed on an anonymous online messaging board. Police have detained suspect Patrick Crusius, a 21-year-old white male.

The Dayton gunman, armed with an AR 15-style rifle, killed nine people in an entertainment district hours later, including his own sister. That shooter, identified as 24-year-old Connor Betts, was killed by officers less than a minute after his attack began, police said.

Trump told reporters Wednesday that he supported background checks for gun purchases.

“I’m looking to do background checks, I think background checks are important,” he said. “I don’t want to put guns into the hands of mentally unstable people or people with rage or hate, sick people. I’m all in favor of it.”

He added that “I think both Republicans and Democrats are getting close” to “doing something on background checks.”

In fact, the Democrat-led House passed a gun control bill that would strengthen background checks months earlier, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has not brought the legislation to the Senate for a vote.

In a statement Monday, McConnell said that “Only serious, bipartisan, bicameral efforts will enable us to continue this important work and produce further legislation that can pass the Senate, pass the House, and earn the president’s signature. Partisan theatrics and campaign-trail rhetoric will only take us farther away from the progress all Americans deserve.”

Neither a spokesman for McConnell nor the White House immediately responded to CNBC’s inquiries about the president’s comments.

Many Republicans have signaled their support for red flag laws, also known as extreme risk protection orders. But Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said in a statement Wednesday that without “strong universal background checks” in place, red flag laws alone “won’t be fully effective.”

“The notion that passing a tepid version of an Extreme Risk Protection Order (ERPO) bill—alone—is even close to getting the job done in addressing rampant gun violence in the U.S. is wrong and would be an ineffective cop out,” Schumer said.

Trump also said there was no “political appetite” for legislation to ban assault weapons. A federal assault weapons ban had been signed into law in 1994 by President Bill Clinton, but was allowed to expire in 2004 under President George W. Bush.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: kevin breuninger, jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, white, congress, reform, washington, background, dems, president, house, texas, checks, senate, gun, trump, close, gop, hell


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GOP vote on Trump’s ‘go back’ comments was an effort to absolve him — and themselves — on racism

President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, July 1, 2019. With their votes this week, House Republicans absolved President Donald Trump of racism in calling for four non-white lawmakers to “go back” to other countries. “They’re being asked to condemn an element of the coalition,” said Carlos Curbelo, a Republican House member from Miami until a Democrat defeated him in 2018 midterm elections. ‘, they don’t want to do that,” says former House GOP leadership


President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, July 1, 2019. With their votes this week, House Republicans absolved President Donald Trump of racism in calling for four non-white lawmakers to “go back” to other countries. “They’re being asked to condemn an element of the coalition,” said Carlos Curbelo, a Republican House member from Miami until a Democrat defeated him in 2018 midterm elections. ‘, they don’t want to do that,” says former House GOP leadership
GOP vote on Trump’s ‘go back’ comments was an effort to absolve him — and themselves — on racism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gop, comments, vote, effort, president, white, republican, party, 2016, absolve, house, trump, racism, change, trumps, republicans


GOP vote on Trump's 'go back' comments was an effort to absolve him — and themselves — on racism

President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, July 1, 2019.

With their votes this week, House Republicans absolved President Donald Trump of racism in calling for four non-white lawmakers to “go back” to other countries.

But not only Trump.

They also voted to absolve themselves, their party and the voters who elected them – like the ones who chanted “send her back” at a rally Wednesday in North Carolina. It took more than just fealty to the president to unite 187 of 191 Republicans against condemning his words.

Analysts across the political spectrum typically cite raw fear as why GOP leaders don’t challenge Trump over behavior that outrages most Americans. Rock-solid support within his party, they argue, means the president can end the careers of Republican dissidents.

“I think he’s racist,” said Mickey Edwards, a Reagan-era GOP lawmaker who once chaired the American Conservative Union. But “a relatively small number of Republicans” share Trump’s racial views, Edwards added, and simple “cowardice” explains the party’s refusal to denounce them.

Yet this week’s furor implicates the character and reputation of many others besides the president. Denouncing Trump’s words as racist, as the House Democratic majority voted to do, means denouncing those chanting rally audiences that all GOP candidates depend on.

“They’re being asked to condemn an element of the coalition,” said Carlos Curbelo, a Republican House member from Miami until a Democrat defeated him in 2018 midterm elections. For a Republican elected official, the blowback would dwarf what Hillary Clinton suffered in 2016 after calling some Trump supporters “deplorables.”

That element of the coalition looms so large because of how the two parties have evolved over the last half-century. After national Democrats decisively embraced the civil rights movement, white conservatives flocked to the GOP, polarizing American politics along racial and partisan lines as well as ideological ones.

That realignment fueled incendiary culture clashes over crime, welfare, affirmation action and immigration long before 2016. Trump accuses Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., of hating America, offering her as a symbol of Democratic radicalism; three decades before, George H.W. Bush’s Republican presidential campaign vowed to make black criminal Willie Horton the Democratic “running mate,” and sought to suggest superior patriotism by appearing at a flag factory.

Those clashes have grown harder for Republicans to win as education levels rise, attitudes change and non-whites swell as a share of America’s population. And they’ve consistently placed Republicans of whatever motivation – ideological or personal, economic or cultural, foreign policy or domestic affairs – on the defensive.

“Reagan conservatives like me have been called racists – falsely and maliciously – all of our lives,” National Review editor Jay Nordlinger said on Twitter today.

But Trump brings the question about his party into sharper focus than Reagan, Bush or Richard Nixon ever did.

Studies have shown that white populations with the strongest feelings of racial resentment – disproportionately less-educated, lower-income religious conservatives — propelled his 2016 campaign from the start. As president, he has abandoned the decorum of Republican predecessors and stoked their resentments.

Now, GOP lawmakers who have surfed overlapping currents to power fear that acknowledging Trump crossed the line would acknowledge that the rest of the party has, too.

“Whether it’s because they’re pointing the finger at themselves, or someone else saying ‘Aha!’, they don’t want to do that,” says former House GOP leadership aide Doug Heye.

By condemning Trump, “they’re condemning themselves,” adds former GOP House member Vin Weber. “They feel it validates the criticism that’s come their way for a lot of things.”

Weber, who once joined his ally Newt Gingrich in rallying the Republican right behind the “Conservative Opportunity Society,” calls some of that criticism justified. “Racism is a part of it,” he says, though “not all or even primarily.”

But it’s becoming a louder part as America draws closer to the day when white people no longer represent a majority of the population. Census officials expect it to happen by mid-century.

That demographic reality led national Republican leaders in 2013 to call for courting non-whites – and also young, female and gay voters — with a “more inclusive and welcoming” message. Trump won in 2016 with the opposite approach, and aims to do it again in 2020.

That would only delay the reckoning with societal change that the GOP sidestepped again by standing behind Trump this week.

“Parties change or evolve when they’re forced to change,” said Curbelo, a Miami-born Cuban-American. “All Republican leaders understand this is the path we have to pursue. There’s no other way.”

WATCH: Crowds chant ‘send her back’ at Trump campaign rally


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gop, comments, vote, effort, president, white, republican, party, 2016, absolve, house, trump, racism, change, trumps, republicans


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‘I like bitcoin,’ says House GOP leader McCarthy, hits Facebook Libra

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told CNBC on Tuesday that he likes the decentralized nature and the security of bitcoin. “When I’m on Facebook, I’m not the customer, I’m the product,” he said. Now they want to get into the business, and they’re not bitcoin, in this Libra. “I want to see decentralization because Libra concerns me that they’re going to control the market,” McCarthy said. However, the Pennsylvania senator added he wants to know the real motivation behind Libra because Facebook


House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told CNBC on Tuesday that he likes the decentralized nature and the security of bitcoin. “When I’m on Facebook, I’m not the customer, I’m the product,” he said. Now they want to get into the business, and they’re not bitcoin, in this Libra. “I want to see decentralization because Libra concerns me that they’re going to control the market,” McCarthy said. However, the Pennsylvania senator added he wants to know the real motivation behind Libra because Facebook
‘I like bitcoin,’ says House GOP leader McCarthy, hits Facebook Libra Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: jessica bursztynsky matthew j belvedere, jessica bursztynsky, matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, toomey, bitcoin, gop, libra, im, mccarthy, including, hits, facebook, money, theyre, security, house, leader


'I like bitcoin,' says House GOP leader McCarthy, hits Facebook Libra

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told CNBC on Tuesday that he likes the decentralized nature and the security of bitcoin.

“I like bitcoin” and the security of the blockchain ledger technology behind cryptocurrencies, the California Republican said, as he criticized Facebook’s plans for a Libra digital coin ahead of hearings on Capitol Hill this week.

Libra will be pegged to a basket of government-backed money, compared with bitcoin, which is highly volatile in price and derives value from factors including its ability to enable instantaneous, anonymous, global payments and as an investment.

Nobody controls bitcoin.

McCarthy did, however, say that bitcoin is not where it needs to be yet, alluding to the risks of cryptocurrencies being used by criminals and money launderers.

While Libra promises more stability, McCarthy remains concerned.

“When I’m on Facebook, I’m not the customer, I’m the product,” he said. “Facebook is free because they sell your data to make money. Now they want to get into the business, and they’re not bitcoin, in this Libra. They’re not decentralized.”

In Libra hearings by the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday and House Financial Services on Wednesday, McCarthy said he’s looking for the social media giant to address its potential anti-competitive behavior.

“I want to see decentralization because Libra concerns me that they’re going to control the market,” McCarthy said.

To address those concerns, Facebook set up Libra to be run by a nonprofit consortium supported by a range of firms and organizations, including including payment companies Visa and PayPal, as well as tech giants eBay, Lyft, Spotify and Uber.

Republican Sen. Pat Toomey strayed from McCarthy’s and the Trump administration’s critical views o Libra, telling CNBC in a separate interview Tuesday that Facebook’s planned digital coin should be given a chance.

“I don’t want to presume in advance that we’ve got to prevent the development of some new innovation,” Toomey offered.

However, the Pennsylvania senator added he wants to know the real motivation behind Libra because Facebook has said that it’s not about making money.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: jessica bursztynsky matthew j belvedere, jessica bursztynsky, matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, toomey, bitcoin, gop, libra, im, mccarthy, including, hits, facebook, money, theyre, security, house, leader


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Former GOP Rep. Scott Taylor will challenge Virginia Sen. Mark Warner in 2020

Rep. Scott Taylor, R-Va., talks with reporters in the Capitol after a meeting of the House Republican Conference on March 06, 2018. Former Republican Rep. Scott Taylor will try to take down Democratic Sen. Mark Warner in Virginia next year. Meanwhile, Democrats unseated three House Republicans from Virginia — including Taylor — on their way to taking control of the chamber. In a statement Monday, Warner campaign manager Bruce Sinclair said, “We welcome Scott Taylor to the race and wish him the b


Rep. Scott Taylor, R-Va., talks with reporters in the Capitol after a meeting of the House Republican Conference on March 06, 2018. Former Republican Rep. Scott Taylor will try to take down Democratic Sen. Mark Warner in Virginia next year. Meanwhile, Democrats unseated three House Republicans from Virginia — including Taylor — on their way to taking control of the chamber. In a statement Monday, Warner campaign manager Bruce Sinclair said, “We welcome Scott Taylor to the race and wish him the b
Former GOP Rep. Scott Taylor will challenge Virginia Sen. Mark Warner in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scott, warner, campaign, race, senate, virginia, taylor, sen, gop, republicans, mark, challenge, 2020, republican, rep


Former GOP Rep. Scott Taylor will challenge Virginia Sen. Mark Warner in 2020

Rep. Scott Taylor, R-Va., talks with reporters in the Capitol after a meeting of the House Republican Conference on March 06, 2018.

Former Republican Rep. Scott Taylor will try to take down Democratic Sen. Mark Warner in Virginia next year.

The ex-congressman and Navy Seal announced his plan to challenge Warner on Monday morning. Taylor faces a difficult task in attempting to unseat the two-term senator in a state that has tilted blue in recent elections.

In an interview Monday on the Fox News program “Fox & Friends,” Taylor contended Warner has little to show for nearly a dozen years in the Senate. He also criticized the senator — the top Democrat on the chamber’s Intelligence Committee — for his role in the Senate panel’s probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election and whether the Trump campaign colluded with Moscow.

“It’s going to be tight,” Taylor told Fox about the race. “There’s no question, we are underdogs.”

A handful of 2020 races will help to determine whether Republicans can keep their 53-47 advantage in the Senate. A close contest in Virginia would bode poorly for Democrats, as election forecasters consider Warner safer next year than several of his Democratic colleagues.

Taylor’s fate could depend in part on whether President Donald Trump makes Virginia competitive. Democrat Hillary Clinton carried the state by about 5 percentage points in 2016.

In last year’s midterms, Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine won by more than 15 percentage points. Meanwhile, Democrats unseated three House Republicans from Virginia — including Taylor — on their way to taking control of the chamber. Rep. Elaine Luria beat the former congressman by about 2 percentage points in Virginia’s 2nd District.

In a statement Monday, Warner campaign manager Bruce Sinclair said, “We welcome Scott Taylor to the race and wish him the best of luck in the Republican primary.”

Taylor enters the race at a cash disadvantage. The Warner campaign said it raised $1.8 million in the second quarter and ended June with $5.4 million on hand.

The former one-term congressman will likely make Warner’s role in the Senate Intelligence Committee’s Russia probe a major part of his campaign. Republicans running for Congress during Trump’s tenure have stressed their allegiance to the president — particularly in primary races.

Trump has publicly targeted Warner several times as he maintains he did not coordinate with Russia or try to obstruct special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. In a May tweet, the president argued Warner “is acting and talking like he is in total control of the Senate Intelligence Committee.” He claimed there is “nothing bipartisan about [Warner].”

Warner has advocated for tighter regulations on social media companies, both in the information they disclose about campaign ads and the data they gather about consumers.

A cloud from Taylor’s last campaign could hang over him this time. A former 2016 campaign staff member was charged in May with submitting forged petition signatures for an independent candidate who could have taken votes away from Luria.

In a statement at the time, Taylor said he “knew nothing about any illegal actions that transpired.”

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scott, warner, campaign, race, senate, virginia, taylor, sen, gop, republicans, mark, challenge, 2020, republican, rep


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Huawei expansion in Western nations may be ‘a Trojan horse,’ warns a top GOP senator

The increased presence of Chinese tech giant Huawei around the world, including in NATO countries, is troubling, GOP Sen. John Barrasso told CNBC on Friday. It could be a Trojan horse,” said the third-ranking member in the Senate Republican leadership. The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that China will demand the U.S. remove its restrictions on the sale of American technology to Huawei. If Trump were to accept those terms, that move would not sit well with Barrasso, chairman of the Senate


The increased presence of Chinese tech giant Huawei around the world, including in NATO countries, is troubling, GOP Sen. John Barrasso told CNBC on Friday. It could be a Trojan horse,” said the third-ranking member in the Senate Republican leadership. The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that China will demand the U.S. remove its restrictions on the sale of American technology to Huawei. If Trump were to accept those terms, that move would not sit well with Barrasso, chairman of the Senate
Huawei expansion in Western nations may be ‘a Trojan horse,’ warns a top GOP senator Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gop, trump, chinese, nations, trojan, horse, including, trade, technology, senate, huawei, western, senator, expansion, threat, warns, used, republican


Huawei expansion in Western nations may be 'a Trojan horse,' warns a top GOP senator

The increased presence of Chinese tech giant Huawei around the world, including in NATO countries, is troubling, GOP Sen. John Barrasso told CNBC on Friday.

“Huawei is a true threat. It could be a Trojan horse,” said the third-ranking member in the Senate Republican leadership.

The Trump administration and lawmakers on Capitol Hill are worried that Huawei’s equipment, including smartphones and key networking gear for next generation 5G wireless, could be used by the Chinese communist government for spying.

Huawei has adamantly and repeatedly said it’s separate from the Chinese government and it would not do its bidding.

However, the Wyoming senator remains unconvinced. “I have great concerns about Huawei and the threat that it would provide to our country.”

Last month, President Donald Trump declared a national emergency over threats against U.S. technology, leading the White House to effectively blacklist Huawei from conducting business with U.S. companies.

The Trump administration has tried to pressure other countries to follow suit but faced resistance from European Union allies, including Germany which laid out specific security standards for foreign vendors.

Huawei said Monday there’s “no doubt” that it can meet the German requirements.

On Saturday at the G-20 summit in Japan, Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping are set to discuss their 11-month trade war, with Beijing seeking relief for Huawei as part of any deal.

The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that China will demand the U.S. remove its restrictions on the sale of American technology to Huawei.

If Trump were to accept those terms, that move would not sit well with Barrasso, chairman of the Senate Republican Conference. Huawei “is not something that can be used as a bargaining chip in trade,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gop, trump, chinese, nations, trojan, horse, including, trade, technology, senate, huawei, western, senator, expansion, threat, warns, used, republican


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Tech industry slams GOP senator’s bill that would hold companies liable for user-posted content

Under the new bill companies would have to submit to audits every two years to prove their algorithms and content-removal practices are “politically neutral” in order to maintain their immunity. A Facebook spokesman also pointed at a statement provided by NetChoice, a trade association focused on e-commerce businesses whose members include Facebook, Twitter and Google. “Sen. Hawley’s bill creates an internet where content from the KKK would display alongside our family photos and cat videos.” A


Under the new bill companies would have to submit to audits every two years to prove their algorithms and content-removal practices are “politically neutral” in order to maintain their immunity. A Facebook spokesman also pointed at a statement provided by NetChoice, a trade association focused on e-commerce businesses whose members include Facebook, Twitter and Google. “Sen. Hawley’s bill creates an internet where content from the KKK would display alongside our family photos and cat videos.” A
Tech industry slams GOP senator’s bill that would hold companies liable for user-posted content Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, content, gop, facebook, slams, userposted, liable, tech, hold, internet, companies, association, users, senators, bill, statement, twitter, provided, industry


Tech industry slams GOP senator's bill that would hold companies liable for user-posted content

Tech trade organizations on Wednesday lashed out at a newly proposed bill by Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., that would fundamentally alter the business models of tech companies such as Facebook, Twitter and Google’s YouTube.

The new bill, titled the Ending Support for Internet Censorship Act, would remove the immunity provided by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996 that protects major tech companies from liability for the content posted by their users. Under the new bill companies would have to submit to audits every two years to prove their algorithms and content-removal practices are “politically neutral” in order to maintain their immunity.

Tech industry trade groups focused on the political neutrality aspect of the bill, arguing that this would make content moderation harder, not easier, as the companies would be open to lawsuits from users who believed they were being censored. More broadly, the bill could effectively require companies to vet all content before it’s posted, rather than after, which would dramatically raise the costs of content moderation and force major changes to these companies’ business models.

Asked about the bill, representatives for Facebook and Twitter both pointed to a statement provided by the Internet Association, a lobbying group that represents the two companies and several others in tech.

“This bill forces platforms to make an impossible choice: either host reprehensible, but First Amendment protected speech, or lose legal protections that allow them to moderate illegal content like human trafficking and violent extremism,” said Michael Beckerman, president and CEO of the Internet Association, in a statement. “That shouldn’t be a tradeoff.”

A Facebook spokesman also pointed at a statement provided by NetChoice, a trade association focused on e-commerce businesses whose members include Facebook, Twitter and Google.

“This bill prevents social media websites from removing dangerous and hateful content, since that could make them liable for lawsuits over any user’s posting,” said Carl Szabo, general counsel at NetChoice, in a statement. “Sen. Hawley’s bill creates an internet where content from the KKK would display alongside our family photos and cat videos.”

A Twitter spokeswoman also pointed to a statement provided by Americans for Prosperity, a policy group funded by the libertarian Koch family.

“This bill would punish success in the next generation of innovative startups and prevent them from achieving their full potential,” AFP said in its statement. “Lawmakers should reject this legislation.”

The Computer & Communications Industry Association, a group that represents computer, communications and internet companies, also criticized Hawley’s bill.

“At a time when white nationalists are stealthily seeding calls in the mainstream press for ‘viewpoint neutrality,’ it’s troubling that the senator would contemplate legislation forcing online services to carry these views,” the CCIA said in a statement. “American businesses shouldn’t be forced to be neutral toward racism and extremism.”

Google, Snap and Reddit did not respond to requests for comment.

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, content, gop, facebook, slams, userposted, liable, tech, hold, internet, companies, association, users, senators, bill, statement, twitter, provided, industry


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Billionaire GOP donor and Trump supporter says he rejected Joe Biden’s request for fundraising help in 2020

Democratic front runner Joe Biden on Monday appealed to a billionaire Republican donor for fundraising help in his presidential campaign. Catsimatidis was an invited guest to the Monday fundraiser and did not contribute to Biden’s campaign to gain entrance. “I think Joe Biden is the most common sense nominee of the 23 people running in the Democratic Party,” he said. Catsimatidis’ decision to stick with Trump despite his goodwill toward Biden demonstrates the stranglehold the president has on th


Democratic front runner Joe Biden on Monday appealed to a billionaire Republican donor for fundraising help in his presidential campaign. Catsimatidis was an invited guest to the Monday fundraiser and did not contribute to Biden’s campaign to gain entrance. “I think Joe Biden is the most common sense nominee of the 23 people running in the Democratic Party,” he said. Catsimatidis’ decision to stick with Trump despite his goodwill toward Biden demonstrates the stranglehold the president has on th
Billionaire GOP donor and Trump supporter says he rejected Joe Biden’s request for fundraising help in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, joe, trump, gop, fundraising, biden, republican, rejected, president, request, campaign, democratic, donor, catsimatidis, supporter, york, billionaire, help


Billionaire GOP donor and Trump supporter says he rejected Joe Biden's request for fundraising help in 2020

Democratic front runner Joe Biden on Monday appealed to a billionaire Republican donor for fundraising help in his presidential campaign. But the financier, Trump-supporting New York supermarket magnate John Catsimatidis, declined.

Biden spoke to Catsimatidis, who has an estimated net worth of $3.1 billion, for about 10 minutes at a fundraiser held at the New York home of short seller Jim Chanos, according to the businessman. When Biden asked for his help, “I just smiled,” Catsimatidis said.

Catsimatidis, who owns the New York supermarket chain Gristedes and ran for mayor in 2013, had praise for Biden, but he is sticking with President Donald Trump in 2020. Catsimatidis was an invited guest to the Monday fundraiser and did not contribute to Biden’s campaign to gain entrance.

“I think Joe Biden is the most common sense nominee of the 23 people running in the Democratic Party,” he said. “Monetarily, I did not commit to helping him but I will help him brotherly, on my radio show and with all my media contacts.”

Catsimatidis’ decision to stick with Trump despite his goodwill toward Biden demonstrates the stranglehold the president has on the Republican donor class. Biden has claimed that he received encouragement from GOP donors.

“An awful lot of people have offered to help — and the people who are usually the biggest donors in the Democratic Party, and I might add some major Republican folks,” Biden said in February, before he launched his campaign. He also repeatedly said he is open to working with Republicans in Congress if he were to become president.

Chanos, according to a pool report, said the event brought in nearly 180 guests. Donors contributed $2,800. People familiar with the Chanos donor retreat and other Biden fundraisers set for Tuesday in New York said they anticipate the events to bring in a total of at least $1 million. The Tuesday fundraisers will be held at law firms Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison; and Weitz and Luxenberg.

A Biden representative did not return a request for comment.

It made sense for Biden to approach Catsimatidis, despite the businessman’s support for Trump. In 2016, Catsimatidis donated more than $116,000 to Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s efforts. While he sent $100,000 to Trump’s joint fundraising committee, Trump Victory, between June and August of that year, he also donated $50,000 Clinton’s committee, the Hillary Victory Fund, one month before the November general election, Federal Election Commission records show.

Catsimatidis’ daughter, Andrea, is the chairwoman of the Manhattan GOP and New York City’s regional vice chair of state’s Republican Party. John Catsimatidis noted that his children are in Orlando for Trump’s official reelection campaign launch Tuesday night.

The Chanos event marked Biden’s first fundraising visit to New York since he launched his campaign in April.

Catsimatidis was not the only Republican at the donor meeting Monday. Former U.S. Sen. Al D’Amato was also there. Other notable guests at the event included former Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, who served under former President Barack Obama and Trump; Michael Kempner, CEO of public relations firm MWWPR; and real estate executive Bruce Mosler.

Kempner helped Obama and Clinton in the fundraising game when they each ran for president, according to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics.

Biden took aim at some of the participants from Wall Street and made it clear that he believes they are not the backbone of American success.

“You know, you guys are great but Wall Street didn’t build America. You guys are incredibly important but you didn’t build America. Ordinary, hard-working, middle-class people given half the chance is what built America,” he told the crowd.

Even though some of the attendees are giving to multiple candidates, organizers, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, say the majority of Democratic donors in the room were for Biden.

“Many of the democrats give to multiple candidates based on personal relationships,” one of the leaders of the event said. “But this room was with Joe.”

While addressing the crowd at Chanos’ residence, Biden appeared to mistakenly announce his campaign has raised at least $19.8 million when he said they’ve brought in “360,000 donors with an average contribution of $55.”

Biden isn’t the only Democratic presidential candidate in New York this week. California Sen. Kamala Harris will be at a Tuesday fundraiser hosted by co-owner of the Milwaukee Bucks Marc Lasry and investment banker Blair Effron. Harris’ campaign aims to raise up to $200,000 there, according to people with direct knowledge of the matter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, joe, trump, gop, fundraising, biden, republican, rejected, president, request, campaign, democratic, donor, catsimatidis, supporter, york, billionaire, help


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GOP senator introduces a bill that would blow up business models for Facebook, YouTube and other tech giants

Hawley, a tech critic, introduced legislation on Wednesday that would remove the immunity big technology companies receive under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996. The CDA protects online platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Google’s YouTube from liability for the content users post. The immunity provision of Hawley’s bill echoes concerns from other politically conservative lawmakers that these platforms are censoring right-wing voices by unfairly removing them from the pl


Hawley, a tech critic, introduced legislation on Wednesday that would remove the immunity big technology companies receive under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996. The CDA protects online platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Google’s YouTube from liability for the content users post. The immunity provision of Hawley’s bill echoes concerns from other politically conservative lawmakers that these platforms are censoring right-wing voices by unfairly removing them from the pl
GOP senator introduces a bill that would blow up business models for Facebook, YouTube and other tech giants Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: mary catherine wellons
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, gop, content, senator, politically, tech, immunity, business, blow, companies, hawley, senate, youtube, provision, giants, 230, big, introduces, models


GOP senator introduces a bill that would blow up business models for Facebook, YouTube and other tech giants

President Donald Trump (R) listens while US Senate candidate from Missouri Josh Hawley (L) speaks at the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States National Convention July 24, 2018 in Kansas City, Missouri.

Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., is turning up the heat on an issue that is sure to spark outrage in Silicon Valley.

Hawley, a tech critic, introduced legislation on Wednesday that would remove the immunity big technology companies receive under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996. The CDA protects online platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Google’s YouTube from liability for the content users post. However, companies will be able to earn immunity from the crackdown if they submit to audits every two years to prove their algorithms and content-removal practices are “politically neutral.”

The idea of limiting Section 230 immunity has earned bipartisan support in recent years, as the companies have struggled to keep offensive and illegal content, ranging from terrorist propaganda to foreign-influenced election meddling, off their platforms.

Repealing the immunity provision could force these companies to use an editorial system where every piece of user-posted content would have to be vetted for illegal or libelous material before it’s posted, instead relying on algorithms and human checkers to scan it after it was already online and had a chance to spread to millions of people. This would fundamentally alter the business models of companies that depend on huge volumes of user-generated content, including all the big social networks.

The immunity provision of Hawley’s bill echoes concerns from other politically conservative lawmakers that these platforms are censoring right-wing voices by unfairly removing them from the platform. For instance, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, hammered Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about alleged political bias during the executive’s testimony before Senate in April 2018.

“With Section 230, tech companies get a sweetheart deal that no other industry enjoys: complete exemption from traditional publisher liability in exchange for providing a forum free of political censorship,” said Hawley. “Unfortunately, and unsurprisingly, big tech has failed to hold up its end of the bargain.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: mary catherine wellons
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, gop, content, senator, politically, tech, immunity, business, blow, companies, hawley, senate, youtube, provision, giants, 230, big, introduces, models


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