Former GOP Rep. Chris Collins set to be sentenced in insider trading case

Former U.S. Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY) exits federal court on October 1, 2019 in New York City. Disgraced former Rep. Chris Collins faces sentencing Friday in the insider-trading case that led him to give up his seat in Congress. ET in federal court in lower Manhattan. Chris Collins himself did not trade Innate stock after learning about the test results. The younger Collins and Stephen Zarsky, his fiancee’s father, will be sentenced next week in the insider trading case.


Former U.S. Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY) exits federal court on October 1, 2019 in New York City.
Disgraced former Rep. Chris Collins faces sentencing Friday in the insider-trading case that led him to give up his seat in Congress.
ET in federal court in lower Manhattan.
Chris Collins himself did not trade Innate stock after learning about the test results.
The younger Collins and Stephen Zarsky, his fiancee’s father, will be sentenced next week in the insider trading case.
Former GOP Rep. Chris Collins set to be sentenced in insider trading case Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, set, insider, gop, case, test, york, federal, court, house, trading, guilty, sentenced, sentence, stock, rep, collins, chris


Former GOP Rep. Chris Collins set to be sentenced in insider trading case

Former U.S. Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY) exits federal court on October 1, 2019 in New York City.

Disgraced former Rep. Chris Collins faces sentencing Friday in the insider-trading case that led him to give up his seat in Congress.

U.S. Judge Vernon Broderick is scheduled to announce the sentence at 2:30 p.m. ET in federal court in lower Manhattan.

Federal prosecutors want Broderick to sentence Collins to nearly five years in prison — the top end of the federal guidelines range — to set an example that will “promote respect for the law, in light of the lack of respect that Collins has shown for it.”

But Collins’ lawyers have asked for probation.

“He has paid a heavy price for his crimes,” one of his attorneys wrote in a court filing last week, claiming Collins is “now too ashamed to spend significant time in the community he loves.”

Probation officers had recommended a sentence of a year and a day in prison, along with a $200,000 fine and a term of supervised release.

Collins, 69, was the first member of Congress to support then-candidate Donald Trump’s 2016 White House bid. Despite pleading guilty to charges of conspiracy to commit securities fraud and making false statements, Collins has retained some support in his upstate New York district — and from high-profile Republicans like former House Speaker John Boehner — who have vouched for Collins’ character in letters to the judge.

Collins pleaded guilty in October to tipping off his son Cameron in a phone call from the White House lawn about the results of an Australian biotech company’s failed drug trial before the test results became public.

After the test was revealed, the stock price of the company — in which Collins was a leading investor and board member — tanked by more than 90%.

A day before Collins switched his plea to guilty, he submitted his resignation from Congress.

Cameron Collins saved nearly $600,000 by dumping his stock in the company, Innate Immunotherapeutics, before it disclosed the bad news. Chris Collins himself did not trade Innate stock after learning about the test results.

The younger Collins and Stephen Zarsky, his fiancee’s father, will be sentenced next week in the insider trading case.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, set, insider, gop, case, test, york, federal, court, house, trading, guilty, sentenced, sentence, stock, rep, collins, chris


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GOP senator blasts Pelosi for trying to control the impeachment trial — ‘she just hates Trump’

GOP Sen. Rick Scott on Monday railed against what he calls the impeachment “circus” surrounding President Donald Trump, accusing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of playing games. “She just hates Trump,” Scott said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “Clearly what Pelosi has done is a circus, it’s a sham,” the Florida Republican added. Scott was referring to the speaker’s delay in sending to the Senate the two articles of impeachment passed by the House last month. The president has repeatedly denied any wrongdoi


GOP Sen. Rick Scott on Monday railed against what he calls the impeachment “circus” surrounding President Donald Trump, accusing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of playing games.
“She just hates Trump,” Scott said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”
“Clearly what Pelosi has done is a circus, it’s a sham,” the Florida Republican added.
Scott was referring to the speaker’s delay in sending to the Senate the two articles of impeachment passed by the House last month.
The president has repeatedly denied any wrongdoi
GOP senator blasts Pelosi for trying to control the impeachment trial — ‘she just hates Trump’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trying, pelosi, senate, president, control, hates, gop, blasts, house, senator, scott, trump, important, playing, impeachment, trial, month


GOP senator blasts Pelosi for trying to control the impeachment trial — 'she just hates Trump'

GOP Sen. Rick Scott on Monday railed against what he calls the impeachment “circus” surrounding President Donald Trump, accusing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of playing games.

“She just hates Trump,” Scott said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “She said it was so important to get it done in December and didn’t have time to have witnesses come, and now she wants to tell us how to do the trial in the Senate.”

“Clearly what Pelosi has done is a circus, it’s a sham,” the Florida Republican added. “We should be doing things that are important, but we’re playing this game.”

A spokesperson for Pelosi did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Scott was referring to the speaker’s delay in sending to the Senate the two articles of impeachment passed by the House last month. She’s expected to send them this week.

The California Democrat’s delay was part of a strategy aimed at trying to force concessions out of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, including the ability to call witnesses.

McConnell, however, shut down that idea last week, telling reporters that he had enough votes to start the trial without a commitment to hear from additional witnesses.

“It’s frustrating to me,” Scott, a key ally of Trump, added. “The Democrats didn’t prove anything but that he is innocent.”

Trump was charged last month with abuse of power for asking Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden while withholding aid as leverage, and with obstruction of Congress for stonewalling the House investigation.

The president has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing and is backed by Senate Republicans, who are unlikely to vote to remove the GOP president.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trying, pelosi, senate, president, control, hates, gop, blasts, house, senator, scott, trump, important, playing, impeachment, trial, month


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GOP Sen. Grassley turns to House Speaker Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan drug pricing bill

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is turning to Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices in the Senate. Grassley told CNBC on Tuesday that he wants to convince Pelosi to abandon her drug pricing bill, passed by the House in December, and support his legislation. We have bipartisan support in the Senate.” Grassley, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, worked with ranking Democrat Ron Wyden of Oregon to pass a broad drug pricing bill through


Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is turning to Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices in the Senate.
Grassley told CNBC on Tuesday that he wants to convince Pelosi to abandon her drug pricing bill, passed by the House in December, and support his legislation.
We have bipartisan support in the Senate.”
Grassley, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, worked with ranking Democrat Ron Wyden of Oregon to pass a broad drug pricing bill through
GOP Sen. Grassley turns to House Speaker Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan drug pricing bill Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drug, wants, turns, sen, pricing, gop, pelosi, support, republicans, house, grassley, selling, senate, bipartisan, prices, help, bill, speaker


GOP Sen. Grassley turns to House Speaker Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan drug pricing bill

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is turning to Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for help selling his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices in the Senate.

Grassley told CNBC on Tuesday that he wants to convince Pelosi to abandon her drug pricing bill, passed by the House in December, and support his legislation. He argued that there’s “no other bill that can get the 60 votes required” to pass the Senate. The Iowa senator said Pelosi’s bill, which would allow the government to negotiate lower prices for certain drugs, does not stand a chance in the GOP-controlled upper chamber.

Pelosi’s support would put “pressure on the leadership of the United States Senate to get our bill up,” Grassley said on “Squawk Box.” “The president supports it. We have bipartisan support in the Senate.”

A spokesman for Pelosi’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Grassley, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, worked with ranking Democrat Ron Wyden of Oregon to pass a broad drug pricing bill through their committee in July. High prescription drug costs have become a rare bipartisan issue, drawing support from both Republicans and Democrats in Congress and the Trump administration. Health care remains a top issue for voters ahead of the 2020 election.

Grassley’s bill would make changes to Medicare by adding an out-of-pocket maximum for beneficiaries and capping drug price increases at the rate of inflation, among other measures. The bill has been stalled due to lack of support from Senate Republicans.

Last month, Grassley accused Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who has not scheduled the bill for a vote, of sabotaging it. During a briefing with reporters on Dec. 18, Grassley said that “the president wants it” but more Republicans don’t support it because McConnell “asked them not to.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drug, wants, turns, sen, pricing, gop, pelosi, support, republicans, house, grassley, selling, senate, bipartisan, prices, help, bill, speaker


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These GOP senators could break the stalemate in Trump’s impeachment trial

Tom Williams | CQ-Roll Call Group | Getty ImagesThe Senate seems certain to keep President Donald Trump in office, thanks to the overwhelming GOP support expected in his impeachment trial. But small cracks in GOP unity have appeared, with two Republican senators criticizing McConnell’s pledge of “total coordination” with the White House during the impeachment trial. A look at senators to watch once the impeachment trial begins:MurkowskiIn her fourth term representing Alaska, Murkowski is conside


Tom Williams | CQ-Roll Call Group | Getty ImagesThe Senate seems certain to keep President Donald Trump in office, thanks to the overwhelming GOP support expected in his impeachment trial.
But small cracks in GOP unity have appeared, with two Republican senators criticizing McConnell’s pledge of “total coordination” with the White House during the impeachment trial.
A look at senators to watch once the impeachment trial begins:MurkowskiIn her fourth term representing Alaska, Murkowski is conside
These GOP senators could break the stalemate in Trump’s impeachment trial Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, senators, trial, trump, trumps, break, senate, collins, stalemate, democrats, witnesses, impeachment, gop


These GOP senators could break the stalemate in Trump's impeachment trial

Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, right, and Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska. Tom Williams | CQ-Roll Call Group | Getty Images

The Senate seems certain to keep President Donald Trump in office, thanks to the overwhelming GOP support expected in his impeachment trial. But how that trial will proceed — and when it will begin — remains to be seen. Democrats are pushing for the Senate to issue subpoenas for witnesses and documents, pointing to reports that they say have raised new questions about Trump’s decision to withhold military aid from Ukraine. Once the House transmits the articles of impeachment, decisions about how to conduct the trial will require 51 votes. With Republicans controlling the Senate 53-47, Democrats cannot force subpoenas on their own. For now, Republicans are holding the line behind Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s position that they should start the trial and hear arguments from House prosecutors and Trump’s defense team before deciding what to do. But small cracks in GOP unity have appeared, with two Republican senators criticizing McConnell’s pledge of “total coordination” with the White House during the impeachment trial. Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski said she was “disturbed” by the GOP leader’s comments, adding that there should be distance between the White House and the Senate on how the trial is conducted. Maine Sen. Susan Collins, meanwhile, called the pledge by McConnell, R-Ky., inappropriate and said she is open to seeking testimony. Democrats could find their own unity tested if and when the Senate reaches a final vote on the two House-approved impeachment charges — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. It would take 67 votes to convict Trump on either charge and remove him from office, a high bar unlikely to be reached. It’s also far from certain that all 47 Democrats will find Trump guilty. Democratic Sen. Doug Jones of Alabama said he’s undecided on how he might vote and suggested he sees merits in the arguments both for and against conviction. A look at senators to watch once the impeachment trial begins:

Murkowski

In her fourth term representing Alaska, Murkowski is considered a key Senate moderate. She has voted against GOP leadership on multiple occasions and opposed Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court in 2018. Murkowski told an Alaska TV station last month there should be distance between the White House and the GOP-controlled Senate in how the trial is conducted. “To me it means that we have to take that step back from being hand in glove with the defense, and so I heard what leader McConnell had said, I happened to think that that has further confused the process,” she said. Murkowski says the Senate is being asked to cure deficiencies in the House impeachment effort, particularly when it comes to whether key witnesses should be brought forward to testify, including White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney and former national security adviser John Bolton. “How we will deal with witnesses remains to be seen,” she said, adding that House leaders should have gone to court if witnesses refused to appear before Congress.

Collins

The four-term senator said she is open to calling witnesses as part of the impeachment trial but calls it “premature” to decide who should be called until evidence is presented. “It is inappropriate, in my judgment, for senators on either side of the aisle to prejudge the evidence before they have heard what is presented to us,″ Collins told Maine Public Radio. Senators take an oath to render impartial justice during impeachment — an oath lawmakers should take seriously, Collins said. Collins, who is running for reelection and is considered one of the nation’s most vulnerable GOP senators, also faulted Democrats for saying Trump should be found guilty and removed from office. “There are senators on both sides of the aisle, who, to me, are not giving the appearance of and the reality of judging that’s in an impartial way,″ she said.

Jones

Jones, a freshman seeking reelection in staunchly pro-Trump Alabama, is considered the Democrat most likely to side with Republicans in a Senate trial. In a Washington Post op-ed column, Jones said that for Americans to have confidence in the impeachment process, “the Senate must conduct a full, fair and complete trial with all relevant evidence regarding the president’s conduct.″ He said he fears that senators “are headed toward a trial that is not intended to find the whole truth. For the sake of the country, this must change.″

Unlike what happened during the investigation of President Bill Clinton, “Trump has blocked both the production of virtually all relevant documents and the testimony of witnesses who have firsthand knowledge of the facts,″ Jones said. “The evidence we do have may be sufficient to make a judgment, but it is clearly incomplete,″ he added. Jones and other Democrats are seeking testimony from Mulvaney and other key White House officials to help fill in the gaps.

Mitt Romney, R-Utah.

Romney, a freshman senator and on-again, off-again Trump critic, has criticized Trump for his comments urging Ukraine and China to investigate Democrat Joe Biden, but has not spoken directly about he thinks impeachment should proceed. Romney is overwhelmingly popular in a conservative state where Trump is not beloved, a status that gives Romney leverage to buck the president or at least speak out about rules and procedures of a Senate trial.

Cory Gardner, R-Colo.

Gardner, like Collins, is a vulnerable senator up for reelection in a state where Trump is not popular. Gardner has criticized the House impeachment effort as overly partisan and fretted that it will sharply divide the country. While Trump is under water in Colorado, a GOP strategist says Gardner and other Republicans could benefit from an energized GOP base if the Senate, as expected, acquits Trump of the two articles of impeachment approved by the House. An acquittal “may have a substantial impact on other races in Colorado, up to and including Sen. Cory Gardner’s re-election,” Ryan Lynch told Colorado Public Radio.

Martha McSally, R-Ariz.

McSally, who was appointed to her seat after losing a Senate bid in 2018, is another vulnerable Republican seeking election this fall. She calls impeachment a serious matter and said she hopes her constituents would want her to examine the facts without partisanship. The American people “want us to take a serious look at this and not have it be just partisan bickering going on,” she told The Arizona Republic.

Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, senators, trial, trump, trumps, break, senate, collins, stalemate, democrats, witnesses, impeachment, gop


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Charities complain about ‘giving gap’ since GOP tax law took effect

Spencer Platt | Getty ImagesA strong economy tends to boost individual giving to charity. According to Giving USA, individual giving fell by 1% in 2018 compared with 2017. That change had put a gloomy forecast on individual giving, but the picture may not be as bleak as originally expected. Fidelity Charitable, which manages two hundred thousand donor accounts, with a median value of $17,000 each, has seen giving increase through its donor-advised funds. Donor-advised funds allow contributors to


Spencer Platt | Getty ImagesA strong economy tends to boost individual giving to charity.
According to Giving USA, individual giving fell by 1% in 2018 compared with 2017.
That change had put a gloomy forecast on individual giving, but the picture may not be as bleak as originally expected.
Fidelity Charitable, which manages two hundred thousand donor accounts, with a median value of $17,000 each, has seen giving increase through its donor-advised funds.
Donor-advised funds allow contributors to
Charities complain about ‘giving gap’ since GOP tax law took effect Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: kayla tausche stephanie dhue, kayla tausche, stephanie dhue
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, education, donor, law, tax, gap, effect, charities, funds, complain, billion, increase, took, giving, strong, donoradvised, seen, gop, individual


Charities complain about 'giving gap' since GOP tax law took effect

Gilbert eats breakfast at the Lazarus House Ministries morning soup kitchen on August 16, 2019 in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Spencer Platt | Getty Images

A strong economy tends to boost individual giving to charity. While economic growth has been strong over the last three years, giving by individuals is down since 2017, when the tax law changed, doubling the standard deduction and keeping many people from itemizing. According to Giving USA, individual giving fell by 1% in 2018 compared with 2017. That change had put a gloomy forecast on individual giving, but the picture may not be as bleak as originally expected. The non-partisan U.S. Congress Joint Committee on Taxation predicts that individual giving to causes outside of education and health will hit $33 billion in 2019 and rise to $37 billion in 2022, that’s up from $30 billion and $34 billion, respectively.

Fidelity Charitable, which manages two hundred thousand donor accounts, with a median value of $17,000 each, has seen giving increase through its donor-advised funds. It attributes the brighter prospects to strong returns in the stock market. Donor-advised funds allow contributors to bundle gifts that can be written off in year one, but spread out over multiple years. “If you have a high income year what you might want to do is bunch a lot of your giving for the next, 2, 3, 4 years into one year and sustain your giving,” said Amy Pirozzolo, Fidelity Charitable Head of Donor Engagement and Insights. A study by The Chronicle for Philanthropy found higher education and the biggest, most well-known organizations have actually seen individual contributions increase over eight percent. But smaller, local charities are concerned about what they see as a giving gap.

Unexpected drop


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: kayla tausche stephanie dhue, kayla tausche, stephanie dhue
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, education, donor, law, tax, gap, effect, charities, funds, complain, billion, increase, took, giving, strong, donoradvised, seen, gop, individual


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Here are the 5 biggest Republican mistakes of the decade

Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign stop at Lansing Community College May 8, 2012 in Lansing, Michigan. Bill Pugliano | Getty ImagesFor Republicans, the 2010s end with the party seemingly in a better situation than it was when the decade started. Thanks to five major blunders over the last decade, the Republican Party is actually weaker than it was on Jan.1, 2010. Much of this was fueled by the Tea Party movement, which added a rare Republican grassroots element to the GOP. When you think about


Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign stop at Lansing Community College May 8, 2012 in Lansing, Michigan.
Bill Pugliano | Getty ImagesFor Republicans, the 2010s end with the party seemingly in a better situation than it was when the decade started.
Thanks to five major blunders over the last decade, the Republican Party is actually weaker than it was on Jan.1, 2010.
Much of this was fueled by the Tea Party movement, which added a rare Republican grassroots element to the GOP.
When you think about
Here are the 5 biggest Republican mistakes of the decade Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senate, republicans, trump, mitt, gop, party, republican, decade, mistakes, border, took, biggest, romney


Here are the 5 biggest Republican mistakes of the decade

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign stop at Lansing Community College May 8, 2012 in Lansing, Michigan. Last night former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum gave his endorsement to Gov. Romney in an e-mail sent to supporters. Bill Pugliano | Getty Images

For Republicans, the 2010s end with the party seemingly in a better situation than it was when the decade started. The GOP has control of the White House and the Senate. Ten years ago, the Democrats held the White House and both houses of Congress. But that scorecard doesn’t tell the whole story. Thanks to five major blunders over the last decade, the Republican Party is actually weaker than it was on Jan.1, 2010. To understand why, you have to document each key mistake in order:

2010: Blowing the midterm elections

The 2008 elections gave Barack Obama a clear win in the presidential election and the Democrats a filibuster-proof supermajority in Congress. They proceeded to spend that political capital almost entirely on passing Obamacare in a lengthy process that included a number of unusual compromises with their own party members, like the “Cornhusker Kickback” and controversial legislative tricks like the “deemed as passed” maneuver. All of this took place even as the Affordable Care Act failed to gain majority support in the polls. That set the stage for a strong Republican advantage going into the 2010 midterm elections. On paper, the GOP did score a resounding victory, picking up 63 seats in the House of Representatives and a net gain of six seats in the Senate. But Republicans blew a solid chance to retake the Senate. They put up weak candidates in several winnable races. They included Sharon Angle in Nevada, who was seen as too radical and managed to lose to then-incumbent Harry Reid despite his very weak approval ratings in his home state. Arch-abortion opponent Ken Buck won the GOP nomination in Colorado, marginalizing him in a moderate state. The biggest mistake of all was Christine O’Donnell in Delaware. O’Donnell lost after she became infamous for her revelation that she had once experimented with witchcraft. As a result, the Democrats kept control of the Senate and the Republicans lost a chance to force Obama into what could have been a series of advantageous compromises over the next six years.

2012: Nominating Mitt Romney for president

Despite the failure to grab the Senate, the GOP was still riding strong anti-Obamacare sentiment and voter frustration over the slow recovery from the Great Recession. Much of this was fueled by the Tea Party movement, which added a rare Republican grassroots element to the GOP. When you think about it now, all of that made former Mitt Romney an extremely odd choice for the Republican nomination for president in 2012. He embodied the establishment GOP in almost every way. Romney had years as a hedge fund manager at Bain Capital on his resume at a time when most Americans were still blaming Wall Street for the nation’s economic woes. Worst of all, his universal health coverage plan enacted while he was governor of Massachusetts looked eerily like Obamacare. In fact, “Romneycare” was seen as one of the models the crafters of the Affordable Care Act used when they wrote the law. If the GOP wanted to put up a candidate who invigorated its anti-Obamacare and increasingly anti-establishment base, they couldn’t have missed the mark much more than they did with Mitt Romney.

2013: Failing to recognize the crisis at the border

The first surge of unaccompanied children at the U.S. southern border began in 2013. It resumed a year later, and the Obama administration responded by detaining many of those children in fenced-in areas critics of the Trump administration today like to call “cages.” While the immigration issue and border battles have been front page news since President Trump was elected, the severe problems at the same border in 2013 and 2014 didn’t garner anywhere near as much attention in the mainstream media. But it was a regular topic on right wing talk radio at the time, and Republican congressional leaders should have spent more time listening. All of this set the stage for making the border issue the blunt weapon that helped Donald Trump trounce a crowded field of establishment GOP presidential candidates in the 2016 primaries. More importantly, it was evidence that Republican leaders seemed more interested in bowing to corporate pressure to keep the borders relatively open instead of dealing with the problems that massive migration present on a human scale.

2014: Surrendering before the battle

The midterm elections of 2014 gave the Republicans control of the Senate that they should have won in 2010. But even before the new members took their oaths of office, then-Senate Majority Leader-elect Mitch McConnell promised never to trigger a government shutdown. That effectively took the sharpest arrow out of the GOP’s congressional quiver, and again relieved the greatest pressure the Republicans could have exercised against Obama.

2017: The Obamacare “repeal & replace” failure


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senate, republicans, trump, mitt, gop, party, republican, decade, mistakes, border, took, biggest, romney


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A decade of Obamacare: How health care went from wrecking to boosting Democrats

In 2010, a voter rebellion against the health-care law helped Republicans wallop Democrats and gain House control. Eight years later, Democrats made GOP efforts to scrap Obamacare the centerpiece of their campaigns and then won back the chamber. “Health care was on the ballot, and health care won,” Pelosi told reporters in November 2018 after Democrats flipped House control. Before the shift, the Affordable Care Act appeared to hurt Democrats politically at the outset as Republicans billed it as


In 2010, a voter rebellion against the health-care law helped Republicans wallop Democrats and gain House control.
Eight years later, Democrats made GOP efforts to scrap Obamacare the centerpiece of their campaigns and then won back the chamber.
“Health care was on the ballot, and health care won,” Pelosi told reporters in November 2018 after Democrats flipped House control.
Before the shift, the Affordable Care Act appeared to hurt Democrats politically at the outset as Republicans billed it as
A decade of Obamacare: How health care went from wrecking to boosting Democrats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-26  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrecking, republicans, obamacare, 2010, vote, decade, went, care, gop, law, democrats, boosting, house, health


A decade of Obamacare: How health care went from wrecking to boosting Democrats

U.S. President Barack Obama signs the Affordable Health Care for America Act during a ceremony with fellow Democrats in the East Room of the White House March 23, 2010 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee | Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi lost her gavel and regained it in this decade. Obamacare played a major role each time. In 2010, a voter rebellion against the health-care law helped Republicans wallop Democrats and gain House control. Eight years later, Democrats made GOP efforts to scrap Obamacare the centerpiece of their campaigns and then won back the chamber. “I’ll just tell you that the lesson from all of this is that health-care policy is treacherous politics,” said Carlos Curbelo, a former Republican congressman. He won Florida’s swing 26th District in 2014 after a campaign in which he promised to repeal Obamacare, then lost his seat to Democratic Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell in 2018 following a vote to scrap the law. In the nearly 10 years since the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act became law in March 2010, it has gone from political anchor to tailwind for Democrats. President Barack Obama’s signature legislative achievement became one of the defining issues of the decade and shaped recent elections more than just about any other policy issue. “Backlash to the ruling party’s actions on health care were a significant part of both the 2010 and 2018 waves,” said Kyle Kondik, managing editor of election forecasting site Sabato’s Crystal Ball. He added that resistance to the law also probably helped the GOP in the 2014 midterms, especially after a messy rollout of the insurance exchange website in 2013. Obamacare sentiment reflects broader trends in American political opinion, Kondik said. Voters often buck the party in power, so the Affordable Care Act was less popular under Obama but gained traction once President Donald Trump took office. Both Democrats and independents started to feel better about Obamacare after Trump entered the White House, driving the increase in popularity, according to monthly Kaiser Family Foundation tracking polls. Democratic calls to maintain the law — particularly its provisions protecting Americans with preexisting medical conditions — appeared to resonate with voters when Republicans got a real chance to replace the health system. “Health care was on the ballot, and health care won,” Pelosi told reporters in November 2018 after Democrats flipped House control.

Obamacare backlash hurt Democrats early

The landmark law better known as Obamacare offered new subsidies for buying plans, barred insurers from denying coverage based on preexisting conditions, allowed states to expand the joint federal and state Medicaid program for low-income Americans and let children stay on their parents’ plans until age 26, among other provisions. Last year, 8.5% of the U.S. population was uninsured, down from 13.3% in 2013, before Obamacare fully took effect. Before the shift, the Affordable Care Act appeared to hurt Democrats politically at the outset as Republicans billed it as a government takeover of health care. While a plurality of voters approved of the law a month after its passage, sentiment changed before the 2010 midterm elections, according to Kaiser surveys. In October 2010, 44% had an unfavorable view of the law, while 42% saw it favorably. In the 2010 elections, Democrats lost 63 House seats. Republicans flipped the chamber and kept control until this year. The GOP also gained six Senate seats. The incumbent president’s party almost always loses seats in midterm elections. Even so, Obamacare appeared to propel the Democratic drubbing. Nearly half – or 45% – of voters said their 2010 vote was a message of opposition to Obamacare, according to exit polling cited by NBC News in 2014. Only 28% responded that their vote was a message of support for the law. After Republicans took over the House in 2011, then the Senate in 2015, they tried to repeal the Affordable Care Act dozens of times. The party made opposition to the law a central part of its political messaging for years — though Obamacare remained safe as long as its namesake president sat in the Oval Office. The GOP gained another 13 House and nine Senate seats in the 2014 midterms. Following the election, then-House Speaker John Boehner said resistance to the health-care law drove the results. “The American people have made it clear: They’re not for Obamacare. Ask all those Democrats who lost their elections Tuesday night. A lot of them voted for Obamacare,” he said in November 2014. Exit surveys cited by NBC News suggest the health-care law had a smaller effect in 2014 than it did in 2010. Only 28% of voters said they wanted to express opposition to Obamacare, while 12 percent said they aimed to show support for the law.

Repeal efforts damage the GOP

When Trump won the White House and the GOP held control of Congress in 2016, Republicans finally got their chance to dismantle Obamacare. While the House passed a repeal bill in 2017, the Senate never could. The GOP fell one vote short in a dramatic late-night vote on a bill to roll back major parts of the ACA. The Trump administration has managed to dismantle pieces of Obamacare, both through administrative and legislative action. The GOP tax law passed in 2017 to end the individual mandate, a divisive provision that required most Americans to have health insurance or pay a penalty. Public opinion around the law started to shift after Republicans gained control of the White House and Congress and started to propose their own alternatives to Obamacare. For nearly all of the stretch from February 2013 to February 2017, monthly Kaiser polls found a larger share of adults had a favorable view of the law than unfavorable. But in every month since May 2017, Kaiser has found more adults like the ACA than dislike it. In November, 52% of adults surveyed by Kaiser had a favorable view of Obamacare, versus 41% who had an unfavorable opinion. Curbelo said opposition to Trump, and his most prominent policy push in trying to unravel Obamacare, helped to drive a rough 2018 election for the GOP. “A large part of the debacle that was that election, certainly in the House, can be attributed to health care,” he said. The former congressman said he does not regret his vote to pass the American Health Care Act, the House Republican ACA overhaul, even now knowing he lost his seat. Curbelo said the vote “was about keeping [his] word” to repeal and replace Obamacare, which he had promised to do since he first ran for Congress.

How Obamacare is shaping the 2020 race


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-26  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrecking, republicans, obamacare, 2010, vote, decade, went, care, gop, law, democrats, boosting, house, health


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‘My conscience is clear’ — GOP Sen. Rick Scott on opposing Trump impeachment and removal

Republican Sen.Rick Scott told CNBC on Wednesday that he has little doubt President Donald Trump will stay in office for the remainder of his term despite ongoing impeachment proceedings. The Democratic-controlled House is expected to vote Wednesday to approve two articles of impeachment, which would then be passed along to the Senate for trial in the new year. But Scott, a key ally of Trump, that said much of the Democrats’ arguments stem from “hearsay” and falsities. “The bottom line is, this


Republican Sen.Rick Scott told CNBC on Wednesday that he has little doubt President Donald Trump will stay in office for the remainder of his term despite ongoing impeachment proceedings.
The Democratic-controlled House is expected to vote Wednesday to approve two articles of impeachment, which would then be passed along to the Senate for trial in the new year.
But Scott, a key ally of Trump, that said much of the Democrats’ arguments stem from “hearsay” and falsities.
“The bottom line is, this
‘My conscience is clear’ — GOP Sen. Rick Scott on opposing Trump impeachment and removal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gop, president, trump, sen, clear, house, impeachment, removal, democrats, articles, wrongdoing, yearthe, rick, trial, scott, opposing, conscience


'My conscience is clear' — GOP Sen. Rick Scott on opposing Trump impeachment and removal

Republican Sen.Rick Scott told CNBC on Wednesday that he has little doubt President Donald Trump will stay in office for the remainder of his term despite ongoing impeachment proceedings.

The Democratic-controlled House is expected to vote Wednesday to approve two articles of impeachment, which would then be passed along to the Senate for trial in the new year.

The articles accuse the president of abuse of power for asking Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden while withholding aid as leverage, and with obstruction of Congress for stonewalling the House investigation.

But Scott, a key ally of Trump, that said much of the Democrats’ arguments stem from “hearsay” and falsities.

The Florida senator said that it’s not a matter of opinion, and argued that Democrats need to remember Trump is being charged with high crimes and misdemeanors, which he doesn’t believe Trump committed.

“The bottom line is, this is an impeachment trial and you have to think of it that way,” Scott said on “Squawk Box.” “My conscience is clear.”

The president has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing. On Tuesday, Trump sent House Speaker Nancy Pelosi a raging, six-page letter that called the impeachment process an “illegal, partisan attempted coup.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gop, president, trump, sen, clear, house, impeachment, removal, democrats, articles, wrongdoing, yearthe, rick, trial, scott, opposing, conscience


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GOP Sen. Grassley says Mitch McConnell sabotaged support for his drug pricing bill

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) talks with reporters as he heads for a meeting at the Capitol October 02, 2018 in Washington, DC. Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley said Wednesday that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is responsible for his colleagues’ apparent lack of enthusiasm about his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices. When asked by reporters during a briefing why more Senate Republicans haven’t supported the legislation, the Senate Finance Committee chairman


Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) talks with reporters as he heads for a meeting at the Capitol October 02, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley said Wednesday that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is responsible for his colleagues’ apparent lack of enthusiasm about his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices.
When asked by reporters during a briefing why more Senate Republicans haven’t supported the legislation, the Senate Finance Committee chairman
GOP Sen. Grassley says Mitch McConnell sabotaged support for his drug pricing bill Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, in berkeleylovelace
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, bill, mitch, pricing, gop, support, senate, reporters, drug, president, mcconnell, grassley, sabotaged, asked, committee


GOP Sen. Grassley says Mitch McConnell sabotaged support for his drug pricing bill

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) talks with reporters as he heads for a meeting at the Capitol October 02, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley said Wednesday that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is responsible for his colleagues’ apparent lack of enthusiasm about his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices.

When asked by reporters during a briefing why more Senate Republicans haven’t supported the legislation, the Senate Finance Committee chairman said because McConnell “asked them not to.”

“The president wants it!” Grassley said, according to a recording of the briefing.

Grassley and McConnell have reportedly been at odds over the bipartisan measure, which has support from President Donald Trump and many Senate Democrats.

When asked for comment, a spokesperson for McConnell directed CNBC to a report where McConnell is quoted saying the Senate’s path forward on drug costs is still “under discussion” and he is “looking to do something on drug pricing.”

Grassley and ranking Democrat Ron Wyden, of Oregon, advanced the broad drug pricing bill through committee in July. Looking to gain more Republican support, the lawmakers unveiled a revamped version of the bill earlier this month. The bill would make changes to Medicare by adding an out-of-pocket maximum for beneficiaries and capping drug price increases at the rate of inflation, among other measures.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, in berkeleylovelace
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, bill, mitch, pricing, gop, support, senate, reporters, drug, president, mcconnell, grassley, sabotaged, asked, committee


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Alaska’s GOP governor dismisses impeachment, saying the Trump economy is ‘hard to beat’

Mike Dunleavy told CNBC on Tuesday that it will be hard for President Donald Trump to be booted from office, due to the strong economic performance during his tenure. The U.S. economy, which was on fire last year, has been cooling lately, under the weight of the U.S.-China trade war. The stock market, as measured by the S&P 500, since Trump’s 2016 election victory is up nearly 50%. Dunleavy said he met with a handful of government officials and Trump on Monday to discuss trade and the state of t


Mike Dunleavy told CNBC on Tuesday that it will be hard for President Donald Trump to be booted from office, due to the strong economic performance during his tenure.
The U.S. economy, which was on fire last year, has been cooling lately, under the weight of the U.S.-China trade war.
The stock market, as measured by the S&P 500, since Trump’s 2016 election victory is up nearly 50%.
Dunleavy said he met with a handful of government officials and Trump on Monday to discuss trade and the state of t
Alaska’s GOP governor dismisses impeachment, saying the Trump economy is ‘hard to beat’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-17  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dismisses, governor, impeachment, vote, president, trumps, hard, trade, gop, trump, dunleavy, alaskas, economy, tariffs, beat, saying


Alaska's GOP governor dismisses impeachment, saying the Trump economy is 'hard to beat'

Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy told CNBC on Tuesday that it will be hard for President Donald Trump to be booted from office, due to the strong economic performance during his tenure.

“All of the numbers are looking good for the country and Alaska,” said Dunleavy, who was one of the few Republican pickups in the Democratic surge in the 2018 midterm elections. Given the chance, the Republican-led Senate is unlikely to remove Trump, he added. “Economic indicators [are] hard to beat.”

The House, controlled by Democrats, is nearing a vote on two articles of impeachment. The articles accuse the president of abuse of power for asking Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden while withholding aid as leverage, and with obstruction of Congress for stonewalling the House investigation.

Dunleavy, who did not address the specific charges against Trump, said in a “Squawk Box” interview, “It’ll be very hard for folks on the left to convince the country” and Republican senators to vote to remove the president.

The U.S. economy, which was on fire last year, has been cooling lately, under the weight of the U.S.-China trade war. Despite the tariffs, now on hold after Friday’s phase one deal, American consumers have generally weathered the storm, and the nation’s 3.5% unemployment rate last month matched 50-year lows.

The Federal Reserve, despite Trump’s frequent bashing and calling for lower interest rates, did deliver three rate cuts this year to inoculate the U.S. economy from the worldwide slowdown. The stock market, as measured by the S&P 500, since Trump’s 2016 election victory is up nearly 50%. The S&P 500 closed at another record high Monday.

Dunleavy said he met with a handful of government officials and Trump on Monday to discuss trade and the state of the U.S. economy. The governor said he remains optimistic.

“Things are looking good,” Dunleavy said, adding that Trump is “on the verge of solidifying” the initial trade agreement with China, which calls for Beijing to purchase billions of dollars worth of U.S. agricultural goods and to embrace structural change to intellectual property and technology issues.

In return, the Trump administration agreed to pause tariffs. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said the two major economies plan to sign the accord in the first week of January.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-17  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dismisses, governor, impeachment, vote, president, trumps, hard, trade, gop, trump, dunleavy, alaskas, economy, tariffs, beat, saying


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