Facebook’s new Portal is great for video calls, but it’s not as useful as Google and Amazon’s competitors

Todd Haselton | CNBCThe new Facebook Portal is Facebook’s second attempt to deliver an in-home smart display that competes with the Amazon Echo Show and Google Nest Hub. It serves as a digital photo frame and lets you place video calls over Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp to phones and other Facebook Portal devices. The Portal is great for video calls, so long as the people you’re calling use Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp. Todd Haselton | CNBCThe camera can also follow people around the room, so


Todd Haselton | CNBCThe new Facebook Portal is Facebook’s second attempt to deliver an in-home smart display that competes with the Amazon Echo Show and Google Nest Hub. It serves as a digital photo frame and lets you place video calls over Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp to phones and other Facebook Portal devices. The Portal is great for video calls, so long as the people you’re calling use Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp. Todd Haselton | CNBCThe camera can also follow people around the room, so
Facebook’s new Portal is great for video calls, but it’s not as useful as Google and Amazon’s competitors Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, portal, amazon, todd, facebooks, calls, video, great, useful, competitors, whatsapp, better, amazons, facebook, echo, google, haselton


Facebook's new Portal is great for video calls, but it's not as useful as Google and Amazon's competitors

A picture of me skydiving on the Facebook Portal. Todd Haselton | CNBC

The new Facebook Portal is Facebook’s second attempt to deliver an in-home smart display that competes with the Amazon Echo Show and Google Nest Hub. It serves as a digital photo frame and lets you place video calls over Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp to phones and other Facebook Portal devices. Facebook isn’t well known for building great hardware yet, but it’s getting more aggressive with a new round of these Portal devices and its Oculus virtual reality business. But these devices make sense for a company that prides itself on connecting people, and the Portal does a good job at that. While the Portal I tested is a marked improvement over the model I tested last year, and the best video chat device of its kind, Google and Amazon’s devices are still better for most people since they can do more. Here’s what you need to know about the latest Facebook Portals, which launch Tuesday.

What’s good

Todd Haselton | CNBC

Last year I tested the massive Portal+, which was huge and a bit goofy looking, even though it worked as advertised. This year, Facebook’s $129 8-inch Portal Mini and $179 10-inch Portal (the one I tested) look like digital picture frames, which I’m more willing to let sit out on my kitchen counter or living room table. The Portal is great for video calls, so long as the people you’re calling use Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp. Most of my family is on WhatsApp, but the Portal only lets you call up to 4 in a video chat, far from the 32 people that you can call with Apple’s FaceTime. Most of my family doesn’t actively use Facebook anymore, but folks with Facebook Messenger can call up to 8 people at once.

Todd Haselton | CNBC

I liked it for simple video calls with my brother and his wife in Santa Monica, who had an identical loaner unit from Facebook. The video was really clear and has a nice wide angle lens so I was able to see my brother, his wife and my niece. Facebook also did a good job with the microphones, so I could hear people even if they walked to the other side of the room during a call. There are some fun options, too, like silly augmented reality masks — I liked one that gave me a mustache — or an option to listen to the same Spotify song together. Parents might appreciate a storybook function, which lets you read a book to your kids over video chat with animated characters. It worked well in a test, though I don’t have any kids of my own to read to.

The Portal has an AR feature that lets you read books over video chat to your children. Todd Haselton | CNBC

The camera can also follow people around the room, so they don’t need to be sitting still. If you want an in-home video calling system, the Portal is better than an Amazon Echo Show or Google Nest Hub Max, since the cameras are better. While the best feature is the video calling function, the Portal spends most of its time as a digital picture frame, showing pictures that you can upload from your phone, or that you’ve selected from Facebook and Instagram. I like that I was always able to look up and see pictures of my niece or recent vacations, but it doesn’t support Google Photos or Apple Photos, where I keep all of my pictures.

There are some apps, but not a lot. Todd Haselton | CNBC

It has a touchscreen that’s easy to use. There are apps and a few games (though not many), like Spotify, which you can tap into to play your favorite music or chess if you want to play a quick game against a random person on Facebook. A Food Network app has a few recipes if you want to scroll through them in the kitchen, but there aren’t enough for the app to be very useful. There’s a web browser, which was useful for checking in on CNBC.com, and helps if you want to find and follow a recipe in the kitchen. Still, you can do a lot more with an Amazon Echo Show or Google Home Hub, which have apps like Prime Video, Netflix, YouTube TV and Hulu, better cooking apps and more.

The Facebook Portal has a web browser. Todd Haselton | CNBC

So, while the video quality may be better on the portal, almost everything else is better on an Echo Show or the Google Nest Hub Max.

What’s bad

There are some (but not many) apps for the Facebook Portal. Todd Haselton | CNBC

There’s a switch that lets you cover the camera and turn off the microphone, which is good, but it seems like Facebook still has a long way to go before it earns people’s trust again. When I told family and friends about the Portal, a lot were skeptical about putting Facebook hardware in their homes, more so than an Amazon Echo or Google speaker. If your friends don’t use WhatsApp or Facebook, then you can’t place a video call. Plenty of people use WhatsApp, like my siblings, so that’s a nice added option that wasn’t available last year. But my inlaws and my parents haven’t fully adopted it yet.

Spotify on the Facebook Portal. Todd Haselton | CNBC

The speakers on the Portal are better than last year’s model but it still didn’t really blow me away. I prefer using either Google, Amazon or Sonos speakers, since I have more of them around the house and can music across all of them at once, too.

The Facebook Portal has a speaker on the back and its charger doubles as a kickstand. Todd Haselton | CNBC

It’s also not very smart. The Portal has Amazon Alexa on it, but that can’t be used to do everything Alexa on an Echo Show can do, like play videos. But you can still do things like ask the weather or control your smart home. I also like that the Google Nest Hub Max recognizes my face and shows me news, my commute time with Google Maps and other information that’s specific to me. My wife thinks that’s creepy, though, so maybe it’s too early for Facebook to add that kind of support.

Should you buy it?

A photo of me skydiving displayed on the Facebook Portal. Todd Haselton | CNBC

If you want a photo frame that can show you your Facebook and Instagram albums and place really good video calls to your friends and family members, and they’re all on Facebook or WhatsApp, then the Portal is great. It’s a fun way to connect with friends and family, especially since the camera works well.

You can call WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger contacts. Todd Haselton | CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, portal, amazon, todd, facebooks, calls, video, great, useful, competitors, whatsapp, better, amazons, facebook, echo, google, haselton


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5 side hustles that can earn you extra money this holiday season

The holiday season isn’t just great for gift-giving — it’s also a great time to earn more money with a seasonal side hustle. If possible, merge your passion with an in-demand job during the holiday season to get the most bang for your buck. “For most seasonal work, you should think about it not necessarily as a side hustle you’ll be investing in long term. Rather, think about it like, ‘How can I make the most money for my time this holiday season?'” Here are five side hustles that are in high de


The holiday season isn’t just great for gift-giving — it’s also a great time to earn more money with a seasonal side hustle. If possible, merge your passion with an in-demand job during the holiday season to get the most bang for your buck. “For most seasonal work, you should think about it not necessarily as a side hustle you’ll be investing in long term. Rather, think about it like, ‘How can I make the most money for my time this holiday season?'” Here are five side hustles that are in high de
5 side hustles that can earn you extra money this holiday season Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, extra, holidays, season, seasonal, earn, long, think, hustle, great, hustles, holiday, money, schedule


5 side hustles that can earn you extra money this holiday season

The holiday season isn’t just great for gift-giving — it’s also a great time to earn more money with a seasonal side hustle.

Retailers are in a hiring frenzy ahead of the holidays, but if your schedule doesn’t allow for long shifts during standard business hours, you still have options.

“If you don’t have that kind of time, or your schedule is such that it’s harder to commit yourself in advance, think about something in the gig economy that increases during the holidays,” like stocking shelves, pet-sitting, or craft-making, says Kathy Kristof, cofounder and editor at SideHusl.com, an independent side hustle review site.

If possible, merge your passion with an in-demand job during the holiday season to get the most bang for your buck. “For most seasonal work, you should think about it not necessarily as a side hustle you’ll be investing in long term. Rather, think about it like, ‘How can I make the most money for my time this holiday season?'” says Grant Sabatier, creator of Millennial Money, an online personal finance community.

Here are five side hustles that are in high demand over the holidays.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, extra, holidays, season, seasonal, earn, long, think, hustle, great, hustles, holiday, money, schedule


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Uniqlo-owner Fast Retailing keeps posting record profits, but one analyst warns of uncertainty

Japan’s Fast Retailing could see a “period of slow growth” despite recently announcing record profits, according to one analyst that spoke to CNBC on Friday. Fast Retailing projected operating profits would grow 6.7% in fiscal 2020, well below the 15% growth analysts polled by Refinitiv had estimated. “It’s a great, great name, great brand but there’s a lot of uncertainty,” Peter Boardman, managing director at NWQ Investment Management, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Friday. So any sort of slowdown


Japan’s Fast Retailing could see a “period of slow growth” despite recently announcing record profits, according to one analyst that spoke to CNBC on Friday. Fast Retailing projected operating profits would grow 6.7% in fiscal 2020, well below the 15% growth analysts polled by Refinitiv had estimated. “It’s a great, great name, great brand but there’s a lot of uncertainty,” Peter Boardman, managing director at NWQ Investment Management, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Friday. So any sort of slowdown
Uniqlo-owner Fast Retailing keeps posting record profits, but one analyst warns of uncertainty Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fast, south, warns, fiscal, analyst, profit, growth, boardman, retailing, uniqloowner, uncertainty, profits, company, great, keeps, posting, record


Uniqlo-owner Fast Retailing keeps posting record profits, but one analyst warns of uncertainty

Japan’s Fast Retailing could see a “period of slow growth” despite recently announcing record profits, according to one analyst that spoke to CNBC on Friday.

The firm, which owns apparel giant Uniqlo, said Thursday that it had booked record profit for the third-straight year, sending shares about 2.5% higher in Friday trading. Operating profit rose 9.1% in the year ended Aug. 31, in line with market expectations.

But the retailer’s profit forecast missed expectations. Fast Retailing projected operating profits would grow 6.7% in fiscal 2020, well below the 15% growth analysts polled by Refinitiv had estimated.

“It’s a great, great name, great brand but there’s a lot of uncertainty,” Peter Boardman, managing director at NWQ Investment Management, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Friday. “Things are slowing down.”

Recent data have pointed to a slowing Chinese economy after years of rapid growth, with concerns that the worst may not be over.

“Remember, 35% of their profits come out of China. So any sort of slowdown in China is certainly negatively affecting Fast Retailing or Uniqlo,” Boardman said.

China has been a major growth market for Fast Retailing. Earlier this year, the retailer said it expects sales from the greater China region to hit 1 trillion yen (about $9.26 billion) by fiscal 2022. That would be nearly double the 502.5 billion yen (roughly $4.65 billion) in sales the company reported for fiscal 2019.

Fast Retailing also faces challenges stemming from Tokyo’s ongoing trade dispute with Seoul, which has resulted in South Korean consumers boycotting Japanese products. That’s a risk that Fast Retailing Chief Executive Tadashi Yanai highlighted as “serious.”

In fiscal 2019, the company said its South Korea business reported a decline in both revenue and profit. Fast Retailing also forecast “large declines” in the country for fiscal 2020.

NWQ’s Boardman said South Korea accounts for about 3% of Fast Retailing’s revenues, a figure that was “not material” but at the same time a “significant amount of money.”

Going forward, Boardman said the pace of new store openings will be “a lot slower” than before, but added that it was “just a sign of a maturing company.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fast, south, warns, fiscal, analyst, profit, growth, boardman, retailing, uniqloowner, uncertainty, profits, company, great, keeps, posting, record


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Many Americans say their financial situation is worse since the Great Recession

The Great Recession has officially been over for a decade, but for many Americans, there’s still little reason to celebrate. Many people’s finances haven’t recovered from the recession’s blows, according to a survey by personal finance website Bankrate.com. More than half of Americans who were adults amid the Great Recession said they endured some type of negative financial impact, Bankrate found. And half of those people say they’re doing worse now than before the crisis. More than half of U.S.


The Great Recession has officially been over for a decade, but for many Americans, there’s still little reason to celebrate. Many people’s finances haven’t recovered from the recession’s blows, according to a survey by personal finance website Bankrate.com. More than half of Americans who were adults amid the Great Recession said they endured some type of negative financial impact, Bankrate found. And half of those people say they’re doing worse now than before the crisis. More than half of U.S.
Many Americans say their financial situation is worse since the Great Recession Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: annie nova
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Many Americans say their financial situation is worse since the Great Recession

Pedestrians pass in front of the New York Stock Exchange.

The Great Recession has officially been over for a decade, but for many Americans, there’s still little reason to celebrate.

Many people’s finances haven’t recovered from the recession’s blows, according to a survey by personal finance website Bankrate.com.

“There are still tens of millions who are struggling to even get back to where they were before the economy took a turn for the worse,” said Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst at Bankrate.com.

More than half of Americans who were adults amid the Great Recession said they endured some type of negative financial impact, Bankrate found. And half of those people say they’re doing worse now than before the crisis.

More than half of U.S. households have no emergency savings, AARP recently found.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, website, say, york, turn, situation, took, great, recession, financial, type, half, worse


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Chinese Vice Premier Liu He says China comes with ‘great sincerity’ for trade talks

The struggling IPO class of 2019 could be facing another wave of… Lock up periods are expiring for new IPOs, which could introduce a new layer of pressure for some already struggling stocks this year. Marketsread more


The struggling IPO class of 2019 could be facing another wave of… Lock up periods are expiring for new IPOs, which could introduce a new layer of pressure for some already struggling stocks this year. Marketsread more
Chinese Vice Premier Liu He says China comes with ‘great sincerity’ for trade talks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ipos, stocks, periods, talks, comes, trade, vice, struggling, great, yearmarketsread, premier, china, ipo, sincerity, oflock, pressure, layer, wave, liu, chinese


Chinese Vice Premier Liu He says China comes with 'great sincerity' for trade talks

The struggling IPO class of 2019 could be facing another wave of…

Lock up periods are expiring for new IPOs, which could introduce a new layer of pressure for some already struggling stocks this year.

Markets

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: yun li
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Cisco tumbles on Goldman downgrade, but two traders see a buying opportunity

Cisco slid nearly 2% on Thursday, the worst performer in the Dow, after Goldman Sachs turned more cautious on the stock. Matt Maley, equity strategist at Miller Tabak, said the stock now faces a level that could kick off a major bounce. But it’s a great level that has held the stock several times in the past,” Maley said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.” Quint Tatro, president of Joule Financial, sees a buying opportunity in the Cisco pullback. “Cisco … is trading around 13 times forward earni


Cisco slid nearly 2% on Thursday, the worst performer in the Dow, after Goldman Sachs turned more cautious on the stock. Matt Maley, equity strategist at Miller Tabak, said the stock now faces a level that could kick off a major bounce. But it’s a great level that has held the stock several times in the past,” Maley said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.” Quint Tatro, president of Joule Financial, sees a buying opportunity in the Cisco pullback. “Cisco … is trading around 13 times forward earni
Cisco tumbles on Goldman downgrade, but two traders see a buying opportunity Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buying, trading, opportunity, traders, times, moving, tatro, maley, level, great, downgrade, cisco, stock, goldman, past, joule, tumbles


Cisco tumbles on Goldman downgrade, but two traders see a buying opportunity

Cisco slid nearly 2% on Thursday, the worst performer in the Dow, after Goldman Sachs turned more cautious on the stock.

Analysts at the firm downgraded the tech name to neutral and cut the price target to $48 from $56 on fears trade uncertainty could hurt profitability.

Matt Maley, equity strategist at Miller Tabak, said the stock now faces a level that could kick off a major bounce.

“This one is at the 100-week moving average. This is a stock that has bounced off that 10 different times in the last three years. It did break below it at the very beginning of 2016 when the whole market went down. But it’s a great level that has held the stock several times in the past,” Maley said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.”

“The 100-week moving average is also its August lows, so if it breaks below that it will break below two key moving averages. So again, you want to have tight stops on this name. But it’s been a great area where the stock has been able to bounce in the past so it looks like it could be another one this time around,” said Maley.

Quint Tatro, president of Joule Financial, sees a buying opportunity in the Cisco pullback.

“Cisco … is trading around 13 times forward earnings having grown those earnings recently around 30%. But more importantly, the stock has an exceptional balance sheet, yields about 3% dividend, unbelievable free cash flow,” Tatro said during the same segment. “That’s a name that as that comes in, that would be the only one that we see value in and we’d be willing to be a buyer here. We still own the shares, but we’d certainly consider adding more.”

Disclosure: Joule Financial holds a position in Cisco.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buying, trading, opportunity, traders, times, moving, tatro, maley, level, great, downgrade, cisco, stock, goldman, past, joule, tumbles


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October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies


October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies
October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, say, spooky, reputation, worst, historically, fear, volatility, worry, great, market, day, heres, lambert, financial, experts


October can be spooky for investors — here's why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market.

This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October.

“The big one is October 1987, when the Dow plunged 22% in a single day,” says Jason Lambert, the president and CEO of Northwest Financial & Tax Solutions, near Portland, Oregon. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.”

The Great Depression began after a market crash in October 1929 and the financial crisis that sparked the Great Recession started with an October market meltdown in 2008.

There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies fear,” he says, “even if it doesn’t mean that the market is moving up or down.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
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Tune out the bears — We can ‘make it through a garden-variety slowdown,’ Jim Cramer says

When bearish investors and short-sellers complain that the Federal Reserve has rigged the market to go higher, “tune them out,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Monday. Cramer got his start on Wall Street in the fall of 1981 as a trader with Goldman Sachs. Back then, he said, the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average traded at 120 points and 856 points, respectively. As of Monday’s close, the broad S&P 500 index is more than 2,300% higher over the course of his career. “I think if we made it through th


When bearish investors and short-sellers complain that the Federal Reserve has rigged the market to go higher, “tune them out,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Monday. Cramer got his start on Wall Street in the fall of 1981 as a trader with Goldman Sachs. Back then, he said, the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average traded at 120 points and 856 points, respectively. As of Monday’s close, the broad S&P 500 index is more than 2,300% higher over the course of his career. “I think if we made it through th
Tune out the bears — We can ‘make it through a garden-variety slowdown,’ Jim Cramer says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reserve, bears, economy, weve, dow, jim, 500, slowdown, think, gardenvariety, cramer, great, saved, tune


Tune out the bears — We can 'make it through a garden-variety slowdown,' Jim Cramer says

When bearish investors and short-sellers complain that the Federal Reserve has rigged the market to go higher, “tune them out,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Monday.

“These people come out of the woodwork every time the Fed cuts interest rates,” the “Mad Money” host said. “I’ve been hearing this same nonsense … since 1981” and “it’s been wrong every step of the way.”

Cramer got his start on Wall Street in the fall of 1981 as a trader with Goldman Sachs. Back then, he said, the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average traded at 120 points and 856 points, respectively. As of Monday’s close, the broad S&P 500 index is more than 2,300% higher over the course of his career. The Dow is up more than 3,000% in the same period.

The major averages all slid less than 0.50% in Monday’s session.

Stocks are great long-term investments, Cramer said.

“First of all, because we’ve had decades of growth, we’ve had decades of progress. This isn’t always the easiest thing to measure,” he said. “Think about how much has changed, though, in the last 38 years: personal computers, the internet, now the cloud. From a material perspective, things are a lot better than they used to be.”

While the stock market has struggled to rise over the past 12 months — the S&P 500 is up just 2% and the Dow Jones 0.12% year over year — the state of the economy is a far cry from what the bearish investors are saying, Cramer argued. He noted how the financial system collapsed just over a decade ago, which brought down Washington Mutual, General Motors, Fannie Mae, Lehman Brothers and a host of other American conglomerates.

The Great Recession of the late 2000s was the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression of the 1930s. The U.S. economy was able to recover from both troubling times, Cramer said.

“Because the Federal Reserve made it so the center held by taking aggressive action … I don’t really care how [the economy] was saved. Enough with the purity. What matters was that it was saved,” he said. “I think if we made it through the Great Recession, we [are] going to make it through a garden-variety slowdown like we might be experiencing now.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reserve, bears, economy, weve, dow, jim, 500, slowdown, think, gardenvariety, cramer, great, saved, tune


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Steve Jobs: ‘Technology is nothing’—here’s what he said it really takes to achieve great success

It’s been eight years since Steve Jobs passed away on Oct. 5, 2011, but his lessons about life, work and success still live on today. He taught them to focusAfter his return to Apple, Jobs would take his top employees on annual retreats. “Deciding what not to do is as important as deciding what to do,” Jobs told Isaacson. According to Isaacson, Jobs believed in the power of in-person conversations and always preferred face-to-face meetings. “There’s a temptation in our networked age to think tha


It’s been eight years since Steve Jobs passed away on Oct. 5, 2011, but his lessons about life, work and success still live on today. He taught them to focusAfter his return to Apple, Jobs would take his top employees on annual retreats. “Deciding what not to do is as important as deciding what to do,” Jobs told Isaacson. According to Isaacson, Jobs believed in the power of in-person conversations and always preferred face-to-face meetings. “There’s a temptation in our networked age to think tha
Steve Jobs: ‘Technology is nothing’—here’s what he said it really takes to achieve great success Cached Page below :
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Steve Jobs: 'Technology is nothing'—here's what he said it really takes to achieve great success

“But it’s not a faith in technology. It’s faith in people,” he said.

In a 1994, the Apple co-founder sat down for an interview with Rolling Stone . At the time, Jobs was at one of the lowest points of his career; he had long ago been booted from Apple, and the personal computer revolution seemed to be dimming. And yet, when asked if he still believed in the limitless potential of technology, Jobs answered yes.

It’s been eight years since Steve Jobs passed away on Oct. 5, 2011, but his lessons about life, work and success still live on today.

Jobs took this philosophy seriously. Years after he rejoined Apple in 1997, it was clear that he had become a far better leader. His goal, according to Walter Isaacson’s biography “Steve Jobs,” was to build an enduring company that prioritized people. Everything else — products and profits — while still important, would be secondary.

Put another way, Jobs believed that in order to achieve great success and create revolutionary changes in the world, we must learn to prioritize the intersection of technology and the humanities, because that’s how the best ideas emerge.

“Technology is nothing. What’s important is that you have faith in people, that they’re basically good and smart — and if you give them tools, they’ll do wonderful things with them,” he said. “Tools are just tools. They either work, or they don’t work.”

Technology is nothing. What’s important is that you have faith in people…

Jobs’ vision paid off: He had successfully shifted Apple’s focus back to making cutting-edge products, which resulted in a phase of unprecedented growth for the company.

Here’s how Jobs’ put his “faith in people” into practice:

1. He hired the right people and trusted them to perform

Jobs understood the cost of hiring the wrong people. He was heavily involved in major hiring decisions, and remained so even after taking medical leave.

Plenty of people have a breadth of knowledge that enables them to make good decisions under a variety of circumstances, but you can’t possibly be an expert at everything. The best leaders know what they don’t know, and they bring in experts to help them plan their next move.

As Jobs once said, “It doesn’t make sense to hire smart people and tell them what to do; we hire smart people so they can tell us what to do.”

2. He delivered his demand for excellence in a inspiring way

To many, Jobs’ version of “having faith in people” might not be considered the norm. His occasionally abrasive style of leadership has been described as “terrorizing” and “extremely demanding.”

But, as proven by Apple’s success, it worked. “Jobs’ rudeness and roughness were accompanied by an ability to be inspirational,” Isaacson wrote in a Harvard Business Review article.

Indeed, Jobs knew how to “infuse Apple employees with an abiding passion to create groundbreaking products and a belief that they could accomplish what seemed impossible,” according to Isaacson.

The author recalled Jobs once telling him: “I’ve learned over the years that when you have really good people, you don’t have to baby them. By expecting them to do great things, you can get them to do great things.”

3. He taught them about humility

Some people might get a chuckle out of this one, considering Jobs was known to have a certain degree of arrogance, but he also had the capacity to admit when he was wrong and change his opinion entirely.

Guy Kawasaki, former chief evangelist at Apple who worked closely with the tech visionary, told CNBC Make It that one of the most important lessons he learned from Jobs “is that changing your mind, changing what you’re doing and reversing yourself at an extreme is a sign of intelligence.”

When Jobs first introduced the iPhone in 2007, for example, it was a closed system — no one outside of Apple could create an app for it. A year later, Jobs made a complete “180-degree reversal,” Kawasaki said. He opened the system to the public after realizing how much more the device could offer customers with apps written by anyone with a good idea.

In a world of stark dichotomies, it’s good to be fearless about changing sides or altering courses.

4. He taught them to focus

After his return to Apple, Jobs would take his top employees on annual retreats. On the last day of each retreat, Isaacson wrote, he’d stand in front of a whiteboard and ask everybody: “What are the 10 things we should be doing next?”

People would fight to get their suggestions on the list. “Jobs would write them down — and then cross off the ones he decreed dumb,” Isaacson continued. “After much jockeying, the group would come up with a list of 10. Then, Jobs would slash seven of them and announce, ‘We can only do three.'”

The theatrics of the activity were meant to teach his employees about focus. “Deciding what not to do is as important as deciding what to do,” Jobs told Isaacson. “That’s true for companies, and it’s true for products.”

5. He engaged face-to-face

If Jobs were alive today, it’d be unlikely for anyone to get a Slack reply from him. According to Isaacson, Jobs believed in the power of in-person conversations and always preferred face-to-face meetings.

“There’s a temptation in our networked age to think that ideas can be developed by email and iChat,” he told Isaacson. “That’s crazy. Creativity comes from spontaneous meetings, from random discussions.”

Even at Pixar, Jobs made sure the building was designed to get people out of their offices and interact with others. The front doors and main stairs and corridors all led to the atrium, which housed essentials like a fitness center, cafe, employee mailboxes and the only set of bathrooms.

It was meant to be the heart of the headquarters, the place where people ran into each other, talked and came up with the most inventive ideas.

Marcel Schwantes is a speaker, executive coach and workplace strategist. As a leadership coach, he addresses the elements required to create human-centered workplaces that result in high-performing cultures. Marcel is also the host of the “Leadership from the Core” podcast.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: marcel schwantes
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, technology, achieve, tools, steve, things, important, jobs, faith, takes, isaacson, good, create, nothingheres, apple, told, success, great


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The ‘omens aren’t great’: UK lawmaker on latest Brexit proposal

The ‘omens aren’t great’: UK lawmaker on latest Brexit proposal7 Hours AgoBrexit’s deadline may be pushed back again, says Jitesh Gadhia, a member of Britain’s House of Lords. The EU either has to accept U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s current deal or “roll the dice on an extension and election,” he says.


The ‘omens aren’t great’: UK lawmaker on latest Brexit proposal7 Hours AgoBrexit’s deadline may be pushed back again, says Jitesh Gadhia, a member of Britain’s House of Lords. The EU either has to accept U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s current deal or “roll the dice on an extension and election,” he says.
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roll, arent, minister, omens, great, brexit, member, lords, proposal, prime, pushed, proposal7, latest, lawmaker


The 'omens aren't great': UK lawmaker on latest Brexit proposal

The ‘omens aren’t great’: UK lawmaker on latest Brexit proposal

7 Hours Ago

Brexit’s deadline may be pushed back again, says Jitesh Gadhia, a member of Britain’s House of Lords. The EU either has to accept U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s current deal or “roll the dice on an extension and election,” he says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roll, arent, minister, omens, great, brexit, member, lords, proposal, prime, pushed, proposal7, latest, lawmaker


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