‘Urgent’ need for businesses to adapt to growing threat from climate change, McKinsey says

As the climate crisis intensifies and as the wide-ranging economic impacts are felt up and down supply chains across continents, business leaders and governments cannot ignore the mounting economic risks, a report from McKinsey said Thursday. A dog looks out of a house flooded by Hurricane Maria, in Catano town, Juana Matos, Puerto Rico, on September 21, 2017. Or in India, McKinsey found that rising temperatures — and the subsequent hours of labor lost due to unsafe conditions — could shave as m


As the climate crisis intensifies and as the wide-ranging economic impacts are felt up and down supply chains across continents, business leaders and governments cannot ignore the mounting economic risks, a report from McKinsey said Thursday.
A dog looks out of a house flooded by Hurricane Maria, in Catano town, Juana Matos, Puerto Rico, on September 21, 2017.
Or in India, McKinsey found that rising temperatures — and the subsequent hours of labor lost due to unsafe conditions — could shave as m
‘Urgent’ need for businesses to adapt to growing threat from climate change, McKinsey says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mckinsey, impacts, effects, urgent, threat, felt, supply, need, adapt, rising, study, businesses, temperatures, economic, growing, change, climate


'Urgent' need for businesses to adapt to growing threat from climate change, McKinsey says

As the climate crisis intensifies and as the wide-ranging economic impacts are felt up and down supply chains across continents, business leaders and governments cannot ignore the mounting economic risks, a report from McKinsey said Thursday. “Much as thinking about information systems and cyber-risks has become integrated into corporate and public-sector decision making, climate change and its resulting risks will also need to feature as a major factor in decisions,” McKinsey Global Institute director Jonathan Woetzel said in a statement.

A dog looks out of a house flooded by Hurricane Maria, in Catano town, Juana Matos, Puerto Rico, on September 21, 2017. Hector Retamal | AFP | Getty Images

The study focused on the physical effects of climate change, including on individuals and communities, as well as infrastructure and natural capital, and found that the knock-on effects from a changing planet are accelerating. This is primarily because while direct impacts such as hurricanes might be felt locally, the repercussions can get kicked down the supply chain and have surprising effects as communities become more interconnected. In Florida, for instance, rising tides could cut property values and reduce tax revenue. Or in India, McKinsey found that rising temperatures — and the subsequent hours of labor lost due to unsafe conditions — could shave as much as 4.5% from annual GDP. Around the world, rising ocean temperatures could reduce fish harvests, thereby impacting as many as 800 million people worldwide who rely on revenue from the industry. The study said trillions of dollars in economic activity and hundreds of millions lives are at risk. The impacts are already being felt — fires are raging in Australia and hurricanes have become ever more destructive.

Lack of preparation


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mckinsey, impacts, effects, urgent, threat, felt, supply, need, adapt, rising, study, businesses, temperatures, economic, growing, change, climate


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Domino’s Pizza reaffirms long-term sales outlook, says focus on carryout is paying off

Domino’s Pizza reaffirmed its long-term outlook on Tuesday, as it enters fiscal 2020 facing headwinds from higher food costs, foreign exchange and competition from third-party delivery services. In October, the pizza chain released a two-to-three year outlook that replaced its prior forecast for three to five years. Domino’s told investors to expect U.S. same-store sales growth in a range of 2% to 5% and global retail sales growth of 7% to 10%. The rise of Postmates, DoorDash and other delivery


Domino’s Pizza reaffirmed its long-term outlook on Tuesday, as it enters fiscal 2020 facing headwinds from higher food costs, foreign exchange and competition from third-party delivery services.
In October, the pizza chain released a two-to-three year outlook that replaced its prior forecast for three to five years.
Domino’s told investors to expect U.S. same-store sales growth in a range of 2% to 5% and global retail sales growth of 7% to 10%.
The rise of Postmates, DoorDash and other delivery
Domino’s Pizza reaffirms long-term sales outlook, says focus on carryout is paying off Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, foreign, food, carryout, pizza, outlook, longterm, range, dominos, growth, growing, sales, focus, paying, fiscal, reaffirms


Domino's Pizza reaffirms long-term sales outlook, says focus on carryout is paying off

Domino’s Pizza reaffirmed its long-term outlook on Tuesday, as it enters fiscal 2020 facing headwinds from higher food costs, foreign exchange and competition from third-party delivery services.

Shares of Domino’s, which has a market value of $11.7 billion, were trading up less than 1% in afternoon trading.

In October, the pizza chain released a two-to-three year outlook that replaced its prior forecast for three to five years. Domino’s told investors to expect U.S. same-store sales growth in a range of 2% to 5% and global retail sales growth of 7% to 10%.

The rise of Postmates, DoorDash and other delivery services have put pressure on Domino’s own sales as customers now have a wider range of food options. But the pizza chain has also been focusing on growing its carryout sales.

Domino’s CFO Jeff Lawrence said at the ICR Conference that part of its business now represents 45% of its U.S. sales, and Domino’s believes that it can keep growing those orders, which are usually more profitable for its business.

Lawrence also said Tuesday that the company is forecasting food costs will jump 1% to 3% in fiscal 2020 and foreign currency will likely be a headwind.

Domino’s is planning to announce its fourth-quarter earnings Feb. 20.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, foreign, food, carryout, pizza, outlook, longterm, range, dominos, growth, growing, sales, focus, paying, fiscal, reaffirms


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Livestreaming in China is growing, offering hopes of fame and wealth to ordinary Chinese

Beauty blogger Austin Li Jiaqi speaks with a dog on his lap while livestreaming on the e-commerce platform Taobao on October 26, 2018 in Shanghai, China. For many Chinese, it’s the dream of overnight wealth, and the social mobility it can bring. Xin, whose full name is Xin Youzhi, is a self-proclaimed farmer’s kid whose selling point is providing value for money. In fact, the three provinces of Dongbei had the highest proportion of professional livestreamers in 2018, according to Chinese social


Beauty blogger Austin Li Jiaqi speaks with a dog on his lap while livestreaming on the e-commerce platform Taobao on October 26, 2018 in Shanghai, China.
For many Chinese, it’s the dream of overnight wealth, and the social mobility it can bring.
Xin, whose full name is Xin Youzhi, is a self-proclaimed farmer’s kid whose selling point is providing value for money.
In fact, the three provinces of Dongbei had the highest proportion of professional livestreamers in 2018, according to Chinese social
Livestreaming in China is growing, offering hopes of fame and wealth to ordinary Chinese Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-02  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hopes, xin, chinese, kuaishou, kols, livestreamers, china, platform, fame, million, livestreaming, wealth, growing, ordinary, zhao, offering


Livestreaming in China is growing, offering hopes of fame and wealth to ordinary Chinese

Beauty blogger Austin Li Jiaqi speaks with a dog on his lap while livestreaming on the e-commerce platform Taobao on October 26, 2018 in Shanghai, China. The 27-year-old Li, nicknamed “Lipstick Brother,” is the hottest online beauty blogger in China. VCG | Getty Images

BEIJING — In five minutes this past November, Chinese livestreamer “Xin Ba” sold 42.5 million sets of Whoo Korean skincare products, and made more than 400 million yuan ($57 million) in sales during that day’s shopping event, according to Kuaishou, the Tencent-backed video platform. For many Chinese, it’s the dream of overnight wealth, and the social mobility it can bring. For global brands, these internet personalities — “key opinion leaders” or KOLs — are emerging as the most effective way to reach China’s hundreds of millions of shoppers. Xin, whose full name is Xin Youzhi, is a self-proclaimed farmer’s kid whose selling point is providing value for money. His conversational skills are hallmarks of his native Dongbei, the northeastern part of China that’s known for a culture of fast-talking entertainers. It’s also a three-province region bordering Siberia and North Korea, with an economy that’s struggled to shake off industrial overcapacity.

“They (people from Dongbei) are much more open in terms of being able to do ad lib comedy, responding on the spot, so that type of content appeals to audiences nationwide, even for people in the south,” said Hao Wu, director of a 2018 documentary on Chinese livestreamers called “People’s Republic of Desire.” In the early days of livestreaming, the region provided a ready pool of talkers — to whom viewers were willing to shower with virtual monetary gifts. In fact, the three provinces of Dongbei had the highest proportion of professional livestreamers in 2018, according to Chinese social networking platform Momo. Citing official figures, the report said that by the middle of last year, China had more than 425 million livestreamers nationwide. And the pie is growing. For Kuaishou users with more than 1 million fans, transaction volume in the last 11 months grew 9 times, versus 34 times for those with 200,000 fans, Wang Yulin, CEO of Mockuai, a Kuaishou partner, said at a conference in Beijing on Dec. 17. A Kuaishou representative noted these were third-party figures, and would not comment on reports the company is eyeing a U.S. IPO next year with a valuation of at least $25 billion.

Rising barriers to entry

But even as lesser-known brands turn to KOLs for help, the industry is still dominated by heavyweights, and increasingly demands professionalization. About a year ago, one user’s videos could easily gain traction, but now, a whole team needs to support that person, said Kelvin Zhao, who is based in Beijing and has spent the last four years working for a top content creator. “(For individuals), the best time is over,” said Zhao, according to a CNBC translation of his Mandarin-language remarks. Zhao noted it now costs at least as much to create a good short video as it does to make an online movie. “To win is very hard, not impossible, but the investment you need to make is much higher.”

According to a report in March from industry research firm TopKlout, there are now at least 5,000 agencies known as “multi-channel networks” — which act as talent agencies connecting KOLs with brands and sometimes assisting with content production. Pedro Yip, retail partner at consulting firm Oliver Wyman, said a middleman can get 10% to 25% in commission, of which a smaller share goes to the KOL. “Income changes as popularity moves with the market,” he said. “Usually what happens is the price goes exponential.”

Is livestreaming forever?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-02  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hopes, xin, chinese, kuaishou, kols, livestreamers, china, platform, fame, million, livestreaming, wealth, growing, ordinary, zhao, offering


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Small business pay checks are growing at a fast pace as job gains slow

Weekly earnings for employees of small businesses grew at an annual rate of 4.1% at the end of the year, the fastest pace since the Paychex/IHS Markit Small Business Employment Watch began. The employment report began making annual comparisons in 2011. Steady gains in hourly earnings and the strongest increase in hours worked in December since 2012 helped drive earnings growth. Job growth was flattish, up just 0.06% from November’s level, but year-over-year, job growth fell 0.7% due to declines


Weekly earnings for employees of small businesses grew at an annual rate of 4.1% at the end of the year, the fastest pace since the Paychex/IHS Markit Small Business Employment Watch began.
The employment report began making annual comparisons in 2011.
Steady gains in hourly earnings and the strongest increase in hours worked in December since 2012 helped drive earnings growth.
Job growth was flattish, up just 0.06% from November’s level, but year-over-year, job growth fell 0.7% due to declines
Small business pay checks are growing at a fast pace as job gains slow Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-01  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, growing, job, gains, checks, markit, growth, business, earnings, employment, worked, hours, small, slow, report, fast, pace


Small business pay checks are growing at a fast pace as job gains slow

A worker of the LIC Corner Cafe prepares an expresso for customers in Long Island City, New York, November 7, 2018.

Weekly earnings for employees of small businesses grew at an annual rate of 4.1% at the end of the year, the fastest pace since the Paychex/IHS Markit Small Business Employment Watch began.

The employment report began making annual comparisons in 2011.

Steady gains in hourly earnings and the strongest increase in hours worked in December since 2012 helped drive earnings growth. Hours worked were up 1% from the same period last year. Job growth was flattish, up just 0.06% from November’s level, but year-over-year, job growth fell 0.7% due to declines in the first half.

“Small business job gains have flattened in the second half of the year as labor markets prove very tight,” said James Diffley, chief regional economist at IHS Markit. “In response, weekly earnings have accelerated, surging from 2.49 percent mid-year to 4.13 percent at year-end.”

The monthly report focuses on small businesses and uses payroll data of about 350,000 Paychex clients to glean wage trends and activity by region and sector.

Wage growth had been steadily rising and sometimes stubbornly slow since the financial crisis, but picked up in late 2018 and 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-01  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, growing, job, gains, checks, markit, growth, business, earnings, employment, worked, hours, small, slow, report, fast, pace


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Jewish community grapples with how to stem growing anti-Semitic violence

After five people were stabbed at a rabbi’s home during a Hanukkah celebration over the weekend, the Jewish community in New York and around the United States is grappling with how to stem growing anti-Semitic violence. Andrew Cuomo called the attack Saturday night on a Hasidic Jewish community in Monsey, New York, “domestic terrorism” and directed state police to increase patrols in Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods across the state. Kelsen has seen increased security over the past few years and sa


After five people were stabbed at a rabbi’s home during a Hanukkah celebration over the weekend, the Jewish community in New York and around the United States is grappling with how to stem growing anti-Semitic violence.
Andrew Cuomo called the attack Saturday night on a Hasidic Jewish community in Monsey, New York, “domestic terrorism” and directed state police to increase patrols in Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods across the state.
Kelsen has seen increased security over the past few years and sa
Jewish community grapples with how to stem growing anti-Semitic violence Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30  Authors: ben kesslen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, increased, community, antisemitic, sasson, security, kelsen, grapples, violence, jewish, ward, stem, attack, growing


Jewish community grapples with how to stem growing anti-Semitic violence

A member of the Ramapo police stands guard in front of the house of Rabbi Chaim Rottenberg on December 29, 2019 in Monsey, New York. Five people were injured in a knife attack during a Hanukkah party and a suspect, identified as Grafton E. Thomas, as was later arrested in Harlem.

After five people were stabbed at a rabbi’s home during a Hanukkah celebration over the weekend, the Jewish community in New York and around the United States is grappling with how to stem growing anti-Semitic violence.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo called the attack Saturday night on a Hasidic Jewish community in Monsey, New York, “domestic terrorism” and directed state police to increase patrols in Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods across the state.

Four Jewish elected officials in New York asked the governor to go a step further Sunday, calling for him to declare a state of emergency and to deploy the National Guard to “visibly patrol and protect” Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods. Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer of New York called for a federal investigation of the attack Sunday.

The calls for increased security come after at least eight attacks this month on Jewish people in New York City, as well as a deadly attack at a kosher supermarket in nearby Jersey City, New Jersey. The suspect in the Monsey stabbing, Grafton Thomas, 37, was arrested in Harlem on Saturday night, two hours after the attack.

The stabbing highlights the violence facing many Hasidic Jews, whose Judaism is often made visible by their clothing and hair. Many are terrified, Jewish leaders and other community members said.

But beyond their fear, they are grappling with what to do about the mounting violence and are divided over some of the solutions being discussed.

“We are not quite sure what to do, because we aren’t used to this,” said Rabbi Jon Kelsen, dean of Yeshivat Chovevei Torah, a modern Orthodox rabbinical school in the Bronx borough of New York City.

Kelsen has seen increased security over the past few years and said he imagines that the efforts will be doubled after a Hanukkah full of so much violence.

“People are trying to have security without turning synagogues into lockdowns,” Kelsen said, adding that it was a challenge to create secure spaces that are also welcoming to outsiders and that he hopes people can find a balance.

The attacks are “symptoms of something deeper,” Kelsen said, but it’s hard to speculate about their exact cause.

“We have to maintain dialogue across communities as we maintain security,” he said.

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But when calls for more security usually mean increased police presence, some fear that more security might hinder the dialogue that Kelsen said is so important.

Audrey Sasson, executive director of Jews for Racial and Economic Justice, or JFREJ, a left-wing “movement to dismantle racism and economic exploitation” based in New York City, said deployment of more police would be an understandable reaction — and one that would worry her.

“Of course, we all need to feel safe. That’s fundamental, and there is no arguing with that,” Sasson said. “But how do we get there?”

Sasson said that her group is multiracial, as is the Jewish community at large, and that many Jewish people wouldn’t feel safer with a greater police presence.

“Right now, the tools we have for safety [are] more police and more guns,” Sasson said, “but the question for me is how can we build other tools?”

Those tools, according to Sasson and JFREJ, include making sure the Jewish community is in a coalition with other targeted communities, having a better system for reporting violence that doesn’t rely so heavily on police, creating community-led transformative justice projects and implementing non-punitive and restorative-oriented approaches to violence.

Sasson acknowledged that the vision is a long-term one, and she does not discount the desire for more police from people living in fear after “the whole holiday was marked by attacks.”

This point is particularly important, said Eric Ward, executive director of the Western States Center, a progressive nonprofit that supports community groups, based in Portland, Oregon.

“You can’t tell a community that is being physically assaulted that they can’t increase law enforcement response but then offer them nothing in response,” Ward said.

Still, Ward, who has studied anti-Semitism extensively, acknowledged that it’s not that simple.

“We know increased policing brings increased racial profiling,” he said, adding that high police presence to protect Jews “is likely to be seen as feeding into black and Jewish tension.”

He said that, now more than ever, civil rights leaders who aren’t Jewish, like himself, need to acknowledge that a minority community is “living in substantial fear” and speak out against anti-Semitism.

“We have to come together as communities and continue to set a moral barrier against hate crimes, racial discrimination and racial harassment,” Ward said.

Ward said education around anti-Semitism is another crucial part of the solution.

“There needs to be more of a prioritization of education around anti-Semitism,” Ward said. “Folks don’t know what to say and don’t understand how anti-Semitism functions in America.”

That often leads to a slow response, he said.

While community leaders and members wrestle with long-term solutions, showing up for grieving community members is crucial in the short term.

On Sunday evening, hundreds of people gathered in Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn to express their support for and solidarity with the victims of the Monsey attack and to celebrate the final night of Hanukkah.

“There are radical questions to be asked about the state of Jewish people in America, but we aren’t at any point” where there are answers, said Kelsen, of Yeshivat Chovevei Torah.

In the meantime, he said, Hasidic Jews who have been victims of the violence should know that “the broader Jewish community is firmly thinking of them and that our thoughts and hearts are with them this holiday and we wish them a powerful and resilient eighth night of Hanukkah.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30  Authors: ben kesslen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, increased, community, antisemitic, sasson, security, kelsen, grapples, violence, jewish, ward, stem, attack, growing


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These 5 high-paying, growing jobs didn’t exist a decade ago—but they’ll be booming through the 2020s

That’s because as more companies are investing in technology to collect user data, the need for professionals to interpret said data has skyrocketed. Information security engineer: $100,553 per yearSince 2010, data breaches have compromised over 38 billion accounts, according to the cybersecurity firm Risk Based Security. These breaches, and the need to protect user data, has resulted in information security being one of the fastest-growing fields. Information security engineers work to safeguar


That’s because as more companies are investing in technology to collect user data, the need for professionals to interpret said data has skyrocketed.
Information security engineer: $100,553 per yearSince 2010, data breaches have compromised over 38 billion accounts, according to the cybersecurity firm Risk Based Security.
These breaches, and the need to protect user data, has resulted in information security being one of the fastest-growing fields.
Information security engineers work to safeguar
These 5 high-paying, growing jobs didn’t exist a decade ago—but they’ll be booming through the 2020s Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, highpaying, exist, growing, agobut, job, jobs, 2020s, theyll, decade, need, information, booming, sales, diversity, companies, stansell, engineers, didnt, security


These 5 high-paying, growing jobs didn't exist a decade ago—but they'll be booming through the 2020s

Data scientist: $107,697 per year

In 2012, Harvard Business Review named data scientist “the sexiest job of the 21st century.” And for the past four years, Glassdoor has recognized it as the No. 1 job in the U.S. based on job satisfaction, pay and opportunities. Stansell says demand for data scientists is still most concentrated within the tech industry, but that it’s growing across every sector: health care, finance, business, retail, media and beyond. “All these companies have a need for a data scientist who can make use of the growing amount of data they have and turn it into something valuable,” Stansell says. While the term “data science” was first coined as an independent discipline (separate from traditional statistics) in 2001 by William S. Cleveland, jobs in data science have grown most rapidly since 2010. That’s because as more companies are investing in technology to collect user data, the need for professionals to interpret said data has skyrocketed. Because it’s still a relatively new field, many of today’s data scientists have varied backgrounds in computer science, math, statistics and engineering. However, more universities have begun offering specific degrees, courses and even bootcamps in data science within the past decade.

Information security engineer: $100,553 per year

Since 2010, data breaches have compromised over 38 billion accounts, according to the cybersecurity firm Risk Based Security. These breaches, and the need to protect user data, has resulted in information security being one of the fastest-growing fields. Information security engineers work to safeguard an organization’s computer network systems, and plan and carry out security measures to protect sensitive information from infiltration and cyber attacks. “As there have been more and more high-profile data breaches in recent years, this has translated to companies seeing the need for having people who can help them protect their data,” Stansell says. The field is projected to grow by 32% through 2028, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. (The average growth rate for all occupations is 5%.) However, the need for information security engineers has far eclipsed the number of people with the skills to do the job. The U.S. Department of Commerce recently estimated there are 350,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs in the country. Cybersecurity Ventures, an analytics and research company, estimates 3.5 million jobs in cybersecurity around the world are likely to go unfilled by 2021. This talent shortage means workers in the field are paid handsomely. While Glassdoor data says information security engineers earn a median base salary of just over $100,000 per year, top-level jobs in the field, like chief information security officer, can yield pay above $300,000 in top metro areas, according to cybersecurity recruiting firm SilverBull.

Director of diversity and inclusion: $98,154 per year

The only top-paying emerging job of the decade that doesn’t fall into the tech space is one that focuses on workplace culture, particularly within diversity and inclusion. The position of D&I director is so new, Glassdoor doesn’t have adequate pay data for the specific role, but uses Human Resources Director salaries with an average pay of $98,154 per year as a guide. According to a 2019 Glassdoor survey, 61% of U.S. employees have witnessed or experienced discrimination in the workplace based on age, race, gender or LGBTQ identity. Meanwhile, the career site saw a 30% increase in the past year of diversity and inclusion job openings, such as D&I director, program manager, diversity recruiter and D&I consultant. “This signals that these are issues employees are facing, and employers are catching up and trying to make an impact in this field,” Stansell says, “which is really an encouraging sign that employers are making the investment towards an inclusive workplace.” Larger companies with 5,000 or more employees are the ones making the biggest investment in growing their D&I departments, likely because they have the financial resources to do so. Stansell predicts progress in these types of roles will continue into the next decade. According to a 2017 survey from Deloitte, 72% of employees said they would consider leaving their company to join another with better diversity initiatives and programs. “In the next few years, we’ll continue to see medium-sized companies invest in diversity and inclusion, especially as it is such an important thing to job seekers,” Stansell says.

Sales engineer: $90,000 per year

Sales engineers work for tech companies to sell customized software and products to other businesses looking to expand their IT efforts. “As tech companies are offering really high-value products to potential customers, they need to have the ability to adapt to each individual [client],” Stansell says. “Having a sales engineer, who is a communicator between the sales and engineering aspects, is really important make sure that the needs of the potential customer are met.” Because workers must have extensive knowledge of these products and understand the scientific processes behind their operations, sales engineers tend to have technical backgrounds (for example, a degree in computer science or engineering). However, Stansell adds they also need solid interpersonal skills such as communication, negotiation and marketing know-how in order to provide customized solutions to clients during the sales process. Those with a marketing background may also be able to learn more about tech products and software in order to transition into this type of role. While Glassdoor puts the annual median salary of a sales engineer at $90,000 per year, pay can vary based on what they’re selling. For example, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says those operating in the telecommunications industry tend to earn the most, about $118,000 a year, followed by sales engineers in computer systems design and wholesale electronic markets, who also command six-figure salaries.

Salesforce developer: $80,357 per year


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, highpaying, exist, growing, agobut, job, jobs, 2020s, theyll, decade, need, information, booming, sales, diversity, companies, stansell, engineers, didnt, security


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Chipotle is testing a new restaurant design to maximize its digital growth

Exterior of a redesigned Chipotle restaurant Source: Chipotle Mexican GrillChipotle Mexican Grill announced Thursday that it is testing a different design for its restaurants as its digital business keeps growing. Interior of a redesigned Chipotle restaurant Source: Chipotle Mexican GrillNew features will include walk-up windows and different seating arrangements. To decide which design will roll out nationally, Chipotle will assess each location based on transactions, consumer feedback and its


Exterior of a redesigned Chipotle restaurant Source: Chipotle Mexican GrillChipotle Mexican Grill announced Thursday that it is testing a different design for its restaurants as its digital business keeps growing.
Interior of a redesigned Chipotle restaurant Source: Chipotle Mexican GrillNew features will include walk-up windows and different seating arrangements.
To decide which design will roll out nationally, Chipotle will assess each location based on transactions, consumer feedback and its
Chipotle is testing a new restaurant design to maximize its digital growth Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-19  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, restaurant, maximize, mexican, redesigned, location, growing, test, chipotle, design, testing, digital, source, restaurants, growth


Chipotle is testing a new restaurant design to maximize its digital growth

Exterior of a redesigned Chipotle restaurant Source: Chipotle Mexican Grill

Chipotle Mexican Grill announced Thursday that it is testing a different design for its restaurants as its digital business keeps growing. Restaurants in Chicago, Cincinnati, Phoenix, Newport Beach and San Diego will be part of the test. Both new and existing locations will be involved in the trial. The test will also cover a variety of types of restaurants, including an urban storefront and a standalone location with a “Chipotlane,” its drive-thru lanes for digital orders.

Interior of a redesigned Chipotle restaurant Source: Chipotle Mexican Grill

New features will include walk-up windows and different seating arrangements. To decide which design will roll out nationally, Chipotle will assess each location based on transactions, consumer feedback and its ability to incorporate new menu items. “While we are staying true to Chipotle’s heritage, we are also excited to integrate new, innovative physical features into the restaurant that complement our growing digital business,” said Tabassum Zalotrawala, Chipotle’s chief development officer. During the chain’s third quarter, digital sales grew 87.9% and accounted for nearly a fifth of its total sales.

Walk-up window at a redesigned Chipotle Source: Chipotle Mexican Grill


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-19  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, restaurant, maximize, mexican, redesigned, location, growing, test, chipotle, design, testing, digital, source, restaurants, growth


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Wall Street points toward higher open on growing trade hope

Wall Street points toward higher open on growing trade hope1 Hour AgoU.S. stock index futures pointed to a higher open Monday morning as investors continue to digest the phase one trade deal struck between the U.S. and China last week. CNBC’s Rahel Solomon reports.


Wall Street points toward higher open on growing trade hope1 Hour AgoU.S. stock index futures pointed to a higher open Monday morning as investors continue to digest the phase one trade deal struck between the U.S. and China last week.
CNBC’s Rahel Solomon reports.
Wall Street points toward higher open on growing trade hope Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, street, wall, week, solomon, hope, points, growing, reports, higher, trade, stock, struck, open


Wall Street points toward higher open on growing trade hope

Wall Street points toward higher open on growing trade hope

1 Hour Ago

U.S. stock index futures pointed to a higher open Monday morning as investors continue to digest the phase one trade deal struck between the U.S. and China last week. CNBC’s Rahel Solomon reports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, street, wall, week, solomon, hope, points, growing, reports, higher, trade, stock, struck, open


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Wall Street set to extend Thursday’s gains amid growing China trade hope

Wall Street set to extend Thursday’s gains amid growing China trade hope1 Hour AgoU.S. stock index futures were higher Friday morning, building on gains in the previous session as the world’s two largest economies neared the signing of a “phase one” trade deal. CNBC’s Rahel Solomon reports.


Wall Street set to extend Thursday’s gains amid growing China trade hope1 Hour AgoU.S. stock index futures were higher Friday morning, building on gains in the previous session as the world’s two largest economies neared the signing of a “phase one” trade deal.
CNBC’s Rahel Solomon reports.
Wall Street set to extend Thursday’s gains amid growing China trade hope Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: johannes eisele, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, wall, set, thursdays, extend, gains, stock, street, worlds, solomon, signing, china, growing, hope


Wall Street set to extend Thursday's gains amid growing China trade hope

Wall Street set to extend Thursday’s gains amid growing China trade hope

1 Hour Ago

U.S. stock index futures were higher Friday morning, building on gains in the previous session as the world’s two largest economies neared the signing of a “phase one” trade deal. CNBC’s Rahel Solomon reports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: johannes eisele, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, wall, set, thursdays, extend, gains, stock, street, worlds, solomon, signing, china, growing, hope


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Student loan forgiveness options are growing. Here’s how to find them

As student debt poses more problems for people, states and the federal government are rolling out more solutions. There are now more than 100 student debt assistance programs across the country. Meanwhile, the Army will wipe out thousands of dollars in student debt each year for soldiers in the National Guard. Even borrowers with private loans could be eligible for many of the state-run student loan assistance programs, said Will Sealy, co-founder and CEO of Summer, which helps people navigate t


As student debt poses more problems for people, states and the federal government are rolling out more solutions.
There are now more than 100 student debt assistance programs across the country.
Meanwhile, the Army will wipe out thousands of dollars in student debt each year for soldiers in the National Guard.
Even borrowers with private loans could be eligible for many of the state-run student loan assistance programs, said Will Sealy, co-founder and CEO of Summer, which helps people navigate t
Student loan forgiveness options are growing. Here’s how to find them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debt, options, work, assistance, growing, forgiveness, companies, social, volunteering, loan, benefits, student, employees, heres


Student loan forgiveness options are growing. Here's how to find them

As student debt poses more problems for people, states and the federal government are rolling out more solutions. There are now more than 100 student debt assistance programs across the country. For example: Certain nurses, doctors and social workers in Michigan could be eligible for up to $200,000 in student debt forgiveness, if they work in high-need areas. Meanwhile, the Army will wipe out thousands of dollars in student debt each year for soldiers in the National Guard. Even borrowers with private loans could be eligible for many of the state-run student loan assistance programs, said Will Sealy, co-founder and CEO of Summer, which helps people navigate their student loan repayment.

Meanwhile, student loan assistance, which started as a niche offering by a handful of companies, is finding its way into the mainstream menu of workplace benefits. Some of the other ideas are pretty creative: New Jersey, for example, considered establishing a lottery for borrowers burdened by student debt. The South Korean auto maker Hyundai announced recently that it will give $900 to people with student debt who buy or lease a car from them. (The offer is available only at dealerships in California and Phoenix, Arizona, right now.)

Keep in mind, however, that these endeavors aren’t free. The funds are taxable, even money from an organization in return for volunteer work. “All money you receive for volunteering is considered income by the IRS,” said Mark Kantrowitz, a student loan expert. Here are some of the ways to get other people to pay off your debt.

1) Federal and state government programs

Maine

2) At your job

Wang Zhao | AFP/Getty Images

“We’re certainly seeing more and more employers interested in offering student debt benefits to their employees,” said Asha Srikantiah, head of Fidelity’s student debt program. Companies that have offered employees help with their student loans include Aetna, Penguin Random House, Nvidia and Sotheby’s. A spokesman for Fidelity said more than 75 companies — including U.S. defense contractor Raytheon and The Travelers Companies — are currently using its student debt employer contribution program. (Fidelity also offers a student debt benefit for its own employees.) Although the company you’re interviewing with most likely won’t offer the benefit, that shouldn’t stop you from asking about it, said Katie Berliner, account executive at YouDecide, a benefits firm. “In the course of the interview, there comes a point where the interviewer says, ‘Do you have any questions?'” Berliner said. “It would not be out of line to say: ‘I want to get your perspective on whether you think this a valuable benefit.'”

3) Volunteering

Borrowers can enroll with Shared Harvest Fund, and get financial help in return for volunteering. Users create a profile and list the social causes they’re interested in, such as gender equality or homelessness. You’ll work on projects for nonprofits and businesses and receive a monthly stipend of $250 to $1,000.

4) Apps


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debt, options, work, assistance, growing, forgiveness, companies, social, volunteering, loan, benefits, student, employees, heres


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