Deadly shooting in Texas becomes a rallying cry for both sides in the gun control debate

Police and fire departments surround the scene of a shooting at West Freeway Church of Christ in White Settlement, Texas, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019. Advocates on both sides of the gun-control debate have seized on the Sunday shooting in White Settlement, Texas, as a rallying cry for their respective causes. But gun safety advocates argued that the shooting itself wouldn’t have happened if the U.S. − and Texas − had stronger gun regulation. Divisions around the shooting in Texas come amid a broader p


Police and fire departments surround the scene of a shooting at West Freeway Church of Christ in White Settlement, Texas, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019.
Advocates on both sides of the gun-control debate have seized on the Sunday shooting in White Settlement, Texas, as a rallying cry for their respective causes.
But gun safety advocates argued that the shooting itself wouldn’t have happened if the U.S. − and Texas − had stronger gun regulation.
Divisions around the shooting in Texas come amid a broader p
Deadly shooting in Texas becomes a rallying cry for both sides in the gun control debate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, control, rallying, sides, debate, cry, church, white, trump, including, gun, texas, safety, settlement, deadly, passed, shooting


Deadly shooting in Texas becomes a rallying cry for both sides in the gun control debate

Police and fire departments surround the scene of a shooting at West Freeway Church of Christ in White Settlement, Texas, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019.

Advocates on both sides of the gun-control debate have seized on the Sunday shooting in White Settlement, Texas, as a rallying cry for their respective causes.

On Sunday, 43-year-old Keith Thomas Kinnunen opened fire in at West Freeway Church of Christ, killing two people before a member of the church’s security team shot and killed him. A video of the incident shows other parishioners reaching for firearms, as well.

Gun-rights advocates, including President Donald Trump, have pointed to the shooting as evidence that access to arms gives citizens better ability to defend themselves. Lawmakers in Texas have passed legislation reflecting that viewpoint, including a series of laws loosening gun control that became effective in September.

The legislation, which was passed after a church shooting in Sutherland Springs left 26 people dead, made it legal for people to bring guns in church, along with other public places.

“Had that law not been passed that allowed these people to be armed, I fear we could have lost hundreds,” Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said in an interview with Fox News.

But gun safety advocates argued that the shooting itself wouldn’t have happened if the U.S. − and Texas − had stronger gun regulation.

“Media referencing the White Settlement shooting owe the public a nuanced discussion; we need watchdogs to make sure it’s so,” tweeted Shannon Watts, founder of gun safety group, Moms Demand Action.

“Two are dead due to Texas’ lax gun laws; a man with a long criminal history was able to access a long gun,” she added.

According to media reports, the assailant’s criminal history includes charges of assault, theft, arson and possession of an illegal weapon in Texas, Oklahoma and New Jersey.

Texas had the 25th highest rate of gun homicides in the U.S from 2008 to 2017, according to research compiled by Everytown, the gun safety group that runs Moms Demand Action.

Divisions around the shooting in Texas come amid a broader political debate over gun safety in the U.S. The issue is a major topic among Democratic presidential candidates who are running for the right to take on Trump next November. Leading candidates, including Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden have advocated for universal background checks and closing loopholes that allow people to buy guns more easily from unlicensed sellers or online.

Mike Bloomberg, a late entrant to the race, has made gun safety is a seminal issue in his campaign. Bloomberg helped found Everytown and he remains a major financial backer of the organization. His financial support helped Democrats in Virginia take back state government in November, in an election that featured gun regulation as a leading issue.

In addition to closing loopholes and requiring universal background checks, Bloomberg has said that, if elected president he would pour $100 million a year into local violence intervention programs and at least $100 million for public health research into gun violence.

Trump, whose White House bid benefited from $30 million from the NRA in 2016, has said he wants to ensure the gun-rights lobby’s views are “represented and respected” in evaluating gun legislation, including H.R. 8., a bill that mandates background checks.

H.R. 8 passed the Democratic-controlled House in February, but has yet to come to a vote in the GOP-controlled Senate. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said he will not put any bill up for a vote unless he is sure that Trump would sign it.

In a tweet on Tuesday, Trump praised the benefits of allowing guns in church.

“If not for the fact that there were people inside of the church that were both armed, and highly proficient in using their weapon, the end result would have been catastrophic,” he wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, control, rallying, sides, debate, cry, church, white, trump, including, gun, texas, safety, settlement, deadly, passed, shooting


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Mike Bloomberg rolls out gun safety proposals

Mike Bloomberg, who has already helped bankroll a battle for gun reform as a private citizen, on Thursday rolled out his gun safety proposals for his 2020 presidential run. Gun safety is a passionate point for Bloomberg. He previously pledged $50 million to support Everytown for Gun Safety, an organization he helped found in 2014 to promote gun reform. In response to Bloomberg’s proposal the NRA said: “Mike Bloomberg supports gun registration along with every oppressive and failed gun control sc


Mike Bloomberg, who has already helped bankroll a battle for gun reform as a private citizen, on Thursday rolled out his gun safety proposals for his 2020 presidential run.
Gun safety is a passionate point for Bloomberg.
He previously pledged $50 million to support Everytown for Gun Safety, an organization he helped found in 2014 to promote gun reform.
In response to Bloomberg’s proposal the NRA said: “Mike Bloomberg supports gun registration along with every oppressive and failed gun control sc
Mike Bloomberg rolls out gun safety proposals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bloomberg, proposal, million, proposed, mike, used, violence, proposals, gun, walmart, guns, rolls, safety


Mike Bloomberg rolls out gun safety proposals

Democratic presidential candidate, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks during an event to introduce his gun safety policy agenda at the Heritage Christian Center on December 5, 2019 in Aurora, Colorado.

Mike Bloomberg, who has already helped bankroll a battle for gun reform as a private citizen, on Thursday rolled out his gun safety proposals for his 2020 presidential run.

Gun safety is a passionate point for Bloomberg. He previously pledged $50 million to support Everytown for Gun Safety, an organization he helped found in 2014 to promote gun reform.

The policies Bloomberg laid out Thursday would require anyone who buys gun to pass a thorough background check. It would close the “private sale loophole” through which people can more easily buy guns from unlicensed sellers at gun shows or online. It would require retailers to use sales records to track guns used for crimes — and notify police when people have been barred from using a gun. A central system would track when a gun owner has a criminal conviction or restraining order placed on them, barring them from owning firearms.

The proposal would also reverse President Donald Trump’s proposed firearm export regulations, which make it easier to sell weapons to foreign buyers. Those regulations are aimed at helping foster sales for gun companies like Vista Outdoors, Smith & Wesson parent company American Outdoor Brands and Sturm, Ruger & Co.

The proposed regulation would also close the “boyfriend loophole,” that prevents married domestic abusers from owning guns, but not unmarried partners. It would set a minimum age of 21 for anyone who wants to purchase handguns, semi-automatic rifles and shotguns.

Retailers like Walmart have already raised their age restrictions to 21 for firearm and ammunition purchases.

The proposal would ban the sale of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, reinstating a prohibition that expired in 2004. Walmart CEO, Doug McMillon, has said that reinstating that ban “should be debated to determine its effectiveness.” The retailer earlier this year stopped selling ammunition for handguns and some assault-style rifles after two shootings at Walmart stores.

Bloomberg would also prohibit guns in all schools, aside from those used by law enforcement.

The proposal would also tackle the gun violence crisis financially, including $100 million a year into local violence intervention programs and at least $100 million for public health research into gun violence. By declaring the crisis to be a public health emergency, the plan would expedite financial support.

Bloomberg also said Thursday said he would repeal the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, a 2005 law that shields gun makers from liability for crimes committed with their products. The law has come under renewed scrutiny after families of children killed in the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary school massacre in Connecticut sued gun maker Remington. The families argued that Remington which makes the AR-15-style weapon used in the incident marketed the weapon in a way that inspired gunman Adam Lanza. The Supreme Court said in November that it declined to hear the case.

The proposed plan put forward by Bloomberg , who is worth $54 billion, represents a new challenge for the National Rifle Association, the gun lobbyist group that has long been a strong force in Washington, D.C., but has recently been stricken with infighting and financial distress.

In response to Bloomberg’s proposal the NRA said: “Mike Bloomberg supports gun registration along with every oppressive and failed gun control scheme ever conceived. This hypocritical billionaire who surrounds himself with armed guards 24/7 doesn’t believe that self-defense is a fundamental human right or that gun ownership is an individual constitutional right as determined by the Supreme Court in the historic Heller decision.”

Shannon Watts, founder of Everytown’s Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, also responded. In a statement she said: “Given the significant progress we’ve made in the past six years working together, it’s no surprise Mayor Bloomberg has put forward a bold and comprehensive agenda to address a gun violence crisis that claims 100 lives every day in America and wounds hundreds more. This is an extraordinary moment as presidential candidates are vying to be the biggest and boldest on the issue of gun safety, in stark contrast to past cycles, where candidates frequently hid.”

Bloomberg’s Everytown spent $2.5 million in Virginia’s elections this past November, helping Democrats take full control of the Virginia House and Senate the first time since 1994.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bloomberg, proposal, million, proposed, mike, used, violence, proposals, gun, walmart, guns, rolls, safety


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Supreme Court shows little appetite for expanding gun rights in arguments over repealed New York regulation

Gun owners and second amendment advocates gather at the Ohio State House to protest gun control legislation on September 14, 2019 in Columbus, Ohio. A decision in thew New York case is expected by July, in the midst of the 2020 presidential election. The case was challenging a New York City gun regulation that barred the transport of handguns outside of the city, even to a second home or firing range. Roberts also asked whether gun owners could still seek damages if the high court were to find t


Gun owners and second amendment advocates gather at the Ohio State House to protest gun control legislation on September 14, 2019 in Columbus, Ohio.
A decision in thew New York case is expected by July, in the midst of the 2020 presidential election.
The case was challenging a New York City gun regulation that barred the transport of handguns outside of the city, even to a second home or firing range.
Roberts also asked whether gun owners could still seek damages if the high court were to find t
Supreme Court shows little appetite for expanding gun rights in arguments over repealed New York regulation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: tucker higgins
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Supreme Court shows little appetite for expanding gun rights in arguments over repealed New York regulation

Gun owners and second amendment advocates gather at the Ohio State House to protest gun control legislation on September 14, 2019 in Columbus, Ohio.

A decision in thew New York case is expected by July, in the midst of the 2020 presidential election. The nation’s gun laws have become one of the key issues in the Democratic race amidst an uptick in mass-shooting deaths and youth-led activism, though substantive new legislation is seen as all-but-impossible for the foreseeable future under divided government.

The dispute had one of the highest profiles of the court’s term. The court has not addressed gun legislation since deciding two landmark cases in 2008 and 2010, which held that the Second Amendment protected the individual right to keep guns for the purpose of self-defense in the home.

While court conservatives including Justices Neil Gorsuch and Samuel Alito seemed eager to use the case to address the reach of the Second Amendment, it appeared likely after an hour of arguments that Chief Justice John Roberts would side with the court’s liberals to dismiss the matter altogether as moot in light of the repeal of the regulation.

The case was challenging a New York City gun regulation that barred the transport of handguns outside of the city, even to a second home or firing range. After the court agreed to hear the case, though, the city did away with the regulation and the state passed a law that prevented the city from reviving it.

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court seemed unlikely to deliver a major win for gun-rights activists during arguments on Monday in the first significant Second Amendment case the justices have heard in nearly a decade.

Supporters of gun control and firearm safety measures hold a protest rally outside the US Supreme Court as the Court hears oral arguments in State Rifle and Pistol v. City of New York, NY, in Washington, DC, December 2, 2019.

Paul Clement, who argued on behalf of three gun owners in New York and a state affiliate of the National Rifle Association, argued that the case was still active because his clients could potentially seek monetary damages in the future.

Clement also argued that even under New York’s new regulations, his clients could still be penalized if they did not travel directly to a firing range outside the city, such as if they stopped for coffee.

But Richard Dearing, an attorney for New York, said that the city guaranteed that gun owners would not be prosecuted for such stops. And he said that any challenge to the new regulations would have to be argued in a future battle.

“There may be a controversy here. But it’s a new controversy that will have to be litigated in a new case,” Dearing said.

Clement, who argued for 20 minutes, had little time to address the merits of New York’s gun regulation. Instead, he spent nearly all of his arguments fielding questions from the court’s liberal wing about why the justices should rule on the case at all.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who asked the first question of the day, sounded off on a theme that would be heard throughout.

“The state says: Thou shalt not enforce the regulations. So, what’s left of this case?” Ginsburg asked.

Ginsburg’s health has been in the spotlight because of two recent cancer scares and a hospitalization last month after she experienced chills and a fever. But the 86-year-old justice appeared healthy on Monday.

The court’s other liberals also wrestled with Clement over whether it was proper for the court to decide the case.

“You’re asking us to opine on a law that’s not on the books anymore,” said Justice Sonia Sotomayor, an Obama-appointee.

Justice Stephen Breyer, who was appointed by President Bill Clinton, said he did not think it was bad “when people who have an argument settle their argument.”

Roberts asked few questions throughout. But at one point, the chief justice asked Dearing if it was possible that individuals who violated the old regulation could be targeted in any way by the city, even though it is no longer in force. Roberts also asked whether gun owners could still seek damages if the high court were to find the case moot.

Dearing responded that the gun owners would face no consequences for any past violations of the regulation, and he left open the possibility for damages, though he suggested there could be a time limit.

Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who is known to have an expansive view of the Second Amendment, did not ask any questions.

One wrinkle during arguments came from a difference in opinion between Clement and Jeffrey Wall, the Justice Department’s principal deputy solicitor general, who was arguing in favor of the gun owners.

Gorsuch asked Wall whether he agreed with Clement that the potential for gun owners to be prosecuted for stopping for coffee while traveling to a gun range kept the case alive.

“Why isn’t that good enough?” Gorsuch asked.

Wall said it was a “close call” and a “hard question” but stopped short of endorsing the argument. Instead, Wall emphasized that the gun owners could still seek monetary damages.

All in all, the justices spent just a few minutes probing the key constitutional question that gun-control activists feared would be on the table and that gun-rights groups hoped the court would address.

Since the court’s landmark 2008 opinion in D.C. v. Heller, the lower courts have generally weighed the public interest in gun laws as part of their consideration of whether they are legal. Using that methodology, appeals courts have upheld a broad range of gun restrictions, and those laws have remained on the books as the Supreme Court refused to review them.

Conservatives, including Kavanaugh while a federal appeals court judge, have argued that such considerations are unconstitutional, and that judges should instead look to whether the law was historically seen as permissible.

Ahead of arguments, gun-control activists worried that the court’s 5-4 conservative majority would issue a ruling that adopted that approach.

The case is New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. City of New York, No. 18-280.

Read more: The Supreme Court is about to hear its biggest gun-control case in a decade


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supreme, owners, arguments, courts, state, city, shows, repealed, second, court, little, regulation, gun, rights, case, expanding, york


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The Supreme Court is about to hear its biggest gun-control case in a decade

Matt Post is too young to remember the last time the Supreme Court heard a case over gun control. On Monday, the Supreme Court is set to hear its first major Second Amendment case since 2010. The composition of the court has shifted since the court last heard a case involving gun legislation. The court established a loose framework for gun legislation in a pair of cases decided in 2008 and 2010. In the 2008 case, D.C. v. Heller, the court found that the Second Amendment protected gun ownership u


Matt Post is too young to remember the last time the Supreme Court heard a case over gun control.
On Monday, the Supreme Court is set to hear its first major Second Amendment case since 2010.
The composition of the court has shifted since the court last heard a case involving gun legislation.
The court established a loose framework for gun legislation in a pair of cases decided in 2008 and 2010.
In the 2008 case, D.C. v. Heller, the court found that the Second Amendment protected gun ownership u
The Supreme Court is about to hear its biggest gun-control case in a decade Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gun, 2010, hear, supreme, biggest, amendment, legislation, shearer, decade, second, justices, cases, guncontrol, case, court


The Supreme Court is about to hear its biggest gun-control case in a decade

Matt Post is too young to remember the last time the Supreme Court heard a case over gun control.

But the 20-year-old college student is hoping the nine justices think of him and other members of the so-called mass-shooting generation when they consider the scope of the Second Amendment during arguments in a landmark dispute next week.

“The shooting in Sandy Hook happened when I was in sixth grade, and I think it’s hard for people who didn’t grow up with this to learn how it weighs on you,” Post, an activist with March for Our Lives, said in a recent interview.

“Someone can just come in and slaughter your classmates,” he said. “The Constitution guarantees you a better childhood than that.”

On Monday, the Supreme Court is set to hear its first major Second Amendment case since 2010.

The dispute, over a since-repealed New York City handgun regulation, comes amid heightened criticism of the nation’s uniquely permissive gun laws. A decision is expected by July, in the midst of the 2020 presidential election.

Gun-control advocates worry that a ruling could spell doom for measures that have been considered lawful by appeals courts in the past nine years, like assault weapon bans and restrictions on gun use outside the home.

For gun-rights supporters, the case is a welcome return to the Second Amendment for a court that they see as having abandoned such cases for too long.

While the top court has repeatedly taken cases featuring other aspects of the Bill of Rights, some conservatives, including Justice Clarence Thomas, have lamented what they see as the justices treating the Second Amendment as a “second-class right.”

With a divided Congress unlikely to reach a deal on gun legislation any time soon, the most important vote on the issue for the foreseeable future is likely to come from the justices.

The case has already spurred fighting among lawmakers. After a group of Democratic senators led by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., filed a brief in connection with the case warning the court it could be “restructured,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and the rest of the Republicans in the Senate told the justices that they would protect them.

The composition of the court has shifted since the court last heard a case involving gun legislation. Justice Anthony Kennedy has since departed, and Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh have joined it, forming a reliable conservative majority. Kavanaugh in particular has expressed an expansive view of gun rights.

The court established a loose framework for gun legislation in a pair of cases decided in 2008 and 2010. In the 2008 case, D.C. v. Heller, the court found that the Second Amendment protected gun ownership unconnected with service in a militia. In 2010, the court applied that ruling to the states, in McDonald v. Chicago.

Hannah Shearer, who researches Second Amendment litigation at the Giffords Law Center, an anti-gun violence group, said that since 2010 lower courts have treated the provision similarly to the First Amendment.

“They consider whether the law burdens Second Amendment rights, and whether there is a compelling public safety reason that is supported by evidence,” Shearer said.

The worry among gun-control proponents, Shearer said, is that the court could do away with considerations of public safety, known as a balancing test.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: tucker higgins
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Bloomberg’s huge donation helps his gun safety group raise record revenue in 2018

A gun safety group co-founded by presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg raised its most money ever in 2018, the year Democrats took back the House of Representatives — with much of it coming from the billionaire former New York mayor himself. The organization, Everytown for Gun Safety Action Fund, brought in $69.5 million in total revenue last year, according to a new 990 tax return first reviewed by CNBC. Combined with their other nonprofit, Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund, the organizatio


A gun safety group co-founded by presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg raised its most money ever in 2018, the year Democrats took back the House of Representatives — with much of it coming from the billionaire former New York mayor himself.
The organization, Everytown for Gun Safety Action Fund, brought in $69.5 million in total revenue last year, according to a new 990 tax return first reviewed by CNBC.
Combined with their other nonprofit, Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund, the organizatio
Bloomberg’s huge donation helps his gun safety group raise record revenue in 2018 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, group, total, helps, bloomberg, raise, gun, million, virginia, record, huge, revenue, safety, state, raised, nra, bloombergs, donation, everytown


Bloomberg's huge donation helps his gun safety group raise record revenue in 2018

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg arrives to speak with Virginia House Delegate-elect Nancy Guy after launching his presidential campaign in the D’Egg cafe in Norfolk, Virginia, November 25, 2019.

A gun safety group co-founded by presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg raised its most money ever in 2018, the year Democrats took back the House of Representatives — with much of it coming from the billionaire former New York mayor himself.

The organization, Everytown for Gun Safety Action Fund, brought in $69.5 million in total revenue last year, according to a new 990 tax return first reviewed by CNBC. That’s nearly double its revenue from 2017. The National Rifle Association, the biggest pro-gun lobby in the country, raised $352 million last year, meanwhile, representing only 12% revenue growth, its most recent disclosure form shows.

The 501(c)(4), which focuses on political initiatives, received $66 million of that total in grants and contributions. A source said $38 million of that — listed as an anonymous donation in the document — came from Bloomberg himself. Combined with their other nonprofit, Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund, the organization as a whole raised over $106 million.

The source said Bloomberg, who earlier this week launched his bid for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, has accounted for about a third of the group’s total funding in recent years. Bloomberg has a net worth of just over $55 billion.

A spokesman for Everytown noted that between the two nonprofits, they received over 300,000 online donations, which are not listed on their disclosure forms.

The organization said it spent $2.5 million this year in the most recent round of Virginia state elections, helping Democrats retake the legislature for the first time since 1994 — and outpacing the NRA, which spent approximately $300,000.

In 2018, Everytown’s Action Fund made political contributions of over $17 million and spent $4 million on lobbying. Democrats made inroads that year in state governments and also went on to capture the House. Since then, House Democrats have opened an impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump.

The group highlights its advocacy on the state level, which it says has led to massive changes on gun policy.

“The greater accomplishments came at the state level, where the action fund’s advocacy led to the passage of meaningful gun safety legislation in 20 states,” the 990 filing says.

The disclosure of Everytown’s success last year comes as Bloomberg runs for president with a message that he is the only candidate who can defeat the gun lobby.

The group’s other affiliated nonprofit, Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund, which is a 501(c)(3) dedicated to gun safety education, raised $37 million last year.

Data compiled by ProPublica, which tracks the activity of nonprofits, shows the closest Everytown has come to its 2018 revenue total was in 2016, when it raised $52 million. The group was formed in 2013.

Trump has been a major beneficiary of the NRA, and the group remains the most influential advocate for gun manufacturers. Trump has repeatedly said he would push for background checks and other gun reforms, but has backed off those ideas after consulting with NRA officials, particularly the group’s chief, Wayne LaPierre.

Despite raising more than $350 million last year, however, the NRA’s nonprofit, along with its four affiliated charities and its political committee, ended the year $10.8 million in the red, The Washington Post reported.

Bloomberg has made taking on the NRA a key part of his presidential campaign, which he launched Sunday.

“I’ll be making gun violence a major issue of my campaign, just as I made it a major issue of my life in government and philanthropy,” Bloomberg told reporters Monday in Virginia. “I spent hundreds of millions of dollars fighting the NRA to win common-sense gun laws, and I’m not stopping now.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: brian schwartz
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Mike Bloomberg launches bid for 2020 Democratic presidential nomination

Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg has officially entered the 2020 presidential race, launching a multi-million dollar ad campaign Sunday following weeks of speculation about whether he would join the already-crowded Democratic primary. The television ad touts Bloomberg’s record as mayor, experience as a businessman and his middle class upbringing. The new ad is part of Bloomberg’s $31 million television ad campaign that will run through at least December 3. He is only focused on doing wh


Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg has officially entered the 2020 presidential race, launching a multi-million dollar ad campaign Sunday following weeks of speculation about whether he would join the already-crowded Democratic primary.
The television ad touts Bloomberg’s record as mayor, experience as a businessman and his middle class upbringing.
The new ad is part of Bloomberg’s $31 million television ad campaign that will run through at least December 3.
He is only focused on doing wh
Mike Bloomberg launches bid for 2020 Democratic presidential nomination Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24  Authors: emma newburger brian schwartz, emma newburger, brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bid, gun, presidential, launches, wealthy, 2020, nomination, mike, campaign, bloomberg, run, bloombergs, democratic, mayor, trump, weeks


Mike Bloomberg launches bid for 2020 Democratic presidential nomination

Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg has officially entered the 2020 presidential race, launching a multi-million dollar ad campaign Sunday following weeks of speculation about whether he would join the already-crowded Democratic primary.

The television ad touts Bloomberg’s record as mayor, experience as a businessman and his middle class upbringing. His campaign vows to raise taxes on the wealthy, expand health insurance without eliminating private plans and take action on gun control and climate change.

The new ad is part of Bloomberg’s $31 million television ad campaign that will run through at least December 3.

Bloomberg’s announcement comes on the heels of him filing paperwork for the Alabama primary, which is scheduled for March 3. The move is a shift from his decision earlier this year when he said he would not be running for president.

Still, Bloomberg’s calculus has clearly changed over the coming weeks. He was recently talking with his close allies about running for president as former Vice President Joe Biden appeared to stumble as a front runner against Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

“Mike has never accepted campaign contributions and never will. He is wholly independent of special interests. He is only focused on doing what’s right, without fear or favor,” said Bloomberg’s campaign communications director Jason Schecter.

Warren has become a critic of the wealthy having too much influence in politics and has created a strong following within the Democratic party with her anti-Wall Street plans. After reports emerged that Bloomberg was inching closer to a run, Warren took aim at him on Twitter.

President Donald Trump, a billionaire himself, also took a swipe at Bloomberg prior to his announcement.

“There’s nobody I would rather run against than Little Michael,” Trump told reporters earlier in November. He noted that Bloomberg doesn’t have the “magic” to run a successful campaign.

Bloomberg has been a key financier for Democrats, including the 2018 congressional midterm elections. He spent over $100 million helping the party recapture the House of Representatives.

Since his days as mayor, he’s been a strong opponent of the National Rifle Association and helped fund a gun safety group, Everytown for Gun Safety.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24  Authors: emma newburger brian schwartz, emma newburger, brian schwartz
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Mike Bloomberg is running for president. These are the causes he supports and industries they will affect

Here are some issues Bloomberg cares about and the industries they would affect. Bloomberg’s Everytown for Gun Safety, which he helped found in 2014, has become a powerful voice in the battle over gun legislation. The group’s focus on retailers expands beyond major chains to unlicensed sellers, which can allow for loopholes to background checks. Everytown is in favor of a bipartisan proposal in support of mandatory background checks for gun purchases, H.R. J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America and


Here are some issues Bloomberg cares about and the industries they would affect.
Bloomberg’s Everytown for Gun Safety, which he helped found in 2014, has become a powerful voice in the battle over gun legislation.
The group’s focus on retailers expands beyond major chains to unlicensed sellers, which can allow for loopholes to background checks.
Everytown is in favor of a bipartisan proposal in support of mandatory background checks for gun purchases, H.R.
J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America and
Mike Bloomberg is running for president. These are the causes he supports and industries they will affect Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bloomberg, support, background, affect, supports, favor, everytown, virginia, causes, gun, companies, mike, checks, running, financial, industries, president


Mike Bloomberg is running for president. These are the causes he supports and industries they will affect

Former mayor of New York City, and Everytown founder, Michael Bloomberg speaks on stage during a forum on gun safety at the Iowa Events Center on August 10, 2019 in Des Moines, Iowa. The event was hosted by Everytown for Gun Safety.

Mike Bloomberg officially entered the 2020 Democratic presidential race Sunday. While Bloomberg has yet to deliver the full details of his platform, his 12-year run as mayor as well as active philanthropy in political causes provide good clues. Here are some issues Bloomberg cares about and the industries they would affect.

Bloomberg’s Everytown for Gun Safety, which he helped found in 2014, has become a powerful voice in the battle over gun legislation. The group has identified a number of issues it views as key to limiting gun violence, including closing loopholes around background checks and limiting illegal gun trafficking from states with weaker gun laws.

Bloomberg has pledged to spend at least $50 million to support the organization, which now has 350,000 financial backers. It recently spent $2.5 million in Virginia elections, helping Democrats take full control of the Virginia House and Senate the first time since 1994. Gun control was a key issue in the election, which came after a shooting in Virginia Beach left a dozen dead earlier in the year. The win carried symbolic significance too. The NRA, which is headquartered in Virginia, cobbled together only $300,000 to support the campaign as it battles infighting and financial distress.

Everytown and one of its subsidiaries, Mom’s Demand Action, has also successfully lobbied companies like Walmart, Kroger and Albertsons to change their policies around gun sales.

The group’s focus on retailers expands beyond major chains to unlicensed sellers, which can allow for loopholes to background checks.

Everytown is in favor of a bipartisan proposal in support of mandatory background checks for gun purchases, H.R. 8. The bill, which passed the Democratic-controlled House in February, has not yet come to a vote in the GOP-controlled Senate.

Everytown is also in favor of a bill introduced by Congresswoman Jennifer Wexton, D-Virginia, that would require banks to report suspicious or illegal financial activity relating to guns. Advocates of the bill argue the stipulations would simply add to other suspicious behavior banks must track as part of compliance like cybercrime and human smuggling.

Still, many large financial institutions have been notably quiet on the gun debate. J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo were noticeably absent from a letter of 145 CEOs released earlier this year in favor of background checks. Technology companies and platforms like Apple and Facebook were also absent.

Shares of gun companies like Vista Outdoor’s, Smith & Wesson parent company American Outdoor Brands and Sturm Ruger & Company have often moved inversely in elections involving gun reform, with some gun enthusiasts stocking up in fear that a new president will take their guns away.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bloomberg, support, background, affect, supports, favor, everytown, virginia, causes, gun, companies, mike, checks, running, financial, industries, president


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Walmart CEO: We’ve seen ‘a little’ customer blow-back over our stricter gun and ammo policies

Walmart has seen “a little bit” of customer-dissatisfaction after the retailer tightened gun and ammunition policies in response to two fatal shootings over the summer at its stores, according to CEO Doug McMillon. The moves came after a July shooting at a Walmart store in Mississippi, where two people were killed, and another one in August at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, where 22 people were killed. Last week, the El Paso Walmart reopened with increased security. “But El Paso really thrust us i


Walmart has seen “a little bit” of customer-dissatisfaction after the retailer tightened gun and ammunition policies in response to two fatal shootings over the summer at its stores, according to CEO Doug McMillon.
The moves came after a July shooting at a Walmart store in Mississippi, where two people were killed, and another one in August at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, where 22 people were killed.
Last week, the El Paso Walmart reopened with increased security.
“But El Paso really thrust us i
Walmart CEO: We’ve seen ‘a little’ customer blow-back over our stricter gun and ammo policies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policies, little, weapons, weve, gun, seen, blowback, customer, paso, mcmillon, think, walmart, response, ceo, killed, ammunition, stricter


Walmart CEO: We've seen 'a little' customer blow-back over our stricter gun and ammo policies

Walmart has seen “a little bit” of customer-dissatisfaction after the retailer tightened gun and ammunition policies in response to two fatal shootings over the summer at its stores, according to CEO Doug McMillon.

“We think there needs to be change” in gun laws while also “protecting the rights of gun owners,” McMillon said Tuesday in an interview from CNBC’s Evolve Summit in Los Angeles awith “Squawk Box” co-host Becky Quick.

Back in September, Walmart announced it was discontinuing all sales of handguns as well as ammunition for handguns and ammunition for short-barrel rifles that can be used with military-style weapons. The nation’s largest retailer also asked its customers to stop openly carrying firearms, in the 26 states where “open carry” is legal.

The moves came after a July shooting at a Walmart store in Mississippi, where two people were killed, and another one in August at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, where 22 people were killed. Last week, the El Paso Walmart reopened with increased security.

McMillon, who said he grew up around guns and still owns them, believes he can see “all sides of this issue,” though it’s ultimately about safety.

In response, the National Rifle Association said, “Lines at Walmart will soon be replaced by lines at other retailers who are more supportive of America’s fundamental freedoms.”

Asked whether there’s been customer blow-back, McMillon told CNBC on Tuesday, “A little bit. But no, not much. I think most people understand that we’re not trying to make a political statement here. We’re just trying to help create a safer environment.”

On Monday, another deadly shooting happened outside of an Oklahoma Walmart. Authorities said a gunman killed two people and then himself in what appears to be a domestic dispute.

“It’s tragic, this most recent event. It looks like a personal situation played out in our parking lot,” McMillon said. “But El Paso really thrust us into a situation that we wouldn’t have anticipated.”

Following the summer shootings, Walmart faced backlash over what was perceived as a slow response to change its weapons policies.

McMillon, responding to that criticism, said Tuesday the company “took some time to think through what we needed to do.”

“Our first focus was on caring for the associates that were impacted and the customers’ families that were impacted and all the things related to that,” he added. “It’s a very divisive issue, obviously.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policies, little, weapons, weve, gun, seen, blowback, customer, paso, mcmillon, think, walmart, response, ceo, killed, ammunition, stricter


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Levi Strauss CEO Chip Bergh on taking big risks with the jeans brand

Jeans are displayed at a Levi Strauss store in New York, March 19, 2019. Shannon Stapleton | ReutersChip Bergh took over as CEO of Levi Strauss & Co. in 2011 when the “death of denim” was in. Levi Strauss had not performed well financially for a decade-and-a-half by the time Bergh took over. Levi Strauss & Co. CEO Chip Bergh speaks at the CNBC Evolve conference November 19th in Los Angeles. Walmart CEO Doug McMillon, speaking earlier in the day at CNBC Evolve, said that the status quo on gun con


Jeans are displayed at a Levi Strauss store in New York, March 19, 2019.
Shannon Stapleton | ReutersChip Bergh took over as CEO of Levi Strauss & Co. in 2011 when the “death of denim” was in.
Levi Strauss had not performed well financially for a decade-and-a-half by the time Bergh took over.
Levi Strauss & Co. CEO Chip Bergh speaks at the CNBC Evolve conference November 19th in Los Angeles.
Walmart CEO Doug McMillon, speaking earlier in the day at CNBC Evolve, said that the status quo on gun con
Levi Strauss CEO Chip Bergh on taking big risks with the jeans brand Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19  Authors: eric rosenbaum, jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, company, control, chip, jeans, taking, strauss, risks, bergh, stand, gun, levi, ceo, brand


Levi Strauss CEO Chip Bergh on taking big risks with the jeans brand

Jeans are displayed at a Levi Strauss store in New York, March 19, 2019. Shannon Stapleton | Reuters

Chip Bergh took over as CEO of Levi Strauss & Co. in 2011 when the “death of denim” was in. Bergh, who had a long career at Procter & Gamble, made the move even though many others saw it as a big risk. “People were saying ‘you only get to leave P&G once, make it count.'” Levi Strauss had not performed well financially for a decade-and-a-half by the time Bergh took over. But what made him take the risk was a chance for the self-proclaimed “brand guy” to tackle the ultimate brand problem: “A 166-year-old company. It was a way to make a mark and leave a legacy. I call it my noble cause, to get it back to where it was when I was a kid, when everyone had to have a pair of jeans,” Bergh said, speaking at the CNBC Evolve summit in Los Angeles on Tuesday. “It was one of greatest and most iconic brands in world and I was convinced if I could turn the brand around, I could turn around the company.” Bergh’s fundamental assessment of the company’s problem was about brand: “The brand had lost the plot. It wasn’t connecting with consumers.” “When it was at its best, it was at the center of culture,” the Levi Strauss CEO said, referencing kids on the Berlin Wall who were wearing Levi’s while knocking down the symbol of communism. “When I was a kid I asked my mom to drive two towns away to buy a pair of Levi’s for middle school.”

Levi Strauss & Co. CEO Chip Bergh speaks at the CNBC Evolve conference November 19th in Los Angeles. Jesse Grant | CNBC

Bergh ran into internal resistance as a non-apparel, non-retail person — he was associated with The Swiffer mop, among other P&G products. “There was a lot of suspicion,” he said. “Not many outsiders have been successful as apparel CEOs. I knew it would be a heavy lift, but it was clear to me we needed to change.” On his second day as CEO, Bergh held a company town hall — a practice he continues once a month — and asked Levi Strauss employees how many of them thought the company was performing. “Eighty percent of hands went up,” he said. That was even though the company’s sales had declined by billions. “My first job was to stare down the brutal facts and get people to embrace the brutal facts and then lay out the course for change.”

The big business shifts

Bergh made a few big business changes: cutting the company’s reliance on wholesalers and refocusing on women’s clothing. When he joined, the company was still roughly 60% U.S. sales and 50% of that was through big stores including Macy’s, Sears, Kohls, and JC Penney — all of which have experienced varying degrees of struggle in the current retail landscape. “The credit agencies were telling us we were too concentrated,” Bergh said. He didn’t want to give up on that core because it was profitable, but it was slow-growing. “I’d like to say I saw that wholesale would be challenged over time but it was more from a brand experience standpoint … we can control the consumer experience from e-commerce or Levi’s store.” The core, which was also focused on men’s clothing, “was necessary but not sufficient,” Bergh said. Now the women’s business is one of the company’s biggest growth engines, after having lost what had once been a strong source of growth. “We were the first brand to ever sell women’s jeans and athleisure was killing us.” Bergh said one of the problems he had to reverse was a focus on sales of women’s jeans exclusively when shopping data shows that five tops are sold for every bottom. The turnaround led to a successful initial public offering earlier this year, though the stock has given back its early gains and is trading around its IPO price of $17.

Values and profits

Before he could make the actual business changes, one of Bergh’s first tasks was to find out what Levi Strauss leaders thought about him — and feared about him taking over. Bergh did a listening tour of 60 company leaders, asking each to answer six questions, including “What are you afraid I might do?” After 15 of the 60 interviews, Bergh said it was clear what the biggest worry was: “I didn’t need to do the next 45. It was clear; the big picture was that we would walk away from our values.”

Young consumers today are so socially aware, social media aware, they read through [BS] and if a brand doesn’t act, if the words and pictures don’t go together, that brand is in trouble.

Among the investor community, ahead of the initial public offering that Bergh oversaw earlier this year, the biggest fear was on the flip side — that values would get in the way of profits. Bergh made it clear to investors that the company would not be reticent to take a stand on important social issues, such as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Bergh said gun control was a trickier issue for the company because it did not have a history of taking a stance. “We have an established framework with the board on issues we will take a stand on … but gun control was new one and it was the Parkland shooting that got to the tipping point and felt we needed to take a stand.” Bergh stressed that taking a stand on gun control did not mean supporting a repeal of the 2nd Amendment and noted that as a former U.S. Army officer, “I fired weapons and know what they can do to a human body.” Walmart CEO Doug McMillon, speaking earlier in the day at CNBC Evolve, said that the status quo on gun control was unacceptable. “Places of safety are no longer safe, and that’s the big issue for society, if kids can’t go to school without being worried. My daughter does more lockdown drills than earthquake drills and I live in San Francisco,” Bergh said In the company’s first year of operations, Levi Strauss (the individual) had donated a portion of sales to an orphanage. Bergh said there’s always a risk associated with taking a stand but one example he looks back in is when Levi’s pulled financial supports for the Boy Scouts of America in the 1990s after the organization banned gay troop leaders. “It was questionable at the time” Bergh said, from the standpoints of the risks to the business, noting that 97% of the letters — and there were many — that the company received were customers saying they would boycott the brand. “Look back 20 years later and we were on the right side. The Boy Scouts have dropped the name ‘boy’ and welcome gay troop leaders.” On gun control, “Momentum is clearly on the side of the federal government taking action to make the world a safer place,” he said.

China


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19  Authors: eric rosenbaum, jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, company, control, chip, jeans, taking, strauss, risks, bergh, stand, gun, levi, ceo, brand


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How to tell if you’re invested in gun stocks

Scott Olson | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesEven if you haven’t actively been seeking gun stocks, you could still be an investor in them. Stocks to look forThere are two gun manufacturers that are publicly traded U.S. companies: American Outdoor Brands, parent of gunmaker Smith & Wesson, and Sturm, Ruger & Co. You could own a total market index fund, extended market fund or a small cap index fund that includes those two companies, Hale said. A traditional S&P 500 index fund would focus on larg


Scott Olson | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesEven if you haven’t actively been seeking gun stocks, you could still be an investor in them.
Stocks to look forThere are two gun manufacturers that are publicly traded U.S. companies: American Outdoor Brands, parent of gunmaker Smith & Wesson, and Sturm, Ruger & Co.
You could own a total market index fund, extended market fund or a small cap index fund that includes those two companies, Hale said.
A traditional S&P 500 index fund would focus on larg
How to tell if you’re invested in gun stocks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tell, gun, index, stocks, companies, funds, fund, outdoor, small, company, youre, exposure, invested, weapons


How to tell if you're invested in gun stocks

A customer shops for a pistol at Freddie Bear Sports sporting goods store on December 17, 2012 in Tinley Park, Illinois. Scott Olson | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Even if you haven’t actively been seeking gun stocks, you could still be an investor in them. Many companies have ties to weapons, either directly or indirectly. And just owning a general index or mutual fund could give you some exposure — even in a retirement fund like your 401(k). There are some signs to look for to assess whether you are supporting the gun industry through your investments.

Stocks to look for

There are two gun manufacturers that are publicly traded U.S. companies: American Outdoor Brands, parent of gunmaker Smith & Wesson, and Sturm, Ruger & Co. Notably, American Outdoor announced this week that it plans to split into two publicly traded companies. The deal will separate its Smith & Wesson unit from the company’s outdoor products and accessories business. The company’s stockholders will own both companies and be able to decide on their investments after the separation. One other publicly traded company, Vista Outdoor, sold two firearms brands, Savage Arms and Stevens, in July. The company still manufactures ammunition.

Both American Outdoor and Ruger are small capitalization companies. To be invested in those, you would have to own a fund with exposure to small cap stocks, according to Jon Hale, head of sustainable investing research at Morningstar. Those holdings could come in a variety of forms. You could own a total market index fund, extended market fund or a small cap index fund that includes those two companies, Hale said. “Chances are, if you are an investor who has small cap exposure and it’s an index fund, you’re going to have exposure to those two companies,” Hale said. In contrast, actively managed funds that include small caps are less likely to invest in either company. Out of 500 funds in that category, just 32 included Ruger and 24 had positions in American Outdoor Brands, according to Hale’s research. A traditional S&P 500 index fund would focus on larger cap stocks, and therefore is not likely to include those companies.

How funds score

That doesn’t necessarily mean that you don’t have financial ties to guns or weapons, said Andrew Behar, CEO of As You Sow, a non-profit foundation focused on corporate social responsibility. Behar’s company provides a website, Weapon Free Funds, where you can see how specific funds score on weapons exposure. A search for a traditional S&P 500 fund, the SPDR S&P 500 ETF, for example, shows that it is exposed to 17 weapons stocks, including 16 with ties to military contractors and one to civilian firearms. The top holdings with exposure to weapons, in terms of dollars invested, include Berkshire Hathaway Inc., Boeing Co. and Walmart Inc.

Ways to limit exposure


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tell, gun, index, stocks, companies, funds, fund, outdoor, small, company, youre, exposure, invested, weapons


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