Gun control groups spend over $2 million on ads since recent mass shootings, while NRA talks to Trump

Demonstrators protest the visit of US President Donald Trump to the site of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on August 7, 2019. Gun control advocacy groups have dedicated more than $2 million on digital and TV ads, widely outspending the National Rifle Association, since the mass shootings weeks ago in California, Texas and Ohio that left more than 30 dead. Gun control advocates say the NRA may not spend as much for lobbying going forward because they have Trump’s ear. Everytown for Gun Safety


Demonstrators protest the visit of US President Donald Trump to the site of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on August 7, 2019. Gun control advocacy groups have dedicated more than $2 million on digital and TV ads, widely outspending the National Rifle Association, since the mass shootings weeks ago in California, Texas and Ohio that left more than 30 dead. Gun control advocates say the NRA may not spend as much for lobbying going forward because they have Trump’s ear. Everytown for Gun Safety
Gun control groups spend over $2 million on ads since recent mass shootings, while NRA talks to Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spent, ads, gun, million, control, mass, spend, shootings, recent, nra, ad, tv, groups, shooting, trump, talks


Gun control groups spend over $2 million on ads since recent mass shootings, while NRA talks to Trump

Demonstrators protest the visit of US President Donald Trump to the site of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on August 7, 2019.

Gun control advocacy groups have dedicated more than $2 million on digital and TV ads, widely outspending the National Rifle Association, since the mass shootings weeks ago in California, Texas and Ohio that left more than 30 dead.

Everytown for Gun Safety — funded mostly by Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire and former New York mayor — is leading the way with a $935,000 ad campaign. Its digital and TV ads call on Congress to require tougher background checks for gun sales along with strong red-flag laws, which are meant to take firearms away from those deemed a threat to themselves or others.

The NRA has spent just $14,000 on Facebook ads since last week. Instead, the group focused its recent advocacy on tweeting and being in direct contact with President Donald Trump.

Gun control advocates say the NRA may not spend as much for lobbying going forward because they have Trump’s ear.

“There is not a response from them to counter the overwhelming push from the American people, politicians and activists on this issue,” said Andrew Patrick, media director at the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence. “In the past, they get their lobbying going. Now they can call the president and he can prepare their talking points.”

The spate of shootings has given organizations calling for tighter gun laws new momentum, particularly as big-money backers such as Bloomberg look to counter the decades-long influence the NRA has exerted on Capitol Hill.

Everytown for Gun Safety’s campaign focuses largely on Republican senators who have resisted calls for tighter gun control. They include Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, of Kentucky, and Sens. Marco Rubio and Rick Scott, both of Florida, Richard Burr, of North Carolina, and John Cornyn, of Texas. Most of these lawmakers have previously received NRA contributions. The ads will start airing next week and will continue through the August recess.

Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, which is part of the Everytown group, says Senate lawmakers will have to listen or expect to face tough reelection battles.

“We’re hopeful that the Senate will act, but if they don’t there will be hell to pay in 2020,” Watts told CNBC on Thursday. “We are having our events in all 50 states, and it’s really important that senators in red, blue and purple states listen to these constituents,” she added. The organization is also spending $65,000 on nationwide rallies that are scheduled to take place this weekend.

A Fox News poll taken Aug. 11-13 showed that 90% of participants support requiring all potential gun buyers to go through a criminal background check, while 81% said they’d like red-flag laws.

Sandy Hook Promise, a nonprofit organization created by the families of victims of the 2012 gun massacre at an elementary school in Connecticut, has spent just over $300,000 on Facebook ads since Aug. 7, according to the company’s ad library. The most recent ad shows a boy named Dylan, who was killed during the mass shooting, and calls on Congress to limit the size of gun magazines.

Only billionaire and presidential candidate Tom Steyer, with more than $900,000 in ads over the past seven days, has spent more than Sandy Hook Promise on Facebook ads.

Ban Assault Weapons NOW, a nonprofit whose leadership includes survivors of various mass shootings, has spent just over $90,000 on ads since this summer’s mass shootings. Its latest message calls for people to sign its petition urging a ban on assault weapons in Florida. It also criticizes Congress for its inaction on gun laws and its members’ ties to the NRA.

A gun control advocacy group founded by former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who was shot in the head during a mass shooting in Arizona in 2011, has launched a $750,000 TV ad campaign. It will call for McConnell and Sen. Cory Gardner, of Colorado, to support background-check legislation.

While the NRA hasn’t spent much recently, it has used other means to get its message across.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spent, ads, gun, million, control, mass, spend, shootings, recent, nra, ad, tv, groups, shooting, trump, talks


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One California police officer killed, two injured in Riverside gun battle

China fixes its yuan midpoint at 7.0326 per dollar, stronger than…Analysts were predicting the midpoint to be set at 7.0421 per dollar after the yuan last traded at 7.0578 in Monday’s session, according to Reuters estimates. China Economyread more


China fixes its yuan midpoint at 7.0326 per dollar, stronger than…Analysts were predicting the midpoint to be set at 7.0421 per dollar after the yuan last traded at 7.0578 in Monday’s session, according to Reuters estimates. China Economyread more
One California police officer killed, two injured in Riverside gun battle Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: joanna tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mondays, riverside, yuan, midpoint, dollar, set, officer, injured, gun, killed, traded, thananalysts, stronger, session, predicting, battle, california


One California police officer killed, two injured in Riverside gun battle

China fixes its yuan midpoint at 7.0326 per dollar, stronger than…

Analysts were predicting the midpoint to be set at 7.0421 per dollar after the yuan last traded at 7.0578 in Monday’s session, according to Reuters estimates.

China Economy

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: joanna tan
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Trump says he’s talking to congressional leaders about ‘meaningful’ gun background checks

President Donald Trump said Friday he is talking to congressional leaders about “meaningful” background checks in the wake of two shooting massacres that rocked the country. Speaking to reporters later Friday as he left the White House for fundraising events in the Hamptons, Trump said he wants “intelligent background checks.” Trump said “we have tremendous support for really common sense, sensible, important background checks.” In February, the chamber passed the measure, which would require ba


President Donald Trump said Friday he is talking to congressional leaders about “meaningful” background checks in the wake of two shooting massacres that rocked the country. Speaking to reporters later Friday as he left the White House for fundraising events in the Hamptons, Trump said he wants “intelligent background checks.” Trump said “we have tremendous support for really common sense, sensible, important background checks.” In February, the chamber passed the measure, which would require ba
Trump says he’s talking to congressional leaders about ‘meaningful’ gun background checks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gun, house, leaders, pass, hes, senate, checks, talking, president, support, trump, background, congressional, meaningful, laws, red


Trump says he's talking to congressional leaders about 'meaningful' gun background checks

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the press before departing from the White House en route to Dayton, Ohio and El Paso, Texas on August 7, 2019 in Washington, DC.

In a pair of tweets, the president acknowledged he has spoken not only to top lawmakers but also the influential National Rifle Association “so that their very strong views can be fully represented and respected.” While Trump did not say what specific measures he would support, the president said he wants to keep guns away from “mentally ill or deranged people.”

President Donald Trump said Friday he is talking to congressional leaders about “meaningful” background checks in the wake of two shooting massacres that rocked the country.

“I am the biggest Second Amendment person there is, but we all must work together for the good and safety of our Country. Common sense things can be done that are good for everyone!” he tweeted.

Speaking to reporters later Friday as he left the White House for fundraising events in the Hamptons, Trump said he wants “intelligent background checks.” He added that he spoke to Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who is “totally on board.” Trump said “we have tremendous support for really common sense, sensible, important background checks.”

Pressure on Congress to pass gun control measures has mounted following mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayon, Ohio, that killed 31 people. Calls for tighter restrictions on guns rise after U.S. shooting massacres but rarely lead to legal changes in Washington.

On Thursday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wrote a letter to Trump pushing him to bring the Senate back from its August recess to pass House-approved universal background check legislation. In February, the chamber passed the measure, which would require background checks for all firearms sales, including those on the internet and at gun shows.

In a joint statement Thursday night, Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said they separately spoke to the president about gun control. The two Democrats said he assured them he would review the House background check plan.

In a Kentucky radio interview Thursday, McConnell said he would not bring his chamber back from its August recess. However, he said he would have a conversation around background checks, so-called red flag laws or a possible assault weapons ban when Congress returned.

Earlier this week, Trump indicated support for red flag laws — which would take guns away from people believed to pose dangers to themselves or others. Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., are working on a proposal to create a federal grant program to encourage states to pass red flag laws.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gun, house, leaders, pass, hes, senate, checks, talking, president, support, trump, background, congressional, meaningful, laws, red


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Pelosi urges Trump to call Senate back into session to consider gun legislation

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, speaks to members of the media while departing a House Democratic Caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., March 26, 2019. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sent a letter to President Donald Trump on Thursday urging him to bring Senate lawmakers back into session to consider gun legislation following a weekend of devastating shootings. Pelosi’s letter comes in the wake of two deadly shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, as


U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, speaks to members of the media while departing a House Democratic Caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., March 26, 2019. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sent a letter to President Donald Trump on Thursday urging him to bring Senate lawmakers back into session to consider gun legislation following a weekend of devastating shootings. Pelosi’s letter comes in the wake of two deadly shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, as
Pelosi urges Trump to call Senate back into session to consider gun legislation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gun, session, legislation, letter, consider, bring, house, urges, pass, senate, pelosi, president, trump, democratic


Pelosi urges Trump to call Senate back into session to consider gun legislation

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, speaks to members of the media while departing a House Democratic Caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., March 26, 2019.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sent a letter to President Donald Trump on Thursday urging him to bring Senate lawmakers back into session to consider gun legislation following a weekend of devastating shootings.

Pelosi’s letter comes in the wake of two deadly shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, as well as gun violence in Chicago.

“Mr. President, we have an opportunity to work in a bipartisan way to pass gun violence prevention background checks,” Pelosi, D- Calif., said in her letter. “This extraordinary moment in our history requires all of us to take extraordinary action to save lives.”

Earlier this week, House Democrats sent a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office urging him to bring the Senate back into session to pass two bills expanding universal background checks and closing gun show loopholes. So far, McConnell, R-Ky., has not brought the legislation up for a vote.

“In February, the new Democratic House Majority took swift action to pass these bipartisan bills which not only save lives, but also has the support of more than 90 percent of the American people,” the letter, which was signed by over 200 Democratic members, said, “This inaction must stop.”

Trump said Wednesday that he would bring lawmakers back to Washington from their August recess if Republicans and Democrats can “get close” on a gun reform proposal.

“If we get close, I will bring them back, but it has to be — you know, we have to see where we are with leadership,” the president told reporters. “Normally, this has been really a decision — Congress gets together and they try to do something, but if you look over the last 30 years, not a lot has been done.”

McConnell has said he will not bring Congress back into session early from its August recess, but on a Kentucky radio show Thursday said he is willing to have the conversation on red flag laws, background checks and even assault weapons bans.

“We want to see if we can achieve something on a bipartisan basis. I don’t want to just engage in finger-pointing or making a point,” McConnell said. “What has happened after every one of these shootings has been a temptation to just engage in political discourse rather than actually passing something.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gun, session, legislation, letter, consider, bring, house, urges, pass, senate, pelosi, president, trump, democratic


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Visa CEO: Unlike PayPal and Square, we won’t block gun purchases

Visa will continue to facilitate gun purchases as long as it is legal for people to buy firearms, the chief executive of the credit card giant told CNBC on Wednesday. Payment companies PayPal and Square do not allow their services to be used for gun sales. Kelly is not the only credit card company CEO to voice the challenges of regulating gun purchases. Meanwhile, Alan Patricof, founder of venture capital firm Greycroft, spoke out earlier this week in favor of tighter gun control laws. While Vis


Visa will continue to facilitate gun purchases as long as it is legal for people to buy firearms, the chief executive of the credit card giant told CNBC on Wednesday. Payment companies PayPal and Square do not allow their services to be used for gun sales. Kelly is not the only credit card company CEO to voice the challenges of regulating gun purchases. Meanwhile, Alan Patricof, founder of venture capital firm Greycroft, spoke out earlier this week in favor of tighter gun control laws. While Vis
Visa CEO: Unlike PayPal and Square, we won’t block gun purchases Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: jasmine kim, matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gun, kelly, shouldnt, weve, ceo, continue, buy, square, paypal, company, purchases, unlike, visa, wont, block, laws


Visa CEO: Unlike PayPal and Square, we won't block gun purchases

Visa will continue to facilitate gun purchases as long as it is legal for people to buy firearms, the chief executive of the credit card giant told CNBC on Wednesday.

“We are guided by the federal laws in a country, and our job is to create and to facilitate fair and secure commerce,” said Visa Chairman and CEO Alfred Kelly, the latest corporate leader to address the issue of gun control after the deadly weekend mass shootings in Texas and Ohio.

Payment companies PayPal and Square do not allow their services to be used for gun sales.

Kelly said it is the legislators who “need to do their job,” and Visa’s stance as a payment processor for gun purchases hasn’t changed over the past year.

“The reality is that it’s very hard for us to do it. … If we start to get in the mode of being legislators it’s a very slippery slope,” Kelly said. “We shouldn’t be determining what’s right or wrong in terms of people’s purchases.”

The company will continue to “follow the laws of the land,” he added.

“We shouldn’t tell people they can’t purchase a 32-ounce soda. We shouldn’t tell people they can’t buy reproductive drugs,” Kelly said.

Kelly is not the only credit card company CEO to voice the challenges of regulating gun purchases.

Ajay Banga, CEO of Mastercard, said it is not his company’s place to dictate what consumers can and cannot buy, according to a Bloomberg article. Banga does not think personal beliefs should guide how he operates his company’s networks.

Meanwhile, Alan Patricof, founder of venture capital firm Greycroft, spoke out earlier this week in favor of tighter gun control laws. He told CNBC that more company leaders need to “come out and massively say, ‘We’ve got to do something about this.'”

Another CEO speaking out is Apple’s Tim Cook. He tweeted that he’s “heartbroken” over the shootings that happened in El Paso and Dayton last weekend.

While Visa will continue to allow its customers to buy and sell guns, Kelly called out policymakers.

“They ought to get busy on some common sense changes to deal with the horrific problems that we’ve seen in the United States, not just this weekend but for years and years,” he said. “It’s time to start looking at mental health, the size of these magazines, the type of weapons. They’ve got to do something.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: jasmine kim, matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gun, kelly, shouldnt, weve, ceo, continue, buy, square, paypal, company, purchases, unlike, visa, wont, block, laws


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Trump visits Dayton, Ohio after mass shooting that shocked country

Demonstrators protest the visit of US President Donald Trump to the site of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on August 7, 2019. The El Paso massacre is being investigated as a hate crime and the FBI said the Dayton shooter had explored violent ideologies. It admonished Trump for calling El Paso one of the country’s most dangerous cities in his February State of the Union address. “The violence that pierced El Paso, drawing you here today, is not of our own community,” wrote editor Tim Archulet


Demonstrators protest the visit of US President Donald Trump to the site of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on August 7, 2019. The El Paso massacre is being investigated as a hate crime and the FBI said the Dayton shooter had explored violent ideologies. It admonished Trump for calling El Paso one of the country’s most dangerous cities in his February State of the Union address. “The violence that pierced El Paso, drawing you here today, is not of our own community,” wrote editor Tim Archulet
Trump visits Dayton, Ohio after mass shooting that shocked country Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, el, white, protesters, visits, country, texas, paso, city, dayton, shocked, mass, ohio, gun, trump, shooting


Trump visits Dayton, Ohio after mass shooting that shocked country

Demonstrators protest the visit of US President Donald Trump to the site of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on August 7, 2019.

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday visited the Ohio city that suffered one of last weekend’s two deadly mass shootings that shocked the country, even as critics and protesters accused him of inflaming tensions with anti-immigrant and racially charged rhetoric.

Trump visited survivors, first responders and staff at Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton, Ohio, where nine people and the suspect were killed in a rampage early on Sunday.

Dozens of protesters outside the hospital set up a “baby Trump” blimp balloon and held signs reading “Do Something,” “Save our city,” and “You are why.”

Later in the day, Trump will visit the Texas city of El Paso, on the border with Mexico, where 22 people were killed at a Walmart store on Saturday by a 21-year-old man who had posted an anti-immigrant manifesto online.

The back-to-back massacres, occurring 13 hours apart, have reopened the national debate over gun safety and led protesters in Dayton to heckle Ohio’s Republican governor, Mike DeWine, at a vigil for the shooting victims with chants of “Do something!”

As he left the White House, Trump said he wanted to strengthen background checks for gun purchases and make sure mentally ill people did not carry guns. He predicted congressional support for those two measures but not for banning assault rifles.

“I can tell you that there is no political appetite for that at this moment,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “But I will certainly bring that up … There is a great appetite, and I mean a very strong appetite, for background checks.”

In Dayton, Trump was greeted at the airport by a bipartisan group of state and local officials, including Democratic Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, who had said she would welcome Trump but planned to tell him he had been “unhelpful” on the issue of gun violence.

Critics have said Trump stokes violence with racially incendiary rhetoric. The El Paso massacre is being investigated as a hate crime and the FBI said the Dayton shooter had explored violent ideologies.

On Monday, Trump gave a speech focusing on mental health reforms, tighter internet regulation and wider use of the death penalty. Democrats accuse Trump of hiding behind talk of mental illness and the influence of social media rather than committing to laws they insist are needed to restrict gun ownership and the types of weapons that are legal.

In Iowa, Democratic presidential front-runner Joe Biden planned to say in a campaign speech, “We have a president with a toxic tongue who has publicly and unapologetically embraced a political strategy of hate, racism, and division.”

In a sign of higher tensions after the shootings, a motorcycle backfiring on Tuesday night in New York’s Times Square sent crowds running for fear of another gun attack.

“People are obviously very frightened,” New York Governor Andrew Cuomo told CNN.

Authorities in Texas have said they are investigating Saturday’s shooting spree in the predominantly Hispanic west Texas border city of El Paso as a hate crime and an act of domestic terrorism. They cited a racist manifesto posted online shortly before the shooting, which they attributed to the suspect.

An open letter to Trump on Wednesday in the El Paso Times described the border city as having “a deep tradition of racial harmony” whose people came together after the tragedy. It admonished Trump for calling El Paso one of the country’s most dangerous cities in his February State of the Union address.

“The violence that pierced El Paso, drawing you here today, is not of our own community,” wrote editor Tim Archuleta. “An outsider came here to shatter our city, to murder our neighbors. A white man from another Texas city came to target the more than 80% of us who share Hispanic roots.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, el, white, protesters, visits, country, texas, paso, city, dayton, shocked, mass, ohio, gun, trump, shooting


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Trump says he’ll call Congress back to Washington if GOP and Dems get ‘close’ on gun reform plan

US President Donald Trump speaks to the press as he departs the White House in Washington, DC, on August 7 2019. And let’s say all good people, but two sides are very different,” Trump told reporters outside the White House. “I’m looking to do background checks, I think background checks are important,” he said. He added that “I think both Republicans and Democrats are getting close” to “doing something on background checks.” Neither a spokesman for McConnell nor the White House immediately resp


US President Donald Trump speaks to the press as he departs the White House in Washington, DC, on August 7 2019. And let’s say all good people, but two sides are very different,” Trump told reporters outside the White House. “I’m looking to do background checks, I think background checks are important,” he said. He added that “I think both Republicans and Democrats are getting close” to “doing something on background checks.” Neither a spokesman for McConnell nor the White House immediately resp
Trump says he’ll call Congress back to Washington if GOP and Dems get ‘close’ on gun reform plan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: kevin breuninger, jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, white, congress, reform, washington, background, dems, president, house, texas, checks, senate, gun, trump, close, gop, hell


Trump says he'll call Congress back to Washington if GOP and Dems get 'close' on gun reform plan

US President Donald Trump speaks to the press as he departs the White House in Washington, DC, on August 7 2019.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that he will bring lawmakers back to Washington from their August recess if Republicans and Democrats can “get close” on a gun reform proposal.

Trump, en route to visit the Ohio and Texas cities in which back-to-back mass shootings over the weekend left 31 dead, also pledged his support for background checks and “red flag” laws preventing mentally ill people from accessing firearms.

“We’re going to see where we are. We’re dealing with leadership right now. And you know, you have two sides that are very different on this issue. And let’s say all good people, but two sides are very different,” Trump told reporters outside the White House.

“If we get close, I will bring them back, but it has to be — you know, we have to see where we are with leadership. Normally, this has been really a decision — Congress gets together and they try to do something, but if you look over the last 30 years, not a lot has been done,” Trump said.

The president and first lady Melania Trump were traveling to Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, to meet with first responders, survivors and victims’ families following the two deadly mass shootings. Some Democrats, including presidential candidates such as former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, have said that Trump’s rhetoric bears at least some of the blame for the shootings.

Trump tweeted in response that O’Rourke “should respect the victims & law enforcement – & be quiet!”

A gunman toting an AK-47-style assault rifle and extra magazines of ammunition killed 22 people and injured dozens more at an El Paso Walmart on Saturday morning, after apparently posting a racist screed on an anonymous online messaging board. Police have detained suspect Patrick Crusius, a 21-year-old white male.

The Dayton gunman, armed with an AR 15-style rifle, killed nine people in an entertainment district hours later, including his own sister. That shooter, identified as 24-year-old Connor Betts, was killed by officers less than a minute after his attack began, police said.

Trump told reporters Wednesday that he supported background checks for gun purchases.

“I’m looking to do background checks, I think background checks are important,” he said. “I don’t want to put guns into the hands of mentally unstable people or people with rage or hate, sick people. I’m all in favor of it.”

He added that “I think both Republicans and Democrats are getting close” to “doing something on background checks.”

In fact, the Democrat-led House passed a gun control bill that would strengthen background checks months earlier, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has not brought the legislation to the Senate for a vote.

In a statement Monday, McConnell said that “Only serious, bipartisan, bicameral efforts will enable us to continue this important work and produce further legislation that can pass the Senate, pass the House, and earn the president’s signature. Partisan theatrics and campaign-trail rhetoric will only take us farther away from the progress all Americans deserve.”

Neither a spokesman for McConnell nor the White House immediately responded to CNBC’s inquiries about the president’s comments.

Many Republicans have signaled their support for red flag laws, also known as extreme risk protection orders. But Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said in a statement Wednesday that without “strong universal background checks” in place, red flag laws alone “won’t be fully effective.”

“The notion that passing a tepid version of an Extreme Risk Protection Order (ERPO) bill—alone—is even close to getting the job done in addressing rampant gun violence in the U.S. is wrong and would be an ineffective cop out,” Schumer said.

Trump also said there was no “political appetite” for legislation to ban assault weapons. A federal assault weapons ban had been signed into law in 1994 by President Bill Clinton, but was allowed to expire in 2004 under President George W. Bush.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: kevin breuninger, jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, white, congress, reform, washington, background, dems, president, house, texas, checks, senate, gun, trump, close, gop, hell


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Walmart employees call for walkout over gun sales

Walmart employees pay their respects at a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims, at the Cielo Vista Mall Walmart in El Paso, Texas, on August 6, 2019. “We are all concerned employees, and Walmart says it values the outlook of its employees,” Marshall told NBC News. “Our focus has been on our associates and the entire El Paso community.” Assisting Marshall with gun sales protest efforts is another Walmart employee, Kate Kesner. Gun control advocates have argued that Walmart should discontin


Walmart employees pay their respects at a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims, at the Cielo Vista Mall Walmart in El Paso, Texas, on August 6, 2019. “We are all concerned employees, and Walmart says it values the outlook of its employees,” Marshall told NBC News. “Our focus has been on our associates and the entire El Paso community.” Assisting Marshall with gun sales protest efforts is another Walmart employee, Kate Kesner. Gun control advocates have argued that Walmart should discontin
Walmart employees call for walkout over gun sales Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: mary pflum, andrew kozak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shooting, ammunition, sales, suspended, shootings, el, walmart, guns, paso, employees, marshall, gun, walkout


Walmart employees call for walkout over gun sales

Walmart employees pay their respects at a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims, at the Cielo Vista Mall Walmart in El Paso, Texas, on August 6, 2019. – The August 3 shooting left 22 people dead. US President Donald Trump will visit the Texan border city August 7, and will also travel to Dayton, Ohio where a second mass shooting early August 4 left another nine dead

In the wake of the weekend’s deadly shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, a pair of Walmart employees are joining a number of gun control advocates, questioning the retail chain’s sale of guns and ammunition and encouraging other employees to join in their protest.

Thomas Marshall, 23, a Walmart employee based in San Bruno, California, used email and internal Walmart Slack channels to reach out to fellow employees this week, encouraging them to call in sick Tuesday, to take part in a walkout Wednesday and to sign a Change.org petition that calls for an end to the sale of guns and ammunition in all Walmart stores.

“We are all concerned employees, and Walmart says it values the outlook of its employees,” Marshall told NBC News. “We feel as if we can make a noticeable difference.”

Marshall said he’s troubled by Walmart’s decision to continue to sell firearms, even after the mass shooting in one of its own stores in El Paso killed at least 22 Saturday.

“If I do wind up getting fired for this, that is a risk I am willing to take,” Marshall said on MSNBC on Wednesday.

According to Walmart spokesperson Randy Hargrove, approximately half of the 4,700 Walmarts in the United States sell guns and many more sell ammunition. Hargrove said that there are no plans to change the retail giant’s policies since the weekend shootings or as a result of Marshall’s call for an employee walkout.

“There’s been no change to our policy regarding firearms,” Hargrove said. “Our focus has been on our associates and the entire El Paso community.”

Assisting Marshall with gun sales protest efforts is another Walmart employee, Kate Kesner.

Kesner and Marshall said that their work accounts were disabled by Walmart after they attempted to organize the protests.

Hargrove confirmed that those company accounts had been suspended and would remain suspended until the employees return to work. He said Marshall has not been suspended or terminated as a result of his recent activities.

Marshall said that he has received widespread support for his protest efforts, and that walkouts were expected to take place Wednesday at the Walmart labs in Portland, Oregon; the Walmart-owned Jet.com e-commerce office in Hoboken, New Jersey; and at his Walmart office location in San Bruno.

Gun control advocates have argued that Walmart should discontinue the sale of all guns and ammunition in the wake of the growing number of mass shootings.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: mary pflum, andrew kozak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shooting, ammunition, sales, suspended, shootings, el, walmart, guns, paso, employees, marshall, gun, walkout


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Texas Democratic Rep. Henry Cuellar doesn’t plan to give away NRA donation in aftermath of gun massacres

And at least one of them, Rep. Henry Cuellar of Texas, doesn’t plan on giving the money back, despite his party’s opposition to the gun lobby. Cuellar received $6,950 in donations from the NRA Political Victory Fund during his reelection campaign last year. Veteran Democratic strategist Mary Anne Marsh went further and said any member of her party that accepts NRA money should not be serving in congress. In addition to Cuellar, Democrats who received money from the NRA last cycle include Rep. Co


And at least one of them, Rep. Henry Cuellar of Texas, doesn’t plan on giving the money back, despite his party’s opposition to the gun lobby. Cuellar received $6,950 in donations from the NRA Political Victory Fund during his reelection campaign last year. Veteran Democratic strategist Mary Anne Marsh went further and said any member of her party that accepts NRA money should not be serving in congress. In addition to Cuellar, Democrats who received money from the NRA last cycle include Rep. Co
Texas Democratic Rep. Henry Cuellar doesn’t plan to give away NRA donation in aftermath of gun massacres Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, republicans, background, money, henry, massacres, gun, plan, nra, donation, democratic, rep, received, texas, reelection, doesnt


Texas Democratic Rep. Henry Cuellar doesn't plan to give away NRA donation in aftermath of gun massacres

The recent mass shootings in California, Texas and Ohio have prompted Democrats to launch fresh broadsides against the National Rifle Association. Yet the NRA, which typically donates to Republicans, has actually donated to a few Democratic politicians.

And at least one of them, Rep. Henry Cuellar of Texas, doesn’t plan on giving the money back, despite his party’s opposition to the gun lobby.

“Why would he do that?” said Cuellar’s campaign spokesman, Colin Strother, when asked whether the lawmaker will return an NRA donation or give it to charity. Cuellar received $6,950 in donations from the NRA Political Victory Fund during his reelection campaign last year. He has received thousands of dollars in donations from the group since he was elected to Congress over a decade ago.

Strother also defended his boss’s record on supporting the expansion of background checks and noted that he helped pass the Fix NICS Act, which would require federal agencies to report criminal convictions to the attorney general. Those convictions are put into a background check system.

Cuellar recently voted in favor of H.R. 8, a bipartisan bill that would create new background check requirements for gun transfers between unlicensed individuals. The NRA has been against universal background checks and has been actively lobbying against the bill.

“Contributions of any size have never and will never influence his policy positions. He votes based on what’s best for his district, and that includes Fix NICS and background checks.” Strother said. “The people of El Paso, Sutherland Springs and all over the country deserve more than symbolic gestures, they deserve a vote in the Senate on background checks.”

Cuellar’s 28th district is home to Sutherland Springs, Texas, the site of a 2017 church shooting in which more than 20 people were killed.

In 2019, 62 people in the United States have been killed due to mass shootings, according to a tally by Time.

Democratic strategists believe it is time for the few members of the party who have accepted money from the NRA to give it away or risk losing their seats.

“The Democrats won’t do that, stupidly, because they will look too liberal,” political strategist Hank Sheinkopf told CNBC. “If you don’t give it back, you will have to explain the position. The explanation in the position is really inexplainable after an event like this.”

Veteran Democratic strategist Mary Anne Marsh went further and said any member of her party that accepts NRA money should not be serving in congress.

“Not one Democrat should take one dime from the NRA,” she said. “With domestic terrorism on the rise and guns the weapons of choice to slaughter Americans, if you aren’t doing everything to end gun violence then you don’t deserve to serve in congress. Taking money from the NRA won’t end gun violence but it will end your political career in 2020.”

In addition to Cuellar, Democrats who received money from the NRA last cycle include Rep. Collin Peterson of Minnesota and Rep. Sanford Bishop of Georgia. All three are up for reelection in 2020. The offices of Peterson and Bishop did not respond to questions about whether the congressmen would let go of the NRA donations in the wake of the shootings.

The NRA has mainly backed Republicans running for congress. Just under $700,000 from the NRA’s affiliated PAC’s was disbursed to various candidates during the 2018 midterms, according to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics. At least 98% of NRA contributions went to Republicans that cycle.

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, received $9,000 from the NRA’s PAC during his reelection campaign last year. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, who is up for reelection next year, received $4,950 from the PAC in March, according to a Federal Election Commission record. Representatives for Cruz and Cornyn did not respond to questions on whether they plan to give away the NRA money.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, republicans, background, money, henry, massacres, gun, plan, nra, donation, democratic, rep, received, texas, reelection, doesnt


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2020 Democratic candidates announce plans to combat gun violence, white nationalism following El Paso, Dayton massacres

Callaghan O’Hare | ReutersIn the wake of the weekend massacres in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, 2020 Democratic presidential candidates are pushing proposals to curb gun violence. Buttigieg’s plan would provide $1 billion to augment law enforcement and intelligence efforts to address white nationalism and emphasizes closer monitoring of and cooperation with social media platforms to track and eliminate such groups. Inslee’s 10-point approachInslee also announced a plan to address white nation


Callaghan O’Hare | ReutersIn the wake of the weekend massacres in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, 2020 Democratic presidential candidates are pushing proposals to curb gun violence. Buttigieg’s plan would provide $1 billion to augment law enforcement and intelligence efforts to address white nationalism and emphasizes closer monitoring of and cooperation with social media platforms to track and eliminate such groups. Inslee’s 10-point approachInslee also announced a plan to address white nation
2020 Democratic candidates announce plans to combat gun violence, white nationalism following El Paso, Dayton massacres Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: marc rod elizabeth myong, marc rod, elizabeth myong, tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weapons, paso, el, buttigieg, democratic, nationalism, massacres, plan, proposal, violence, following, gun, rise, firearms, plans, white


2020 Democratic candidates announce plans to combat gun violence, white nationalism following El Paso, Dayton massacres

Amber Ruiz and Jazmyn Blake embrace during a vigil a day after a mass shooting at a Walmart store in El Paso, Texas, August 4, 2019. Callaghan O’Hare | Reuters

In the wake of the weekend massacres in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, 2020 Democratic presidential candidates are pushing proposals to curb gun violence. Both South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee introduced detailed, multi-point plans Tuesday. Buttigieg’s plan would provide $1 billion to augment law enforcement and intelligence efforts to address white nationalism and emphasizes closer monitoring of and cooperation with social media platforms to track and eliminate such groups. Buttigieg said the U.S. must “name and shame” websites that fail to limit hate groups’ use of their services, specifically mentioning 8chan, the fringe forum where the alleged El Paso shooter and other mass shooters have posted white nationalist screeds. He also called for implementing universal background checks, including building a national gun licensing system, implementing “red flag” laws that allow judges to seize guns from those they deem a threat to themselves or others, banning assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, closing loopholes in background check laws, and funding federal gun violence research. Buttigieg was a high school student in 1999 when the Columbine massacre took place. “Weapons like the one I carried in Afghanistan have no place on our streets or in our schools — least of all in the hands of white nationalists,” Buttigieg said in his proposal. “We’ve traumatized an entire generation and are set to traumatize yet another.”

Inslee’s 10-point approach

Inslee also announced a plan to address white nationalism and gun violence on Tuesday. His 10-point approach outlines steps to address the rise of white nationalism and limit access to firearms. He harshly criticized President Donald Trump for his response to the national rise in gun violence and white nationalism. “Combating white nationalist violence starts with a president who is willing to call out racism and put the tools of the federal government to work in tracking the scourge of extremist violence,” he states in the proposal. His plan proposes increasing investments that will enable law enforcement to identify and prosecute white nationalist extremists and creating international alliances that will strengthen counterterrorism efforts at home. Inslee also proposed limiting the “ease-of-access” to firearms by creating a national assault weapons ban that will apply to firearms like the AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, which was used in the Dayton shooting. Citing the rise in hate crimes under the Trump administration, he proposed making a misdemeanor hate crime one of the list of federal prohibiting factors that would prevent a person from purchasing or owning a firearm. The proposal suggests prosecuting those who attempt to buy a gun while ineligible, banning “ghost guns” that are untraceable, implementing “red flag” laws, and improving the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives systems so that they can conduct thorough inspections. Inslee’s campaign declined to provide CNBC with a cost estimate for his plan.

Biden, others back gun control measures


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: marc rod elizabeth myong, marc rod, elizabeth myong, tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weapons, paso, el, buttigieg, democratic, nationalism, massacres, plan, proposal, violence, following, gun, rise, firearms, plans, white


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