A happy retirement is more than just money

This is an important distinction to make, that insufficient retirement savings could be more a function of conscious decisions made in the past than a failure to behave responsibly. More from Fixed Income Strategies:Now may be the time for bonds in portfoliosSurprising spending truths could upend your retirementFinancial worries prevent earlier retirement for manyFurthermore, saving for retirement is not as easy as advertised. Given our increasing life expectancy, accumulating enough money in 35


This is an important distinction to make, that insufficient retirement savings could be more a function of conscious decisions made in the past than a failure to behave responsibly. More from Fixed Income Strategies:Now may be the time for bonds in portfoliosSurprising spending truths could upend your retirementFinancial worries prevent earlier retirement for manyFurthermore, saving for retirement is not as easy as advertised. Given our increasing life expectancy, accumulating enough money in 35
A happy retirement is more than just money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: ivory johnson, guest contributor, nastasic, getty images, photo hero images via getty images, michael grabois, flickr, adam gault, roger wright
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, income, given, chance, retirement, life, happy, need, decisions, earlier, money, easy


A happy retirement is more than just money

What you will need to budget for once you retire 10:14 AM ET Wed, 27 Feb 2019 | 00:48

Daunting numbers indeed, but these conditions speak to priorities undertaken years earlier. Many families would list education as their No. 1 goal, and given the exorbitant cost of college tuition, it only makes sense that their nest egg is less than robust.

This is an important distinction to make, that insufficient retirement savings could be more a function of conscious decisions made in the past than a failure to behave responsibly.

More from Fixed Income Strategies:

Now may be the time for bonds in portfolios

Surprising spending truths could upend your retirement

Financial worries prevent earlier retirement for many

Furthermore, saving for retirement is not as easy as advertised.

Glossy financial planning brochures with couples in their mid-50s riding a sailboat notwithstanding, this is simply an unrealistic expectation for many households. Given our increasing life expectancy, accumulating enough money in 35 to 40 years of working to sustain us for the remainder of our lives is no easy task.

To put this into perspective, if you take out 5 percent from a diversified portfolio each year, you stand a 58 percent chance of running out of money within 30 years of retirement.

After all, anyone taking withdrawals during the 2008 housing crisis would have a dramatically different outcome than investors who retired in 2009 and lived off market returns in the beginning of retirement. Volatility matters. This would suggest that you need $2,000,000 saved to generate $100,000 in annual income.

It’s also worth mentioning that distributions from retirement accounts are subject to ordinary income taxes. In other words, there’s a fair chance that a great many savers — unless they make lifestyle sacrifices or wiser investment decisions or have an actual pension — won’t be able to maintain their current quality of life once they leave the workforce.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: ivory johnson, guest contributor, nastasic, getty images, photo hero images via getty images, michael grabois, flickr, adam gault, roger wright
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, income, given, chance, retirement, life, happy, need, decisions, earlier, money, easy


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Cathay Pacific says it’s ‘very happy’ with its Boeing fleet, despite recent 737 Max crash

U.S. plane manufacturer Boeing has been mired in controversy since its 737 Max 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed minutes after takeoff on Sunday, killing all 157 people on board. Despite recent safety concerns surrounding the 737 Max 8, Cathay Pacific’s CEO said Thursday he was “very happy” with the Hong Kong-based carrier’s Boeing fleet. Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia,” Rupert Hogg said “about 50-50” of the airline’s fleet is made up of Boeing and Airbus planes — namely, the Boeing


U.S. plane manufacturer Boeing has been mired in controversy since its 737 Max 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed minutes after takeoff on Sunday, killing all 157 people on board. Despite recent safety concerns surrounding the 737 Max 8, Cathay Pacific’s CEO said Thursday he was “very happy” with the Hong Kong-based carrier’s Boeing fleet. Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia,” Rupert Hogg said “about 50-50” of the airline’s fleet is made up of Boeing and Airbus planes — namely, the Boeing
Cathay Pacific says it’s ‘very happy’ with its Boeing fleet, despite recent 737 Max crash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: shirley tay, marcio rodrigo machado, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cathay, crash, pacific, despite, 737, airlines, plane, recent, fleet, hogg, boeing, happy, operated, max, killing, ethiopian


Cathay Pacific says it's 'very happy' with its Boeing fleet, despite recent 737 Max crash

U.S. plane manufacturer Boeing has been mired in controversy since its 737 Max 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed minutes after takeoff on Sunday, killing all 157 people on board.

Despite recent safety concerns surrounding the 737 Max 8, Cathay Pacific’s CEO said Thursday he was “very happy” with the Hong Kong-based carrier’s Boeing fleet.

Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia,” Rupert Hogg said “about 50-50” of the airline’s fleet is made up of Boeing and Airbus planes — namely, the Boeing 777, Airbus A350 and A330. The airline does not fly the Boeing 737 Max.

“It is a tragedy, but we’re very happy with both sets of aircraft that we have,” Hogg said, in reference to Sunday’s deadly crash.

The fatal accident involving Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 — which killed all 149 passengers and eight crew members — comes less than five months after the same model plane operated by Indonesia’s Lion Air crashed shortly after taking off from Jakarta, killing all 189 on board.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: shirley tay, marcio rodrigo machado, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cathay, crash, pacific, despite, 737, airlines, plane, recent, fleet, hogg, boeing, happy, operated, max, killing, ethiopian


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95-year-old billionaire Charlie Munger: The secret to a long and happy life is ‘so simple’

At 95, Charlie Munger is best known for his steady role as the right-hand man of investing legend Warren Buffett. As the vice chairman of Berkshire Hathaway, Munger is worth $1.7 billion, according to Forbes. Munger has had, by almost any standard, a wildly successful life — and a long one, at that. Last week, at The Daily Journal annual meeting in Los Angeles, California, Munger was asked to reflect on that journey. “There were a lot of questions today — people trying to figure out what the sec


At 95, Charlie Munger is best known for his steady role as the right-hand man of investing legend Warren Buffett. As the vice chairman of Berkshire Hathaway, Munger is worth $1.7 billion, according to Forbes. Munger has had, by almost any standard, a wildly successful life — and a long one, at that. Last week, at The Daily Journal annual meeting in Los Angeles, California, Munger was asked to reflect on that journey. “There were a lot of questions today — people trying to figure out what the sec
95-year-old billionaire Charlie Munger: The secret to a long and happy life is ‘so simple’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: catherine clifford, lacy o, toole, lacy otoole
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, long, journal, life, best, role, secret, charlie, 95yearold, chairman, happy, worth, simple, billionaire, daily, munger


95-year-old billionaire Charlie Munger: The secret to a long and happy life is 'so simple'

At 95, Charlie Munger is best known for his steady role as the right-hand man of investing legend Warren Buffett.

As the vice chairman of Berkshire Hathaway, Munger is worth $1.7 billion, according to Forbes.

In addition to the his role alongside Buffett, Munger is chairman of the publisher the Daily Journal Corp. and is on the board of the big-box retailer Costco.

Munger has had, by almost any standard, a wildly successful life — and a long one, at that. He’s nearly a centenarian.

Last week, at The Daily Journal annual meeting in Los Angeles, California, Munger was asked to reflect on that journey.

“There were a lot of questions today — people trying to figure out what the secret to life is, to a long and happy life,” CNBC’s Becky Quick said to Munger when they talked at the end of February.

The secret is “easy, because it’s so simple,” Munger told Quick.

Munger went on to rattle off a list of his best advice, each lesson succinctly delivered in bite-size form.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: catherine clifford, lacy o, toole, lacy otoole
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, long, journal, life, best, role, secret, charlie, 95yearold, chairman, happy, worth, simple, billionaire, daily, munger


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Trump: ‘I’m not happy’ with border security deal, but another shutdown looks unlikely

The president did not immediately commit to signing the agreement reached late Monday to prevent a partial government closure this weekend. I’m not happy” about the agreement, Trump said during a Cabinet meeting. However, he added, “I don’t think you’re going to see a shutdown.” The measure would put about $1.4 billion toward physical border barriers, but not a wall as the president has demanded. Despite the apparent breakthrough in Congress, Trump’s stance leaves the fate of government funding


The president did not immediately commit to signing the agreement reached late Monday to prevent a partial government closure this weekend. I’m not happy” about the agreement, Trump said during a Cabinet meeting. However, he added, “I don’t think you’re going to see a shutdown.” The measure would put about $1.4 billion toward physical border barriers, but not a wall as the president has demanded. Despite the apparent breakthrough in Congress, Trump’s stance leaves the fate of government funding
Trump: ‘I’m not happy’ with border security deal, but another shutdown looks unlikely Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: jacob pramuk, getty images, joe raedle
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, happy, border, security, agreement, im, funding, president, sign, shutdown, closure, youre, deal, meeting, think, looks, unlikely, trump


Trump: 'I'm not happy' with border security deal, but another shutdown looks unlikely

President Donald Trump said Tuesday he has reservations about a tentative federal spending deal, but he does not think parts of the government will shut down for the second time since December.

The president did not immediately commit to signing the agreement reached late Monday to prevent a partial government closure this weekend.

“The answer is no. … I’m not happy” about the agreement, Trump said during a Cabinet meeting. However, he added, “I don’t think you’re going to see a shutdown.”

Bipartisan appropriators emerged from a meeting Monday night saying they have a deal in principle to keep the government running past a midnight Friday deadline. The measure would put about $1.4 billion toward physical border barriers, but not a wall as the president has demanded. It includes money for 55 new miles of bollard fencing on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Despite the apparent breakthrough in Congress, Trump’s stance leaves the fate of government funding uncertain as another shutdown draws closer. While the president’s political motives for letting funding lapse have lessened since the last closure, there is no guarantee that he will sign what lawmakers approve.

Republicans will nudge Trump to keep the government open. On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters that “it’s not everything the president hoped to get, but I think it’s a good step in the right direction. I hope he’ll decide to sign it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: jacob pramuk, getty images, joe raedle
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, happy, border, security, agreement, im, funding, president, sign, shutdown, closure, youre, deal, meeting, think, looks, unlikely, trump


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Naomi Osaka just won $2.9 million—here’s what she did with her first Grand Slam paycheck

Naomi Osaka, 21, won her second Grand Slam on Saturday when she beat Petra Kvitova, 28, in a dramatic three-set Australian Open final. The win came with a $4.1 million AUD check ($2.9 million USD), the most lucrative payout in Australian Open history. Last year, she made history when she defeated Serena Williams in the 2018 U.S. Open final and became the first Japanese-born tennis player to win a Grand Slam title. The U.S. Open win in September also came with a sizable $3.8 million paycheck. “Fo


Naomi Osaka, 21, won her second Grand Slam on Saturday when she beat Petra Kvitova, 28, in a dramatic three-set Australian Open final. The win came with a $4.1 million AUD check ($2.9 million USD), the most lucrative payout in Australian Open history. Last year, she made history when she defeated Serena Williams in the 2018 U.S. Open final and became the first Japanese-born tennis player to win a Grand Slam title. The U.S. Open win in September also came with a sizable $3.8 million paycheck. “Fo
Naomi Osaka just won $2.9 million—here’s what she did with her first Grand Slam paycheck Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-26  Authors: kathleen elkins, anadolu agency, getty images, -naomi osaka
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grand, naomi, came, paycheck, won, osaka, slam, open, win, millionheres, williams, happy, second, shes, million, 29


Naomi Osaka just won $2.9 million—here's what she did with her first Grand Slam paycheck

Naomi Osaka, 21, won her second Grand Slam on Saturday when she beat Petra Kvitova, 28, in a dramatic three-set Australian Open final.

The win came with a $4.1 million AUD check ($2.9 million USD), the most lucrative payout in Australian Open history.

It’s Osaka’s second major win in a row. Last year, she made history when she defeated Serena Williams in the 2018 U.S. Open final and became the first Japanese-born tennis player to win a Grand Slam title.

The U.S. Open win in September also came with a sizable $3.8 million paycheck.

Just because she’s earning lottery-sized paychecks doesn’t mean she’s spending a lot, though. In fact, after beating Williams at the U.S. Open, reporters asked if she was going to treat herself to anything, and she said she wasn’t sure.

“I’m not really the type that spends money on myself,” she said in the post-match press conference. “For me, as long as my family’s happy, I’m happy. So when I see my sister … for me, that’s the biggest gift.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-26  Authors: kathleen elkins, anadolu agency, getty images, -naomi osaka
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grand, naomi, came, paycheck, won, osaka, slam, open, win, millionheres, williams, happy, second, shes, million, 29


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48% of people think sharing a drink improves work relationships

Despite flagging interest in consumption, trends toward alcohol avoidance for health and wellness reasons, and concerns about its role in sexual harassment and injury claims, drinking remains a fixture of many work environments. That’s according to a recent survey from Niznik Behavioral Health of 1,010 full-time U.S. workers. Almost half of employees reported attending company holiday parties where booze was served, while a quarter said alcohol is present at team bonding events. Fewer offices se


Despite flagging interest in consumption, trends toward alcohol avoidance for health and wellness reasons, and concerns about its role in sexual harassment and injury claims, drinking remains a fixture of many work environments. That’s according to a recent survey from Niznik Behavioral Health of 1,010 full-time U.S. workers. Almost half of employees reported attending company holiday parties where booze was served, while a quarter said alcohol is present at team bonding events. Fewer offices se
48% of people think sharing a drink improves work relationships Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, vgajic, getty images, thomas barwick, digitalvision, creative-family, istock
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, remains, 48, parties, holiday, health, sharing, employees, days, hours, relationships, think, improves, drinking, drink, happy


48% of people think sharing a drink improves work relationships

Americans aren’t just setting the booze aside for Dry January. For the third year in a row, the country’s total consumption of beer, wine, and spirits declined, but the well hasn’t quite dried up when it comes to indulging in a tipple at work events.

Despite flagging interest in consumption, trends toward alcohol avoidance for health and wellness reasons, and concerns about its role in sexual harassment and injury claims, drinking remains a fixture of many work environments. That’s according to a recent survey from Niznik Behavioral Health of 1,010 full-time U.S. workers.

The days of deals sealed over a three-martini lunch or of bar carts wheeling down office halls may be gone, but drinking remains at the heart of co-worker bonding once the work day ends, often in the form of employer-sponsored happy hours, holiday or end-of-year parties, and corporate retreats, according to the survey.

Almost half of employees reported attending company holiday parties where booze was served, while a quarter said alcohol is present at team bonding events. Fewer offices seem to permit drinks during meeting or lunches with customers or clients — only 13 percent of workers said they were allowed to do so. And finally 12 percent of employees work for a company that sponsors happy hours or allows drinking on certain days or times.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, vgajic, getty images, thomas barwick, digitalvision, creative-family, istock
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, remains, 48, parties, holiday, health, sharing, employees, days, hours, relationships, think, improves, drinking, drink, happy


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Trump attacks Fed Chairman Powell: ‘I’m not even a little bit happy with my selection of Jay’

President Donald Trump told The Washington Post on Tuesday that he’s “not even a little bit happy” with his appointment Jerome Powell as chair of the Federal Reserve. Trump told the Post, “So far, I’m not even a little bit happy with my selection of Jay,” who he appointed earlier this year. The president told the newspaper that he thinks the U.S. central bank is “way off-base with what they’re doing.” “I’m doing deals and I’m not being accommodated by the Fed,” Trump told the Post. The president


President Donald Trump told The Washington Post on Tuesday that he’s “not even a little bit happy” with his appointment Jerome Powell as chair of the Federal Reserve. Trump told the Post, “So far, I’m not even a little bit happy with my selection of Jay,” who he appointed earlier this year. The president told the newspaper that he thinks the U.S. central bank is “way off-base with what they’re doing.” “I’m doing deals and I’m not being accommodated by the Fed,” Trump told the Post. The president
Trump attacks Fed Chairman Powell: ‘I’m not even a little bit happy with my selection of Jay’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-27  Authors: christine wang, alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, chairman, hes, reserve, fed, little, happy, market, post, bit, jay, im, federal, rate, selection, trump, powell, told


Trump attacks Fed Chairman Powell: 'I'm not even a little bit happy with my selection of Jay'

President Donald Trump told The Washington Post on Tuesday that he’s “not even a little bit happy” with his appointment Jerome Powell as chair of the Federal Reserve.

Trump told the Post, “So far, I’m not even a little bit happy with my selection of Jay,” who he appointed earlier this year. The president told the newspaper that he thinks the U.S. central bank is “way off-base with what they’re doing.”

The Federal Reserve has been raising interest rates as the U.S. economy picks up, but the Post reported that Trump argued these rate hikes were hurting the U.S. economy. The Post also said he blamed the Fed for the recent stock market sell-off and General Motors’ plans to close plants and cut more than 14,000 jobs.

“I’m doing deals and I’m not being accommodated by the Fed,” Trump told the Post. “They’re making a mistake because I have a gut and my gut tells me more sometimes than anybody else’s brain can ever tell me.”

The president has previously criticized the Federal Reserve, saying they should do “what’s good for the country.” He’s also said he’s “not thrilled” with Powell for continuing to raise interest rates.

Although Powell has become a repeated target of Trump’s ire, it is historically unusual for presidents to openly criticize the head of the Federal Reserve. His comments have drawn concern from those who have interpreted the president’s remarks as threats to the central bank’s independence.

Trump’s comments to the Post come a day before Powell’s highly anticipated comments at the Economic Club of New York on Wednesday. The Fed chair is unlikely to signal any significant changes to the central bank’s existing rate hike projections. The market generally expects the Federal Open Market Committee to raise its benchmark interest rate in its December meeting.

Read the full report in The Washington Post.

WATCH: Trump dismisses report he’s displeased with Mnuchin


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-27  Authors: christine wang, alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, chairman, hes, reserve, fed, little, happy, market, post, bit, jay, im, federal, rate, selection, trump, powell, told


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HSBC on global growth: ‘We should be pretty happy’

HSBC on global growth: ‘We should be pretty happy’15 Hours AgoThe global economy should not expect “sustained, above-trend” growth in the medium-to-long term, according to Bill Maldonado of HSBC Global Asset Management.


HSBC on global growth: ‘We should be pretty happy’15 Hours AgoThe global economy should not expect “sustained, above-trend” growth in the medium-to-long term, according to Bill Maldonado of HSBC Global Asset Management.
HSBC on global growth: ‘We should be pretty happy’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, management, hsbc, term, hours, maldonado, pretty, global, happy, mediumtolong, growth, sustained


HSBC on global growth: 'We should be pretty happy'

HSBC on global growth: ‘We should be pretty happy’

15 Hours Ago

The global economy should not expect “sustained, above-trend” growth in the medium-to-long term, according to Bill Maldonado of HSBC Global Asset Management.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-21
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McDonald’s is being sued by a father over ‘illegal’ marketing of Happy Meals to children

A spokesperson for McDonald’s Canada told CNBC by email that the company had received the ruling and will examine it carefully. “We are aware of our obligations under Quebec’s advertising laws and reiterate that we do not believe this class action has merit. He pointed to the long-running “McLibel” case of the 1980s and 1990s in which McDonald’s sued activists who were part of the London Greenpeace group. They had produced a leaflet called “What’s wrong with McDonald’s — everything they don’t wa


A spokesperson for McDonald’s Canada told CNBC by email that the company had received the ruling and will examine it carefully. “We are aware of our obligations under Quebec’s advertising laws and reiterate that we do not believe this class action has merit. He pointed to the long-running “McLibel” case of the 1980s and 1990s in which McDonald’s sued activists who were part of the London Greenpeace group. They had produced a leaflet called “What’s wrong with McDonald’s — everything they don’t wa
McDonald’s is being sued by a father over ‘illegal’ marketing of Happy Meals to children Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: lucy handley, chris so, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meals, children, happy, displays, claims, advertising, father, mcdonalds, sued, spokesperson, quebec, company, leaflet, told, marketing, illegal, stores


McDonald's is being sued by a father over 'illegal' marketing of Happy Meals to children

A spokesperson for McDonald’s Canada told CNBC by email that the company had received the ruling and will examine it carefully. “We are aware of our obligations under Quebec’s advertising laws and reiterate that we do not believe this class action has merit. We are proud of our long-standing relationship with Quebecers and their families, who have been choosing to enjoy McDonald’s for more than 45 years,” the spokesperson added.

Advertising to children under 13 has been banned in Quebec since the 1970s with three exceptions: advertising in children’s magazines, advertising children’s entertainment events and advertising via store windows, displays, containers, packaging or labels.

Zukran, an attorney at LPC Avocat, told CNBC by phone that McDonald’s toy displays are not covered by this exception, with the judgment stating that the company operates restaurants rather than stores. Even if they are considered stores, Zukran said, advertising must not “directly incite a child to buy goods or services,” according to the Consumer Protection Act.

Zukran claims that his firm has had a “huge” response from other consumers, as anyone who has bought a Happy Meal in Quebec since November 2013 can request to be part of the action. He would not give a number but claims that the website crashed due to people’s interest.

He pointed to the long-running “McLibel” case of the 1980s and 1990s in which McDonald’s sued activists who were part of the London Greenpeace group. They had produced a leaflet called “What’s wrong with McDonald’s — everything they don’t want you to know.” Most of the claims in the leaflet were rejected by the judge, Justice Bell, but he decided that the advertising from McDonald’s had exploited children, a blow to the fast-food chain.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: lucy handley, chris so, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meals, children, happy, displays, claims, advertising, father, mcdonalds, sued, spokesperson, quebec, company, leaflet, told, marketing, illegal, stores


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People who make time for this at work are 21% more likely to be happy than those who don’t

Those who said they spent between one and five hours a week on education also had much happier work lives than the light learners (though not as happy as those of heavy learners.) They reported being 14 percent happier than light learners did, 13 percent less stressed, 16 percent more productive and 32 percent more likely to know where they want to go in their career. “There is a clear relationship between time spent learning and a person’s career satisfaction, career prospects and general happi


Those who said they spent between one and five hours a week on education also had much happier work lives than the light learners (though not as happy as those of heavy learners.) They reported being 14 percent happier than light learners did, 13 percent less stressed, 16 percent more productive and 32 percent more likely to know where they want to go in their career. “There is a clear relationship between time spent learning and a person’s career satisfaction, career prospects and general happi
People who make time for this at work are 21% more likely to be happy than those who don’t Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, jose luis pelaez inc, blend images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bersin, light, heavy, learning, dont, work, 21, hours, spent, likely, learners, week, happy


People who make time for this at work are 21% more likely to be happy than those who don't

Taking time at work to focus on mastering a new skill, learning a new software program or tool, or even just reading widely about your industry can do wonders for you mentally — as well as professionally.

New research conducted by LinkedIn found that the best way to ensure that you’re happy at your job is to spend more time learning.

Among the professionals surveyed, those who were “heavy” learners — devoting more than five hours a week to things like reading, taking classes and watching online courses — reported being happier, less stressed, more productive and more confident than those who spent less time learning.

For instance, when compared to “light” learners, those who commit an hour or less each week, heavy learners were:

74 percent more likely to know where they want to go in their career

48 percent more likely to have found purpose in their work

47 percent less likely to be stressed at work

39 percent more likely to feel productive and successful

21 percent more likely to feel confident in their work

And finally, 21 percent more likely to be happy at work

Heavy learners see almost three times as many positive results as light learners says Josh Bersin, an HR industry analyst who developed the survey with LinkedIn.

Those who said they spent between one and five hours a week on education also had much happier work lives than the light learners (though not as happy as those of heavy learners.) They reported being 14 percent happier than light learners did, 13 percent less stressed, 16 percent more productive and 32 percent more likely to know where they want to go in their career.

“There is a clear relationship between time spent learning and a person’s career satisfaction, career prospects and general happiness,” says Bersin. “People who either have the time or make the time to educate themselves are performing at higher levels.”

The bad news? Few of us are actually heavy learners.

Of the 2,049 workers surveyed, including freelancers and entrepreneurs, in the United States, United Kingdom, Sweden, Iceland, Denmark, Finland, Norway, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany, France, Australia, India, Singapore, and Hong Kong, only 7 percent said they spent five hours or more a week learning. That number may even skew a little high, admits Bersin, as LinkedIn only queried people who had recently paid for some form of online learning with the company.

Most of people fall into one of the two other learning groups: 47 percent are “medium” learners, spending 1-5 hours a week educating themselves, and 46 percent are “light” learners, spending less than an hour a week.

It’s an understandable reality, when you consider that two-thirds of workers already spend more than 40 hours a week at work performing necessary tasks. Bersin says that one key way to free up time in your week for more learning activities is simply to cut back on communications.

“One of the big messages I took out of this research is that people are so distracted at work that they need to force themselves to limit interacting,” says Bersin.

Things like email, social media and meetings eat up so much of a person’s day that it leaves little extra time for this kind of learning, he adds. More than a quarter of people admit they waste a day a week on emails and messages that don’t contribute to their jobs, the survey found.

“This is also a call on leaders and management to recognize that they need to give employees time to improve their core skills,” says Bersin. “It will pay off.”

Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook.

See also: Here are the 25 most attractive start-ups to work for, according to LinkedIn


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, jose luis pelaez inc, blend images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bersin, light, heavy, learning, dont, work, 21, hours, spent, likely, learners, week, happy


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