YouTube CEO says ‘sorry,’ but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.” Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious mater


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.” Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious mater
YouTube CEO says ‘sorry,’ but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: dylan byers, david ingram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homophobic, hosting, videos, harassment, conference, ceo, youtubes, defends, susan, slurs, youtube, sorry, wojcicki, services


YouTube CEO says 'sorry,' but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California.

SCOTTSDALE, Arizona — YouTube’s chief executive apologized on Monday for the hurt she said is caused by videos with anti-gay slurs, but said the company was right to let the videos remain on its service.

CEO Susan Wojcicki, in an on-stage interview at the tech-focused Code Conference in Scottsdale, Arizona, spoke publicly for the first time since YouTube last week imposed a stricter ban on hate speech, including videos that promote ideas of racial superiority.

But rather than being lauded for tackling Nazism, Wojcicki was met with a barrage of questions about videos she has decided to leave up. The questions were prompted by journalist Carlos Maza launching a campaign last month to bring attention to homophobic abuse and harassment he says he received from a conservative YouTube personality.

Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. Several activists are lobbying to ban YouTube’s parent company, Google, from the San Francisco Pride march this month over what they see as the service’s inaction.

“I know the decision we made was very hurtful to the LGBTQ community,” Wojcicki said. “That was not our intention at all. We’re really sorry about that.”

But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.”

“I do agree this was the right decision,” she said.

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Wojcicki, a high-profile Silicon Valley executive, faced a skeptical crowd at the annual conference for tech and media professionals. When Ina Fried, a journalist from Axios, suggested during a question-and-answer period that Wojcicki wasn’t actually sorry, the audience greeted the question with applause.

YouTube, like Facebook and other online services that rely on users for content, is facing growing scrutiny over material that shows violence, promotes hatred or is objectionable in other ways. The service’s rulebook bans harassment, for example, but only when it is “malicious.”

Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious material, and that the service faced a challenge in being consistent. She said the same rules needed to apply across the board, including to late-night comedy shows or rap music videos.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: dylan byers, david ingram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homophobic, hosting, videos, harassment, conference, ceo, youtubes, defends, susan, slurs, youtube, sorry, wojcicki, services


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YouTube flip-flops on suspending video blogger accused of harassment

Vox.com producer Carlos Maza, who identifies as gay, initially complained to YouTube on June 1, saying that Crowder, a popular YouTube user, made homophobic and racial slurs toward him in his videos. Crowder, whose account has 3.84 million subscribers, earns an estimated annual revenue of $81,000 from YouTube, according to social analytics company SocialBlade.com. YouTube responded Tuesday, saying that after a four-day long “in-depth investigation” it determined Crowder’s videos were “hurtful” b


Vox.com producer Carlos Maza, who identifies as gay, initially complained to YouTube on June 1, saying that Crowder, a popular YouTube user, made homophobic and racial slurs toward him in his videos. Crowder, whose account has 3.84 million subscribers, earns an estimated annual revenue of $81,000 from YouTube, according to social analytics company SocialBlade.com. YouTube responded Tuesday, saying that after a four-day long “in-depth investigation” it determined Crowder’s videos were “hurtful” b
YouTube flip-flops on suspending video blogger accused of harassment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suspending, crowder, content, violate, blogger, user, tweeted, youtube, videos, harassment, crowders, accused, video, company, saying, flipflops


YouTube flip-flops on suspending video blogger accused of harassment

YouTube has suspended the monetization of a popular user, Steven Crowder, for “a pattern of egregious actions that has harmed the broader community” — only hours after defending it.

The flip-flop shows how Google-owned YouTube struggles to define and enforce clear standards for content on its platform, as it faces pressure from lawmakers and the public to remove hateful content and misinformation.

Parent company Alphabet reported a slowdown in ad revenue growth in Q1, which some analysts believed was partly a result of algorithm changes meant to reduce the prominence of harmful content on YouTube.

Vox.com producer Carlos Maza, who identifies as gay, initially complained to YouTube on June 1, saying that Crowder, a popular YouTube user, made homophobic and racial slurs toward him in his videos. Crowder, whose account has 3.84 million subscribers, earns an estimated annual revenue of $81,000 from YouTube, according to social analytics company SocialBlade.com.

YouTube responded Tuesday, saying that after a four-day long “in-depth investigation” it determined Crowder’s videos were “hurtful” but didn’t violate any of the platform’s policies.

Maza became the target of more harassment as a result of that decision, he told CNBC.com, adding that death threats from Crowder supporters had increased since Tuesday night.

Wednesday morning, the company announced a new anti-harassment policy that will crack down on users and accounts that express supremacy over other groups. However, Crowder’s videos remained available and YouTube continued to tell CNBC that they didn’t violate the policies.

Two hours later, the company publicly tweeted at Maza, saying it had decided to suspend Crowder’s monetization after all.

Adding to the confusion, YouTube then tweeted that Crowder had to stop selling t-shirts with offensive messages on them in order to be reinstated.

It then clarified later that Crowder would also have to address other problems, as well, in order to be reinstated.

YouTube declined to provide a statement on the flip-flop.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suspending, crowder, content, violate, blogger, user, tweeted, youtube, videos, harassment, crowders, accused, video, company, saying, flipflops


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Almost half of men say they don’t know what’s an acceptable compliment to give a coworker

Despite growing conversation around workplace harassment, thanks to the #MeToo movement and high-profile cases of powerful executives, like Harvey Weinstein, using their position to gain sexual favors, workers still aren’t sure what they’re supposed to do when they encounter harassment in their own workplaces. Instead, U.S. workers both acknowledge that workplace harassment happens but remain “alarming ambivalent” about it, according to a new survey of 1,227 U.S. employees, age 18 and older, rel


Despite growing conversation around workplace harassment, thanks to the #MeToo movement and high-profile cases of powerful executives, like Harvey Weinstein, using their position to gain sexual favors, workers still aren’t sure what they’re supposed to do when they encounter harassment in their own workplaces. Instead, U.S. workers both acknowledge that workplace harassment happens but remain “alarming ambivalent” about it, according to a new survey of 1,227 U.S. employees, age 18 and older, rel
Almost half of men say they don’t know what’s an acceptable compliment to give a coworker Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, pixelfit, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, metoo, despite, whats, harassment, workplace, say, compliment, workers, jenkins, men, dont, gender, acceptable, work, coworker, half, workplacesinstead, know


Almost half of men say they don't know what's an acceptable compliment to give a coworker

Despite growing conversation around workplace harassment, thanks to the #MeToo movement and high-profile cases of powerful executives, like Harvey Weinstein, using their position to gain sexual favors, workers still aren’t sure what they’re supposed to do when they encounter harassment in their own workplaces.

Instead, U.S. workers both acknowledge that workplace harassment happens but remain “alarming ambivalent” about it, according to a new survey of 1,227 U.S. employees, age 18 and older, released by global HR consultancy Randstad.

More than half, 51 percent, of those surveyed said they know a woman who has been sexually harassed at work, but half also admitted they’d never spoken up after hearing a colleague make an inappropriate comment about a person of the opposite sex.

The data shows workers are not as concerned about these issues as we might expect to them to be, despite serious discussions around gender happening in the #MeToo era, Audra Jenkins, chief diversity and inclusion officer for Randstad North America, told CNBC Make It.

“The exceptions appear to be Millennials as well as minorities, who were more likely to recognize and report gender discrimination,” Jenkins said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, pixelfit, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, metoo, despite, whats, harassment, workplace, say, compliment, workers, jenkins, men, dont, gender, acceptable, work, coworker, half, workplacesinstead, know


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Jack Dorsey admits a link between Twitter activity and physical danger to people

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said Tuesday that he recognizes there is a link between activity on his social network and real life danger to people. During the conversation, Dorsey said Twitter’s top priority is focusing on users’ physical safety. Dorsey said the company is putting in place mechanisms that will reduce the probability of Twitter users experiencing offline physical harm as a result of what others see on the service. Dorsey listed coordinated harassment campaigns and doxxing, which is th


Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said Tuesday that he recognizes there is a link between activity on his social network and real life danger to people. During the conversation, Dorsey said Twitter’s top priority is focusing on users’ physical safety. Dorsey said the company is putting in place mechanisms that will reduce the probability of Twitter users experiencing offline physical harm as a result of what others see on the service. Dorsey listed coordinated harassment campaigns and doxxing, which is th
Jack Dorsey admits a link between Twitter activity and physical danger to people Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: salvador rodriguez, burhaan kinu, hindustan times, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, jack, danger, admits, twitters, service, link, users, thats, harassment, physical, swisher, dorsey, activity


Jack Dorsey admits a link between Twitter activity and physical danger to people

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said Tuesday that he recognizes there is a link between activity on his social network and real life danger to people.

The tech executive made his comments while discussing Twitter’s efforts to reduce harassment on the service and promote “healthy conversation” during in an interview conducted on Twitter with Recode’s Kara Swisher. During the conversation, Dorsey said Twitter’s top priority is focusing on users’ physical safety.

Dorsey said the company is putting in place mechanisms that will reduce the probability of Twitter users experiencing offline physical harm as a result of what others see on the service. Dorsey listed coordinated harassment campaigns and doxxing, which is the online publication of one’s private identifiable information, as examples of physical dangers Twitter is working to reduce.

“So you do see the link between what you do and real life danger to people? Can you say that explicitly?” Swisher asked in a tweet.

“I see the link, and that’s why we need to put physical safety above all else. That’s what we’re figuring out how to do now. We don’t have all the answers just yet. But that’s the focus. I think it clarifies a lot of the work we need to do. Not all of it of course,” Dorsey responded.

Swisher asked if Twitter’s lack of diversity was a cause for why the company has been slow to build features to protect users against harassment, to which Dorsey said that was “likely a reason.”

WATCH: Facebook, Snapchat and TikTok have a massive underage user problem — here’s why it matters


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: salvador rodriguez, burhaan kinu, hindustan times, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, jack, danger, admits, twitters, service, link, users, thats, harassment, physical, swisher, dorsey, activity


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Jack Dorsey admits a link between Twitter activity and physical danger to people

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said Tuesday that he recognizes there is a link between activity on his social network and real life danger to people. During the conversation, Dorsey said Twitter’s top priority is focusing on users’ physical safety. Dorsey said the company is putting in place mechanisms that will reduce the probability of Twitter users experiencing offline physical harm as a result of what others see on the service. Dorsey listed coordinated harassment campaigns and doxxing, which is th


Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said Tuesday that he recognizes there is a link between activity on his social network and real life danger to people. During the conversation, Dorsey said Twitter’s top priority is focusing on users’ physical safety. Dorsey said the company is putting in place mechanisms that will reduce the probability of Twitter users experiencing offline physical harm as a result of what others see on the service. Dorsey listed coordinated harassment campaigns and doxxing, which is th
Jack Dorsey admits a link between Twitter activity and physical danger to people Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: salvador rodriguez, burhaan kinu, hindustan times, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, service, jack, harassment, swisher, admits, dorsey, thats, link, activity, danger, twitter, physical, twitters


Jack Dorsey admits a link between Twitter activity and physical danger to people

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said Tuesday that he recognizes there is a link between activity on his social network and real life danger to people.

The tech executive made his comments while discussing Twitter’s efforts to reduce harassment on the service and promote “healthy conversation” during in an interview conducted on Twitter with Recode’s Kara Swisher. During the conversation, Dorsey said Twitter’s top priority is focusing on users’ physical safety.

Dorsey said the company is putting in place mechanisms that will reduce the probability of Twitter users experiencing offline physical harm as a result of what others see on the service. Dorsey listed coordinated harassment campaigns and doxxing, which is the online publication of one’s private identifiable information, as examples of physical dangers Twitter is working to reduce.

“So you do see the link between what you do and real life danger to people? Can you say that explicitly?” Swisher asked in a tweet.

“I see the link, and that’s why we need to put physical safety above all else. That’s what we’re figuring out how to do now. We don’t have all the answers just yet. But that’s the focus. I think it clarifies a lot of the work we need to do. Not all of it of course,” Dorsey responded.

Swisher asked if Twitter’s lack of diversity was a cause for why the company has been slow to build features to protect users against harassment, to which Dorsey said that was “likely a reason.”

WATCH: Facebook, Snapchat and TikTok have a massive underage user problem — here’s why it matters


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: salvador rodriguez, burhaan kinu, hindustan times, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, service, jack, harassment, swisher, admits, dorsey, thats, link, activity, danger, twitter, physical, twitters


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Fearing #MeToo allegations, companies turn to reputation managers

The business of protecting companies from sexual harassment scandals is booming. Calls to reputation management firm Temin and Company quadrupled in 2018, according to president and CEO Davia Temin. “Sexual harassment has not been one of our biggest areas of inquiry, up until now,” Temin tells CNBC Make It. When a company hires Temin and Company, the firm first conducts an in-depth study into the company’s leadership and corporate culture. The EEOC recovered $70 million from companies for victim


The business of protecting companies from sexual harassment scandals is booming. Calls to reputation management firm Temin and Company quadrupled in 2018, according to president and CEO Davia Temin. “Sexual harassment has not been one of our biggest areas of inquiry, up until now,” Temin tells CNBC Make It. When a company hires Temin and Company, the firm first conducts an in-depth study into the company’s leadership and corporate culture. The EEOC recovered $70 million from companies for victim
Fearing #MeToo allegations, companies turn to reputation managers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: harriet taylor, lesiavalentain via, photo courtesy of temin, -victoria lipnic, acting chair, us equal employment opportunity commission
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, metoo, temin, turn, fearing, sexual, corporate, according, managers, reputation, culture, allegations, harassment, companies, eeoc, company, lipnic


Fearing #MeToo allegations, companies turn to reputation managers

The business of protecting companies from sexual harassment scandals is booming.

Calls to reputation management firm Temin and Company quadrupled in 2018, according to president and CEO Davia Temin.

“Sexual harassment has not been one of our biggest areas of inquiry, up until now,” Temin tells CNBC Make It. But with the rise of the #MeToo movement, companies are finding themselves unprepared and facing huge legal liabilities. Temin’s business helps companies — including more than 15 in the Fortune 500 — find and address internal problems, before they become public.

When a company hires Temin and Company, the firm first conducts an in-depth study into the company’s leadership and corporate culture. Temin zeroes in on how persistent a culture of sexual harassment is at an organization and what the company is doing wrong, then makes recommendations at the governance level, including, in some cases, firing senior people. Many of Temin’s clients are in highly-regulated industries, like pharmaceuticals and finance.

Workplace sexual harassment claims jumped more than 12 percent in fiscal year 2018, according to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The EEOC recovered $70 million from companies for victims of sexual harassment in 2018, up from $47.5 million the year before.

“From the beginning of the #MeToo movement to now, I have definitely seen corporate employers and non-profit organizations taking this issue so much more seriously,” Victoria Lipnic, acting chair of the EEOC tells CNBC Make It.

The EEOC offers harassment prevention training, and its trainers are booked up six or seven months out, according to Lipnic. Its staff outline best practices for preventing harassment and tailor recommendations to suit different workplace cultures. Though the organization used to receive case-by-case requests for help, often from employers looking to “check the box” following an expensive settlement, this type of training aimed at really changing corporate culture is new, says Lipnic, who now gets more than 100 emails every day from companies asking for help.

“It is undeniable that people woke up,” said Lipnic. “I certainly hope, as the head of the EEOC, that people stay awake.”

Still, she says, the real impact of the actions firms are taking won’t be clear for five to 10 years. “If this is all a ‘one -and-done’ thing, then I am not sure how much improvement we will have made.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: harriet taylor, lesiavalentain via, photo courtesy of temin, -victoria lipnic, acting chair, us equal employment opportunity commission
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, metoo, temin, turn, fearing, sexual, corporate, according, managers, reputation, culture, allegations, harassment, companies, eeoc, company, lipnic


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Former Scottish leader Salmond charged with attempted rape

Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond denied committing any crime after he appeared in court on Thursday, charged with multiple sex offences including attempted rape. Scottish prosecutors said Salmond, 64, who said he had voluntarily gone to police on Wednesday after becoming aware of the investigation, had been charged with nine counts of sexual assault, two counts of attempted rape, two counts of indecent assault and breach of the peace. Salmond, who did not enter a plea, was released on


Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond denied committing any crime after he appeared in court on Thursday, charged with multiple sex offences including attempted rape. Scottish prosecutors said Salmond, 64, who said he had voluntarily gone to police on Wednesday after becoming aware of the investigation, had been charged with nine counts of sexual assault, two counts of attempted rape, two counts of indecent assault and breach of the peace. Salmond, who did not enter a plea, was released on
Former Scottish leader Salmond charged with attempted rape Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scottish, rape, led, independence, charged, leader, attempted, case, salmond, counts, sturgeon, harassment, snp, court


Former Scottish leader Salmond charged with attempted rape

Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond denied committing any crime after he appeared in court on Thursday, charged with multiple sex offences including attempted rape.

Scottish prosecutors said Salmond, 64, who said he had voluntarily gone to police on Wednesday after becoming aware of the investigation, had been charged with nine counts of sexual assault, two counts of attempted rape, two counts of indecent assault and breach of the peace.

“I am innocent of any criminality whatsoever,” Salmond told reporters outside Edinburgh Sheriff Court following the brief hearing which media and public were not allowed to attend.

“I refute absolutely these allegations of criminality and I will defend myself to the utmost in court,” he added. “I would love to say a great deal more but I’ve got to observe the rules of the court and in court is where I will state my case.”

Salmond, who did not enter a plea, was released on bail with his next court date yet to be fixed.

The combative politician, nicknamed “Wee Eck” (little Alex), led the devolved Scottish government for seven years until 2014.

As leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP), he helped to push support for Scottish independence to a record level but Scotland ultimately voted to stay part of the United Kingdom in a 2014 referendum.

Last year, Salmond took legal action against the Scottish devolved government now led by his successor Nicola Sturgeon over how it handled a complaints process against him in a harassment case.

Salmond, who denied any wrongdoing, won a judicial review earlier this month on how that case was handled by the Scottish government when it conceded it had acted unlawfully in probing the harassment claims.

The case pitted the two most popular figures in the Scottish independence movement against one another, and some commentators believe it could weaken Sturgeon’s leadership just as she seeks to start a new drive for secession amid the chaos of Britain’s exit from the European Union.

A dispute has continued to simmer between two factions in the SNP around what Sturgeon knew about the case and when, and an inquiry by the Scottish parliament is under way to discover more.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scottish, rape, led, independence, charged, leader, attempted, case, salmond, counts, sturgeon, harassment, snp, court


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Ashley Judd’s sexual harassment claim against Weinstein dismissed by US judge

A federal judge in Los Angeles on Wednesday dismissed actress Ashley Judd’s sexual harassment claim against movie producer Harvey Weinstein but said she could proceed with a defamation claim against him. Judd had accused Weinstein of defaming her in 1998 after she refused what she said were his sexual advances a year earlier. In her lawsuit, filed in April 2018, the “Double Jeopardy” actress accused Weinstein of smearing her reputation by discouraging director Peter Jackson from casting her in h


A federal judge in Los Angeles on Wednesday dismissed actress Ashley Judd’s sexual harassment claim against movie producer Harvey Weinstein but said she could proceed with a defamation claim against him. Judd had accused Weinstein of defaming her in 1998 after she refused what she said were his sexual advances a year earlier. In her lawsuit, filed in April 2018, the “Double Jeopardy” actress accused Weinstein of smearing her reputation by discouraging director Peter Jackson from casting her in h
Ashley Judd’s sexual harassment claim against Weinstein dismissed by US judge Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: jefferson siegel-pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, producer, accused, sexual, relationship, refused, women, judge, judds, movie, ashley, claim, harassment, weinstein, dismissed, actress


Ashley Judd's sexual harassment claim against Weinstein dismissed by US judge

A federal judge in Los Angeles on Wednesday dismissed actress Ashley Judd’s sexual harassment claim against movie producer Harvey Weinstein but said she could proceed with a defamation claim against him.

Judd had accused Weinstein of defaming her in 1998 after she refused what she said were his sexual advances a year earlier.

In her lawsuit, filed in April 2018, the “Double Jeopardy” actress accused Weinstein of smearing her reputation by discouraging director Peter Jackson from casting her in his blockbuster movie franchise “The Lord of the Rings.”

Judd, one of the first women in October 2017 to publicly accuse Weinstein of sexual misconduct, had accused the Hollywood movie mogul of sexual harassment in violation of a California law barring such conduct by a person in a “business, service or professional relationship” with another.

In a footnote to his ruling, U.S. District Judge Philip Gutierrez said he was not determining whether Judd was sexually harassed by Weinstein “in the colloquial sense of the term.”

But Gutierrez said that Judd’s relationship as an actress with the film producer was not covered under the California statute she had sued under, nor under a 2019 amendment.

“We have said from the beginning that this claim was unjustified, and we are pleased that the court saw it as we did. We believe that we will ultimately prevail on her remaining claims,” Weinstein’s lawyer, Phyllis Kupferstein, said in a statement.

Judd’s representative did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Weinstein is to stand trial in May in New York on five charges, including rape, involving two other women.

The disgraced Hollywood producer of movies like “Shakespeare in Love” has been accused of sexual misconduct by more than 70 women. He has denied the accusations, saying any sexual encounters were consensual.

Judd’s lawsuit had alleged Weinstein “cornered her in a hotel room in 1997 under the guise of discussing business.” When she refused his demands, he retaliated by making what she called “baseless smears” against her to “Lord of the Rings” director Jackson, and she lost a part in the movie.

Weinstein denied defaming Judd or interfering with her career.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: jefferson siegel-pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, producer, accused, sexual, relationship, refused, women, judge, judds, movie, ashley, claim, harassment, weinstein, dismissed, actress


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Alphabet’s board sued for role in allegedly covering up sexual misconduct by senior execs

“The Directors’ wrongful conduct allowed the illegal conduct to proliferate and continue,” the suit reads. “As such, members of Alphabet’s Board were knowing and direct enablers of the sexual harassment and discrimination.” And if you get caught, Google would keep it quiet, let you resign, and pay you millions of dollars in severance,” the suit reads. In this way, Alphabet and the Board were able to maintain optics and superficial compliance with its code of conduct, internal rules, and laws reg


“The Directors’ wrongful conduct allowed the illegal conduct to proliferate and continue,” the suit reads. “As such, members of Alphabet’s Board were knowing and direct enablers of the sexual harassment and discrimination.” And if you get caught, Google would keep it quiet, let you resign, and pay you millions of dollars in severance,” the suit reads. In this way, Alphabet and the Board were able to maintain optics and superficial compliance with its code of conduct, internal rules, and laws reg
Alphabet’s board sued for role in allegedly covering up sexual misconduct by senior execs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: jillian donfro, jerome favre, bloomberg, getty images, michelle castillo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, misconduct, allegedly, role, harassment, conduct, san, execs, covering, alphabets, severance, sued, reads, sexual, senior, google, suit, employees, board


Alphabet's board sued for role in allegedly covering up sexual misconduct by senior execs

The new lawsuit, filed in California’s San Mateo County, asserts claims for breach of fiduciary duty, abuse of control, unjust enrichment, and waste of corporate assets. The attorneys say the lawsuit is the result of “an extensive original investigation into non-public evidence” and produced copies of internal Google minutes from board of directors meetings.

“The Directors’ wrongful conduct allowed the illegal conduct to proliferate and continue,” the suit reads. “As such, members of Alphabet’s Board were knowing and direct enablers of the sexual harassment and discrimination.”

The suit also accuses board members of employing contradictory standards:

“If you were a high‐level male executive at Google responsible for generating millions of dollars in revenue, Google would let you engage in sexual harassment. And if you get caught, Google would keep it quiet, let you resign, and pay you millions of dollars in severance,” the suit reads. “On the other hand, if you were a low‐level employee at Google and were accused of sexual harassment or discrimination, you would be fired for cause with no severance benefits. In this way, Alphabet and the Board were able to maintain optics and superficial compliance with its code of conduct, internal rules, and laws regarding sexual harassment. By appearing to take decisive action against a significant number of low‐level employees, and by concealing the blatant and widespread sexual harassment by senior Google executives, the Board avoided a much bigger scandal.”

In late October, Google CEO Sundar Pichai told employees that Google had fired 48 employees for sexual misconduct over the past two years.

The shareholder plaintiff, James Martin, has held Alphabet stock since October 2009.

Soon after the original complaint, another similar suit was filed in San Mateo County on behalf of two additional stockholders, which also alleges that the board breached its fiduciary duty and had a “culture of concealment” around sexual misconduct, as well as a bug in the Google Plus social network.

Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

You can read the suit in full here:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: jillian donfro, jerome favre, bloomberg, getty images, michelle castillo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, misconduct, allegedly, role, harassment, conduct, san, execs, covering, alphabets, severance, sued, reads, sexual, senior, google, suit, employees, board


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Facebook follows Google to end mandatory arbitration for sexual-harassment claims

Facebook on Friday became the latest tech company to end a policy of requiring employees to settle claims of sexual harassment through private arbitration, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal. It will now allow employees to take these types of claims to court. Tech companies have long used arbitration as a method for handling instances of sexual harassment to prevent employees from suing them in court, but that’s starting to change. Facebook’s move comes shortly after a similar move


Facebook on Friday became the latest tech company to end a policy of requiring employees to settle claims of sexual harassment through private arbitration, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal. It will now allow employees to take these types of claims to court. Tech companies have long used arbitration as a method for handling instances of sexual harassment to prevent employees from suing them in court, but that’s starting to change. Facebook’s move comes shortly after a similar move
Facebook follows Google to end mandatory arbitration for sexual-harassment claims Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: salvador rodriguez, jim watson, afp, getty images, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, handling, sexualharassment, google, employees, end, sexual, wall, follows, mandatory, claims, arbitration, week, harassment, facebook, company


Facebook follows Google to end mandatory arbitration for sexual-harassment claims

Facebook on Friday became the latest tech company to end a policy of requiring employees to settle claims of sexual harassment through private arbitration, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal. It will now allow employees to take these types of claims to court.

Tech companies have long used arbitration as a method for handling instances of sexual harassment to prevent employees from suing them in court, but that’s starting to change. Facebook’s move comes shortly after a similar move this week by Google, which came after thousands of its employees walked out in protest last week over its handling of sexual harassment complaints. In particular, those Google employees were protesting how the company reportedly gave large exit packages to departing executives after credible claims of sexual misconduct.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: salvador rodriguez, jim watson, afp, getty images, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, handling, sexualharassment, google, employees, end, sexual, wall, follows, mandatory, claims, arbitration, week, harassment, facebook, company


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