Wall Street analysts are sticking by these stocks hit hard by the trade war

The Dow dropped a s much 719 points on Monday as the trade war continued its escalation but is higher in early trading on Tuesday. CNBC did a deep dive through sell-side stock research since the trade war escalated to find companies that analysts are singling out in their respective coverage universes. Wall Street analysts aren’t backing down from their buy ratings on stocks that have been hit hard in the latest trade battle between the U.S. and China. Wall Street will be watching Alibaba’s earn


The Dow dropped a s much 719 points on Monday as the trade war continued its escalation but is higher in early trading on Tuesday. CNBC did a deep dive through sell-side stock research since the trade war escalated to find companies that analysts are singling out in their respective coverage universes. Wall Street analysts aren’t backing down from their buy ratings on stocks that have been hit hard in the latest trade battle between the U.S. and China. Wall Street will be watching Alibaba’s earn
Wall Street analysts are sticking by these stocks hit hard by the trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, sticking, buy, analysts, wall, earnings, trade, hard, street, tariffs, services, hit, chinese, china, company, stocks


Wall Street analysts are sticking by these stocks hit hard by the trade war

Apple CEO Tim Cook attends the annual session of China Development Forum (CDF) 2018 at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China March 26, 2018.

The Dow dropped a s much 719 points on Monday as the trade war continued its escalation but is higher in early trading on Tuesday.

CNBC did a deep dive through sell-side stock research since the trade war escalated to find companies that analysts are singling out in their respective coverage universes.

Wall Street analysts aren’t backing down from their buy ratings on stocks that have been hit hard in the latest trade battle between the U.S. and China. While the two countries continue slapping tariffs on each other, many analysts say clients should use the market weakness as a time to buy these beaten down shares because the risks are overblown.

Wall Street will be watching Alibaba’s earnings report on Wednesday for any signs of the trade war effect on the Chinese e-commerce giant.

The most recent actions by the White House have brought “greater uncertainty,” to the company, but SunTrust analysts are sticking with their buy rated call. “The latest data out of National Bureau of Statistics of China suggests that the macro environment has been improving, a positive for Chinese consumption, and for BABA in particular,” analyst Youssef Squali said.

“Long term we view BABA as a winner considering 1) its dominance of the Chinese ecom. mkt and the insatiable appetite for China’s growing middle class, 2) it’s a 25%+ compounder over the next 5 yrs (our ests), and 3) its portfolio of strategic invests,” he added.

Shares of the company are down 4% over the last week.

Apple has also been hit hard by the ongoing trade uncertainty, but Wedbush analysts say things might not be as bad as they appear.

“That said, for Apple in particular we believe the way things stand today the bark will be worse than the bite for Cupertino around China headwinds and we would be buyers of the name on weakness,” said analyst Dan Ives who’s keeping his outperform rating on the stock.

Apple, which was the worst performer on the Dow on Monday, is down more than 8% over the last week.

Despite the trade dispute, Credit Suisse analysts are not backing down from their calls on some business services stocks.

Alarm.com, provides cloud services for remote control home monitoring services and has an outperform rating at the firm.

The company recently reported earnings and stated that tariffs were indeed having an effect.

“ALRM highlighted on its most recent earnings call that higher tariffs have modestly impacted hardware sales,” analyst Kevin McVeigh said.

The stock is down more than 15% over the last week.

Here are other buy-rated stocks analysts are sticking by in the trade war:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, sticking, buy, analysts, wall, earnings, trade, hard, street, tariffs, services, hit, chinese, china, company, stocks


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Flipkart co-founder explains why foreign companies often struggle to succeed in India

Many foreign companies find it tough to succeed in India. Bansal, one of the co-founders of the Indian e-commerce giant, told CNBC that India is “definitely a very different market than Western markets.” Foreign direct investments would only be allowed into e-commerce companies that provide marketplaces for buyers and sellers, according to the new rules. The new rules took effect in February, and followed complaints from local Indian retailers and traders about anti-competitive practices from th


Many foreign companies find it tough to succeed in India. Bansal, one of the co-founders of the Indian e-commerce giant, told CNBC that India is “definitely a very different market than Western markets.” Foreign direct investments would only be allowed into e-commerce companies that provide marketplaces for buyers and sellers, according to the new rules. The new rules took effect in February, and followed complaints from local Indian retailers and traders about anti-competitive practices from th
Flipkart co-founder explains why foreign companies often struggle to succeed in India Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, explains, local, foreign, ecommerce, companies, bansal, struggle, pangarkar, hard, cofounder, succeed, policies, profits, india, flipkart, indian


Flipkart co-founder explains why foreign companies often struggle to succeed in India

Many foreign companies find it tough to succeed in India. One reason, according to Flipkart co-founder Binny Bansal, is their inability to deal with India’s unique environment, as well as the frequent policy changes by the government. Bansal, one of the co-founders of the Indian e-commerce giant, told CNBC that India is “definitely a very different market than Western markets.” Speaking to CNBC’s Christine Tan at the Credit Suisse Global Supertrends Conference in Singapore in April, he said: “For Flipkart, we had to start our logistics arm on our own, which is something you don’t see happening globally. So you have to do things in a different way because of how the market is structured.” That ability to learn to “do things on your own” and scale up “becomes an advantage for Indian startups, (which) can compete better,” said Bansal. That’s not the “strength of a lot of foreign companies,” he added.

Things take a lot of time and capital to really develop and mature, and if policies keep changing, then every second or third year, it becomes very hard for everyone. Binny Bansal co-founder of Flipkart

Flipkart’s logistics arm, called eKart, was founded in 2010. Its Western competitor, Amazon, started calling itself a transportation service provider for the first time in 2016. It was only in recent years that Amazon significantly expanded its logistics footprint, leasing dozens of aircraft and thousands of trucks to handle some of its massive shipments.

New e-commerce rules

Recent developments have made it difficult for foreign companies to compete in Asia’s third-largest economy. Last December, the Indian government effectively banned Amazon and Flipkart, which is owned by Walmart, from selling products of companies in which they have an equity stake. The government announced that e-commerce firms could no longer form exclusive selling arrangements with sellers or offer steep discounts to consumers based on those deals. Foreign direct investments would only be allowed into e-commerce companies that provide marketplaces for buyers and sellers, according to the new rules. The new rules took effect in February, and followed complaints from local Indian retailers and traders about anti-competitive practices from the likes of Amazon and Flipkart. That same month, the Indian government again outlined more regulations for the sector, focusing on data measures and improved privacy safeguards. That followed a move by the central bank in 2018 that forced payments providers — such as Mastercard and Visa — to store Indian users’ data locally.

Those changes in policies have made the environment even tougher to navigate, said Bansal. “Things take a lot of time and capital to really develop and mature, and if policies keep changing, then every second or third year, it becomes very hard for everyone. For large companies it becomes hard to navigate, for small companies it just becomes hard to start and survive,” he said, at the conference. “When we started, there were very few policies. But in 2018, 19, if you want to start an e-commerce company, you have to really go through what can you do, what can you not do,” Bansal continued.

Uncertainty looms

Amazon’s Chief Financial Officer Brian Olsavsky said in a call with analysts in January that there is “much uncertainty” regarding the impact of the rule changes on India’s e-commerce sector. “Our main issue and our main concern is trying to minimize the impact to our customers and sellers in India,” he had said. But one expert told CNBC that some sectors are more vulnerable than others, especially those that are “driven by politics.” “Generally, retail is politicized because it has a number of small businesses that can make money only if the pricing remains firm (less competition),” said Nitin Pangarkar, an associate professor at the National University of Singapore Business School. “Retail also employs lots of people. That is why politicians will protect local retailers whose profits (and possibly existence) may be challenged by multinationals,” he added. “Many other sectors may not face as much scrutiny or regulation.”

Regardless of industry, however, India has some inherent challenges that companies have to learn to navigate. Infrastructure is still bad, while work ethics and productivity in the country have not caught up with workers in other countries, according to Pangarkar. Still, some companies — particularly those in the consumer goods industry — have found success and even built profits in the Indian market, he said, pointing to multinational companies such as Unilever and Nestle as examples. But beyond looking at the traditional definition of success, Pangarkar said companies should use their India operations to benefit themselves in some way. “The key is to have a multi-dimensional view of success — not just local profits but how the Indian operation can contribute to the whole. For example, IBM employs lots of software developers in India and the low cost software coming from the Indian labs might enhance its overall competitiveness which is not reflected in local profits,” Pangarkar noted. — CNBC’s Saheli Roy Choudhury and Eugene Kim contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, explains, local, foreign, ecommerce, companies, bansal, struggle, pangarkar, hard, cofounder, succeed, policies, profits, india, flipkart, indian


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Trump’s escalated trade war with China could hit California ports especially hard

They say the major California ports, which serve as a gateway to trade with China, have already been hit on the export side due to Beijing’s retaliatory tariffs on U.S. agricultural and other products. For one, China represents about 60% of the trade volumes at the Port of Los Angeles, the busiest container port in the nation. “On the export side, we’ve been hammered,” said Gene Seroka, executive director of the Port of Los Angeles. Experts warn California ports could see a further slowdown in v


They say the major California ports, which serve as a gateway to trade with China, have already been hit on the export side due to Beijing’s retaliatory tariffs on U.S. agricultural and other products. For one, China represents about 60% of the trade volumes at the Port of Los Angeles, the busiest container port in the nation. “On the export side, we’ve been hammered,” said Gene Seroka, executive director of the Port of Los Angeles. Experts warn California ports could see a further slowdown in v
Trump’s escalated trade war with China could hit California ports especially hard Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, california, especially, port, trumps, impact, los, china, hit, war, say, ports, escalated, long, hard, tariffs, trade


Trump's escalated trade war with China could hit California ports especially hard

An American flag flies as cranes for shipping containers stand in the distance at the Port of Los Angeles.

LOS ANGELES — An escalation of trade tensions between the U.S. and China, including President Donald Trump’s threat to punish Beijing with additional tariffs, could deal a severe blow to California’s ports and economy, potentially putting at risk thousands of jobs, according to experts.

They say the major California ports, which serve as a gateway to trade with China, have already been hit on the export side due to Beijing’s retaliatory tariffs on U.S. agricultural and other products. For one, China represents about 60% of the trade volumes at the Port of Los Angeles, the busiest container port in the nation.

On Sunday, Trump tweeted he was prepared to increase tariffs from 10% to up to 25% on $200 billion of Chinese goods this week. In February, Trump announced he would delay an increase in Chinese tariffs, citing progress in talks — and then in early April the president indicated a deal was “very close.”

“On the export side, we’ve been hammered,” said Gene Seroka, executive director of the Port of Los Angeles. “We call for a negotiated settlement so we can get moving in the direction that we need to.”

Seroka said exports to China last year declined by about 25%, and as a region and port declined on exports to China by about 22%. He said cargo that goes through the port includes items not only produced in California but coming via rail from Midwestern states, including soybeans.

“We imported a heck of a lot more last year than we exported,” he said.

Besides food and agricultural items, Seroka said other sectors already hit by the trade war on the export side are electronic products, household goods and recyclables. He said many were down double-digit percentage levels in 2018 from the prior year.

Overall, California represented a 15.4% share of total U.S. exports to China in the year-to-date period through February, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. The Golden State also accounted for nearly 30% of all imports from China, which includes goods received at seaports and airports.

Experts warn California ports could see a further slowdown in volumes of trade between the U.S. and China from new tariffs.

“The impact of that will be felt most directly at the ports of LA and Long Beach, and all of the tens of thousands of people whose livelihoods are directly tied to the fluid movement of containers through those two maritime gateways,” said Jock O’Connell, a Sacramento, California-based international trade advisor for Beacon Economics, a research and consulting firm. “That in itself could have a very dramatic effect on employment in Southern California.”

Jobs at risk include dock workers and truckers, as well as rail and other trade-related jobs.

According to Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. estimates, the international trade sector is responsible for over 160,000 jobs in that county alone. Other estimates indicate the twin LA and Long Beach ports represent more than 500,000 jobs when including the five-county Southern California region.

“We’re concerned about the potential impact, not only with regard to the tariff as it applies to Chinese imports but of course the expected action by China — some form of retaliation on American exporters,” said Mario Cordero, executive director of California’s Port of Long Beach, the nation’s second-largest container port. “Any time you have market uncertainty by way of tariff applications, I think that does put an additional factor that could impact the economy.”

Also, on the import side, experts say the uncertainty of not knowing how long the trading war will last and where it will go is a headache for U.S. retailers and others. Last year, some importers rushed to beat increased tariffs of 25% that the administration had previously threatened would go into effect Jan. 1, 2019.

So far, observers say expansion of tariffs will likely impact everything from clothing and footwear to consumer electronics.

“The public will definitely begin to feel the impact of the tariffs,” said O’Connell. “That will happen nationally, but to the extent that California consumers are sensitive to higher prices because of other high costs of living here, that will have a particularly egregious effect.”

Moreover, O’Connell said he expects Beijing will likely retaliate if they can’t work things out in Washington.

O’Connell said China could impose new tariffs on electronic components and chips, including items made by companies such as San Diego-based Qualcomm. The economist added that Boeing commercial aircraft also could face tariffs from China and noted that up to 2,600 vendors in California supply components on those planes.

China’s foreign ministry indicated Monday that a trade delegation still plans to visit Washington later this week. However, the ministry didn’t say whether the delegation would be headed by a high-level trade official, such as Vice Premier Liu He.

“It is concerning in terms of the length of the trade war and tariff discussions,” said Cordero. “However, we remain optimistic that there will be some resolution.”

— Graphics by CNBC’s John Schoen.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, california, especially, port, trumps, impact, los, china, hit, war, say, ports, escalated, long, hard, tariffs, trade


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Europe backs copyright overhaul that threatens to hit YouTube and Facebook hard

EU countries approved sweeping reforms to the bloc’s copyright laws on Monday, marking a symbolic end to a political battle that has pitted tech giants against high-profile media figures. The copyright directive was backed by 19 countries at an EU Council vote, with six member states — including Italy and the Netherlands — voting against it. This means they will have to acquire licenses from rights holders to be able to host such content in the first place. The EU, however, says this won’t be th


EU countries approved sweeping reforms to the bloc’s copyright laws on Monday, marking a symbolic end to a political battle that has pitted tech giants against high-profile media figures. The copyright directive was backed by 19 countries at an EU Council vote, with six member states — including Italy and the Netherlands — voting against it. This means they will have to acquire licenses from rights holders to be able to host such content in the first place. The EU, however, says this won’t be th
Europe backs copyright overhaul that threatens to hit YouTube and Facebook hard Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: ryan browne, emmanuele contini, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, tech, able, wont, eu, youtube, countries, overhaul, law, hard, worry, europe, copyright, content, hit, backs, threatens


Europe backs copyright overhaul that threatens to hit YouTube and Facebook hard

EU countries approved sweeping reforms to the bloc’s copyright laws on Monday, marking a symbolic end to a political battle that has pitted tech giants against high-profile media figures.

The copyright directive was backed by 19 countries at an EU Council vote, with six member states — including Italy and the Netherlands — voting against it. Three countries abstained from the vote.

The legislation, which was passed by lawmakers at the EU Parliament last month, aims to update Europe’s rules on copyright to reflect the challenges posed by the age of information. But it’s been criticized by the likes of Google and internet freedom campaigners who worry it will result in censorship.

One of the most heavily scrutinized aspects of the law, Article 13 — or 17 as it’s now numbered — would make tech firms liable for copyright breaches. This means they will have to acquire licenses from rights holders to be able to host such content in the first place.

Opponents of the law say this will lead to controversial filtering systems that block everything from memes to GIFs before they’re even uploaded. The EU, however, says this won’t be the case, claiming that people will still be able to share such content freely.

Either way, it’s expected to hit platforms that rely on user-generated content — like YouTube, Facebook and Instagram — hard.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: ryan browne, emmanuele contini, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, tech, able, wont, eu, youtube, countries, overhaul, law, hard, worry, europe, copyright, content, hit, backs, threatens


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Fading fears of a ‘hard landing’ for China’s economy could push stocks higher, strategist predicts

Hofer cautioned that more data is needed to confirm whether a “soft landing” will be achieved. And if it is, stocks will likely push higher, he predicted, while pointing out that it will not be at the pace seen so far this year. “But at least we can hold on to what we have, which is already quite important, and so profit-taking should actually be quite minimal,” Hofer said. Speaking earlier on CNBC’s “Street Signs,” Hofer described such a deal as one that contains methods for enforcement and mon


Hofer cautioned that more data is needed to confirm whether a “soft landing” will be achieved. And if it is, stocks will likely push higher, he predicted, while pointing out that it will not be at the pace seen so far this year. “But at least we can hold on to what we have, which is already quite important, and so profit-taking should actually be quite minimal,” Hofer said. Speaking earlier on CNBC’s “Street Signs,” Hofer described such a deal as one that contains methods for enforcement and mon
Fading fears of a ‘hard landing’ for China’s economy could push stocks higher, strategist predicts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, strategist, quite, visible, landing, stocks, push, fears, economy, hofer, earlier, yearbut, hard, predicts, likely, china, higher, fading, deal, quarter


Fading fears of a 'hard landing' for China's economy could push stocks higher, strategist predicts

Hofer cautioned that more data is needed to confirm whether a “soft landing” will be achieved. And if it is, stocks will likely push higher, he predicted, while pointing out that it will not be at the pace seen so far this year.

“But at least we can hold on to what we have, which is already quite important, and so profit-taking should actually be quite minimal,” Hofer said.

The strategist said that a further “gentle 5, 10, 15 percent” in gains is possible the rest of the year, adding that “green shoots of recovery” are visible and will likely increase.

“And if you do have that U.S.-China trade deal that we’re expecting, which is a higher quality one, then investor sentiment in China is going to go through the roof and it should be relatively clear sailing,” he said.

Speaking earlier on CNBC’s “Street Signs,” Hofer described such a deal as one that contains methods for enforcement and monitoring.

“If all we get is an agreement from China to buy more U.S. agricultural product, I think the market will be very disappointed with that,” he said.

China is scheduled to release economic growth numbers for the first quarter of 2019 on Wednesday and economists polled by Reuters expect GDP to increase 6.3 percent from the same period last year. China’s economy grew 6.4 percent in the last quarter of 2018 from a year earlier.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, strategist, quite, visible, landing, stocks, push, fears, economy, hofer, earlier, yearbut, hard, predicts, likely, china, higher, fading, deal, quarter


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The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era

Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more. The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information. Ass


Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more. The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information. Ass
The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: kate fazzini, henry nicholls
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, modern, shows, helped, era, 2010, data, media, manning, allegedly, classified, assange, indictment, protect, diplomatic, hard, wikileaks, information


The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era

The indictment describes a relationship that ran from January to May 2010. During that time, Chelsea Manning, an Army intelligence analyst then known as Bradley Manning, sent “nearly complete” databases from U.S. government agencies to Wikileaks at Assange’s request. The data included 90,000 Afghan war reports, 400,000 Iraq war reports, 800 assessment briefs of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay and 250,000 diplomatic cables.

Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more.

Assange is alleged to have helped Manning break a password associated with the U.S. government’s Secret Internet Protocol Network, encouraged Manning to provide various records and information from several different departments and helped Manning conceal her identity while doing it.

The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. For this, Manning used a Linux-based software tool, the Justice Department alleges, though it’s unclear where Manning obtained the software.

These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information.

Assange also allegedly pushed Manning for more information.

“After this upload, that’s all I really have got left,” Manning allegedly said in early 2010 after the initial leaks.

“Curious eyes never run dry in my experience,” Assange replied, according to the indictment.

The army arrested Manning for the leaks in July 2010. Wikileaks publicly released the data starting later that year.

Assange used the diplomatic cables to take U.S. government officials and media outlets on a months-long ride, involving promises of massive file dumps, allegedly damaging data held as “insurance,” and various other teases throughout 2010. The data dumps provided Wikileaks with significant media attention and caused diplomatic headaches and long-lasting repercussions in the relationships between the U.S. and its European allies.

Manning has said she leaked the information to Wikileaks because of grave concerns that media and government portrayals of success in Iraq and Afghanistan were a stark contrast to the starker, uglier reality she had been observing in her Army role.

At her sentencing in August 2013, she said, “When I made these decisions I believed I was going to help people, not hurt people. At the time of my decisions I was dealing with a lot of issues.” She was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

Throughout her court martial, Manning was often described by her attorneys as “emotionally fragile,” and she said she became involved with Wikileaks staffers because they sympathized with her personally and made her feel like she could “be myself.” Manning has so far fought a subpoena to testify in the case against Assange.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: kate fazzini, henry nicholls
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, modern, shows, helped, era, 2010, data, media, manning, allegedly, classified, assange, indictment, protect, diplomatic, hard, wikileaks, information


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The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era

Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more. The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information. Ass


Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more. The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information. Ass
The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: kate fazzini, henry nicholls
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, modern, shows, helped, era, 2010, data, media, manning, allegedly, classified, assange, indictment, protect, diplomatic, hard, wikileaks, information


The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era

The indictment describes a relationship that ran from January to May 2010. During that time, Chelsea Manning, an Army intelligence analyst then known as Bradley Manning, sent “nearly complete” databases from U.S. government agencies to Wikileaks at Assange’s request. The data included 90,000 Afghan war reports, 400,000 Iraq war reports, 800 assessment briefs of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay and 250,000 diplomatic cables.

Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more.

Assange is alleged to have helped Manning break a password associated with the U.S. government’s Secret Internet Protocol Network, encouraged Manning to provide various records and information from several different departments and helped Manning conceal her identity while doing it.

The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. For this, Manning used a Linux-based software tool, the Justice Department alleges, though it’s unclear where Manning obtained the software.

These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information.

Assange also allegedly pushed Manning for more information.

“After this upload, that’s all I really have got left,” Manning allegedly said in early 2010 after the initial leaks.

“Curious eyes never run dry in my experience,” Assange replied, according to the indictment.

The army arrested Manning for the leaks in July 2010. Wikileaks publicly released the data starting later that year.

Assange used the diplomatic cables to take U.S. government officials and media outlets on a months-long ride, involving promises of massive file dumps, allegedly damaging data held as “insurance,” and various other teases throughout 2010. The data dumps provided Wikileaks with significant media attention and caused diplomatic headaches and long-lasting repercussions in the relationships between the U.S. and its European allies.

Manning has said she leaked the information to Wikileaks because of grave concerns that media and government portrayals of success in Iraq and Afghanistan were a stark contrast to the starker, uglier reality she had been observing in her Army role.

At her sentencing in August 2013, she said, “When I made these decisions I believed I was going to help people, not hurt people. At the time of my decisions I was dealing with a lot of issues.” She was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

Throughout her court martial, Manning was often described by her attorneys as “emotionally fragile,” and she said she became involved with Wikileaks staffers because they sympathized with her personally and made her feel like she could “be myself.” Manning has so far fought a subpoena to testify in the case against Assange.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: kate fazzini, henry nicholls
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, modern, shows, helped, era, 2010, data, media, manning, allegedly, classified, assange, indictment, protect, diplomatic, hard, wikileaks, information


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I was ‘credit invisible.’ That made it very hard to have a life

To make matters worse, I applied for a new personal cell phone plan and was denied. It was an abrupt lesson that, in the eyes of any lender in America, I was “credit invisible.” One in every 10 U.S. adults is credit invisible, or without any credit history on record at the three major credit reporting companies. Unable to get a lease because of no credit history, I ended up staying in corporate housing — for four months. I had to rely on a company cell phone.


To make matters worse, I applied for a new personal cell phone plan and was denied. It was an abrupt lesson that, in the eyes of any lender in America, I was “credit invisible.” One in every 10 U.S. adults is credit invisible, or without any credit history on record at the three major credit reporting companies. Unable to get a lease because of no credit history, I ended up staying in corporate housing — for four months. I had to rely on a company cell phone.
I was ‘credit invisible.’ That made it very hard to have a life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-03  Authors: samantha barry, editor in chief at glamour, fizkes, getty images, -samantha barry
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worse, york, job, company, life, credit, cell, invisible, working, hard, phone, history, wouldnt


I was 'credit invisible.' That made it very hard to have a life

In 2014, I landed at New York City’s JFK airport, three overstuffed suitcases in tow, incredibly excited about my new job in a new city. I’d spent more than a decade working as a journalist in Ireland, where I grew up, and the U.K., and now I was going to be running social media for CNN in their New York office.

I had a week to find a place, unpack the boxes en route from home and start my job. I was ready!

As I started my search for the perfect downtown apartment, my broker warned me that it wouldn’t be easy. To make matters worse, I applied for a new personal cell phone plan and was denied.

It was an abrupt lesson that, in the eyes of any lender in America, I was “credit invisible.”

One in every 10 U.S. adults is credit invisible, or without any credit history on record at the three major credit reporting companies. I had years and years of spending and saving and establishing my credit in Europe, but none of that had traveled with me across the Atlantic.

Unable to get a lease because of no credit history, I ended up staying in corporate housing — for four months. I had to rely on a company cell phone. These company perks aren’t available to everyone, so I was immensely lucky.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-03  Authors: samantha barry, editor in chief at glamour, fizkes, getty images, -samantha barry
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worse, york, job, company, life, credit, cell, invisible, working, hard, phone, history, wouldnt


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Blackstone CEO: A hard Brexit would send UK into a recession

Blackstone CEO: A hard Brexit would send UK into a recession12:30 AM ET Sat, 23 March 2019Stephen Schwarzman, CEO of Blackstone, talks to CNBC’s Eunice Yoon on Saturday on the sidelines of the China Development Forum. He says Brexit is quite “confounding” and the U.K. doesn’t appear to be prepared for a hard exit, which would hit Britain “very hard.”


Blackstone CEO: A hard Brexit would send UK into a recession12:30 AM ET Sat, 23 March 2019Stephen Schwarzman, CEO of Blackstone, talks to CNBC’s Eunice Yoon on Saturday on the sidelines of the China Development Forum. He says Brexit is quite “confounding” and the U.K. doesn’t appear to be prepared for a hard exit, which would hit Britain “very hard.”
Blackstone CEO: A hard Brexit would send UK into a recession Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yoon, uk, schwarzman, brexit, send, talks, sidelines, hard, blackstone, recession, ceo


Blackstone CEO: A hard Brexit would send UK into a recession

Blackstone CEO: A hard Brexit would send UK into a recession

12:30 AM ET Sat, 23 March 2019

Stephen Schwarzman, CEO of Blackstone, talks to CNBC’s Eunice Yoon on Saturday on the sidelines of the China Development Forum. He says Brexit is quite “confounding” and the U.K. doesn’t appear to be prepared for a hard exit, which would hit Britain “very hard.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yoon, uk, schwarzman, brexit, send, talks, sidelines, hard, blackstone, recession, ceo


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