Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes doesn’t recall Zuckerberg discussing the Iraq War at Harvard

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes said on Friday that he doesn’t recall Mark Zuckerberg ever discussing the Iraq War during the early days of the company, contradicting recent comments from the CEO tying the war to his views on free speech. “I had never heard that before, and the internet had never heard that before,” Hughes said an event with the Bay Area Chapter of the American Constitution Society. Unlike other social media companies, Facebook has said it won’t ban political advertising nor wi


Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes said on Friday that he doesn’t recall Mark Zuckerberg ever discussing the Iraq War during the early days of the company, contradicting recent comments from the CEO tying the war to his views on free speech.
“I had never heard that before, and the internet had never heard that before,” Hughes said an event with the Bay Area Chapter of the American Constitution Society.
Unlike other social media companies, Facebook has said it won’t ban political advertising nor wi
Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes doesn’t recall Zuckerberg discussing the Iraq War at Harvard Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, remember, facebook, discussing, heard, harvard, hughes, iraq, cofounder, zuckerberg, mark, recall, role, doesnt, days


Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes doesn't recall Zuckerberg discussing the Iraq War at Harvard

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes said on Friday that he doesn’t recall Mark Zuckerberg ever discussing the Iraq War during the early days of the company, contradicting recent comments from the CEO tying the war to his views on free speech.

“I had never heard that before, and the internet had never heard that before,” Hughes said an event with the Bay Area Chapter of the American Constitution Society. “I don’t remember ever talking about that with Mark.”

Last month, Zuckerberg told an audience at Georgetown University that discussion about the Iraq War at Harvard, where he was a student, and on Facebook in its embryonic days, played a key role in his controversial positions on policing speech. Unlike other social media companies, Facebook has said it won’t ban political advertising nor will it play the role of fact-checker.

In claiming that Facebook was meant to promote dialogue about the Iraq War, which began in 2003, Zuckerberg took a departure from the well-known origin tale that includes the development of Facemash, a predecessor to Facebook where students could compare females at the college and decide who was more attractive.

Hughes said he takes Zuckerberg at his word and admits there’s a chance he may not remember the past correctly, as it’s been 15 years since Facebook was founded from their dorm room. But he indicated that it’s an unlikely tale.

“I was at protests protesting the Iraq War,” Hughes said. “I did not go to any with Mark Zuckerberg.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, remember, facebook, discussing, heard, harvard, hughes, iraq, cofounder, zuckerberg, mark, recall, role, doesnt, days


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Harvard’s endowment is worth $40 billion—here’s how it’s spent

But in the school’s 2018-2019 financial report , Harvard stressed that the endowment does not give the school full financial freedom. Harvard’s endowment is made up of more than 13,000 individual funds invested as a single entity and is overseen by the Harvard Management Company. Last year, the school borrowed $1.9 billion from the endowment to cover some of the school’s operating costs. Additionally, many schools — including Harvard — see their endowments as a way to assure that they will remai


But in the school’s 2018-2019 financial report , Harvard stressed that the endowment does not give the school full financial freedom.
Harvard’s endowment is made up of more than 13,000 individual funds invested as a single entity and is overseen by the Harvard Management Company.
Last year, the school borrowed $1.9 billion from the endowment to cover some of the school’s operating costs.
Additionally, many schools — including Harvard — see their endowments as a way to assure that they will remai
Harvard’s endowment is worth $40 billion—here’s how it’s spent Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schools, billionheres, harvards, spent, worth, harvard, financial, funds, including, used, students, school, endowment, costs


Harvard's endowment is worth $40 billion—here's how it's spent

“There is a common misconception that endowments, including Harvard’s, can be accessed like bank accounts, used for anything at any time as long as funds are available,” reads the report . “In reality, Harvard’s flexibility in spending from the endowment is limited by the fact that it is designed to last forever, which is crucial for an institution intended to serve generations of students and pursue research on big questions—questions that cannot be answered in one lifetime.”

But in the school’s 2018-2019 financial report , Harvard stressed that the endowment does not give the school full financial freedom.

Harvard’s endowment is made up of more than 13,000 individual funds invested as a single entity and is overseen by the Harvard Management Company.

Harvard Magazine and The Harvard Crimson report that the fund’s total value during the 2019 fiscal year is $40.9 billion — a $1.7 billion increase from the previous year.

Last year, the school borrowed $1.9 billion from the endowment to cover some of the school’s operating costs. About 35% of the school’s annual operating budget is covered this way. The remaining costs are covered by a combination of sources including student income (tuition paid by students) and donations made directly to the school, as opposed to those made towards the school’s endowment.

The school’s latest financial report states that 30% of endowment spending is flexible, while the remaining 70% is allocated to various costs. Twenty-four percent of endowment spending is used for professorships, 19% is used on scholarships and student support, 7% is used on research costs, 4% goes toward the school’s libraries and museums, 2% goes toward faculty and teaching, 1% is used for construction and 9% is used for “other” costs.

According to Harvard, “the two largest categories of funds support faculty and students, including professorships and financial aid for undergraduates, graduate fellowships, and student life and activities.”

During the 2016-2017 school year, Harvard committed $414 million toward financial aid, including roughly $175 million in need-based aid for undergraduates.

The school reports that about 70% of Harvard students receive some form of financial aid, and 55% of Harvard students receive need-based scholarship aid with average grant totals around $53,000.

While Harvard College enrolls 6,699 undergraduate students, the school also enrolls some 13,120 graduate and professional students. With such a large number of graduate students, it is unsurprising that the school uses some of the funds from its endowment toward this student population.

Fellowship amounts and totals vary by department and program, but students can search and apply for Harvard’s graduate fellowships using the school’s CARAT database.

Additionally, many schools — including Harvard — see their endowments as a way to assure that they will remain in operation for years to come.

in 2018, Harvard’s endowment was worth $39.2 billion, and the school used $1.8 billion from the fund to cover the University’s costs. According to The Washington Post, “At that spending rate, and assuming inflation of 2%, the endowment will have to generate a return of 7% a year just to maintain its value in today’s dollars, or 2.5 percentage points a year more than it generated over the last decade.”

Harvard’s endowment provided a 10% return in 2018 — but just 6.5% this year.

Representatives for the Harvard Management Company confirmed to CNBC Make It that these figures are accurate but declined to comment further.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schools, billionheres, harvards, spent, worth, harvard, financial, funds, including, used, students, school, endowment, costs


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19-year-old Mark Zuckerberg: ‘Issues about violating people’s privacy don’t seem to be surmountable’

Privacy concerns are a constant for Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg. Even as Zuckerberg testified before Congress about Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra on Wednesday, the CEO was asked about Facebook’s privacy violations. After Harvard’s computer services department complained about the site, Zuckerberg was brought before Harvard’s Administrative Board, accused of violating individual privacy, breaching security and violating copyrights with Facemash. “Issues about violating people’s privacy don’t s


Privacy concerns are a constant for Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg.
Even as Zuckerberg testified before Congress about Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra on Wednesday, the CEO was asked about Facebook’s privacy violations.
After Harvard’s computer services department complained about the site, Zuckerberg was brought before Harvard’s Administrative Board, accused of violating individual privacy, breaching security and violating copyrights with Facemash.
“Issues about violating people’s privacy don’t s
19-year-old Mark Zuckerberg: ‘Issues about violating people’s privacy don’t seem to be surmountable’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mark, peoples, issues, facebook, facebooks, users, facemash, privacy, dont, crimson, violating, site, surmountable, harvard, 19yearold, zuckerberg


19-year-old Mark Zuckerberg: 'Issues about violating people's privacy don't seem to be surmountable'

Privacy concerns are a constant for Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg. Even as Zuckerberg testified before Congress about Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra on Wednesday, the CEO was asked about Facebook’s privacy violations.

In light of what has unfolded over the last several years, including Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data scandal, comments Zuckerberg made about user privacy as a 19-year-old Harvard student seem ironic today.

In 2003, before Zuckerberg dropped out of Harvard to start Facebook, he created a site called Facemash; at the time, The Harvard Crimson described it as a “popular Harvard version of the Am I Hot or Not? website.”

After Harvard’s computer services department complained about the site, Zuckerberg was brought before Harvard’s Administrative Board, accused of violating individual privacy, breaching security and violating copyrights with Facemash.

Zuckerberg chose to shut down the site because he didn’t see a good way around the issues.

“Issues about violating people’s privacy don’t seem to be surmountable,” Zuckerberg told the Crimson about Facemash in an issue published in November 2003.

“I’m not willing to risk insulting anyone,” said a teenage Zuckerberg.

The Crimson article was recently resurfaced by Bloomberg’s Sarah Frier after Zuckerberg gave a speech at Georgetown University on Oct. 17. The speech defended Facebook’s stance on “freedom of expression,” including its decision not to ban or fact check political advertising on the site. (Frier referenced The Harvard Crimson story to make a point about Facebook’s origin.)

Despite a young Zuckerberg’s privacy concerns with Facemash (an admittedly small and short-lived operation), he of course went on to launch Facebook on Feb. 4, 2004, with co-founders Chris Hughes, Dustin Moskovitz and Eduardo Saverin.

Today, at 35, Zuckerberg and is worth $68 billion. Facebook has almost 40,000 full-time employees and more than 2.7 monthly active users across Facebook and its properties Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger.

In July, Facebook paid a $5 billion fine to consumer protection agency, the Federal Trade Commission, to settle a privacy violation claim.

The FTC began investigating Facebook in March 2018 after allegations that the data of 87 million Facebook users were accessed by the political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica, violating a user agreement requiring Facebook to give users clear notifications when their data was shared with third parties.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mark, peoples, issues, facebook, facebooks, users, facemash, privacy, dont, crimson, violating, site, surmountable, harvard, 19yearold, zuckerberg


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Harvard researchers say business leaders are making this one simple mistake with employees

Offering advice to workers is more effective than giving feedback, according to research from Harvard Business School. Harvard researchers reached the conclusion in an August report after conducting four separate experiments. 1,438 participants took part in the study, which included a field-based experiment, were asked to provide feedback or advice about someone’s task performance. The findings showed that people offered more “critical and actionable input” when giving advice. The report therefo


Offering advice to workers is more effective than giving feedback, according to research from Harvard Business School. Harvard researchers reached the conclusion in an August report after conducting four separate experiments. 1,438 participants took part in the study, which included a field-based experiment, were asked to provide feedback or advice about someone’s task performance. The findings showed that people offered more “critical and actionable input” when giving advice. The report therefo
Harvard researchers say business leaders are making this one simple mistake with employees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offering, advice, business, employees, researchers, feedback, making, mistake, constructive, say, experiment, report, input, past, harvard, simple, giving, leaders


Harvard researchers say business leaders are making this one simple mistake with employees

Offering advice to workers is more effective than giving feedback, according to research from Harvard Business School.

Harvard researchers reached the conclusion in an August report after conducting four separate experiments. 1,438 participants took part in the study, which included a field-based experiment, were asked to provide feedback or advice about someone’s task performance.

The findings showed that people offered more “critical and actionable input” when giving advice. In one experiment, where people were asked to offer input on a job application for a tutoring position, those providing advice presented 34% more ideas for improvement and 56% more suggestions as to how to do so.

Feedback, on the other hand, put the focus on how an employee had performed in the past, as opposed to offering a constructive, “clear path forward.” Honing in on past performance was also found more likely to restrict and narrow a person’s understanding of the task.

The report also said feedback was normally limited to specific times in the year — at work in the form of annual and quarterly reviews, or at school when students were awarded grades.

Some employees also said the feedback they received was “overly positive and lacks usefulness.”

The report therefore concluded employees in search of constructive feedback could benefit from seeking advice.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offering, advice, business, employees, researchers, feedback, making, mistake, constructive, say, experiment, report, input, past, harvard, simple, giving, leaders


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Here’s an example of the perfect LinkedIn profile summary, according to Harvard career experts

The LinkedIn profile summarySimply signing up for an account, quickly filling in the blanks and then letting your profile remain dormant won’t do you any good. Together, they make up what’s known as your “LinkedIn profile summary,” and it’s one of the first things people see when they visit your page. Below is an example of a strong LinkedIn profile summary, according to the career experts at Harvard: *** NAME:Jessica Yan PROFESSIONAL HEADLINE:Research Scientist | Ph.D. LinkedIn profile checklis


The LinkedIn profile summarySimply signing up for an account, quickly filling in the blanks and then letting your profile remain dormant won’t do you any good. Together, they make up what’s known as your “LinkedIn profile summary,” and it’s one of the first things people see when they visit your page. Below is an example of a strong LinkedIn profile summary, according to the career experts at Harvard: *** NAME:Jessica Yan PROFESSIONAL HEADLINE:Research Scientist | Ph.D. LinkedIn profile checklis
Here’s an example of the perfect LinkedIn profile summary, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, experts, summary, harvard, help, linkedin, heres, professional, network, career, profile, perfect, according, include, example, skills


Here's an example of the perfect LinkedIn profile summary, according to Harvard career experts

If you want to have a successful career, maintaining an online presence on LinkedIn is crucial. Not only is it an effective way to network with other professionals in your field, but it can get you noticed by others and potentially land you several job opportunities. In fact, I landed a great job at a major company because I regularly updated my profile and published career-related content almost daily. (That job ultimately inspired me to start my own company.) Believe it or not, that was six years ago — and today, LinkedIn has only become increasingly important.

The LinkedIn profile summary

Simply signing up for an account, quickly filling in the blanks and then letting your profile remain dormant won’t do you any good. Of the many elements that make up a strong profile, two of the most important ones are your professional headline and “About” section, explain career experts at Harvard University’s Office for Alumni Affairs and Career Advancement. Together, they make up what’s known as your “LinkedIn profile summary,” and it’s one of the first things people see when they visit your page. Your professional headline is especially important because it’s the text that gets displayed in search results for both Google and LinkedIn. Below is an example of a strong LinkedIn profile summary, according to the career experts at Harvard: *** NAME:

Jessica Yan PROFESSIONAL HEADLINE:

Research Scientist | Ph.D. Candidate | Data Analytics, Biotech, Pharma “ABOUT” SECTION:

I’m a research scientist working to better understand how neural activity motivates and shapes human behavior. My expertise includes project design and management, data analysis and interpretation, and the development and implementation of research tools. I enjoy generating new ideas and devising feasible solutions to broadly relevant problems. My colleagues would describe me as a driven, resourceful individual who maintains a positive, proactive attitude when faced with adversity. Currently, I’m seeking opportunities that will allow me to develop and promote technologies that benefit human health. Specific fields of interest include data analytics, biotechnology, and pharmaceuticals. *** Here’s what makes it a strong profile summary: Can be skimmed in 30 seconds or less

Professional headline is below 120 characters, lists career focus and components of work

Includes industry-related keywords, core skills, strengths, talents and interests

Well written in a professional style, no spelling and grammatical mistakes

Answers questions that provides deeper insight about the individual: What makes her unique? Where is her career headed? How would others describe her? What are her values and personal traits?

LinkedIn profile checklist

While your profile summary holds major emphasis, you’ll need to spend time on savvying up the rest of it. Here’s a quick checklist of the basics to help you get started: Upload your photo . Ideally, this should be done in professional attire. Profiles with photos are 14 times more likely to be viewed, according to the career experts.

. Ideally, this should be done in professional attire. Profiles with photos are 14 times more likely to be viewed, according to the career experts. Customize your public profile URL. The address should look something like: www.linkedin.com/in/yourname. This will make it easier for you to include it on business cards, resumes and email signatures.

The address should look something like: www.linkedin.com/in/yourname. This will make it easier for you to include it on business cards, resumes and email signatures. Enhance your profile with additional sections. Displaying further information (e.g., accomplishments, skills, volunteer experience, certifications, expertise) can also increase the amount of times people view your profile, notes LinkedIn. This, in turn, can help you build your network and connect to new opportunities.

Displaying further information (e.g., accomplishments, skills, volunteer experience, certifications, expertise) can also increase the amount of times people view your profile, notes LinkedIn. This, in turn, can help you build your network and connect to new opportunities. Elaborate on your work history in the “Experience” section. Use targeted keywords and include specific information about what you’ve done in your previous positions that led to measurable results. (Don’t lie about titles or duties; you’ll likely get called out by old colleagues — and it will be embarrassing.)

Use targeted keywords and include specific information about what you’ve done in your previous positions that led to measurable results. (Don’t lie about titles or duties; you’ll likely get called out by old colleagues — and it will be embarrassing.) Education : Include, in reverse chronological order, any programs or schools you went to.

: Include, in reverse chronological order, any programs or schools you went to. Customize your “Skills & Endorsements” section. Ensuring a relevant list of skills on your profile allows others in your network to endorse you. (Skills with the most endorsements will be listed first). This will also help others understand your strengths and match you with the right opportunities.

Ensuring a relevant list of skills on your profile allows others in your network to endorse you. (Skills with the most endorsements will be listed first). This will also help others understand your strengths and match you with the right opportunities. Include recommendations. These should come from former supervisors, coworkers, clients, vendors, professors or fellow students. (Basically, anyone who will have good things to say about you and your work.)

Be an active member and build your network


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, experts, summary, harvard, help, linkedin, heres, professional, network, career, profile, perfect, according, include, example, skills


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Harvard reviewing millions of dollars in donations late sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein gave to the Ivy League school

Harvard University is reviewing millions of dollars in donations that late sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein gave to the Ivy League school, the university’s president announced Thursday. “Jeffrey Epstein’s crimes were repulsive and reprehensible,” Harvard President Lawrence S. Bacow wrote. The president also said that the review has not found any donation from Epstein after he pleaded guilty to a sex crime in 2008. Microsoft founder Bill Gates, who helps oversee the massive Bill and Melinda Gates Fou


Harvard University is reviewing millions of dollars in donations that late sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein gave to the Ivy League school, the university’s president announced Thursday. “Jeffrey Epstein’s crimes were repulsive and reprehensible,” Harvard President Lawrence S. Bacow wrote. The president also said that the review has not found any donation from Epstein after he pleaded guilty to a sex crime in 2008. Microsoft founder Bill Gates, who helps oversee the massive Bill and Melinda Gates Fou
Harvard reviewing millions of dollars in donations late sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein gave to the Ivy League school Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: mike calia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reviewing, bill, millions, ivy, gates, jeffrey, epstein, school, president, review, harvard, harvards, wealthy, league, sex, gave, late


Harvard reviewing millions of dollars in donations late sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein gave to the Ivy League school

Harvard University is reviewing millions of dollars in donations that late sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein gave to the Ivy League school, the university’s president announced Thursday.

“Jeffrey Epstein’s crimes were repulsive and reprehensible,” Harvard President Lawrence S. Bacow wrote. “I profoundly regret Harvard’s past association with him. Conduct such as his has no place in our society.”

Bacow said the review is ongoing, and that it has already found that wealthy financier Epstein made several gifts to the school between 1998 and 2007, including a $6.5 million gift to Harvard’s Program of Evolutionary Dynamics. The president also said that the review has not found any donation from Epstein after he pleaded guilty to a sex crime in 2008.

The Boston Globe previously reported on the extent of Epstein’s largess toward Harvard.

Epstein, a former friend of Presidents Bill Clinton and Donald Trump, was known for working his way into wealthy and powerful circles. Microsoft founder Bill Gates, who helps oversee the massive Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, met with Epstein to discuss philanthropy several times years after Epstein had already served time for a sex crime. Epstein counted L Brands CEO Les Wexner as one of his few clients.

Epstein, 66, died last month in a jailhouse suicide after he had been hit with sex trafficking charges.

An indictment issued in federal court in Manhattan accused Epstein of sexually abusing dozens of minor girls from 2002 to 2005 at his homes in New York and Palm Beach, Florida.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: mike calia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reviewing, bill, millions, ivy, gates, jeffrey, epstein, school, president, review, harvard, harvards, wealthy, league, sex, gave, late


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Here’s an example of the perfect cover letter, according to Harvard career experts

That’s where the cover letter comes in. Linda Spencer, associate director and coordinator of career advising at Harvard Extension School, says that a solid cover letter answers two key questions: Why are you the right fit for the job? Here’s an example of what a strong cover letter looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge): Credit: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center Don’t know where to start?


That’s where the cover letter comes in. Linda Spencer, associate director and coordinator of career advising at Harvard Extension School, says that a solid cover letter answers two key questions: Why are you the right fit for the job? Here’s an example of what a strong cover letter looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge): Credit: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center Don’t know where to start?
Here’s an example of the perfect cover letter, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-23  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, example, skills, experts, company, according, heres, career, perfect, job, harvard, cover, youre, writing, letter, dont


Here's an example of the perfect cover letter, according to Harvard career experts

Found your dream job? Don’t be so confident that you’ll get hired: It’s very likely that there are several other qualified candidates competing for that same position. That’s where the cover letter comes in. Including a cover letter to complement your resume can be an effective way to impress hiring managers: It displays your strong writing skills, sets you apart from other applicants and shows that you went the extra mile. Linda Spencer, associate director and coordinator of career advising at Harvard Extension School, says that a solid cover letter answers two key questions: Why are you the right fit for the job? How will you add value to the organization? “It takes the average employer about seven seconds to review these documents,” says Spencer. “They’re not reading, they’re skimming. So you need to make it clear right off the bat how you can add value.” Here’s an example of what a strong cover letter looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge): Credit: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center Don’t know where to start? The career experts share tips on how to write a cover letter that stands out:

1. Address the letter to a specific person

“To whom it may concern” is one of the fastest ways to get your application deleted. Always try to address your letter to a specific person — usually the hiring manager or department head. Include their name, title, company and address at the very top below the date. If you don’t know who to address, LinkedIn is a great place to start. Simply enter the company name and some keywords into the search bar (e.g., “Google, hiring manager, sales”) and a variety of related profiles will appear.

2. Clearly state the purpose of your letter

Your opening line doesn’t need to be anything extravagant. In fact, it should be the complete opposite, according Harvard’s career experts. Keep it simple and straightforward: State why you’re writing, the position you’re applying for and, if applicable, how you found the job listing.

3. Don’t rehash your entire resume

You’re not writing a 1,000-word essay that summarizes your resume. The cover letter is your chance to explain why you’re genuinely interested in the company and its mission. No need to make it super formal, either. Use your own voice and add some personal flourishes to make the letter more interesting. “If you have relevant school or work experience, be sure to point it out with one or two key examples,” the career experts note. “Emphasize skills or abilities that relate to the job. Be sure to do this in a confident manner and keep in mind that the reader will also view your letter as an example of your writing skills.”

4. Use action words and don’t overuse the pronoun “I”

Instead of using flowery words and cliche claims like “fast thinker” and “highly creative,” go for action words. Here are a few examples of action verbs to use when highlighting specific skills: To demonstrate leadership skills : Accomplished, contracted, assigned, directed, orchestrated, headed, delegated

: Accomplished, contracted, assigned, directed, orchestrated, headed, delegated To demonstrate communication skills : Addressed, translated, presented, negotiated, moderated, promoted, edited

: Addressed, translated, presented, negotiated, moderated, promoted, edited To demonstrate research skills : Constructed, examined, critique, systematized, investigated, modeled, formulated

: Constructed, examined, critique, systematized, investigated, modeled, formulated To demonstrate creative skills: Revitalized, redesigned, developed, integrated, conceptualized, fashioned, shaped Avoid using too many “I” statements because it can come off as though you’re mostly interested in what you can gain from the company. The focus should be on what the company can gain from you.

5. Reiterate your enthusiasm and thank the reader

The closing of your letter should: Reiterate your interest in the position

Thank the reader for his or her consideration

State that you look forward hearing back from them

Include your signature at the very bottom

6. Keep your format consistent


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-23  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, example, skills, experts, company, according, heres, career, perfect, job, harvard, cover, youre, writing, letter, dont


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Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es


Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es
Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


Here's an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache.

But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience.

Certainly, they aren’t exactly the same (resumes shouldn’t be written in a narrative style), but both share a few similarities: They tell the truth, differentiate you from others, highlight your most unique qualities and capture readers’ attention.

Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):

IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center

Don’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the essential tips below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


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Stop asking, ‘Can I pick your brain?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice

Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. Identify the type of advice you’re seekingImmediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtful


Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. Identify the type of advice you’re seekingImmediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtful
Stop asking, ‘Can I pick your brain?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guidance, researchers, brain, problem, youre, type, question, stop, outcomes, advice, pick, harvard, margolis, say, successful, asking, conversation, ask


Stop asking, 'Can I pick your brain?' Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice

“Can I pick your brain?” Five words that make up the most thoughtless, irritating and generic way to ask for advice — and any person who is a rock star in their industry has heard it more than a dozen times. The phrase, while well-intentioned, is overused, vague and way too open-ended. When conversations start this way, there’s no telling where it’ll go or how long it’ll take. Don’t get me wrong: I’m all for giving — and receiving — advice. Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. If the exchange goes well, both parties benefit. “The whole interaction is a subtle and intricate art. It requires emotional intelligence, self-awareness, restraint, diplomacy and patience,” Harvard Business School professors Joshua D. Margolis and David A. Garvin wrote in a 2015 Harvard Business Review article. But the process can derail in many ways. It can quickly lead to “frustration, decision gridlock, subpar solutions, frayed relationships and thwarted personal development,” according to Margolis and Garvin. To avoid those consequences, here’s some guidance on how to ask for advice without annoying the other person:

Start with a positive tone

The way you initiate the conversation is everything. Instead of starting with, “Can I pick your brain,” shift the language to a more positive tone. When in doubt, I recommend: “I’d love your advice.” No-frills, friendly and simple.

Identify the type of advice you’re seeking

Immediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? What does my problem involve? What are my desired outcomes? Below are the four general types of advice, according to Garvin and Margolis’ research: Type of advice: Discrete

What it involves: Exploring options for a single decision

Desired outcomes: Recommendations in favor of or against specific options

Example question: “Where should we build the new factory — in China, Brazil or Eastern Europe?” Type of advice: Counsel

What it involves: Providing guidance on how to approach a complex or unfamiliar situation

Desired outcomes: A framework or process for navigating the situation

Example question: “How should I handle my domineering supervisor?” Type of advice: Coaching

What it involves: Enhancing skills, self-awareness and self-management

Desired outcomes: Task proficiency; personal and professional development

Example question: “How can I work more collaboratively with my peers?” Type of advice: Mentoring

What it involves: Providing opportunities, guidance and protection to aid career success

Desire outcomes: A relationship dedicated to building and sustaining professional and personal effectiveness and to career advancement

Example question: “How can I get more exposure for my project?” Just the other day, someone approached me for guidance, and her execution was perfect: “I’d love your advice. My company is asking me to relocate. There are several factors to consider and I’m not sure if I should do it. Do you have 45 minutes to chat?” Forty-five minutes is a lot, I know, but I appreciated the fact that she acknowledged it would be a longer conversation. I happily blocked off some time on my calendar and we ended up talking for an hour.

Come prepared with specific details

As you move further into the conversation, it’s important to clearly define the problem. Otherwise, you’re doing what I like to call a “bait-and-switch.” (This is another reason why you should never ask to pick someone’s brain; it makes the other person assume that the exchange will only take a few minutes. But more often than not, it ends up being a deep dive.) According to Margolis and Garvin, when you don’t come prepared with specific details about your problem, you’re more likely to end up “telling a lengthy, blow-by-blow story” that might cause the advice giver to tune out, lose focus or misidentify the core problem that needs solving. Simply put, don’t come into the conversation empty-handed. Put realistic guardrails on the conversation and include any essential background information that your advisor might not be familiar with. Providing specific details also keeps the conversation pleasant and interesting.

Ask the right person

Several field studies have discovered that advice seekers are more likely to ask for guidance from people they feel comfortable with, like a close friend or family member. “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtfulness of the advice,” Margolis and Garvin wrote. This is especially true if you’re seeking career-related advice. Think creatively about the expertise you need. Who will bring in the most valuable insight? Who has the most knowledge that’s relevant to your problem? For example, if you’re asking a seasoned CEO for advice involving your personal life, don’t expect to have lunch with Yoda. Your advisor is offering up valuable time to listen and provide professional feedback, not to hear you vent for an hour.

Don’t ask everyone

Things can backfire quickly if you run around asking a bunch of people for advice. Clearly, you won’t be able to follow everyone’s advice. “Research shows that those whose advice you don’t take may have a worse view of you afterward. They may even see you as less competent or avoid you, ” according to Hayley Blunden, a PhD student at Harvard Business School and co-author of the 2018 study, “The Interpersonal Costs of Ignoring Advice.” For example, a marketing executive who is widely respected is pleased when you ask her what to do about a particular situation, but is then less pleased when she finds out you didn’t do it. Remember, you’re not running a Gallup poll (but if you really are, then just say so).

Don’t assume you already know the answers

Garvin and Margolis pointed out that people often have a hard time “assessing their own competence and place too much faith in their intuition.” As a result, they end up asking for advice simply to gain validation or praise. Those who have a tendency to do this often believe they’ve already solved the problem, but just want confirmation or recognition from their bosses or peers. “It’s a dangerous game to play because they risk alienating their advisers when it becomes evident — and it will — that they’re requesting guidance just for show or to avoid additional work,” the professors noted.

Be grateful


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guidance, researchers, brain, problem, youre, type, question, stop, outcomes, advice, pick, harvard, margolis, say, successful, asking, conversation, ask


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Parkland shooting survivor says Harvard rescinded his admission after racist remarks surfaced

Kyle Kashuv, a recent graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., says that Harvard has withdrawn his acceptance after racist comments he says he made as a 16-year-old student surfaced online in May. A Harvard spokesperson tells CNBC Make It the school does not “comment publicly on the admissions status of individual applicants.” Harvard accepted 5.3% of applicants to its incoming undergraduate class, the lowest acceptance rate of any Ivy League school this year. This is


Kyle Kashuv, a recent graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., says that Harvard has withdrawn his acceptance after racist comments he says he made as a 16-year-old student surfaced online in May. A Harvard spokesperson tells CNBC Make It the school does not “comment publicly on the admissions status of individual applicants.” Harvard accepted 5.3% of applicants to its incoming undergraduate class, the lowest acceptance rate of any Ivy League school this year. This is
Parkland shooting survivor says Harvard rescinded his admission after racist remarks surfaced Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ivey, kashuv, harvard, offers, high, shooting, remarks, surfaced, racist, school, shared, parkland, admission, university, rescinded, survivor, thats


Parkland shooting survivor says Harvard rescinded his admission after racist remarks surfaced

Kyle Kashuv, a recent graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., says that Harvard has withdrawn his acceptance after racist comments he says he made as a 16-year-old student surfaced online in May.

Kashuv, 18, took to Twitter on Monday morning with a thread recounting his communication with the Ivy League school. He shared a letter from the university requesting a written explanation from Kashuv after his offensive remarks became public and said he responded with “full explanation, apology, and requested documents.”

He also shared a letter from the university revoking his admission. Dated June 3rd, it notes that “the Committee takes seriously the qualities of maturity and moral character.”

According to HuffPost, Kashuv’s offensive remarks, which included the repeated use of a racial slur, were originally circulated in a shared Google document as part of a class study guide. After screenshots of the doc including the remarks became public, Kashuv apologized on Twitter for his “callous and inflammatory language,” saying, “we were 16-year-olds making idiotic comments.”

Kashuv became widely known in the wake of the February 2018 Parkland shooting for his pro-gun stance – a counterweight to March For Our Lives activists. He is the former high school outreach director for the conservative non-profit organization Turning Point USA, and has met with President Trump at the White House, appeared on Fox News and spoken at conservative conferences.

A Harvard spokesperson tells CNBC Make It the school does not “comment publicly on the admissions status of individual applicants.” Harvard accepted 5.3% of applicants to its incoming undergraduate class, the lowest acceptance rate of any Ivy League school this year.

In his tweet thread on Monday, Kashuv said that he “had given up huge scholarships in order to go to Harvard” and that as the deadline for other college offers has passed, he’s “exploring all options at the moment.” CNBC Make It reached out to Kashuv but did not receive a response.

This is not the first time Harvard rescinded an admission offer after discovering bad behavior of its already accepted applicants online. The New York Times reports that in 2017, Harvard withdrew offers for at least 10 students who shared anti-Semitic and sexist messages in a private Facebook group.

Anna Ivey, the founder of Ivey Consulting, an admissions-counseling company, and former college admissions dean at the University of Chicago Law School, tells The Atlantic that college admittance offers are conditional — it isn’t too late to withdraw decisions once learning of new revelations about incoming students.

“Everything a kid does starting in 9th grade matters for admissions purposes,” Ivey said. “That’s sometimes a tough thing to hear, especially if it happened earlier in one’s high school years. But that’s the reality for applicants.”

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Don’t miss: Harvard’s freshman class is more than one-third legacy—here’s why that’s a problem


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ivey, kashuv, harvard, offers, high, shooting, remarks, surfaced, racist, school, shared, parkland, admission, university, rescinded, survivor, thats


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