Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es


Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
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Here's an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache.

But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience.

Certainly, they aren’t exactly the same (resumes shouldn’t be written in a narrative style), but both share a few similarities: They tell the truth, differentiate you from others, highlight your most unique qualities and capture readers’ attention.

Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):

IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center

Don’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the essential tips below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
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Stop asking, ‘Can I pick your brain?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice

Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. Identify the type of advice you’re seekingImmediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtful


Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. Identify the type of advice you’re seekingImmediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtful
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: gary burnison
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Stop asking, 'Can I pick your brain?' Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice

“Can I pick your brain?” Five words that make up the most thoughtless, irritating and generic way to ask for advice — and any person who is a rock star in their industry has heard it more than a dozen times. The phrase, while well-intentioned, is overused, vague and way too open-ended. When conversations start this way, there’s no telling where it’ll go or how long it’ll take. Don’t get me wrong: I’m all for giving — and receiving — advice. Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. If the exchange goes well, both parties benefit. “The whole interaction is a subtle and intricate art. It requires emotional intelligence, self-awareness, restraint, diplomacy and patience,” Harvard Business School professors Joshua D. Margolis and David A. Garvin wrote in a 2015 Harvard Business Review article. But the process can derail in many ways. It can quickly lead to “frustration, decision gridlock, subpar solutions, frayed relationships and thwarted personal development,” according to Margolis and Garvin. To avoid those consequences, here’s some guidance on how to ask for advice without annoying the other person:

Start with a positive tone

The way you initiate the conversation is everything. Instead of starting with, “Can I pick your brain,” shift the language to a more positive tone. When in doubt, I recommend: “I’d love your advice.” No-frills, friendly and simple.

Identify the type of advice you’re seeking

Immediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? What does my problem involve? What are my desired outcomes? Below are the four general types of advice, according to Garvin and Margolis’ research: Type of advice: Discrete

What it involves: Exploring options for a single decision

Desired outcomes: Recommendations in favor of or against specific options

Example question: “Where should we build the new factory — in China, Brazil or Eastern Europe?” Type of advice: Counsel

What it involves: Providing guidance on how to approach a complex or unfamiliar situation

Desired outcomes: A framework or process for navigating the situation

Example question: “How should I handle my domineering supervisor?” Type of advice: Coaching

What it involves: Enhancing skills, self-awareness and self-management

Desired outcomes: Task proficiency; personal and professional development

Example question: “How can I work more collaboratively with my peers?” Type of advice: Mentoring

What it involves: Providing opportunities, guidance and protection to aid career success

Desire outcomes: A relationship dedicated to building and sustaining professional and personal effectiveness and to career advancement

Example question: “How can I get more exposure for my project?” Just the other day, someone approached me for guidance, and her execution was perfect: “I’d love your advice. My company is asking me to relocate. There are several factors to consider and I’m not sure if I should do it. Do you have 45 minutes to chat?” Forty-five minutes is a lot, I know, but I appreciated the fact that she acknowledged it would be a longer conversation. I happily blocked off some time on my calendar and we ended up talking for an hour.

Come prepared with specific details

As you move further into the conversation, it’s important to clearly define the problem. Otherwise, you’re doing what I like to call a “bait-and-switch.” (This is another reason why you should never ask to pick someone’s brain; it makes the other person assume that the exchange will only take a few minutes. But more often than not, it ends up being a deep dive.) According to Margolis and Garvin, when you don’t come prepared with specific details about your problem, you’re more likely to end up “telling a lengthy, blow-by-blow story” that might cause the advice giver to tune out, lose focus or misidentify the core problem that needs solving. Simply put, don’t come into the conversation empty-handed. Put realistic guardrails on the conversation and include any essential background information that your advisor might not be familiar with. Providing specific details also keeps the conversation pleasant and interesting.

Ask the right person

Several field studies have discovered that advice seekers are more likely to ask for guidance from people they feel comfortable with, like a close friend or family member. “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtfulness of the advice,” Margolis and Garvin wrote. This is especially true if you’re seeking career-related advice. Think creatively about the expertise you need. Who will bring in the most valuable insight? Who has the most knowledge that’s relevant to your problem? For example, if you’re asking a seasoned CEO for advice involving your personal life, don’t expect to have lunch with Yoda. Your advisor is offering up valuable time to listen and provide professional feedback, not to hear you vent for an hour.

Don’t ask everyone

Things can backfire quickly if you run around asking a bunch of people for advice. Clearly, you won’t be able to follow everyone’s advice. “Research shows that those whose advice you don’t take may have a worse view of you afterward. They may even see you as less competent or avoid you, ” according to Hayley Blunden, a PhD student at Harvard Business School and co-author of the 2018 study, “The Interpersonal Costs of Ignoring Advice.” For example, a marketing executive who is widely respected is pleased when you ask her what to do about a particular situation, but is then less pleased when she finds out you didn’t do it. Remember, you’re not running a Gallup poll (but if you really are, then just say so).

Don’t assume you already know the answers

Garvin and Margolis pointed out that people often have a hard time “assessing their own competence and place too much faith in their intuition.” As a result, they end up asking for advice simply to gain validation or praise. Those who have a tendency to do this often believe they’ve already solved the problem, but just want confirmation or recognition from their bosses or peers. “It’s a dangerous game to play because they risk alienating their advisers when it becomes evident — and it will — that they’re requesting guidance just for show or to avoid additional work,” the professors noted.

Be grateful


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guidance, researchers, brain, problem, youre, type, question, stop, outcomes, advice, pick, harvard, margolis, say, successful, asking, conversation, ask


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Parkland shooting survivor says Harvard rescinded his admission after racist remarks surfaced

Kyle Kashuv, a recent graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., says that Harvard has withdrawn his acceptance after racist comments he says he made as a 16-year-old student surfaced online in May. A Harvard spokesperson tells CNBC Make It the school does not “comment publicly on the admissions status of individual applicants.” Harvard accepted 5.3% of applicants to its incoming undergraduate class, the lowest acceptance rate of any Ivy League school this year. This is


Kyle Kashuv, a recent graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., says that Harvard has withdrawn his acceptance after racist comments he says he made as a 16-year-old student surfaced online in May. A Harvard spokesperson tells CNBC Make It the school does not “comment publicly on the admissions status of individual applicants.” Harvard accepted 5.3% of applicants to its incoming undergraduate class, the lowest acceptance rate of any Ivy League school this year. This is
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: elizabeth gravier
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Parkland shooting survivor says Harvard rescinded his admission after racist remarks surfaced

Kyle Kashuv, a recent graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., says that Harvard has withdrawn his acceptance after racist comments he says he made as a 16-year-old student surfaced online in May.

Kashuv, 18, took to Twitter on Monday morning with a thread recounting his communication with the Ivy League school. He shared a letter from the university requesting a written explanation from Kashuv after his offensive remarks became public and said he responded with “full explanation, apology, and requested documents.”

He also shared a letter from the university revoking his admission. Dated June 3rd, it notes that “the Committee takes seriously the qualities of maturity and moral character.”

According to HuffPost, Kashuv’s offensive remarks, which included the repeated use of a racial slur, were originally circulated in a shared Google document as part of a class study guide. After screenshots of the doc including the remarks became public, Kashuv apologized on Twitter for his “callous and inflammatory language,” saying, “we were 16-year-olds making idiotic comments.”

Kashuv became widely known in the wake of the February 2018 Parkland shooting for his pro-gun stance – a counterweight to March For Our Lives activists. He is the former high school outreach director for the conservative non-profit organization Turning Point USA, and has met with President Trump at the White House, appeared on Fox News and spoken at conservative conferences.

A Harvard spokesperson tells CNBC Make It the school does not “comment publicly on the admissions status of individual applicants.” Harvard accepted 5.3% of applicants to its incoming undergraduate class, the lowest acceptance rate of any Ivy League school this year.

In his tweet thread on Monday, Kashuv said that he “had given up huge scholarships in order to go to Harvard” and that as the deadline for other college offers has passed, he’s “exploring all options at the moment.” CNBC Make It reached out to Kashuv but did not receive a response.

This is not the first time Harvard rescinded an admission offer after discovering bad behavior of its already accepted applicants online. The New York Times reports that in 2017, Harvard withdrew offers for at least 10 students who shared anti-Semitic and sexist messages in a private Facebook group.

Anna Ivey, the founder of Ivey Consulting, an admissions-counseling company, and former college admissions dean at the University of Chicago Law School, tells The Atlantic that college admittance offers are conditional — it isn’t too late to withdraw decisions once learning of new revelations about incoming students.

“Everything a kid does starting in 9th grade matters for admissions purposes,” Ivey said. “That’s sometimes a tough thing to hear, especially if it happened earlier in one’s high school years. But that’s the reality for applicants.”

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Don’t miss: Harvard’s freshman class is more than one-third legacy—here’s why that’s a problem


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: elizabeth gravier
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The brilliant life advice Charlie Munger gave at Harvard 24 years ago

Charlie Munger, like his business partner Warren Buffett, is a walking encyclopedia of investment history. But he’s also widely also known for his unique ability to inject timeless wisdom right when you need it most. He cites the murder of Kitty Genovese in 1964 to demonstrate how many people tend to adopt the most popular behavior. Munger also compares those bystanders to “big-shot businessmen” who, instead of betting against the market, simply make investments others are making. While social p


Charlie Munger, like his business partner Warren Buffett, is a walking encyclopedia of investment history. But he’s also widely also known for his unique ability to inject timeless wisdom right when you need it most. He cites the murder of Kitty Genovese in 1964 to demonstrate how many people tend to adopt the most popular behavior. Munger also compares those bystanders to “big-shot businessmen” who, instead of betting against the market, simply make investments others are making. While social p
The brilliant life advice Charlie Munger gave at Harvard 24 years ago Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-01  Authors: nicholas pearce, lacy o, toole
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decisions, ago, theres, munger, proof, charlie, business, right, values, 24, harvard, world, management, social, advice, life, gave, brilliant


The brilliant life advice Charlie Munger gave at Harvard 24 years ago

Charlie Munger, like his business partner Warren Buffett, is a walking encyclopedia of investment history. But he’s also widely also known for his unique ability to inject timeless wisdom right when you need it most.

The Berkshire Hathaway vice chairman has given several speeches on the intersection of psychology and economics. During one talk at Harvard University in 1995, he spoke extensively about the framework for decision-making and the psychological factors that influence us to make poor choices.

“I am very interested in the subject of human misjudgment, and Lord knows I’ve created a good bit of it,” Munger said before going on to share a handful of cognitive biases that interfere with our ability to make smart decisions in business and life.

I found all of them incredibly insightful — and worth listening to if you have an hour to spare — but there’s one that stood out in particular: “Now this is a lollapalooza, and Henry Kaufman wisely talked about this bias from over-influence by social proof,” Munger says. “It’s adopting the conclusions of others, particularly under conditions of natural uncertainty and stress.”

He cites the murder of Kitty Genovese in 1964 to demonstrate how many people tend to adopt the most popular behavior. “[…] all these people, I don’t know, 50, 60, 70 of them just sort of sat and did nothing while she was slowly murdered,” Munger says. “Now one of the explanations is that everybody looked at everybody else and nobody else was doing anything, and so there’s automatic social proof that the right thing to do is nothing.”

Munger also compares those bystanders to “big-shot businessmen” who, instead of betting against the market, simply make investments others are making.

“There are microeconomic ideas and gain/loss ratios and so forth that also come into play,” he continues. “I think time and time again, in reality, psychological notions and economic notions interplay, and the man who doesn’t understand both is a damned fool.”

Munger’s advice from 25 years ago ring truer than ever in today’s always-connected world, in which constant activity from social media can leave too little room for reflection. In my journey to discovering what I call a “Purpose Path,” I encountered several people — students, business executives, parishioners and their families — who felt they were living a life based on somebody else’s values.

Our lives are defined by the decisions we make, and when we fall into the trap of following the most popular behavior because of its social clout, we end up living an inauthentic life.

Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be that way, as Munger would likely agree. While social proof clearly permeates every aspect of our lives, we can make better decisions by being aware of the extent to which it influences us.

Munger’s words are also a reminder that, in a world with so much noise, it’s important to be guided by your highest values, and to allow those values to inform you of your life choices. This will challenge your thinking and encourage you to get off the “autopilot” of following others’ behaviors and instead determine how you want to leave a mark on the world.

Nicholas Pearce is a clinical professor of management and organizations at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. He is also the CEO of The Vocati Group and author of the new book “The Purpose Path: A Guide to Pursuing Your Authentic Life’s Work.” Pearce earned a B.S. in chemical engineering and management from MIT.

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Harvard professor says ‘winning a $20 million lottery won’t make you happier in life’—but these 4 things will

“Winning a $20 million lottery ticket won’t make you happier. In the talk, Chopra explains the four things that have been scientifically linked to happiness:1. A study from the University of Chicago and Northwestern University found that giving, rather than receiving, leads to long-term happiness. “Those who spent money on themselves reported a steady decline in happiness over the five-day period. Gratitude”There’s a wonderful anonymous quote that goes, ‘If you don’t know the language of gratitu


“Winning a $20 million lottery ticket won’t make you happier. In the talk, Chopra explains the four things that have been scientifically linked to happiness:1. A study from the University of Chicago and Northwestern University found that giving, rather than receiving, leads to long-term happiness. “Those who spent money on themselves reported a steady decline in happiness over the five-day period. Gratitude”There’s a wonderful anonymous quote that goes, ‘If you don’t know the language of gratitu
Harvard professor says ‘winning a $20 million lottery won’t make you happier in life’—but these 4 things will Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: kyle young
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Harvard professor says 'winning a $20 million lottery won't make you happier in life'—but these 4 things will

What makes us happy in life? It seems like a straightforward question, but it’s one that we find ourselves asking every day. There have been several possible answers as to where happiness comes from. One of the most debated concepts is that happiness comes from having more money. But Dr. Sanjiv Chopra, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, disagrees. “Winning a $20 million lottery ticket won’t make you happier. Research has shown that after one year, lottery winners go back to their baseline. Some are even less happy, ” he said in a TED Talk earlier this year. “A few probably spent their money on a big mansion or a fancy car. Maybe they spent it all on gambling. But even so, at the end of three months, it’s just a house, it’s just a nice car. You get used to it,” says Chopra, who has written a number of books about happiness. He calls this phenomenon hedonic adaptation, which is a concept that refers to people’s general tendency to return to a set level of happiness despite life’s ups and downs. In the talk, Chopra explains the four things that have been scientifically linked to happiness:

1. Friends and family

Developing a close bond with people we trust and confide in is essential to our overall well-being. “Choose your friends wisely and celebrate everything small and good with them,” Chopra says. Many others have stressed the importance of having deep and meaningful relationships. “The world is suffering from an epidemic of loneliness,” former U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy wrote in a 2017 Harvard Business Review article. “If we cannot rebuild strong, authentic social connections, we will continue to splinter apart — in the workplace and in society.”

Researchers have also warned that “loneliness and social isolation can be as damaging to health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day,” whereas friendships can “reduce the risk of mortality or developing certain diseases and can speed recovery in those who fall ill.”

2. Forgiveness

“The ability to forgive frees you from the burdens of hate and other unhealthy emotions that can negatively impact your happiness quotient,” says Chopra. He cites Nelson Mandela as a hero who truly mastered the art of forgiveness. In 1990, when the legendary freedom fighter emerged from his 27 years of prison, he was asked whether he had any resentment toward his captors. “I have no bitterness, I have no resentment. Resentment is like drinking poison and then hoping it will kill your enemies,” Mandela responded. Anyone who’s ever felt they’ve been mistreated (most likely each and every one of us) knows that the act of forgiving can be challenging. But Karen Swartz, director of the Mood Disorders Adult Consultation Clinic at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, says that “making a conscious decision to let go of negative feelings whether the person deserves it or not” can lead to more than just increased happiness.

Resentment is like drinking poison and then hoping it will kill your enemies. Nelson Mandela

Studies have found that it can also lower the risk of heart attack, improve cholesterol levels and reduce blood pressure, anxiety, depression and stress.

3. Giving

Chopra says that getting involved with charities and donating money to help others is one of the most fulfilling ways to spend your time and money. Researchers have even suggested that people who volunteer experience greater happiness, higher self-esteem and a lower mortality rate. A study from the University of Chicago and Northwestern University found that giving, rather than receiving, leads to long-term happiness. In one experiment, 96 participants were given $5 every day for five days — with the option to either spend it on themselves or on others. “Everyone started off with similar levels of self-reported happiness,” the researchers wrote. “Those who spent money on themselves reported a steady decline in happiness over the five-day period. But happiness didn’t seem to fade for those who gave their money to someone else.”

4. Gratitude

“There’s a wonderful anonymous quote that goes, ‘If you don’t know the language of gratitude, you’ll never be on speaking terms with happiness,'” Chopra tells the audience. Practicing gratitude can be as simple as saying “I’m grateful” at least once a day. In fact, one study from the American Psychological Association found that doing so can help people savor positive experiences, cope with stressful circumstances and strengthen relationships.

Happiness flows not from physical or external conditions, such as bodily pleasures or wealth and power, but from living a life that’s right for your soul, your deepest good. Socrates


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: kyle young
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These people won the lottery multiple times, taking home millions—a Harvard prof. talks odds

Source: Pennsylvania LotteryDodson has a daily habit of buying lottery tickets with no plans to stop. When Janet Pflaumer-Phillips, 59, won $1 million from a “Diamond Millions” scratch-off lottery ticket last month, it was technically her first big lottery win. “In other words, having previously won the lottery does not improve or make less likely the chance of winning the lottery in the future.” That also means that buying lottery tickets on the regular — every day or every week, for example —


Source: Pennsylvania LotteryDodson has a daily habit of buying lottery tickets with no plans to stop. When Janet Pflaumer-Phillips, 59, won $1 million from a “Diamond Millions” scratch-off lottery ticket last month, it was technically her first big lottery win. “In other words, having previously won the lottery does not improve or make less likely the chance of winning the lottery in the future.” That also means that buying lottery tickets on the regular — every day or every week, for example —
These people won the lottery multiple times, taking home millions—a Harvard prof. talks odds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: tom huddleston jr
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These people won the lottery multiple times, taking home millions—a Harvard prof. talks odds

The recent multimillion-dollar jackpots on offer from the Powerball and Mega Millions lotteries have had many Americans salivating at the idea of becoming instant millionaires. While the odds of winning a massive lottery jackpot like Saturday night’s $350 million Powerball drawing are astronomical (roughly 1 in 292 million, in fact), that won’t stop millions of people from buying lottery tickets this weekend. In fact, lottery ticket sales generate roughly $80 billion of revenue annually in the US, as players hope to become the latest person who beat the odds to win a once-in-a-lifetime jackpot. But, for some especially lucky people, that once-in-a-lifetime luck inexplicably strikes more than once. In fact, there are many recent stories of people who have been lucky enough to win the lottery multiple times — whether it’s a $1,000 prize or a $1 million jackpot.

Winning, and winning again

In May, 72-year-old Peggy Dodson won a $1 million jackpot from a “Max-a-Million” scratch-off lottery ticket that she bought at the same Pennsylvania convenience store where she’d purchased another scratch-off ticket that turned out to be a $100,000 winner just two years earlier.

Lottery winner Peggy Dodson poses with her husband, Ottis, and a $1 million prize check. Source: Pennsylvania Lottery

Dodson has a daily habit of buying lottery tickets with no plans to stop. “I don’t drink. I don’t smoke. But I love to play the lottery,” she told the Lancaster Online newspaper. When Janet Pflaumer-Phillips, 59, won $1 million from a “Diamond Millions” scratch-off lottery ticket last month, it was technically her first big lottery win. But if you count the two times her husband, Kevin Phillips, won his own separate $1 million prizes (in 2014 and 2016), then that made three wins for the couple overall, and a total of $3 million.

Kevin Phillips and Janet Pflaumer-Phillips in 2016. Source: Massachusetts Lottery

Pflaumer-Phillips told The Boston Globe she and her husband have been buying lottery tickets regularly for the past 20 years, and she plans to use some of her winnings to fund a trip to Disney World. And Eugene Martellio, of Vineland, N.J., won a $3 million grand prize playing the “CA$H OUT” scratch-off lottery game in April, just two years after winning more than $730,000 from a Jersey Cash 5 lottery drawing. But Martellio doesn’t want to stop there, as he told lottery officials he’s still hoping for a third win sometime this year, possibly from a massive Mega Millions or Powerball drawing.

So does buying tickets regularly increase your odds of winning?

It would be easy to think that someone would have to be one of the luckiest people alive to win the lottery multiple times. Surely, if you win the lottery once, the odds of you winning again would have to skyrocket, right? Well, not exactly. “If someone already wins the lottery, then the chance that the person wins the lottery a second time will be exactly the same as the probability they win the lottery if they had not previously won the lottery before,” Harvard statistics professor Dr. Mark Glickman tells CNBC Make It. “In other words, having previously won the lottery does not improve or make less likely the chance of winning the lottery in the future.” That also means that buying lottery tickets on the regular — every day or every week, for example — does not up your odds of winning, because the odds of all lotteries are independent. However, there is one way to boost your chances of winning the lottery, says Glickman: Your odds do improve by buying more tickets for each game. Of course, buying a couple of extra tickets isn’t going to change the fact that winning a big pot is long shot. Plus, when you buy more tickets, “the investment you make by playing multiple games also goes up and the payouts in a real lottery may vary,” points out Dr. Lew Lefton, a faculty member at Georgia Tech’s School of Mathematics. So investing more money in a higher number of tickets might not always be worth the expense, Lefton says. “My advice is don’t play the lottery and expect to win,” Lefton adds. “That said, it can be fun to play the lottery and imagine you win. That’s a different approach, and it’s just like any other gambling: You should only be willing to spend what you can afford to lose.” Of course, if you do win the lottery, financial experts usually advise you to take the lump sum option (and invest your winnings in long-term stocks), rather than taking multi-year annuity payments. And, no matter what, you’re sure to face a sizable tax hit from any lottery winnings over $5,000, with the minimum federal tax charge on lottery winnings being 24%, along with state taxes that vary by state. Don’t Miss: The 24-year-old winner of the $768 million Powerball had under $1,000 in his bank account Kevin O’Leary: This is what you should do if you win the $750 million Powerball Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: tom huddleston jr
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Harvard study finds people who use dating apps such as Tinder are more likely to have eating disorders

People who use dating apps are more likely to have eating disorders, abuse laxatives or use other unhealthy weight management practices than people who don’t date online, Harvard researchers found in a new study published Friday in the Journal of Eating Disorders. Sometimes unrealistic portrayals of beauty in media can lead to body dissatisfaction, which can result in unhealthy eating behaviors, the study said. Among the 1,762 people surveyed, about 17% of the women and 33% of the men said they


People who use dating apps are more likely to have eating disorders, abuse laxatives or use other unhealthy weight management practices than people who don’t date online, Harvard researchers found in a new study published Friday in the Journal of Eating Disorders. Sometimes unrealistic portrayals of beauty in media can lead to body dissatisfaction, which can result in unhealthy eating behaviors, the study said. Among the 1,762 people surveyed, about 17% of the women and 33% of the men said they
Harvard study finds people who use dating apps such as Tinder are more likely to have eating disorders Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, behaviors, finds, disorders, apps, weight, adults, tinder, using, unhealthy, likely, study, dating, online, harvard, eating


Harvard study finds people who use dating apps such as Tinder are more likely to have eating disorders

People who use dating apps are more likely to have eating disorders, abuse laxatives or use other unhealthy weight management practices than people who don’t date online, Harvard researchers found in a new study published Friday in the Journal of Eating Disorders.

The study, which surveyed more than 1,700 U.S. adults between the ages of 18 and 65, found that people who use dating apps are 2.7 to 16.2 times more likely to have an eating disorder than those who don’t use them.

Women were particularly vulnerable, with those who use apps such as Tinder and Coffee Meets Bagel having 2.3 to 26.9 times higher odds of using elevated “unhealthy weight control behaviors.” That includes self-induced vomiting, fasting or using diet pills and laxatives, which are all symptoms of eating disorders.

Men who dated online were also at greater risk, with 3.2 to 14.6 times the odds of using unhealthy weight management practices, including using steroids, researchers from Harvard’s Chan School of Public Health found.

“Individual dating app users are continuously engaging in a cycle in which they are evaluating profile pictures and brief descriptions of others, yet are being subject to scrutiny themselves,” wrote study author Dr. Alvin Tran, a postdoctoral associate at the Yale School of Medicine.

Although online dating helps some people socialize, the technology can also serve as an avenue “for discrimination, avenues for racism and avenues for body shaming,” he said in an interview.

Sometimes unrealistic portrayals of beauty in media can lead to body dissatisfaction, which can result in unhealthy eating behaviors, the study said. Tran wrote that generally men seek to be lean and muscular, while women want to be thin.

The survey asked the adults if they engaged in six unhealthy weight management behaviors — including vomiting, fasting and use of laxatives, diet pills, muscle building supplements and anabolic steroids — within the past year and if they used dating apps within the past 30 days. The study was conducted from October 2017 to December 2017.

Among the 1,762 people surveyed, about 17% of the women and 33% of the men said they used dating apps. Of those who said they date online, 44.8% of women and 54.1% of men reported fasting, 22.4% of women and 36.4% of men reported purposefully vomiting, and 24% of women and 41.1% of men said they used laxatives to manage their weight. Some of the adults also reported using diet pills, muscle-building supplements and anabolic steroids to achieve a certain weight.

Dating apps have become increasingly commonplace, especially among younger users. Well-known apps include Tinder, Bumble, Match, and Coffee Meets Bagel.

Bumble spokeswoman Emily Wright declined to comment for this article. Tinder, Match and Coffee Meets Bagel did not respond to requests for comment.

According to the Pew Research Center, 27% of adults ages 18 to 24 used dating apps in 2015, up from 11% in 2013. A 2017 survey said dating app usage in adults ages 18 to 29 could now be as high as 30%.

But as the popularity of these apps grows, so does speculation that they could negatively affect a person’s relationship with their body image. Another 2017 study found that Tinder users were significantly less satisfied with their faces and bodies and reported higher levels of body shame than those who did not use the app.

Minority groups who use the apps were at an even higher risk than whites. Asian-Americans, African-Americans and Hispanics had “significantly higher” odds of using unhealthy weight management behaviors than white people who date online, according to the study.

Though eating disorders were more common in adults who use dating apps, Tran cautioned that his study does not imply that there is a cause-and-effect relationship between online dating and unhealthy weight management.

“While we do not know if the people in our study were already engaging in these weight control behaviors before using dating apps, we worry that the use of these image and appearance-focused services could exacerbate those behaviors,” Tran said, adding that there’s a need to further understand how dating apps influence health behaviors.

Tran noted that some apps seem aware of body shaming and discrimination on their platforms and are looking to address the issue. LGBTQ dating app Grindr recently unveiled Kindr Grindr, an initiative to end sexual racism, transphobia and fat shaming through strict enforcement policies and updated community guidelines.

Grindr did not return a request for comment.

Tran said there’s still work to be done to address bullying on dating platforms, however.

“These apps need to find more effective ways to make their services safer for users,” Tran said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, behaviors, finds, disorders, apps, weight, adults, tinder, using, unhealthy, likely, study, dating, online, harvard, eating


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A 30-year Harvard study reveals the 5 simple habits that may prolong your life by 10 years or more

Americans have a much shorter life expectancy compared to almost all other high-income countries, according to the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics. That puts Americans well behind the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) average life expectancy of 80.3 years. Chan School of Public Health found five habits that could prolong a person’s life by up to a decade or more. For the study, researchers reviewed 34 years’ worth of data from 78,000 women and 27 years’ w


Americans have a much shorter life expectancy compared to almost all other high-income countries, according to the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics. That puts Americans well behind the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) average life expectancy of 80.3 years. Chan School of Public Health found five habits that could prolong a person’s life by up to a decade or more. For the study, researchers reviewed 34 years’ worth of data from 78,000 women and 27 years’ w
A 30-year Harvard study reveals the 5 simple habits that may prolong your life by 10 years or more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: john hall, mubariz khan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, women, prolong, habits, study, worth, harvard, health, oecd, life, 30year, lifestyles, likely, reveals, persons, simple, healthiest


A 30-year Harvard study reveals the 5 simple habits that may prolong your life by 10 years or more

Americans have a much shorter life expectancy compared to almost all other high-income countries, according to the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics.

Recent data reveals that people in the U.S. can expect to live an average of 78.7 years. That puts Americans well behind the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) average life expectancy of 80.3 years. (The OECD includes a group of developed countries like Canada, Germany, Mexico, Japan and France.)

Luckily, a 2018 study from Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health found five habits that could prolong a person’s life by up to a decade or more. For the study, researchers reviewed 34 years’ worth of data from 78,000 women and 27 years’ worth from more than 44,000 men.

The results showed a correlation between healthy behaviors and cardiovascular issues: Women and men who maintained the healthiest lifestyles were 82% less likely to die from cardiovascular disease and 65% less likely to die from cancer when compared to those with the least healthiest lifestyles over the course of the roughly 30-year study period.

The study suggested that maintaining these five habits could add up to 10 years or more to a person’s life:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: john hall, mubariz khan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, women, prolong, habits, study, worth, harvard, health, oecd, life, 30year, lifestyles, likely, reveals, persons, simple, healthiest


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MIT, Harvard study: Want your kids to be successful? Do this 1 thing

Every parent knows that raising a child can feel tantamount to a competitive sport. And while competitive parenting is widely condemned, we ultimately just want our children to live happy and successful lives. Thanks to modern science, there are a number of effective — yet obvious — strategies to smart parenting. One study from Harvard even suggested that skilled communicators typically turn out to be great negotiators. In turn, they “recognize the importance of expanding the pie of value for al


Every parent knows that raising a child can feel tantamount to a competitive sport. And while competitive parenting is widely condemned, we ultimately just want our children to live happy and successful lives. Thanks to modern science, there are a number of effective — yet obvious — strategies to smart parenting. One study from Harvard even suggested that skilled communicators typically turn out to be great negotiators. In turn, they “recognize the importance of expanding the pie of value for al
MIT, Harvard study: Want your kids to be successful? Do this 1 thing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: tom popomaronis, amy aldrete
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parenting, widely, harvard, kids, typically, value, turn, mit, successful, skills, number, children, study, competitive, thing


MIT, Harvard study: Want your kids to be successful? Do this 1 thing

Every parent knows that raising a child can feel tantamount to a competitive sport. And while competitive parenting is widely condemned, we ultimately just want our children to live happy and successful lives.

Thanks to modern science, there are a number of effective — yet obvious — strategies to smart parenting. But last year, a group of researchers at MIT, Harvard and the University of Pennsylvania found that one of the best things parents can do for their children is to have frequent back-and-forth exchanges with them.

The findings suggest that doing this at an early age (typically between ages 4 to 6) will help develop, foster and improve what is perhaps one of the most important skills that contribute to success in life: Communication.

What’s more, a number of studies have supported the idea that children with stronger communication skills are more likely to have healthier relationships, longer marriages, higher self-esteem and overall satisfaction in life.

One study from Harvard even suggested that skilled communicators typically turn out to be great negotiators. In turn, they “recognize the importance of expanding the pie of value for all parties at the table. In the process, they claim more money for themselves.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: tom popomaronis, amy aldrete
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parenting, widely, harvard, kids, typically, value, turn, mit, successful, skills, number, children, study, competitive, thing


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J.K. Rowling’s greatest advice to Harvard grads is disturbingly dark—but honestly, so brilliant and true

In 2008, J.K. Rowling delivered a powerful graduation speech at Harvard University. It was, in many ways, absolutely spellbinding — and quickly became the most-viewed commencement address on Harvard’s website (it’s even now available as a book!). What’s particularly interesting is how she defines the concept and purpose of imagination in a much broader sense. “Imagination is not only the uniquely human capacity to envision that which is not, and therefore the fount of all invention and innovatio


In 2008, J.K. Rowling delivered a powerful graduation speech at Harvard University. It was, in many ways, absolutely spellbinding — and quickly became the most-viewed commencement address on Harvard’s website (it’s even now available as a book!). What’s particularly interesting is how she defines the concept and purpose of imagination in a much broader sense. “Imagination is not only the uniquely human capacity to envision that which is not, and therefore the fount of all invention and innovatio
J.K. Rowling’s greatest advice to Harvard grads is disturbingly dark—but honestly, so brilliant and true Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: tom popomaronis, neal hamberg, bloomberg, getty images, -jk rowling
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, website, rowling, power, transformative, honestly, harvard, darkbut, greatest, jk, rowlings, imagination, surprising, ways, true, disturbingly, capacity, grads, brilliant, university, uniquely


J.K. Rowling's greatest advice to Harvard grads is disturbingly dark—but honestly, so brilliant and true

In 2008, J.K. Rowling delivered a powerful graduation speech at Harvard University. It was, in many ways, absolutely spellbinding — and quickly became the most-viewed commencement address on Harvard’s website (it’s even now available as a book!).

It’s not surprising that Rowling, the creator of the beloved Harry Potter series and one of history’s most successful novelists, would encourage graduates to capitalize on the power of their imagination, something that she claims to have played a leading role in rebuilding her life.

What’s particularly interesting is how she defines the concept and purpose of imagination in a much broader sense.

“Imagination is not only the uniquely human capacity to envision that which is not, and therefore the fount of all invention and innovation,” she said. “In its arguably most transformative and revelatory capacity, it is the power that enables us to empathize with humans whose experiences we have never shared.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: tom popomaronis, neal hamberg, bloomberg, getty images, -jk rowling
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, website, rowling, power, transformative, honestly, harvard, darkbut, greatest, jk, rowlings, imagination, surprising, ways, true, disturbingly, capacity, grads, brilliant, university, uniquely


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