The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer


Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer
The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, highquality, report, stability, live, states, according, healthcare, infrastructure, world, public, education, best


The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. “pop.” Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life.

Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity.

U.S. News ranks each state from one to 50 — with one being the best and 50 being the worst — across each of these eight categories and then uses a weighed average to create a final ranking of the best places to live in the country.

The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer residents public safety and just corrections programs, strong employment and growth, high-quality public education, clean air and water, long and short-term financial stability, access to high-quality healthcare as well as robust energy, internet and transportation infrastructure. U.S. News also calculated opportunity based on variables like cost of living and economic equality.

Here is are the top five states on U.S. News’ Best States of 2019 ranking:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, highquality, report, stability, live, states, according, healthcare, infrastructure, world, public, education, best


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Glenview’s Larry Robbins says he’s shorting 3M shares

Glenview Capital Management CEO Larry Robbins said Monday that he’s shorting shares of industrial conglomerate 3M. Robbins underscored 3M’s mounting litigation headaches, which span multiple states and center on pollution as a result of its operations. New Jersey officials filed a similar suit against 3M in March to pay to clean up water and soil contamination. Long a fan of health-care stocks, Robbins also said he likes HMO health-care names like Cigna, Humana and UnitedHealth Group, but he doe


Glenview Capital Management CEO Larry Robbins said Monday that he’s shorting shares of industrial conglomerate 3M. Robbins underscored 3M’s mounting litigation headaches, which span multiple states and center on pollution as a result of its operations. New Jersey officials filed a similar suit against 3M in March to pay to clean up water and soil contamination. Long a fan of health-care stocks, Robbins also said he likes HMO health-care names like Cigna, Humana and UnitedHealth Group, but he doe
Glenview’s Larry Robbins says he’s shorting 3M shares Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shares, space, hes, states, larry, glenviews, drug, water, 3m, shorting, robbins, suit, short, stocks, healthcare


Glenview's Larry Robbins says he's shorting 3M shares

Glenview Capital Management CEO Larry Robbins said Monday that he’s shorting shares of industrial conglomerate 3M.

Robbins underscored 3M’s mounting litigation headaches, which span multiple states and center on pollution as a result of its operations. The manager added that, since 2015, 3M’s lawsuits have soared eightysevenfold and now pose a significant liability to the company’s earnings.

Glenview estimates that 3M will lose between $4 billion and $6 billion as a result of the litigation.

“You don’t have to be Erin Brockovich to realize it’s not a good pattern,” Robbins said. “This company, 12 days after filing their 2017 10-K in 2018 … paid out” an $850 million settlement to Minnesota, which claimed the manufacturer contaminated water in the state for at least 50 years.

New Jersey officials filed a similar suit against 3M in March to pay to clean up water and soil contamination. The suit in New Jersey court came days after the state’s environmental department directed five companies to take action on contamination caused by toxic chemicals commonly known as PFAS.

Shares of 3M fell 1.9% Monday versus the S&P 500’s 0.8% decline.

Long a fan of health-care stocks, Robbins also said he likes HMO health-care names like Cigna, Humana and UnitedHealth Group, but he doesn’t like pharmaceutical stocks due to the political risk. He highlighted that many Democratic presidential hopefuls — as well as President Donald Trump — are opposed to lofty drug prices.

“In pharmaceuticals … the president can act unilaterally to reduce drug pricing,” Robbins warned from the 2019 Sohn Conference in New York. “The same drug in the United States costs three times as much as other” developed countries.

Robbins spoke at length about possible changes to the health-care system, calling the “Medicare for all” plan favored by many progressives “dead on arrival.”

Robbins said Glenview has three long and 16 short positions in the pharmaceutical space and recommends investors short any ETF that tracks the space. Last year, he picked Express Scripts-Cigna, CVS-Aetna and McKesson as his winners in the field.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shares, space, hes, states, larry, glenviews, drug, water, 3m, shorting, robbins, suit, short, stocks, healthcare


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

April’s jobs report is full of great news for college grads

As college graduation season fast approaches, new grads find themselves heading into one of the friendliest hiring markets in recent history. “It’s a great time to be graduating,” Andrew Challenger, VP of executive placement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, tells CNBC Make It. In April, 27,000 healthcare jobs were added to the market, along with 76,000 professional and business services jobs. Data from BLS shows that retail hiring decreased by 12,000 jobs last month and hiring for manufacturin


As college graduation season fast approaches, new grads find themselves heading into one of the friendliest hiring markets in recent history. “It’s a great time to be graduating,” Andrew Challenger, VP of executive placement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, tells CNBC Make It. In April, 27,000 healthcare jobs were added to the market, along with 76,000 professional and business services jobs. Data from BLS shows that retail hiring decreased by 12,000 jobs last month and hiring for manufacturin
April’s jobs report is full of great news for college grads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, chamberlain, job, aprils, grads, report, college, challenger, jobs, months, healthcare, market, recent, great, professional


April's jobs report is full of great news for college grads

As college graduation season fast approaches, new grads find themselves heading into one of the friendliest hiring markets in recent history. In April, 263,000 jobs were added to the economy, putting unemployment at 3.6%, the lowest its been since December 1969. That’s according to the latest report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which also showed wages increasing by 3.2% from a year ago. “It’s a great time to be graduating,” Andrew Challenger, VP of executive placement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, tells CNBC Make It. “We have historically low unemployment rates and surveys show that American companies plan to hire more graduating college students this year than they did last year. ” Challenger, and Glassdoor chief economist Andrew Chamberlain broke down which industries are showing solid job growth and what skill sets recent grads need to emphasize in order to get hired.

Westend61 | Westend61 | Getty Images

Industries with the strongest growth

For those on the job hunt, Chamberlain says focusing your attention on jobs in the healthcare and professional and business services industries can really pay off. In April, 27,000 healthcare jobs were added to the market, along with 76,000 professional and business services jobs. With an aging demographic that’s moving from the workforce to retirement, Chamberlain says he thinks healthcare “is one of the best fields for long-term growth for a young college grad today. “And, that doesn’t necessarily mean you have to be a nurse practitioner or a healthcare provider,” he says. “There are data analyst roles, project manager roles and there are also sales-related roles in healthcare. So depending on your skills, there are a lot of different ways you can fit in there.” In the professional and business services industry, Chamberlain says “management and technical consulting is adding the most jobs, along with computer systems design, which is basically tech.” “If you’re coming out as a STEM major,” he says, “getting on a software developer track, or a data scientist track, is a great way to earn premium pay right out of school.” According to Glassdoor, the average base salary for an entry-level data scientist is $109,727 per year and the average base salary for an entry-level software developer is $68,270 per year — pretty nice, when you consider the average $50,004 a year salary recent gradates earned in 2018, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) . On the flip side, Challenger says any recent graduate — or seasoned professional — looking for a new job should steer clear of the retail and manufacturing industries. Data from BLS shows that retail hiring decreased by 12,000 jobs last month and hiring for manufacturing jobs has slowed drastically. In April, manufacturing added a mere 4,000 jobs to the market, whereas in the 12 months prior to February the industry was adding an average of 22,000 jobs per month.

Twenty20

Skills to emphasize

Chamberlain says that any recent graduate who is looking to get hired should play up on their ability to work with data. He says that regardless of what industry you’re working in, “anyone who is able to help businesses turn their data into information will find a really good job market no matter where they go.” “That’s a main problem many companies face today,” he says. “They have a lot of data and they don’t know what to do with it.” Additionally, Chamberlain says, companies are looking for people who can “pop in as a consultant and help solve problems. Or, be able to be a storyteller to help the company run better.” “I think those are the factors that will set you up for very long-term growth,” he says. Aside from those skills, Challenger says that any recent grad with a STEM degree will have “skill sets that are in really high demand” in today’s market.

10 years ago this month

In April 2009, 539,000 jobs disappeared from the market, reports The New York Times. That put unemployment at 8.9% —the highest level it had been in a quarter century. And April’s numbers were actually less severe than previous months. “The most intense spate of weakness is probably behind us,” Michael T. Darda, chief economist at the research and trading firm MKM Partners, told The New York Times in 2009. “Less bad is always a prelude to good. It’s going to take some time for this economy to get back on its feet, but we might be closer to the recession ending.” By contrast, today’s labor market has shown consistent gains for over 100 months. “We’re getting very close to being in the longest economic expansion in U.S. history,” says Chamberlain. “If the economy continues growing through June, we will have 120 months since the end of the last recession.” Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: March jobs report: Hiring growth and more jobs added in high-paying industries


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, chamberlain, job, aprils, grads, report, college, challenger, jobs, months, healthcare, market, recent, great, professional


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

More Americans are likely to oppose Trump in the 2020 elections because of his handling of health care, poll says

While 23% of those polled said Trump’s stance on health care would compel them to vote for his reelection, 40% said they likely will not support him next year because of it. Of the remaining voters, 33% said health care is not a factor in who they’ll vote for, while 5% said they had no opinion on Trump’s handling of health care. More Americans say they are likely to oppose rather than support President Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential elections because of his handling of health care, accord


While 23% of those polled said Trump’s stance on health care would compel them to vote for his reelection, 40% said they likely will not support him next year because of it. Of the remaining voters, 33% said health care is not a factor in who they’ll vote for, while 5% said they had no opinion on Trump’s handling of health care. More Americans say they are likely to oppose rather than support President Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential elections because of his handling of health care, accord
More Americans are likely to oppose Trump in the 2020 elections because of his handling of health care, poll says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, popular, hudak, trump, oppose, likely, 2020, poll, republicans, americans, trumps, healthcare, health, handling, obamacare, elections, president, care


More Americans are likely to oppose Trump in the 2020 elections because of his handling of health care, poll says

US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on April 26, 2019.

It’s not surprising that health care has become a top priority for voters, because the last few years have been “tumultuous” for the health-care system, said Rachel Nuzum, vice president for the Federal and State Health Policy initiative at The Commonwealth Fund.

While 23% of those polled said Trump’s stance on health care would compel them to vote for his reelection, 40% said they likely will not support him next year because of it. Of the remaining voters, 33% said health care is not a factor in who they’ll vote for, while 5% said they had no opinion on Trump’s handling of health care.

More Americans say they are likely to oppose rather than support President Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential elections because of his handling of health care, according to a new ABC/Washington Post poll .

“Americans need certainty when it comes to their health care,” Nuzum said. And Trump’s call to upend the health-care system “creates a lot of uncertainty,” she added.

Trump and congressional Republicans have vowed to repeal the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, pledging to deliver on one of Trump’s main campaign promises. Despite Trump’s assertion that Republicans will become “The Party of Healthcare,” Republicans don’t have another health-care plan in place and are waiting until the GOP regains control of the House of Representatives to unveil a replacement proposal. Republicans currently hold control of the Senate but lost the majority of the House in the 2018 midterm elections.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle widely believe the Republican-led Senate’s attempt to repeal Obamacare in 2017 led to the Democrats’ House victory.

Trump’s effort to repeal Obamacare without a better proposal in place is a “very risky political proposition,” according to John Hudak, a senior fellow and deputy director at the Brookings Institution’s Center for Effective Public Management.

Hudak said Obamacare’s individual provisions — such as Medicaid expansion, protecting preexisting conditions and allowing children to stay on their parents’ insurance plans until they are 26 years old — are “wildly popular” with voters.

“These are all issues that are not just more popular than the president, they’re more popular than a lot of other issues in America,” Hudak said.

But Obamacare is in jeopardy once again, after the Trump administration supported a lawsuit questioning the health-care law’s constitutionality.

In December, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor of Texas said that without a rule that requires Americans to have health insurance or face a tax penalty, Obamacare cannot stand. The Trump administration reduced the tax penalty — called the individual mandate — to $0 in the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

Now O’Connor’s ruling, which is backed by the Justice Department, awaits deliberation in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, though experts and even some top Republicans have said it’s unlikely the law will be overturned.

Though some believe Obamacare is safe from a negative ruling from the Supreme Court, Hudak said Trump’s attacks on Obamacare, which has become popular with many citizens despite failing to reduce health-care costs, can hurt his relationship with swing voters.

“Threatening to take away tens of millions of people’s health care is not a great recipe for growing his political coalition,” Hudak said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, popular, hudak, trump, oppose, likely, 2020, poll, republicans, americans, trumps, healthcare, health, handling, obamacare, elections, president, care


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Health-care stocks could rebound after their worst week of the year

That comment sent UnitedHealth shares down 4% and the health-care sector down 2%. Biogen, Cigna and Abiomed are the worst-performing stocks in the sector, falling at least 20%. This is not the first time health-care related stocks have taken a beating amid worries leading up to a presidential election. Ogg added the current pullback in health care “probably won’t last because, at some point, earnings will overtake fears. But I do think we’ll hear a lot of health care bashing.”


That comment sent UnitedHealth shares down 4% and the health-care sector down 2%. Biogen, Cigna and Abiomed are the worst-performing stocks in the sector, falling at least 20%. This is not the first time health-care related stocks have taken a beating amid worries leading up to a presidential election. Ogg added the current pullback in health care “probably won’t last because, at some point, earnings will overtake fears. But I do think we’ll hear a lot of health care bashing.”
Health-care stocks could rebound after their worst week of the year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: fred imbert, justin sullivan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worstperforming, stocks, healthcare, worst, town, health, trading, rebound, unitedhealth, week, care, sector, sanders


Health-care stocks could rebound after their worst week of the year

Health care stocks under pressure, but one could be on the mend 3 Hours Ago | 03:48

“Because this latest move was largely caused by political hot air (so to speak) and not something structural within the sector, I think we could see a bounce back in some of these names,” Thrasher said in a note to clients. “I believe the stocks have been over-extended to the downside.”

The move down began Tuesday after presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders received a positive response to his “Medicare for All” plan at a town hall organized by Fox News.

“What we’re talking about is stability. That when you have a Medicare for all, it is there now and it will be there in the future,” Sanders said at the town hall, which aired last Monday. The plan creates a single-payer health-care system run by the government, which Sanders argues would be more affordable for consumers.

Worries increased after UnitedHealth CEO David Wichmann warned Tuesday that such policies would “destabilize the nation’s health system.” That comment sent UnitedHealth shares down 4% and the health-care sector down 2%.

Health care is by far the worst-performing sector this year. It is down 1.2% in 2019 and is the only one trading in negative territory. By comparison, utilities is the second-worst performer of 2019 and it is up about 8%.

The group was down fractionally in afternoon trading Monday.

Biogen, Cigna and Abiomed are the worst-performing stocks in the sector, falling at least 20%. CVS Health is also down nearly 20% year to date.

This is not the first time health-care related stocks have taken a beating amid worries leading up to a presidential election. The iShares Nasdaq Biotechnology ETF (IBB) came under sharp pressure in 2015 after former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton — then the favorite to win the 2016 election — tweeted against drug-price gouging, calling it “outrageous.”

The ETF later recovered some of those losses to end the year up more than 11%.

“Ever since Obamacare, it’s been tough on these stocks pre-election season because they make the drug companies out to be the bad guys,” said Maris Ogg, president at Tower Bridge Advisors. Ogg added the current pullback in health care “probably won’t last because, at some point, earnings will overtake fears. But I do think we’ll hear a lot of health care bashing.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: fred imbert, justin sullivan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worstperforming, stocks, healthcare, worst, town, health, trading, rebound, unitedhealth, week, care, sector, sanders


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

These 2 health-care giants could take down the ETFs in their sector, says investor

Health care stocks are the worst performing sector, here are the ETFs to watch 4 Hours Ago | 02:26Health care just caught a cold. The Health Care Select Sector SPDR Fund, an exchange-traded fund tracking 62 major health-care companies, has shed more than 2% in the last month. “Value’s a little bit out of favor today, so that’s another reason why the big health-care stocks aren’t doing as well.” “If you look at the big health-care ETFs, what are the two biggest stocks in there? So, if you’re on t


Health care stocks are the worst performing sector, here are the ETFs to watch 4 Hours Ago | 02:26Health care just caught a cold. The Health Care Select Sector SPDR Fund, an exchange-traded fund tracking 62 major health-care companies, has shed more than 2% in the last month. “Value’s a little bit out of favor today, so that’s another reason why the big health-care stocks aren’t doing as well.” “If you look at the big health-care ETFs, what are the two biggest stocks in there? So, if you’re on t
These 2 health-care giants could take down the ETFs in their sector, says investor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, healthcare, care, giants, investor, youve, etfs, big, health, stocks, wiener, etf, sector


These 2 health-care giants could take down the ETFs in their sector, says investor

Health care stocks are the worst performing sector, here are the ETFs to watch 4 Hours Ago | 02:26

Health care just caught a cold.

The Health Care Select Sector SPDR Fund, an exchange-traded fund tracking 62 major health-care companies, has shed more than 2% in the last month. The iShares U.S. Healthcare Providers ETF, a similar fund tracking 47 health-care providers, has lost about 5%.

Uncertainty around the fate of the Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as Obamacare, and rising drug prices, has weighed on the group in recent weeks. The downward moves have left health care as the only market sector still in the red, and the worst-performing one in the last month, after a banner year as 2018’s best-performing sector.

Tom Lydon, editor and proprietor of ETFTrends.com, told CNBC’s “ETF Edge” on Monday that the weakness could also be tied to a change in investors’ priorities.

“In Q4 of last year, we saw big declines in the stock market, but health care buoyed because of [its] value,” Lydon said. “Value’s a little bit out of favor today, so that’s another reason why the big health-care stocks aren’t doing as well.”

But Dan Wiener, chairman of Adviser Investments, sees something bigger at play.

“You have to remember health care is an enormous part of this economy. We’re talking about close to 20% of the economy,” Wiener told CNBC in the same “ETF Edge” interview. “You’ve got the biotechs. You’ve got the health-care providers. You’ve got the pharma. You’ve got the device companies.”

Most broad-based health-care ETFs have all of those categories in their holdings, Wiener noted. However, two of those holdings far outweigh the rest.

“[Tuesday] morning, we’re going to get [Johnson & Johnson] earnings,” Wiener said. “If you look at the big health-care ETFs, what are the two biggest stocks in there? J&J and Pfizer. And we’re not talking about 5% positions. Between the two of them, we’re talking 15%. Those are big. I mean, if J&J and Pfizer don’t have a good day, the whole sector disappears on the ETF side.”

That could prove disastrous for the sector’s various ETFs, but there’s no harm in getting more granular, Lydon said.

“It’s kind of been the tale of two cities” with “conventional health-care” companies and the biotechnology names, he noted, with traditional health-care stocks tacking on only mid-single-digit gains year to date, but some biotech stocks up north of 20%.

So, if you’re on the hunt for health-care stocks, be sure you know where to look.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, healthcare, care, giants, investor, youve, etfs, big, health, stocks, wiener, etf, sector


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Health-care stocks plunge as lawmakers threaten action on drug prices

Health-care stocks were poised to end the week in the red Friday after lawmakers on Capitol Hill threatened to write new laws tightening control over the nation’s largest pharmacy benefit mangers to curb skyrocketing drug costs. The XLV, an ETF that tracks the health-care industry’s biggest companies, was down 1.48% for the week as of Friday morning. These so-called backdoor deals are suspected by lawmakers of increasing drug costs for patients. It is “very likely” lawmakers force drug companies


Health-care stocks were poised to end the week in the red Friday after lawmakers on Capitol Hill threatened to write new laws tightening control over the nation’s largest pharmacy benefit mangers to curb skyrocketing drug costs. The XLV, an ETF that tracks the health-care industry’s biggest companies, was down 1.48% for the week as of Friday morning. These so-called backdoor deals are suspected by lawmakers of increasing drug costs for patients. It is “very likely” lawmakers force drug companies
Health-care stocks plunge as lawmakers threaten action on drug prices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, tetra images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, healthcare, week, insurance, sanders, action, medicare, stocks, health, plunge, industrys, gupte, threaten, lawmakers, drug, prices


Health-care stocks plunge as lawmakers threaten action on drug prices

Health-care stocks were poised to end the week in the red Friday after lawmakers on Capitol Hill threatened to write new laws tightening control over the nation’s largest pharmacy benefit mangers to curb skyrocketing drug costs.

The Trump administration’s legal challenge to former President Barack Obama’s signature health insurance law, the Affordable Care Act, and Sen. Bernie Sanders’ new “Medicare for All” bill also weighed on the industry’s shares.

The XLV, an ETF that tracks the health-care industry’s biggest companies, was down 1.48% for the week as of Friday morning. The biggest declines were from insurers Anthem, Humana and UnitedHealth Group, which were all down more than 5% for the week through Thursday’s close.

Executives from CVS Health, Cigna, Prime Therapeutics, Humana and UnitedHealth’s OptumRx testified about rising prescription drug costs before the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday. The PBMs left the congressional hearing mostly unscathed but Chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, hinted that the committee is ready to write new laws to bring down drug prices.

Ana Gupte, senior health-care services analyst at Leerink Partners, said the health-care sell-off is mostly driven by the proposed legislative changes to the PBMs’ business model, which are paid so-called rebates by Big Pharma for getting their drugs covered by private and public insurance plans, like Medicare. These so-called backdoor deals are suspected by lawmakers of increasing drug costs for patients.

It is “very likely” lawmakers force drug companies to give those rebates to consumers instead, starting as early as next year, Gupte said.

Separately, a federal appeals court in New Orleans said Wednesday that it will hear arguments in July on a lawsuit backed by President Donald Trump to overturn Obamacare. Dismantling the health-care law would lead to 32 million more uninsured people in the U.S. by 2026, according to an estimate from the Congressional Budget Office.

Separately, Sanders unveiled a universal health-care plan on Wednesday, which would eliminate most private health insurance by creating a government-run system to provide health insurance for all Americans.

For more on investing in health-care innovation, click here to join CNBC at our Healthy Returns Summit in New York City on May 21.

“Newsflow on the Medicare for All proposal from Senator Bernie Sanders and the scheduling of the hearing on the Texas Court decision to overthrow the ACA at the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in July also contributed to the sell off in health-care stocks,” Gupte said.

Ross Muken, an analyst at Evercore ISI, told clients in a note that watching the industry’s shares fall has “not been fun,” but added he expects first-quarter earnings to be positive as “fundamentals generally remain positive and utilization still appears under control.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, tetra images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, healthcare, week, insurance, sanders, action, medicare, stocks, health, plunge, industrys, gupte, threaten, lawmakers, drug, prices


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley doubts Obamacare will be ruled unconstitutional

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley doesn’t believe a lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act’s constitutionality will succeed, the Iowa Republican told the Des Moines Register on Thursday. In December, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor ruled the health-care law unconstitutional after 20 Republican-led states filed a suit against it. The health-care law captured the ire of conservatives when it passed in 2010. However, Grassley told the Register that the bill, which was unveiled


Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley doesn’t believe a lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act’s constitutionality will succeed, the Iowa Republican told the Des Moines Register on Thursday. In December, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor ruled the health-care law unconstitutional after 20 Republican-led states filed a suit against it. The health-care law captured the ire of conservatives when it passed in 2010. However, Grassley told the Register that the bill, which was unveiled
Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley doubts Obamacare will be ruled unconstitutional Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: ashley turner, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doubts, replacement, healthcare, sen, republicans, ruled, grassley, law, majority, unconstitutional, trump, obamacare, senate, chuck, republican, told


Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley doubts Obamacare will be ruled unconstitutional

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley doesn’t believe a lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act’s constitutionality will succeed, the Iowa Republican told the Des Moines Register on Thursday.

“I don’t believe the courts are going to strike it down,” Grassley said, adding that Republicans don’t have to work on a replacement for the 2010 health-care law because he said it is unclear what the courts will decide to do.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, is once again in jeopardy after President Donald Trump reignited debate over his predecessor’s health-care law in March when his administration decided to support a federal judge’s ruling that Obamacare is unconstitutional.

In December, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor ruled the health-care law unconstitutional after 20 Republican-led states filed a suit against it. O’Connor said that without the law’s individual mandate — a tax penalty on anyone who did not purchase health insurance — Obamacare could not stand.

The Trump administration reduced the individual mandate to $0 in the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

O’Connor’s ruling awaits deliberation in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit in New Orleans.

Trump has repeatedly criticized Obamacare and pledged to repeal it, but Republicans have yet to propose a health-care policy to replace it that could pass muster in Congress. Trump said in a late-March tweet that the “Republican Party will become the Party of Great HealthCare,” but the president was forced to abandon the cause when his party expressed little desire to revisit the health-care debate before the 2020 election.

Grassley, who is one of the many Republicans who oppose President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law, said Thursday that he expects the Supreme Court will uphold Obamacare if the case is brought before them.

He told the Register he “would be very doubtful” that Chief Justice John Roberts would “be changing his mind” on the law. Roberts was the deciding vote that upheld Obamacare’s constitutionality when the law was deliberated by the Supreme Court in 2012.

Obamacare, which sought to expand access to insurance and increase consumer protections, includes provisions that expand Medicaid in most states, allow children to remain on their parents’ insurance plans until age 26 and protect those with pre-existing conditions.

The health-care law captured the ire of conservatives when it passed in 2010. Republicans have vowed to do away with Obamacare ever since, but the GOP failed to repeal the law in 2017 when they controlled Congress and the White House. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle believe Republicans’ failed efforts to scrap the law handed Democrats a majority in the House of Representatives in last year’s midterm elections.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in March that the Senate would wait until Republicans gained full control of Congress before considering a replacement plan. The GOP, which holds a majority in the Senate, needs 21 more seats in the House to win a majority in the next election.

Grassley, who has been working on a bipartisan basis to tackle high drug prices in the U.S., also praised a bill he co-sponsored that protects people with pre-existing conditions. However, Grassley told the Register that the bill, which was unveiled this week, would not be debated unless Obamacare was repealed.

Though Grassley doubts Obamacare will be ruled unconstitutional, he claimed replacement legislation could “easily” be created.

Grassley’s office confirmed the Register’s reporting, but did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for additional comment.

Read the Des Moines Register’s full report here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: ashley turner, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doubts, replacement, healthcare, sen, republicans, ruled, grassley, law, majority, unconstitutional, trump, obamacare, senate, chuck, republican, told


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Warren Buffett says there’s ‘enormous resistance to change’ healthcare

Complacency will make fixing the nation’s health-care system a daunting task, according to Warren Buffett, whose Berkshire Hathaway recently joined with J.P. Morgan Chase and Amazon to develop a new model for their 1 million employees. Buffett along with Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and J.P. Morgan’s Jamie Dimon recently formed the health-care joint venture Haven to figure out how to deliver better health care at a lower cost. One of the problems with the current system, Buffett said in an interview for


Complacency will make fixing the nation’s health-care system a daunting task, according to Warren Buffett, whose Berkshire Hathaway recently joined with J.P. Morgan Chase and Amazon to develop a new model for their 1 million employees. Buffett along with Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and J.P. Morgan’s Jamie Dimon recently formed the health-care joint venture Haven to figure out how to deliver better health care at a lower cost. One of the problems with the current system, Buffett said in an interview for
Warren Buffett says there’s ‘enormous resistance to change’ healthcare Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: liz moyer, david a grogan, cnbc, jaden urbi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buffett, change, healthcare, resistance, system, current, recently, warren, jp, weve, model, theres, worse, enormous


Warren Buffett says there's 'enormous resistance to change' healthcare

Complacency will make fixing the nation’s health-care system a daunting task, according to Warren Buffett, whose Berkshire Hathaway recently joined with J.P. Morgan Chase and Amazon to develop a new model for their 1 million employees.

Buffett along with Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and J.P. Morgan’s Jamie Dimon recently formed the health-care joint venture Haven to figure out how to deliver better health care at a lower cost. One of the problems with the current system, Buffett said in an interview for Yahoo Finance, is that health-care providers and others entrenched in the current model don’t have any incentive to change things.

“We have a $3.4 trillion industry, which is as much as the federal government raises every year, that basically feels pretty good about the system,” Buffett said. “There’s enormous resistance to change while a similar acknowledgement that change will be needed. And of course if the private sector doesn’t supply that over a period of time, people will say ‘we give up, we’ve got to turn this over to the government,’ which will probably be even worse.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: liz moyer, david a grogan, cnbc, jaden urbi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buffett, change, healthcare, resistance, system, current, recently, warren, jp, weve, model, theres, worse, enormous


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Joe Biden hits health-care cuts in Trump budget after teasing 2020 run

Former Vice President Joe Biden on Tuesday took a shot at President Donald Trump’s newly unveiled fiscal 2020 budget proposal for cutting billions from federal health programs. Biden also offered the latest — and clearest — hint that he is leaning toward a 2020 White House run, where he is already considered the Democratic front-runner in early polls. The White House denies that Trump’s budget cuts the perennially popular Medicare program. Acting Budget Director Russ Vought said Monday that Trum


Former Vice President Joe Biden on Tuesday took a shot at President Donald Trump’s newly unveiled fiscal 2020 budget proposal for cutting billions from federal health programs. Biden also offered the latest — and clearest — hint that he is leaning toward a 2020 White House run, where he is already considered the Democratic front-runner in early polls. The White House denies that Trump’s budget cuts the perennially popular Medicare program. Acting Budget Director Russ Vought said Monday that Trum
Joe Biden hits health-care cuts in Trump budget after teasing 2020 run Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: kevin breuninger, andrew caballero-reynolds, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biden, 2020, hits, cut, white, cuts, run, house, teasing, trumps, joe, healthcare, medicare, budget, trump, billion, president, proposal


Joe Biden hits health-care cuts in Trump budget after teasing 2020 run

Former Vice President Joe Biden on Tuesday took a shot at President Donald Trump’s newly unveiled fiscal 2020 budget proposal for cutting billions from federal health programs.

Biden also offered the latest — and clearest — hint that he is leaning toward a 2020 White House run, where he is already considered the Democratic front-runner in early polls.

“I was going to stay away from this, but I can’t,” Biden told a supportive crowd at the International Association of Fire Fighters Legislative Conference in Washington.

“Did you see the budget that was introduced? It cuts $845 billion. Almost a trillion-dollar cut in Medicare. And almost a quarter-billion [cut] … in Medicaid,” Biden said.

He continued: “Why? Because of a tax cut for the super wealthy that created a deficit of $1.9 trillion, and now they’ve got to make somebody pay for it.”

Biden, who was vice president under President Barack Obama after a decades-long career in the Senate, launched the attack on Trump’s policies just one day after the White House presented its new budget proposal, which administration officials say will tackle excessive government spending and U.S. deficits.

The plan would cut an estimated $800 billion or more over 10 years from the 65-and-up Medicare, according to reports and analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation. The proposal would also reduce spending on Medicaid, the federal-and-state program that provides low-income Americans insurance, by more than $200 billion while setting up block grants to states.

The White House denies that Trump’s budget cuts the perennially popular Medicare program. Acting Budget Director Russ Vought said Monday that Trump is “not cutting Medicare in this budget” but rather “putting forward reforms that are cutting drug prices.”

The budget would also allocate $8.6 billion toward the construction of Trump’s long-promised border wall.

At the firefighters’ event Tuesday morning, Biden also teased his plans about running for president on the Democratic ticket in the 2020 election.

“I appreciate the energy you showed when I came up here. Save it a little longer — I may need it in a few weeks.” Biden said to raucous applause from the crowd, which later broke into chants of “run, Joe, run!”

“Be careful what you wish for,” he quipped a moment later.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: kevin breuninger, andrew caballero-reynolds, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biden, 2020, hits, cut, white, cuts, run, house, teasing, trumps, joe, healthcare, medicare, budget, trump, billion, president, proposal


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post