Taboo money topics: How to talk about student debt with your partner

Graphic preview Taboo money topics A recent survey found that more people are uncomfortable talking about their student debt than any other aspect of their finances. kiersten schmidt/grow TD AmeritradeHere’s how to make that conversation easier and keep student debt from hurting your relationship. Ask your partner if they have student debt too, and if so, what kind. Of the borrowers surveyed, 84% report that student loans are negatively affecting the amount they are able to save for retirement,


Graphic preview Taboo money topics A recent survey found that more people are uncomfortable talking about their student debt than any other aspect of their finances. kiersten schmidt/grow TD AmeritradeHere’s how to make that conversation easier and keep student debt from hurting your relationship. Ask your partner if they have student debt too, and if so, what kind. Of the borrowers surveyed, 84% report that student loans are negatively affecting the amount they are able to save for retirement,
Taboo money topics: How to talk about student debt with your partner Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, borgesodell, money, student, couples, financial, debt, loans, talk, topics, taboo, help, theres, partner


Taboo money topics: How to talk about student debt with your partner

Over a third of Americans say student loan debt is the most uncomfortable financial topic to discuss in social settings. But keeping your loved ones in the dark about your debt can lead to turmoil in your personal relationships. Nearly four in 10 student loan borrowers say that loans have affected their relationships with significant others, according to a recent study by the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America (TIAA) and the MIT AgeLab. But there’s no reason to be ashamed of having student loans. Nearly 70% of students from the class of 2018 borrowed money to pay for school, according to the Federal Reserve. Cynthia Borges-O’Dell, a licensed marriage and family therapist from Modesto, California, says if you’re in an exclusive relationship, it helps to be candid about your student debt situation early on.

Graphic preview Taboo money topics A recent survey found that more people are uncomfortable talking about their student debt than any other aspect of their finances. Topics that respondents aren’t comfortable discussing Social chart title Note: Based on a survey of 1,006 U.S. adults aged 22 and older with at least $10,000 in investable assets. kiersten schmidt/grow TD Ameritrade

Here’s how to make that conversation easier and keep student debt from hurting your relationship.

Be transparent

“I think there is an embarrassment or a stigma attached to student loan debt because there’s an underlying fear that someone will not be able to accept it, or understand why one made the decision to acquire that kind of student debt, when there are other options,” says Borges-O’Dell. She recommends kicking off the conversation by explaining your initial reasons for choosing your college. Ask your partner if they have student debt too, and if so, what kind. Sharing personal financial information probably won’t cause a rift, she says. Being aware of your loved one’s loans, and making them aware of yours, can actually help you better understand each other and your priorities. And being open about money in general can establish a solid foundation for your relationship. “It’s perfectly fine to ask what kind of credit history they have and what their spending habits are,” too, she says. “Knowing this information about your partner will help them come up with a financial plan and set goals for the future.”

I think there is an embarrassment or a stigma attached to it because there’s an underlying fear that someone will not be able to accept it or understand why one made the decision to acquire that kind of student debt when there are other options. Cynthia Borges-O’Dell Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

Decide what your roles will be

One of the most important decisions you make as a couple could be determining what your partner’s role is in your debt. Will they cheer you on as you pay it down? Are they willing or able to contribute in some way? What are the two of you comfortable with? Whatever you agree to do, make sure you set clear expectations early on: 36% of borrowers who currently contribute to their partner’s education report conflict as a result of unclear expectations about the amount, according to the TIAA and MIT AgeLab study. There’s no right or wrong way to go about handling your debt, and having the conversation will help you both come to a decision. It can also inform the approach you take to money generally as a couple. “I’ve seen people tackle it all kinds of ways, but usually couples will divvy their finances into ‘yours, mine, and ours’ buckets,” says Richard Kahler, a NAPFA registered financial advisor with Kahler Financial Group in Rapid City, South Dakota. Buckets allow for couples to contribute to a joint account in proportion to their individual incomes or to put in equal amounts. Though Kahler says many couples choose to tackle student debt together by putting all of their earnings into an “us” bucket, and paying off debt and other bills jointly, some couples opt for separate accounts and that’s fine, too.

Consider asking an expert

If you and your partner decide to tackle the debt together, Borges-O’Dell suggests seeking help from a certified financial planner (CFP) to ensure that you’re both on the same page about money. Clear, consistent communication helps couples manage finances and set expectations about how much of your combined monthly income will be put towards debt and other expenses. Borges-O’Dell says that meeting with a CFP and having regular check-ins with each other can help both parties come to a mutual agreement on a budget and a set of financial goals to help keep both partners accountable. “They need to sit down and schedule a time once a week or so to review their finances and to review where the money is going,” she says, so you’re making joint decisions.

Agree on your goals and how to pursue them

Student debt can be difficult to discuss in part because of the threat it poses to other priorities. Of the borrowers surveyed, 84% report that student loans are negatively affecting the amount they are able to save for retirement, for example. But student loans don’t have to hold you back, as an individual or as a couple. Though Kahler says that, in most cases, paying off student debt should be a high priority, your circumstances, like the amount of debt you have and the interest rates on your loans, matter. You may have the flexibility to prioritize saving for a mortgage, too, for example, or to start a family. And many experts encourage you to start putting aside at least a little for retirement as soon as you can, even if you’re paying off student loans at the same time, so that you can benefit from compounding. Start having the conversations with your partner early on so that you can figure out how to take care of your loans and how to think beyond them, too. Borges-O’Dell says that these productive conversations, and a stronger, more open relationship, begins with overcoming the fear of telling your partner about your student loan debt. “If you enjoyed what you did, if you got an outstanding education, then why be embarrassed about that?” she says. “There’s no doubt that debt is kind of a romantic buzzkill,” Kahler acknowledges. But dealing with debt can help you and your partner can learn to collaborate and compromise, skills that help couples thrive in all sorts of challenging situations, and it can end up bringing you closer. More from Grow: ‘Struggle Meals’ host: You can cook fast, easy dishes for only $2 a person

3 tips for side hustle success from Kevin Ha, who brings in over $33,000 a year

How $10 or less can help you turn old clothes into a new wardrobe


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, borgesodell, money, student, couples, financial, debt, loans, talk, topics, taboo, help, theres, partner


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

A quick US trade deal won’t help Britain avoid Brexit damage, economists say

A possible trade deal with the U.S. will do little to mitigate the impact of Britain leaving the EU without a deal in place, economists have told CNBC. In the event of a no-deal Brexit, the U.K. would lose this tariff-free access and would have to trade under World Trade Organization (WTO) rules. In order to avoid this, the U.K. government is trying to replicate many of the EU’s existing trade deals with other territories. It will, however, also need to renegotiate a trade deal with the EU in or


A possible trade deal with the U.S. will do little to mitigate the impact of Britain leaving the EU without a deal in place, economists have told CNBC. In the event of a no-deal Brexit, the U.K. would lose this tariff-free access and would have to trade under World Trade Organization (WTO) rules. In order to avoid this, the U.K. government is trying to replicate many of the EU’s existing trade deals with other territories. It will, however, also need to renegotiate a trade deal with the EU in or
A quick US trade deal won’t help Britain avoid Brexit damage, economists say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, damage, uk, deal, deals, help, say, brexit, economists, britain, eu, quick, trade, imports, pickering, political, wont, offset, told


A quick US trade deal won't help Britain avoid Brexit damage, economists say

A possible trade deal with the U.S. will do little to mitigate the impact of Britain leaving the EU without a deal in place, economists have told CNBC. Both the U.K. and U.S. governments have expressed a desire to forge a partial deal on trade as soon as possible after Britain’s anticipated departure from the EU on October 31. On a recent visit to London, U.S. national security advisor John Bolton said the U.S. would enthusiastically support a no-deal Brexit should Prime Minister Boris Johnson pursue it, adding that Washington would be ready to work fast on a free trade agreement. However, such an accord faces significant political hurdles on both sides of the Atlantic, while also falling short of the economic reprieve Britain will need to offset the loss of its existing trade arrangements with the EU, economists have argued. Limited impact In 2018, the EU accounted for 46% of all U.K. exports, 54% of all imports, and seven of the U.K.’s 10 largest export markets and sources of imports were from the other 27 EU nations, according to a House of Commons briefing paper published last week. The U.S. accounted for 19% of U.K. exports and 11% of imports, while Germany as a standalone partner represented 9% of exports and 12% of imports. Kallum Pickering, senior economist at Berenberg, told CNBC that given the larger impact on GDP from the quantity of trade with the EU in comparison with the U.S., it is “hard to see how leaving the EU could be offset with a trade deal with the U.S.” “You could add a further layer in the fact that the U.K.’s trade agreement with the EU is free in all senses of the word, on investment, on immigration, on goods and in most services, including finance, whereas the U.K. would presumably be striking with the U.S. a trade deal that covers goods and only partial agreements in services, with very little on immigration,” Pickering said. “So the major things that the U.K. benefits from — attracting lots of FDI (foreign direct investment) from Europe, a high inflow of EU workers boosting the labor force — would not be offset by a trade deal with the U.S,” he added.

The EU has around 40 trade deals covering over 70 countries, meaning the U.K. currently has access to those markets, such as Canada, without having to pay import tariffs on most goods. In the event of a no-deal Brexit, the U.K. would lose this tariff-free access and would have to trade under World Trade Organization (WTO) rules. In order to avoid this, the U.K. government is trying to replicate many of the EU’s existing trade deals with other territories. If Brexit does happen on October 31, the U.K. will be free to sign trade deals with countries which do not have existing agreements with the EU, such as the U.S. Britain has rolled over 13 trade deals so far, most recently with South Korea. Others have included partners with whom trade is historically negligible, such as Central America, Norway and Iceland, Israel and the Pacific Islands. It will, however, also need to renegotiate a trade deal with the EU in order to ensure continued tariff-free access to the world’s largest free-trading bloc. While acknowledging that a trade deal with the U.S. would be advantageous in general terms, Pickering argued that the benefit of an immediate U.S. trade deal upon leaving the EU, in the case of a hard exit, “provides only a limited offset, and that’s being generous.”

Other analysts were similarly skeptical about the practical aspects of a potential deal. Steen Jakobsen, chief economist at Saxo Bank, dismissed the suggestions as “political noise” when speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Tuesday, citing the seven-year negotiation to establish the landmark EU-Canada deal as an example of the complexity of the process. Altaf Kassam, EMEA head of investment strategy and research at State Street Global Advisors, pointed to the White House’s recent handling of trade negotiations as an ominous sign for any prospective trade deal. “Boris Johnson and Donald Trump have some kind of rapport, and that’s a good thing, but if you see the way the U.S.-China trade negotiations have gone, it’s never going to be a slam dunk for the U.K. This is going to drag on,” he told CNBC earlier this week. Political wall The politics of the deal have emerged front and center of late. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Monday vowed to oppose any post-Brexit trade deal with the U.K. that would risk Northern Ireland’s peaceful status quo by reinstalling a hard southern border with the Republic of Ireland, which will remain part of the EU. U.K. leader Johnson has made eradicating the Irish “backstop” the key non-negotiable in his attempt to return to the table with European leaders. The “backstop” is seen as a way to keep the porous border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (which is a part of the U.K.) open in the event that the U.K. and EU fail to agree a future trade deal at the end of a 21-month transition period. Its unpopularity with pro-Brexit lawmakers stems from its requirement that the U.K. remains in a single customs territory with the EU for an indefinite amount of time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, damage, uk, deal, deals, help, say, brexit, economists, britain, eu, quick, trade, imports, pickering, political, wont, offset, told


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon Alexa will soon help people check in on aging relatives, with new skill from State Farm

State Farm, the provider of car, home and life insurance, is working with Amazon on a new Alexa tool that helps people stay in contact with their aging family members. The skill, as Amazon calls Alexa apps, will allow owners of Amazon Echo Show devices to share alerts and check-ins so adult children and caregivers can know that their relatives are safe and in the right place. Mark Oakley, State Farm’s senior vice president of the labs team, said the idea came to him based on a personal experienc


State Farm, the provider of car, home and life insurance, is working with Amazon on a new Alexa tool that helps people stay in contact with their aging family members. The skill, as Amazon calls Alexa apps, will allow owners of Amazon Echo Show devices to share alerts and check-ins so adult children and caregivers can know that their relatives are safe and in the right place. Mark Oakley, State Farm’s senior vice president of the labs team, said the idea came to him based on a personal experienc
Amazon Alexa will soon help people check in on aging relatives, with new skill from State Farm Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, echo, soon, stay, working, senior, seniors, aging, check, state, amazon, farm, ways, alexa, skill, relatives, insurance, help


Amazon Alexa will soon help people check in on aging relatives, with new skill from State Farm

State Farm, the provider of car, home and life insurance, is working with Amazon on a new Alexa tool that helps people stay in contact with their aging family members.

The skill, as Amazon calls Alexa apps, will allow owners of Amazon Echo Show devices to share alerts and check-ins so adult children and caregivers can know that their relatives are safe and in the right place. State Farm’s research team developed the skill in recent months and will roll it out with a list of activities and suggested events for users.

Along with a State Farm-developed mobile app, the skill creates “a virtual circle of support, coordination and communication at any time of the day while delivering a personalized experience to the senior,” the insurance company said in a statement to CNBC.

Amazon has been researching ways for its technology to help seniors, a huge and growing demographic, and the company is also exploring how its voice assistant can support skills that manage sensitive health information so users can get things like medication reminders. The 2010 U.S. census found that one in five residents will be 65 or older by 2030, and many of them will want to live independently as long as possible.

Mark Oakley, State Farm’s senior vice president of the labs team, said the idea came to him based on a personal experience. Last year, he and his siblings struggled to stay in touch with their father, who was living independently. Most of their communication took place in disparate ways, by phone or e-mail, and he thought there must be a better way to coordinate care.

He started working on a skill for the Amazon Echo that wouldn’t feel intrusive or make a senior feel old. Oakley said he’s also thinking about ways to bring kids into the mix to further motivate grandparents to stay engaged with more family members.

For now, State Farm is focused on providing reassurance to caregivers and supporting seniors and isn’t currently looking at health features such as medication reminders. Oakley said data won’t be shared across business lines so it can’t be used to discriminate against users when it comes to insurance products.

Oakley said he’s only working on the Echo at the moment and not any other smart speaker such as the Google Home.

“We liked the voice and touch elements, and Amazon is the leader in terms of market share,” he said.

The service will be tested in trials in the coming months and is expected to launch in 2020. State Farm hasn’t yet determined if seniors or caregivers will have to buy the Echo devices or whether insurance will cover them.

WATCH: Amazon launches lines of over-the-counter health products


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, echo, soon, stay, working, senior, seniors, aging, check, state, amazon, farm, ways, alexa, skill, relatives, insurance, help


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

4 rules that help me save hundreds of dollars on my work wardrobe

But I have also found ways to make sure buying and maintaining clothes and shoes doesn’t have to cost a whole paycheck. Don’t: Wear work clothes outside of workAvoid mixing your work clothes and your weekend clothes, and you’ll get more wear out of your professional wardrobe. My work shoes live at work: They don’t go outside to lunch, they don’t commute, and they don’t go on vacation. Some of the author’s work shoes. My work shoes live at work: They don’t go outside to lunch, they don’t commute,


But I have also found ways to make sure buying and maintaining clothes and shoes doesn’t have to cost a whole paycheck. Don’t: Wear work clothes outside of workAvoid mixing your work clothes and your weekend clothes, and you’ll get more wear out of your professional wardrobe. My work shoes live at work: They don’t go outside to lunch, they don’t commute, and they don’t go on vacation. Some of the author’s work shoes. My work shoes live at work: They don’t go outside to lunch, they don’t commute,
4 rules that help me save hundreds of dollars on my work wardrobe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: laura edwins, aditi shrikant, lance lambert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, clothes, black, dont, pieces, help, tshirt, rules, price, outside, work, dollars, shoes, wear, wardrobe, hundreds, save


4 rules that help me save hundreds of dollars on my work wardrobe

Dressing the part at work can be a smart investment. Studies have found that having a put-together appearance can help boost your earnings. In my job as a senior social media editor for CNBC, I have found that the right look can also boost my performance: When I feel like I look good at work, I’m in a better mood and more willing to collaborate and speak up in meetings. But I have also found ways to make sure buying and maintaining clothes and shoes doesn’t have to cost a whole paycheck. Over the years, these four rules have helped me save hundreds of dollars on my work wardrobe:

Do: Develop a few go-to looks

High-profile leaders like former President Barack Obama, Mark Zuckerberg, and late Apple cofounder Steve Jobs have used “work uniforms” of go-to pieces and looks to streamline their morning routine and help them focus on big tasks. It’s an easy move to emulate — one that can save you time and money.

Provided by Laura Edwins

Find a few looks that work for any season, and then mix and match expensive and inexpensive pieces to create them. Some of my favorites are: A black T-shirt tucked into jeans with a black blazer

A white button-down shirt with statement jewelry and jeans or a skinny pant

A neutral dress with a fun scarf There’s lots of flexibility with all these looks, and a black T-shirt or a white button down are available at every price range. I like to buy basics like these at Old Navy where, with sales and coupons, a T-shirt is usually $10 or less.

Don’t: Wear work clothes outside of work

Avoid mixing your work clothes and your weekend clothes, and you’ll get more wear out of your professional wardrobe. It can even be smart to leave some key pieces at the office. The biggest item this applies to is shoes. My work shoes live at work: They don’t go outside to lunch, they don’t commute, and they don’t go on vacation. About three years ago I paid around $90 for a pair of black Coach flats — more than I would typically spend on a pair of shoes. Following this rule has kept them in great condition, even though there are weeks I wear them almost every day.

Some of the author’s work shoes. Provided by Laura Edwins

Do: Get savvy about laundry

Often, clothing items that say “dry clean” on the label can be cleaned at home, either by using the delicate cycle in a washing machine or by hand-washing them in the bathroom sink. Then skip the dryer in favor of line drying. To decipher laundry tag symbols and best practices for different kinds of fabric, check out guides like those from Textile Industry Affairs and Reviewed.com. Without that trick, my monthly dry-cleaning bill would likely be around $30-40. Instead, I bought a foldable drying rack for about $20, and when necessary I buy a bottle of delicate laundry detergent ($5-$20, depending on how high end I want to go).

Don’t: Buy at retail prices

There are so many opportunities to avoid paying full price. If you’re in love with a particular brand that’s available at multiple retailers, do a quick price comparison search to see if an item is available at discount or secondhand sites like Nordstrom Rack or Poshmark, or at often-affordable online retailers like Zappos and its sister site 6pm. I’ve saved hundreds of dollars on dresses and shoes over the years this way.

My work shoes live at work: They don’t go outside to lunch, they don’t commute, and they don’t go on vacation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: laura edwins, aditi shrikant, lance lambert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, clothes, black, dont, pieces, help, tshirt, rules, price, outside, work, dollars, shoes, wear, wardrobe, hundreds, save


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Huge deals from the likes of Amazon help UK tech start-ups score record foreign investment

British technology start-ups have attracted more foreign investment since the start of the year than they did throughout all of 2018, according to fresh figures published Wednesday. U.S. and Asian venture capital investors poured $3.7 billion into U.K. tech companies in the first seven months of 2019, research from industry group Tech Nation and data firm Dealroom showed. Last year, U.K. start-ups raised $2.9 billion from American and Asian investors. Including domestic sources of cash, $6.7 bil


British technology start-ups have attracted more foreign investment since the start of the year than they did throughout all of 2018, according to fresh figures published Wednesday. U.S. and Asian venture capital investors poured $3.7 billion into U.K. tech companies in the first seven months of 2019, research from industry group Tech Nation and data firm Dealroom showed. Last year, U.K. start-ups raised $2.9 billion from American and Asian investors. Including domestic sources of cash, $6.7 bil
Huge deals from the likes of Amazon help UK tech start-ups score record foreign investment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, asian, record, foreign, score, likes, help, million, startups, uk, venture, funding, tech, start, huge, billion, nation


Huge deals from the likes of Amazon help UK tech start-ups score record foreign investment

British technology start-ups have attracted more foreign investment since the start of the year than they did throughout all of 2018, according to fresh figures published Wednesday.

U.S. and Asian venture capital investors poured $3.7 billion into U.K. tech companies in the first seven months of 2019, research from industry group Tech Nation and data firm Dealroom showed. Last year, U.K. start-ups raised $2.9 billion from American and Asian investors.

The eye-watering sum was boosted by nine-figure deals from capital-rich companies like Amazon and SoftBank. In May, Amazon led a $575 million funding round for Deliveroo — although that was hit with a warning from the U.K. competition regulator — while SoftBank’s notable U.K. investments include $800 million for Greensill and $390 million for OakNorth.

Including domestic sources of cash, $6.7 billion has been invested into private British tech firms overall in 2019, Tech Nation said, adding that figure could rise to a record $11 billion by the end of the year. The organization said U.S. corporate venture capital funding for U.K. start-ups has risen by 3% in the last six years, while Asian corporate funding is up 20%.

“It’s evidence for us that there’s growing interest for emerging technologies that are gaining a lot of traction in the U.K. from foreign investors,” George Windsor, Tech Nation’s head of insights, told CNBC in a phone interview. “This shows us the U.K. is continuing to perform strongly on the global stage, and for us this is just the start.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, asian, record, foreign, score, likes, help, million, startups, uk, venture, funding, tech, start, huge, billion, nation


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

A 6-figure salary won’t make you love your job—but these ‘happiness hacks’ might help

But finding happiness at work is easier said than done. Whatever the reason, these research-backed happiness hacks might just tick up your level of on-the-job satisfaction:1. Don’t take a high-paying job you hateWhatever meaning you’re drawing from your job, one thing is for sure: Doing it for the money won’t bring your happiness. Numerous studies have found no correlation between higher salaries and higher levels of happiness. Researchers have found that once a person earns an average of $75,00


But finding happiness at work is easier said than done. Whatever the reason, these research-backed happiness hacks might just tick up your level of on-the-job satisfaction:1. Don’t take a high-paying job you hateWhatever meaning you’re drawing from your job, one thing is for sure: Doing it for the money won’t bring your happiness. Numerous studies have found no correlation between higher salaries and higher levels of happiness. Researchers have found that once a person earns an average of $75,00
A 6-figure salary won’t make you love your job—but these ‘happiness hacks’ might help Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: alex palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, 6figure, help, satisfaction, youre, workers, researchers, higher, personal, happiness, employees, wont, hacks, work, love, jobbut, job


A 6-figure salary won't make you love your job—but these 'happiness hacks' might help

Unhappiness can be expensive. According to Gallup’s 2018 State of the Global Workplace report, 85% of employees are not engaged at work, and it’s costing our economy approximately $7 trillion in lost productivity each year. While it’s important for business leaders to take action, employees are also encouraged to seek out their own ways of boosting satisfaction at work. Why? A cheery disposition — and not a bigger paycheck — can actually make you better at your job and less likely to quit. One study from the University of Warwick found that increased happiness in the workplace led to a 12% jump in productivity, while unhappy workers were 10% less productive. Sales? Thirty-seven percent higher from happy workers. Creativity? Three times higher. But finding happiness at work is easier said than done. Even if you start the day eager to dive into a project, you’re likely struggling to stay focused by late afternoon. And maybe you’re great at what you do, but there might still be a nagging voice in the back of your mind asking: “Wouldn’t you be happier at another job?” Whatever the reason, these research-backed happiness hacks might just tick up your level of on-the-job satisfaction:

1. Don’t take a high-paying job you hate

Whatever meaning you’re drawing from your job, one thing is for sure: Doing it for the money won’t bring your happiness. Numerous studies have found no correlation between higher salaries and higher levels of happiness. A good rule of thumb: $80,000 is enough. Researchers have found that once a person earns an average of $75,000 per year, they experience a happiness plateau. Those who earn six- or seven-figure income jobs might be able to buy nice things, but they don’t enjoy a higher level of happiness commensurate with the higher salary, the study concluded. A pair of researchers drawing on data from 5,000 British workers also found that while absolute pay didn’t predict a person’s sense of satisfaction, their education did — as in the higher their education level, the lower their sense of life satisfaction. Researchers suggested that this is because of the higher aspirations that education creates. The takeaway? Stop putting so much importance on making more money at work. A bigger paycheck doesn’t always guarantee a bigger smile.

2. Walk or bike to work

While some researchers have found that longer commutes tend to correlate with lower job satisfaction, a study of 3,400 participants by researchers at McGill University examined different modes of transportation for getting to work and respondents’ relative satisfaction. Subjects were interviewed in both the summer and winter to get an average satisfaction score that accounted for changing weather conditions. They found that while the commute length did not correlate with satisfaction, the mode of transportation did. Specifically, the study returned the following percentages of satisfaction: Walkers: 85% Cyclists: 77% Metro/subway riders: 76% Bus riders: 75.5%

3. Craft your job

Don’t just do your job, craft it. That’s the insight from a team of researchers who urge employees to reframe their worklife in terms of their own personal strengths and passions. Called “job crafting,” the exercise directs a person to “visualize the job, map its elements and reorganize them to better suit you.” Drawing on their research with companies of a wide range of sizes, they found that employees who craft their jobs grow more engaged in their work and deliver stronger performance: Job crafting involves a series of steps: Create a “before diagram” of what your job consists of, with larger squares representing tasks that require the most time, and smaller squares for tasks that take less time. Review the diagram and identify areas of greatest importance ― professional development, revenue-generating tasks ― where more time should be applied. Identify your own motives, strengths and passions ― the things that inspire you to work hard or get you excited about your work. Use these motives, strengths and passions to create an “after diagram” with a new set of task blocks that align with these drives, and frame your roles in a way that’s most meaningful to you.

4. Jazz up your personal workspace

While taking long personal calls at work might not be a great way to win over your boss, bringing your personal life into your workspace has been found to have very positive results. A pair of psychologists from the University of Exeter found that workers were more productive when their desks were “decorated rather than lean” — that is, when their desks included additions such as plants or art. In two experiments — one at a university psychology department, the other at a commercial city office — the psychologists examined the performance of employees (e.g., attention to detail, management, processing of information) in several different workplace conditions. Results consistently showed that those with decorated spaces were more productive than those with lean (or undecorated) ones. When participants had input into the decoration of their spaces, the researchers noted, it “increased participants’ feelings of autonomy and decisional involvement,” which then led to increases in comfort, job satisfaction and job productivity. This feeling of empowerment boosted productivity by 32%. If your workspace feels bare, consider adding artwork, plants or some other addition that enhances the space in a way that feels personal for you. Throw in a lava lamp or disco ball if you’re into that sort of thing.

5. Write down meaningful moments


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: alex palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, 6figure, help, satisfaction, youre, workers, researchers, higher, personal, happiness, employees, wont, hacks, work, love, jobbut, job


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Greenland to Trump: ‘We’re open for business, not for sale’

Fed may not have enough firepower to prevent a recessionPresident Trump has been pressing the Fed to help head off a feared economic slowdown, but it’s not clear the central bank has the ammunition. The Fedread more


Fed may not have enough firepower to prevent a recessionPresident Trump has been pressing the Fed to help head off a feared economic slowdown, but it’s not clear the central bank has the ammunition. The Fedread more
Greenland to Trump: ‘We’re open for business, not for sale’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recessionpresident, greenland, slowdown, pressing, prevent, fed, firepower, head, business, open, help, sale, fedread, trump


Greenland to Trump: 'We're open for business, not for sale'

Fed may not have enough firepower to prevent a recession

President Trump has been pressing the Fed to help head off a feared economic slowdown, but it’s not clear the central bank has the ammunition.

The Fed

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recessionpresident, greenland, slowdown, pressing, prevent, fed, firepower, head, business, open, help, sale, fedread, trump


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Money problems? Here’s how financial therapy might help

That’s when he decided to seek out help himself from a professional specializing in financial therapy. “Financial therapy starts to melt away some of the stress. What is financial therapyFinancial therapy is a relatively new field that combines financial planning services and mental health treatment. Financial planners who enter into financial therapy understand that you can make the perfect plan on paper, but if you have hang ups about money, anxieties and fears about money, you’re not going to


That’s when he decided to seek out help himself from a professional specializing in financial therapy. “Financial therapy starts to melt away some of the stress. What is financial therapyFinancial therapy is a relatively new field that combines financial planning services and mental health treatment. Financial planners who enter into financial therapy understand that you can make the perfect plan on paper, but if you have hang ups about money, anxieties and fears about money, you’re not going to
Money problems? Here’s how financial therapy might help Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, help, clients, problems, coambs, therapists, financial, heres, emotional, emotions, therapist, therapy, mccoy


Money problems? Here's how financial therapy might help

As a marriage and family therapist, Ed Coambs has a knack for open and honest conversation. In his practice in Charlotte, North Carolina, he facilitates communication between his clients — many of them couples — and prioritizes it in his own life. But he wasn’t always so attuned to his own emotional needs. When Coambs and his wife first got married, he considered becoming a financial planner. But then he started seeing the same money issues creep up in his own life. For one, his wife is the breadwinner in his family, and though logically he knows that dynamic shouldn’t bother him, it was still having an effect on his self esteem and relationship with his wife, he tells CNBC Make It. He switched career paths to counseling but says learning more about psychology and helping others wasn’t enough to alleviate his own emotional distress. He was still experiencing anxiety, shame and fear in his financial life. That’s when he decided to seek out help himself from a professional specializing in financial therapy. “While I externally would say that I have no problem with women earning more than men, that ended up not being my internal experience,” Coambs says. “What I have come to accept and make peace with is that, like many people, I internalized very conflicting views about the roles of men and women, work and money.” He says working with a financial therapist has allowed him to process his emotions in a non-judgmental space. Feelings of shame, anxiety and fear related to money have decreased, he says. At the same time, he feels more grateful and safe in his financial life. “I wanted to delve through the deeper layers about what I’ve inherited about how a man should be a provider, a man should earn more than a woman,” he says. “Financial therapy starts to melt away some of the stress. It really is a safe space to explore your personal relationship with money.”

What is financial therapy

Financial therapy is a relatively new field that combines financial planning services and mental health treatment. Megan McCoy, director of the Personal Financial Planning Masters Program at Kansas State University and a member of the Financial Therapy Association’s (FTA) Board of Directors, tells CNBC Make It that clients get the best of both worlds when they see a financial therapist: They can begin to process their underlying feelings about money, while working out a plans for retirement, savings, investments and other goals.

Financial planners who enter into financial therapy understand that you can make the perfect plan on paper, but if you have hang ups about money, anxieties and fears about money, you’re not going to make that plan work. Megan McCoy Kansas State University

McCoy adds that there are two primary types of financial therapists: Those who come from a counseling background and add financial competencies, and those who come from a financial planning background and add counseling competencies. Clients should pick the one that better fits their specific needs. “Financial planners who enter into financial therapy understand that you can make the perfect plan on paper, but if you have hang ups about money, anxieties and fears about money, you’re not going to make that plan work,” McCoy says. Though money and emotions have been tied together since the beginning of time, financial therapy as a practice is so new — McCoy says it didn’t really start developing until 2008 — that 2019 is the first year that financial therapists can get certified with the FTA. The certification ensures they are able to help clients with relationship disputes and disagreements, and depression related to finances. Rick Kahler, a financial planner and therapist, is a pioneer in the field, and co-founder of the FTA. In the 1990s, he and a group of researchers studied the psychological and emotional aspects of money. “What we found is 90% of financial decisions are made emotionally,” Kahler tells CNBC Make It. “The problem is that financial advisors and planners are not trained in behavioral change or communications, and therapists are not trained in money. There’s a hesitation in both camps to add competencies in the other.” That’s all changing with financial therapy.

Where money and emotions meet

Dr. Alex Melkumian, founder of the Financial Psychology Center, tells CNBC Make It he was inspired to get a clinical psychology doctorate with an emphasis in financial therapy after practicing family therapy in Los Angeles at the beginning of the Great Recession. Many of his clients, he says, were consistently bringing up money worries and financial stress, and he wanted to be able to talk with them more effectively. In fact, money is the number-one source of stress for Americans, according to a report from BlackRock. And while everyone knows that they should save more and watch their spending — “just like everyone knows not to overeat,” Melkumian says — there is often a disconnect between what they know they “should” do and what they actually do. “Everybody knows to save for a rainy day, but it doesn’t happen,” Melkumian says. “So why doesn’t that happen? A lot of times, it’s tied to emotions, an emotional journey. In our culture we think of money as rational, but human beings are not rational.”

In our culture, we think of money as rational, but human beings are not rational. Dr. Alex Melkumian Founder, Financial Psychology Center

“A lot of it comes down to having conversations that aren’t, unfortunately, that common yet in our culture,” Melkumian continues. “We think of money as strictly transactional, but we don’t consider all of the layers.” Coambs, the Charlotte-based therapist, says that financial therapy can help people recognize that experiences they had growing up that may seem unrelated to money — such as their parents’ divorce, an addiction or some sort of assault or other trauma — might actually inform their financial habits on an subconscious level. Such adverse developmental experiences, he says, have a “profound impact on people,” often times for life. “If you recognize that you have problematic financial behaviors and you’ve tried on your own to get them right and you haven’t, that’s not on you,” Coambs says. “Therapists help you understand the mind, how it shapes and grows.”

Working out family issues

While a traditional therapist might not have the proper background or ability to talk through money issues — Coambs and the other professionals interviewed for this story all said that traditional therapists tend to avoid the topic of money — it is a major source of discontent and stress within relationships of all types, and many couples don’t want to have money conversations because they consider them too difficult or embarrassing. But open communication is the foundation of any healthy relationship. It’s important, then, for financial therapists to work with both partners and get both perspectives, Coambs says. “A lot of our distress about money starts in interpersonal relationships, where difficult emotions emerge but never get dealt with,” Coambs says. “Positive emotions get minimized or dismissed, making it hard to experience joy around money and what it helps you do.” Once each partner is aware of the other’s story, the financial therapist can help the couple process and move forward. A skilled therapist, Coambs says, will be able to meet a client’s experiences with empathy, draining difficult emotions and creating “space for the pleasurable emotions to emerge.”

When to hire a financial therapist

Kansas State University’s McCoy says rates for therapy and the amount of sessions needed vary, just like with a traditional therapist. She encourages people to look on the FTA’s website for qualified therapists in their area, or search on Psychology Today for professionals specializing in money or finance. Financial planners tend to be more expensive, while a therapist might be able to accept insurance. People interested in seeing a financial therapist should look for a “fee only” practitioner. Kahler, the co-founder of the FTA, says that it should be clear to both the client and the professional if the sessions are working and they are making progress. Financial decisions, like saving more, for example, are concrete and measurable. “The process may look to be really slow when you’re working through emotional trauma, and then all of a sudden if you get that emotional piece resolved, boom here comes the financial proof,” Kahler says. McCoy believes all couples would benefit from seeing a financial therapist, particularly before they get married ( “divorce is way more expensive than therapy,” she says), as would anyone who is routinely stressed out or anxious about some part of their finances. “If at the end of the day you just need a mutual fund and need to get your portfolio established, you should see a certified financial planner,” McCoy says. “But if your issue is that you don’t trust your spouse with money or every time you think about money you break out in sweats, you should see a mental health professional.” Don’t miss: Why a down market may actually represent an opportunity for investors Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, help, clients, problems, coambs, therapists, financial, heres, emotional, emotions, therapist, therapy, mccoy


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Seeing red? Why a falling stock market can help you save on taxes

wundervisuals | E+ | Getty ImagesIf you’re panicking over Wednesday’s market declines, here’s your silver lining: You might have a great opportunity to save on taxes. That’s because when you convert to a Roth, you pay income taxes in the present based on the amount converted from the traditional IRA. Second, there are the lower income tax rates that are now in effect due to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This tax overhaul trimmed the individual income tax rates, so if you’re converting in 2018, you’


wundervisuals | E+ | Getty ImagesIf you’re panicking over Wednesday’s market declines, here’s your silver lining: You might have a great opportunity to save on taxes. That’s because when you convert to a Roth, you pay income taxes in the present based on the amount converted from the traditional IRA. Second, there are the lower income tax rates that are now in effect due to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This tax overhaul trimmed the individual income tax rates, so if you’re converting in 2018, you’
Seeing red? Why a falling stock market can help you save on taxes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: darla mercado john w schoen, darla mercado, john w schoen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, roth, seeing, falling, traditional, taxes, slott, youre, market, stock, tax, income, red, retirement, lower, convert, save


Seeing red? Why a falling stock market can help you save on taxes

wundervisuals | E+ | Getty Images

If you’re panicking over Wednesday’s market declines, here’s your silver lining: You might have a great opportunity to save on taxes. The Dow Jones Industrial Average plummeted by more than 600 points on Wednesday morning, amid news that the yield curve has inverted. In particular, yields are now higher on 2-year Treasury bonds compared to the 10-year Treasury. The development has stoked fears of an impending recession. There may be a bright spot for retirement savers, though — provided they don’t obsess over their shifting balances: If your traditional individual retirement account fell in value, it might be time to think about converting to a Roth IRA.

“The optimal time to convert is when valuations in your traditional accounts are lower,” said Suzanne Shier, chief tax strategist at Northern Trust. That’s because when you convert to a Roth, you pay income taxes in the present based on the amount converted from the traditional IRA. The tax bill will be lower if the value of the portfolio is down. Further, your Roth IRA will benefit from future tax-free growth and withdrawals in retirement. “If the market is tanking and you think it’s going to go back up, right now is the time to do it,” said Ed Slott, CPA and founder of Ed Slott and Co. “You have low tax rates and lower values.”

Two factors

There are two factors that might make a Roth conversion a good deal in the near term. First, there are the declining share values. This means you can transfer a greater portion of your IRA portfolio — more shares — to the Roth for potential tax-free growth and withdrawals in retirement. “Let’s say we were going to convert $50,000, now we can do it with a greater number of shares,” said David Oransky, a CPA and member of the American Institute of CPAs’ Personal Financial Planning Executive Committee. More from Personal Finance:

The IRS may seize your passport if you owe taxes

4 essential documents that could save your financial life

Why these people don’t mind overpaying the IRS “This is the CPA getting excited about the market dip,” he said. Second, there are the lower income tax rates that are now in effect due to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This tax overhaul trimmed the individual income tax rates, so if you’re converting in 2018, you’re likely paying a lower income tax rate than you would have in previous years. See below for your 2019 bracket.

A permanent decision

Jose Luis Pelaez | Getty Images

Before you break out the bubbly, know that this strategy isn’t necessarily for everyone. For instance, prior to the tax overhaul, financial planners and CPAs used to recommend Roth conversions early in the year. Investors would then see how their Roth accounts performed over subsequent months. If any of the converted accounts didn’t perform well, they might undo — or recharacterize — the transaction. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act took that tool away, so any Roth conversions you do now are permanent. It’s something to bear in mind in the event you convert some of your savings now and the market tanks in 2019. “You can’t play both ends like you used to do,” Slott said. “There are no do-overs anymore.”

Income planning


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: darla mercado john w schoen, darla mercado, john w schoen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, roth, seeing, falling, traditional, taxes, slott, youre, market, stock, tax, income, red, retirement, lower, convert, save


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

3 lifestyle changes experts say can help you save money for a home

But though it can feel out of reach, he says, “there are things you can do” to help you become a homeowner. He and other experts recommend that, if possible, you try to make changes to what are likely your biggest monthly expenses, including housing and transportation costs. These types of changes are likely to help you save the largest amount of money in the shortest amount of time. But if you can walk, ride a bike, and occasionally use a ride-sharing service, Barnes says, the choice to be car-


But though it can feel out of reach, he says, “there are things you can do” to help you become a homeowner. He and other experts recommend that, if possible, you try to make changes to what are likely your biggest monthly expenses, including housing and transportation costs. These types of changes are likely to help you save the largest amount of money in the shortest amount of time. But if you can walk, ride a bike, and occasionally use a ride-sharing service, Barnes says, the choice to be car-
3 lifestyle changes experts say can help you save money for a home Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: sam becker, myelle lansat, sofia pitt, lance lambert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finance, money, lifestyle, save, changes, getting, biggest, moving, transportation, way, experts, barnes, car, say, help


3 lifestyle changes experts say can help you save money for a home

A home will probably “be the biggest purchase that most of us make,” says Amin Dabit, director of advisor services at financial management company Personal Capital. But though it can feel out of reach, he says, “there are things you can do” to help you become a homeowner. He and other experts recommend that, if possible, you try to make changes to what are likely your biggest monthly expenses, including housing and transportation costs. These types of changes are likely to help you save the largest amount of money in the shortest amount of time.

1. Rethink how you get around

The average American spends $9,576 per year to own a car. Because owning a vehicle can be such a drain on your finances, finding a new way to get around could be a way to free up a significant amount of money. This works best if you live in an area with adequate public transportation options or you have access to another means of getting around. Getting rid of your car “may not be the easiest thing to do for someone who’s accustomed to jumping in the car and going,” acknowledges personal finance expert Marsha Barnes, who runs the website The Finance Bar. But if you can walk, ride a bike, and occasionally use a ride-sharing service, Barnes says, the choice to be car-free can save you a lot of money. And it’s not “something that you have to do forever,” either, she adds. If you love and miss having a car, you can get one after you’ve reached your savings goal. Entrepreneur Kevin O’Leary has reaped the benefits of going without a car. As the “Shark Tank” investor told CNBC Make It, “I use my phone to call Uber or Lyft and they take me around the city. I save a fortune. I feel good about it. I hate cars.”

2. Move back home

The last thing many independent young adults want to do is move back in with their parents, but if doing so is an option that’s available to you, it’s probably the single biggest way to save a lot of money. “You’re basically getting rid of all of your household expenses when you move back home,” says Barnes. While you may throw mom and dad some money for rent, you should still come out ahead. A 25-year-old in Pennsylvania told USA Today that she was able to save 75% to 80% of her paycheck by moving back in with her parents, and that helped her save up enough to buy a home. “You really want to do something that makes a huge impact [financially], and moving back home is a way to do that,” Barnes says.

You really want to do something that makes a huge impact [financially], and moving back home is a way to do that. Marsha Barnes The Finance Bar

3. Pick up a side hustle


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: sam becker, myelle lansat, sofia pitt, lance lambert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finance, money, lifestyle, save, changes, getting, biggest, moving, transportation, way, experts, barnes, car, say, help


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post