Neuroscientist: Mindfulness ‘is kind of a superpower’ and can help you have ‘a brilliant career’

Sam Harris, neuroscientist, New York Times bestselling author, host of the Making Sense podcast, and creator of the Waking Up course. Here’s how Harris and Hunter say mindfulness can help you in your professional life. Recognize where you focus your attention”The ability to notice thoughts and emotions arise and pass away, rather than being merely identified with them, is a kind of superpower,” says Harris. If you’re writing an important email and your attention shifts to searching the internet


Sam Harris, neuroscientist, New York Times bestselling author, host of the Making Sense podcast, and creator of the Waking Up course.
Here’s how Harris and Hunter say mindfulness can help you in your professional life.
Recognize where you focus your attention”The ability to notice thoughts and emotions arise and pass away, rather than being merely identified with them, is a kind of superpower,” says Harris.
If you’re writing an important email and your attention shifts to searching the internet
Neuroscientist: Mindfulness ‘is kind of a superpower’ and can help you have ‘a brilliant career’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-19  Authors: sofia pitt, aditi shrikant, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brilliant, thoughts, recognize, harris, hunter, work, help, superpower, kind, youre, career, thought, attention, stress, neuroscientist, mindfulness


Neuroscientist: Mindfulness 'is kind of a superpower' and can help you have 'a brilliant career'

Sam Harris, neuroscientist, New York Times bestselling author, host of the Making Sense podcast, and creator of the Waking Up course.

Bill Gates, Oprah Winfrey, and Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff all have something in common besides being successful billionaires. They all practice meditation, and credit it as a tool for their success. Research tends to back up the buzz: A 2018 study in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology found that daily mindfulness training, like meditation, can improve productivity, job satisfaction, work-life balance, and reduce stress. “Mindfulness allows you to experience your life in the present without ruminating about what just happened, what should have happened, what almost happened,” says neuroscientist Sam Harris, a New York Times bestselling author, the host of the Making Sense podcast, and the creator of the Waking Up meditation course for beginners. “It is the ability to pay attention to what actually matters.” Though incorporating mindfulness into your own life can be tricky, the challenge is worth it, Harris says, since it “can be the difference between having a brilliant career, surrounded by creative people you love to work with, and being the scary guy in the office who just got fired (again).” Jeremy Hunter, Ph.D., the founding director of the Executive Mind Leadership Institute at the Peter F. Drucker Graduate School of Management, agrees: Mindfulness can give you a “competitive edge at work,” he says, which can help you manage your attention, develop self-awareness, learn to adapt, and regulate your emotional impulses. Here’s how Harris and Hunter say mindfulness can help you in your professional life.

1. Recognize where you focus your attention

“The ability to notice thoughts and emotions arise and pass away, rather than being merely identified with them, is a kind of superpower,” says Harris. But it’s not a superpower we’re born with. Useless mental chatter is the brain’s default and “we never get a moment’s peace for the rest of our lives,” he says. “That is, until we learn to meditate.” We live in an environment that “seduces our attention at every turn … and at the same time we’re using our minds to make a living.” Your capacity to focus your attention is your most valuable asset, but reclaiming our focus requires intention, says Hunter. Hunter tells his students that the first step to becoming more mindful is to observe where attention is being allocated: “Ask yourself, ‘Is what you’re giving your attention to on a daily basis truly meaningful to you?'”

Ask yourself, ‘Is what you’re giving your attention to on a daily basis truly meaningful to you?’ Jeremy Hunter founding director of the Executive Mind Leadership Institute at the Peter F. Drucker Graduate School of Management

This question led one of his students to recognize she was spending the first 30 minutes of her day in bed scrolling through Instagram. She was shocked to learn that amounted to 3.5 hours a week. After you observe where you’re putting your attention, you start to recognize which routine behaviors may be reducing your productivity, and therefore hindering your success. Outlining your priorities can help you catalog what’s unproductive. If you’re writing an important email and your attention shifts to searching the internet for what you should make for dinner, say, mindfulness helps you recognize you’re being distracted. Instead of letting it lead you away, “ask yourself, ‘Is this the best use of my time?'” says Hunter.

2. Gain insight into your thought patterns

Being mindful doesn’t mean you’ll stop experiencing distraction or no longer entertain negative thoughts or emotions. Instead, it teaches you to assign less value to those thoughts. “The goal isn’t to stop thinking. Rather, it’s to recognize thoughts as transitory appearances in consciousness,” says Harris. Not all negative feelings are counterproductive, he says. He uses exercise as an analogy for how negative feelings can serve as motivation: At the gym, you voluntarily create physical stress by running in place or lifting heavy weights. When you leave the gym, you don’t keep tensing your muscles and elevating your heart rate for no reason. You physically relax. “You want to have a similar relationship to periods of psychological stress. Can you put down your five-year plan so that you can actually enjoy dinner with your family? Not if you’re helplessly identified with every thought that comes lurching into consciousness,” Harris says. Meditate for as little as 10 minutes a day and you’ll slowly start to increase the amount of time you’re able to pay attention to the present. That ability will start to seep into other aspects of life, says Harris. You can then take a step back, categorize the feeling or thought as useless, and avoid manifesting ill feelings or acting impulsively.

3. Apply these techniques at work


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-19  Authors: sofia pitt, aditi shrikant, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brilliant, thoughts, recognize, harris, hunter, work, help, superpower, kind, youre, career, thought, attention, stress, neuroscientist, mindfulness


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6 easy tips to help raise your credit score

It’s important to raise your credit score so you receive the best rates and can qualify for more credit cards. Read on for CNBC Select’s six easy tips to help you raise your credit score. But your credit score isn’t just impacted by your credit card bills. The different versions are broken up into two main categories: base FICO Scores and industry-specific FICO Scores. Even if your credit score falls within the “good” range, there is no guarantee you’ll be approved for a financial product that r


It’s important to raise your credit score so you receive the best rates and can qualify for more credit cards.
Read on for CNBC Select’s six easy tips to help you raise your credit score.
But your credit score isn’t just impacted by your credit card bills.
The different versions are broken up into two main categories: base FICO Scores and industry-specific FICO Scores.
Even if your credit score falls within the “good” range, there is no guarantee you’ll be approved for a financial product that r
6 easy tips to help raise your credit score Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: alexandria white anna hecht, alexandria white, anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, easy, credit, pay, card, raise, good, tips, scores, score, experian, help, cards, fico, bills


6 easy tips to help raise your credit score

Establishing a good credit score isn’t a complex process, but it’s a vital piece of your financial picture. Having a high score gives you access to the best credit cards, a lower interest rate on personal loans and can even come into play when you apply for a new job or rent an apartment. It’s important to raise your credit score so you receive the best rates and can qualify for more credit cards. If you’re building credit, secured cards, such as the Discover it® Secured, are often your best option, but once you work your way up to good or excellent credit, you may qualify for cards with generous welcome bonuses and robust rewards programs, such as the American Express® Gold Card and the Chase Sapphire Reserve®, two of CNBC Select’s top-rated rewards cards. Thankfully, there are some easy and proactive steps you can take to improve your score. Read on for CNBC Select’s six easy tips to help you raise your credit score.

1. Make your payments on time

Paying your bills on time is the number-one most important thing you can do to help raise your score. FICO and VantageScore, which are two of the main credit card scoring models, both view payment history as the most influential factors when determining a person’s credit score. For lenders, a person’s ability to keep up with their credit card payments indicates that they are capable of taking out a loan and paying it back. But your credit score isn’t just impacted by your credit card bills. You need to pay all your bills on time. That includes all your utilities, student loan debt and any medical bills you might have.

2. Set up autopay or calendar reminders

If you struggle to remember to pay your bills each month (so many different due dates, so little time), there’s an easy fix: autopay. If you’re not sure you’ll be able to pay your bill in full, you can set it so you just pay the minimum. And the same goes with your utilities: Most major providers will let you set up autopay that withdraws automatically each month from your checking or savings account (or charges your credit card). In the case of student loan companies, some give you a discount on your interest rate if you set up autopay. If you don’t want to use autopay, another easy option is setting up a payment reminder. Many banks and card issuers will let you schedule reminders through their websites, including sending you email reminders or push notifications (or both). You can also set up Google or Outlook calendar invites or make a note of the due date on a physical calendar. It doesn’t really matter what notification system you use so long as you pay on time. The sooner you start paying on time, the sooner your score will begin to improve. And just as a bit of motivation, older credit penalties, such as late payments, matter less as time passes. So start now and stay consistent.

3. Don’t open too many accounts at once

FICO and VantageScore look at the number of credit inquiries, such as applications for new financial products or requests for credit limit increases, as well as the number of new account openings. Making these kinds of inquiries frequently dings your credit, so only apply for what you really need in order to avoid damaging your score. If you want a new card, but you’re not sure you’ll qualify, you can submit a pre-qualification form online. You can submit as many pre-qualification forms as you want, as they won’t impact your credit score.

4. Get credit for paying monthly utility and cell phone bills on time

If you are already responsible about making your utility and cell phone payments on time, then you should check out Experian Boost. It’s free and easy way for consumers to improve their credit scores. The way it works is simple: Connect your bank account(s) to Experian Boost so it can identify your utility and cell phone payment history. Once you verify the data and confirm you want it added to your Experian credit file, you’ll get an updated FICO score delivered to you in real time. Visit Experian to read more and register. By signing up, you will receive a free credit report and FICO score instantly.

5. Request a credit report and dispute any credit report errors

It’s smart to look over your credit reports from each of the three major credit reporting bureaus: Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. You can proactively monitor your credit and receive three free credit reports (one from each bureau) annually at annualcreditreport.com. Be sure to check for errors on your credit reports that could be hurting your score. While it may seem unlikely that your reports would be flawed, 26% of participants in a study by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) found at least one error on their reports that could make them appear riskier to lenders. Common mistakes, according to My FICO, occur when a person applies for credit cards under different names, if a clerical error is made when information is typed from a hand-written application or if an ex-spouse’s information remains on a person’s report. If you spot an error, you should then gather any supporting evidence and dispute the mistake either online or by phone with the respective bureau who issued the incorrect report.

6. Pay attention to your credit utilization rate

Your credit utilization rate (CUR) is your total credit card balance divided by your total available credit. For instance, the average American has a credit limit of $22,589 on four cards and a $6,028 balance, according to Experian. That results in a CUR of about 27%. Experts typically recommend keeping your total CUR below 30%. If your CUR is above 30% and you have no problem paying your bills on time and in full, you can call your card issuer and ask for a credit increase. If you’re struggling to pay off your bills and you have a high CUR, it’s smarter to figure out some areas where you can cut back your spending.

What is considered a good credit score?

FICO Scores and VantageScore credit scores both range from 300 to 850 — but they classify good credit differently. Here’s how the two companies classify good credit, according Experian: FICO 300-579: Very poor

580-669: Fair

670-739: Good

740-799: Very good

800-850: Exceptional VantageScore 300-549: Very poor

550-649: Poor

650-699: Fair

700-749: Good

750-850: Excellent While this information is helpful, just know that ranges vary depending on the credit scoring model used and what the lender perceives as good credit. For example, a credit score of 680 is considered good by FICO, but not by VantageScore. And your lender may have another idea of what credit score is good. Another thing to consider is the credit scoring versions that lenders use during the application process — FICO has 19. The different versions are broken up into two main categories: base FICO Scores and industry-specific FICO Scores. Base FICO Scores, such as FICO® Score 8, predict your chances of not paying as agreed in the future on any credit product, such as a mortgage, credit card or student loan. Industry-specific FICO® Scores, such as FICO® Auto Score 8, are more in-depth and also provide lenders a detailed credit risk assessment tailored to the specific type of credit you’re applying for, such as an auto loan. Even if your credit score falls within the “good” range, there is no guarantee you’ll be approved for a financial product that requires good credit. During the application process, lenders consider numerous factors beyond your credit score, such as income and monthly housing payments.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: alexandria white anna hecht, alexandria white, anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, easy, credit, pay, card, raise, good, tips, scores, score, experian, help, cards, fico, bills


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Warren slams Zuckerberg’s speech, saying Facebook’s political ad policy could help Trump win again

Warren lodged her latest attack after Zuckerberg gave a speech on free expression . Facebook has been criticized for both what it does and does not fact-check on its platform, and conservatives have complained that Facebook suppresses their voices. Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren took another jab at Mark Zuckerberg, accusing the Facebook CEO of helping Donald Trump win the presidential election in 2016 and aiding his reelection at a profit. Zuckerberg said in the speech that he’


Warren lodged her latest attack after Zuckerberg gave a speech on free expression .
Facebook has been criticized for both what it does and does not fact-check on its platform, and conservatives have complained that Facebook suppresses their voices.
Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren took another jab at Mark Zuckerberg, accusing the Facebook CEO of helping Donald Trump win the presidential election in 2016 and aiding his reelection at a profit.
Zuckerberg said in the speech that he’
Warren slams Zuckerberg’s speech, saying Facebook’s political ad policy could help Trump win again Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, trump, does, help, previously, win, slams, political, zuckerbergs, saying, policy, zuckerberg, ads, presidential, speech, facebook


Warren slams Zuckerberg's speech, saying Facebook's political ad policy could help Trump win again

Warren lodged her latest attack after Zuckerberg gave a speech on free expression . In his speech at Georgetown University, Zuckerberg defended his decision to err on the side of allowing more speech on Facebook, rather than less, even as the company has been attacked by both political parties for the types of content it hosts. Facebook has been criticized for both what it does and does not fact-check on its platform, and conservatives have complained that Facebook suppresses their voices.

“Facebook is actively helping Trump spread lies and misinformation,” the senator from Massachusetts said in a tweet Thursday, adding that Facebook is “unprepared” to deal with the 2020 election.

Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren took another jab at Mark Zuckerberg, accusing the Facebook CEO of helping Donald Trump win the presidential election in 2016 and aiding his reelection at a profit.

Political ads have been a sticking point for Facebook in the past few weeks after the company said it will not remove or fact-check false ads placed by politicians in a response to a request from Joe Biden’s presidential campaign to remove an ad with unsubstantiated claims placed by Trump. Zuckerberg said in the speech that he’s gone as far as to consider eliminating political ads, but said it would still leave ambiguity on where to draw the line.

“There are many more ads about issues than there ads about elections. Do we ban ads about health care, immigration or women’s empowerment?” he asked. “If you’re not going to ban those, does it really make sense to give everyone else a voice in political debates except for the candidates themselves?”

Warren previously attacked the policy and deliberately placed her own ad falsely claiming Zuckerberg endorsed Trump to test how far Facebook would take its own rules. In response, a Facebook spokesperson previously told CNBC, “If Senator Warren wants to say things she knows to be untrue, we believe Facebook should not be in the position of censoring that speech.”

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Warren’s latest tweets.

Publicly, Zuckerberg has appeared mostly unflappable in the face of Warren’s calls to break up his company. But there’s now evidence that he does see her campaign as a threat, after a leaked recording of his meeting with employees heard him acknowledge that Facebook would likely face “a legal challenge” under her administration, though he said he’d bet Facebook would win.

In the past week, Warren took another step to distance herself from the tech giants by pledging to turn down contributions over $200 from Big Tech executives. She also swore off large donations from executives at big banks, private equity firms or hedge funds after previously promising to deny the same from pharmaceutical and fossil fuel executives.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, trump, does, help, previously, win, slams, political, zuckerbergs, saying, policy, zuckerberg, ads, presidential, speech, facebook


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Millennials aren’t counting on Social Security for much help in retirement

Social Security is a central pillar in retirement security for current retirees and baby boomers. Younger generations are predicting a different outcome. Millennials, and members of Generations X and Z, said they plan to rely more on their personal savings than on Social Security in retirement. News headlines about a Social Security funding crisis have likely made younger people worry about depending on those monthly checks. More than 70% of working people, across generations, said they were afr


Social Security is a central pillar in retirement security for current retirees and baby boomers.
Younger generations are predicting a different outcome.
Millennials, and members of Generations X and Z, said they plan to rely more on their personal savings than on Social Security in retirement.
News headlines about a Social Security funding crisis have likely made younger people worry about depending on those monthly checks.
More than 70% of working people, across generations, said they were afr
Millennials aren’t counting on Social Security for much help in retirement Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, counting, wells, retirees, younger, program, help, generations, current, arent, millennials, personal, social, security, retirement


Millennials aren't counting on Social Security for much help in retirement

Social Security is a central pillar in retirement security for current retirees and baby boomers.

Younger generations are predicting a different outcome.

More than 60% of current retirees say their monthly Social Security checks are the primary way they cover their expenses, while just 13% of millennials expect that to be their situation, according to Wells Fargo’s annual retirement study. (More than 3,700 people were surveyed in summer 2019.)

Millennials, and members of Generations X and Z, said they plan to rely more on their personal savings than on Social Security in retirement.

More from Personal Finance:

The next big question after you retire

Couples weigh a ‘strategic divorce’ to save

Four ways to not outlive your retirement savings

“Our survey clearly shows the stark differences between current retirees and younger generations and how they will fund retirement,” said Fredrik Axsater, head of the institutional client group for Wells Fargo Asset Management.

News headlines about a Social Security funding crisis have likely made younger people worry about depending on those monthly checks. Next year, for the first time since 1982, the program will need to start depleting its funds to pay retirees their complete benefit, according to the latest government projections. By 2035, the program will only be able to pay about 80% of promised benefits.

More than 70% of working people, across generations, said they were afraid Social Security will not be available in their retirement, Wells Fargo found.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, counting, wells, retirees, younger, program, help, generations, current, arent, millennials, personal, social, security, retirement


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PayPal is launching a Venmo credit card to help monetize the payment app

The popular app, owned by PayPal, will offer a Venmo-branded credit card in 2020, the company announced Thursday. Venmo has since brought in 40 million users, launched a debit card last year and offers a “pay with Venmo” option with partners like Uber. “The next natural extension was to have a Venmo credit card,” Darrell Esch, senior vice president of credit at PayPal, told CNBC. Amazon offers credit cards and uses Synchrony for its most recent secured card. Instead, they pay bills directly on t


The popular app, owned by PayPal, will offer a Venmo-branded credit card in 2020, the company announced Thursday.
Venmo has since brought in 40 million users, launched a debit card last year and offers a “pay with Venmo” option with partners like Uber.
“The next natural extension was to have a Venmo credit card,” Darrell Esch, senior vice president of credit at PayPal, told CNBC.
Amazon offers credit cards and uses Synchrony for its most recent secured card.
Instead, they pay bills directly on t
PayPal is launching a Venmo credit card to help monetize the payment app Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, credit, card, payment, launching, popular, app, recent, payments, monetize, help, paypal, venmo, synchrony


PayPal is launching a Venmo credit card to help monetize the payment app

Venmo is moving from enabling payments with emojis on a phone to a more traditional method. The popular app, owned by PayPal, will offer a Venmo-branded credit card in 2020, the company announced Thursday. Synchrony Financial will handle the banking side of the card. The app started with peer-to-peer payments and became famous for incorporating a social network with the ability to “like” and comment on friends’ transactions. Venmo has since brought in 40 million users, launched a debit card last year and offers a “pay with Venmo” option with partners like Uber. “The next natural extension was to have a Venmo credit card,” Darrell Esch, senior vice president of credit at PayPal, told CNBC. “This rounds out what was otherwise a gap with the debit card.”

Venmo was acquired for $26 million by Braintree in 2012, and PayPal bought Braintree a year later. It joins a list of tech names that have offered credit cards to increase profits and engage customers. Apple was the most recent high-profile example in a partnership with Goldman Sachs to launch the Apple Card. Amazon offers credit cards and uses Synchrony for its most recent secured card. PayPal is not a bank, so in order to offer bank-like products, it relies on FDIC-insured Synchrony. It’s an increasingly popular setup for fintech companies that don’t have a bank charter. Although Synchrony Financial is the one handling the banking side, customers won’t be logging onto Synchrony’s website. Instead, they pay bills directly on the Venmo app. They can also opt to share payment history on their social feed, split purchases with other people, and get real-time alerts to monitor card activity. PayPal said some of the details, like rewards and cash back, are still being determined.

Monetizing Venmo


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, credit, card, payment, launching, popular, app, recent, payments, monetize, help, paypal, venmo, synchrony


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How Howard Schultz conquered self-doubt to build Starbucks into a $100 billion company

Despite having a net worth of more than $4 billion and being the driving force behind Starbucks for more than three decades, Howard Schultz says he’s just an average Joe, like you. I did not go to an Ivy League school,” Schultz tells Masterclass.com in 13-part series teaching business leadership. “I’m just a regular person just like you who had a dream to try and build a great, enduring company.” Today, Starbucks has a market cap over $100 billion. Schultz credits his success with Starbucks to h


Despite having a net worth of more than $4 billion and being the driving force behind Starbucks for more than three decades, Howard Schultz says he’s just an average Joe, like you.
I did not go to an Ivy League school,” Schultz tells Masterclass.com in 13-part series teaching business leadership.
“I’m just a regular person just like you who had a dream to try and build a great, enduring company.”
Today, Starbucks has a market cap over $100 billion.
Schultz credits his success with Starbucks to h
How Howard Schultz conquered self-doubt to build Starbucks into a $100 billion company Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, build, selfdoubt, howard, life, schultz, help, grew, conquered, company, moment, 100, billion, success, jump, tells, starbucks


How Howard Schultz conquered self-doubt to build Starbucks into a $100 billion company

Despite having a net worth of more than $4 billion and being the driving force behind Starbucks for more than three decades, Howard Schultz says he’s just an average Joe, like you.

“I don’t have an MBA. I did not go to an Ivy League school,” Schultz tells Masterclass.com in 13-part series teaching business leadership. “I’m just a regular person just like you who had a dream to try and build a great, enduring company.”

Today, Starbucks has a market cap over $100 billion.

Schultz, who grew up poor and lived in public housing in Brooklyn, New York, bought the Seattle coffee franchise in 1987 for $3.8 million after finding investors (including Bill Gates’ dad) to help him out. He grew the company from 11 stores to more than 3,500 locations in over 75 countries.

Schultz, 66, who now serves as the Starbuck’s chairman emeritus after retiring as executive chairman in June of 2018, says the only difference between him and most people is that he fought off self-doubt and jumped in headfirst.

He says it’s okay to have self-doubt about your ability to succeed, raise money or even attract the right people at times. But under no circumstance can you ever have any self-doubt about “your commitment and conviction to do what you set out to do,” which for him was building Starbucks into an international brand.

Schultz goes on to say that there will be no “magical” moment, time or formula that will help you start your venture, you just have to do it “with great discipline and thoughtfulness.”

“There is no single textbook, there is no mentor, there is no primary tool to get you to jump in that pool other than your own courage and conviction of the idea and this moment in time for you and your family,” he tells Masterclass.com.

Schultz credits his success with Starbucks to his fierce determination and unwavering persistence.

“I willed it to happen,” Schultz writes in his memoir, “Pour Your Heart Into It.” “I took my life in my hands, learned from anyone I could, grabbed what opportunity I could, and molded my success step by step.”

Schultz does knowledge that entrepreneurship isn’t for everyone, but he still encourages people to live life to the fullest and not have any regrets.

“You’ve got to find your position in life. But if [entrepreneurship] is in your blood — and only you know if it is — then jump into the pool.”

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Don’t miss: From summer janitor to CEO of Disney: What fueled Bob Iger’s rise to the top

Billionaire Tim Draper’s first job was selling apples for 5 cents—and it drove him to become a capitalist


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, build, selfdoubt, howard, life, schultz, help, grew, conquered, company, moment, 100, billion, success, jump, tells, starbucks


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Borrowing to squash your credit card debt? This move could help you save

If you’re thinking of tidying up your balance sheet by taking out a personal loan, consider doing some research first. The website studied three-year personal loans offered to borrowers with credit scores of at least 640. Personal loans are unsecured debts with a typical term of three to five years. Here’s the catch: While borrowers with higher credit scores generally are eligible for lower interest rates, even those with pristine credit can see significant differences in offered rates. The diff


If you’re thinking of tidying up your balance sheet by taking out a personal loan, consider doing some research first.
The website studied three-year personal loans offered to borrowers with credit scores of at least 640.
Personal loans are unsecured debts with a typical term of three to five years.
Here’s the catch: While borrowers with higher credit scores generally are eligible for lower interest rates, even those with pristine credit can see significant differences in offered rates.
The diff
Borrowing to squash your credit card debt? This move could help you save Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, borrowers, scores, debt, borrowing, help, interest, card, according, credit, rates, squash, loan, pristine, personal, loans


Borrowing to squash your credit card debt? This move could help you save

If you’re thinking of tidying up your balance sheet by taking out a personal loan, consider doing some research first.

It could save you thousands of dollars.

That’s because the interest rates lenders charge on personal loans can vary significantly, even if you have pristine credit, according to an analysis by LendingTree, a loan comparison site.

The website studied three-year personal loans offered to borrowers with credit scores of at least 640.

Personal loans are unsecured debts with a typical term of three to five years. They generally charge a fixed interest rate.

Borrowers take them out for several reasons, including debt consolidation, home improvements and wedding finances.

Rates on personal loans can run as low as 5.95% to as high as 35.89%, according to Bankrate.com.

Here’s the catch: While borrowers with higher credit scores generally are eligible for lower interest rates, even those with pristine credit can see significant differences in offered rates.

That means it pays to shop around.

For instance, the average annual percentage rate, or APR, on a personal loan for these top-tier customers was 9.92%, yet lenders were willing to offer the top 10% of these borrowers an average APR of 5.43%, according to LendingTree.

The difference was also stark when it came to borrowers in a lower tier — those with credit scores between 640 and 679.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, borrowers, scores, debt, borrowing, help, interest, card, according, credit, rates, squash, loan, pristine, personal, loans


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Cash-back cards can help you save hundreds each year—here’s how to get the most out of yours

Cash-back credit cards are one of the most popular types of rewards cards. Cash-back cards offer a minimum of 1% cash back on all purchases, with some cards offering up to 6% cash back in select categories. For instance, Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card offers 8% cash back on tickets purchased through Vivid Seats through May 2020. These cards are a great choice for people who don’t want to deal with the sometimes confusing points or miles rewards cards. Gift cards: Some cash-back car


Cash-back credit cards are one of the most popular types of rewards cards.
Cash-back cards offer a minimum of 1% cash back on all purchases, with some cards offering up to 6% cash back in select categories.
For instance, Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card offers 8% cash back on tickets purchased through Vivid Seats through May 2020.
These cards are a great choice for people who don’t want to deal with the sometimes confusing points or miles rewards cards.
Gift cards: Some cash-back car
Cash-back cards can help you save hundreds each year—here’s how to get the most out of yours Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, categories, hundreds, cards, yearheres, rewards, help, redeem, card, purchases, select, credit, cashback, cash


Cash-back cards can help you save hundreds each year—here's how to get the most out of yours

Cash-back credit cards are one of the most popular types of rewards cards. Cardholders earn a percentage of their spending back, which can be used to offset your balance. If a card offers 2% cash back and you spend $100, you’ll receive $2 back. Cash-back cards offer a minimum of 1% cash back on all purchases, with some cards offering up to 6% cash back in select categories. In some cases, there are even limited-time offers where cardholders can earn even more cash back. For instance, Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card offers 8% cash back on tickets purchased through Vivid Seats through May 2020. These cards are a great choice for people who don’t want to deal with the sometimes confusing points or miles rewards cards. Below, CNBC Select breaks down the different types of cash-back cards and how you can redeem cash back.

Types of cash-back cards

Cash-back cards can be broken up into three main categories: flat-rate, bonus category and rotating category. Here’s how each type works. 1. Flat-rate Some cash-back cards offer the same amount of cash back on every purchase. The best flat-rate cash-back cards earn you at least 2% cash back on all purchases, with some cards offering up to 2.5%, such as the Alliant Cashback Visa® Signature Credit Card. These cards are great for consumers looking for a simple cash-back program that requires minimal effort to reap great rewards. The Citi® Double Cash Card, which offers 2% cash back on every purchase (1% cash back when you buy, plus an additional 1% as you pay for those purchases) and charges no annual fee, makes CNBC Select’s list of the best cash-back cards. 2. Bonus categories Many cash-back cards offer bonus cash back in certain categories, such as grocery stores, travel, gas stations and entertainment. Sometimes cash back in the bonus categories is limited to a certain amount of spending each year, but it can also be unlimited. The Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express gives cardholders 6% cash back at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1%), 6% cash back on select U.S. streaming subscriptions, 3% cash back on transit and at U.S. gas stations, and 1% cash back on all other purchases. 3. Rotating categories Other cash-back cards offer 5% cash back in select categories that rotate throughout the year (typically changing each quarter). Common categories include restaurants, gas stations and grocery stores. These cards are popular among consumers looking to maximize rewards. The Discover it® Cash Back and Chase Freedom® both offer 5% cash back in rotating categories on up to $1,500 in combined purchases after you activate the bonus every quarter. After you reach the limit, it’s 1% on all purchases.

How to redeem cash back

Cash-back cards usually only provide a few redemption options. Some cards allow you to redeem cash back at any amount, while others require you to reach a minimum amount, typically $25. Here are the most common ways you can redeem cash back. Statement credit: Apply cash back as a credit to your account balance. This helps offset the cost of your bill. However, you still need to make the minimum payment toward your balance.

Apply cash back as a credit to your account balance. This helps offset the cost of your bill. However, you still need to make the minimum payment toward your balance. Direct deposit or check: You can often transfer cash back to a linked bank account or request a paper check.

You can often transfer cash back to a linked bank account or request a paper check. Gift cards: Some cash-back cards may allow you to redeem cash back for various gift cards. Information about the Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card, Alliant Cashback Visa® Signature Card, and Chase Freedom® has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, categories, hundreds, cards, yearheres, rewards, help, redeem, card, purchases, select, credit, cashback, cash


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Cash-back cards can help you save hundreds each year—here’s how to get the most out of yours

Cash-back credit cards are one of the most popular types of rewards cards. Cash-back cards offer a minimum of 1% cash back on all purchases, with some cards offering up to 6% cash back in select categories. For instance, Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card offers 8% cash back on tickets purchased through Vivid Seats through May 2020. These cards are a great choice for people who don’t want to deal with the sometimes confusing points or miles rewards cards. Gift cards: Some cash-back car


Cash-back credit cards are one of the most popular types of rewards cards.
Cash-back cards offer a minimum of 1% cash back on all purchases, with some cards offering up to 6% cash back in select categories.
For instance, Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card offers 8% cash back on tickets purchased through Vivid Seats through May 2020.
These cards are a great choice for people who don’t want to deal with the sometimes confusing points or miles rewards cards.
Gift cards: Some cash-back car
Cash-back cards can help you save hundreds each year—here’s how to get the most out of yours Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, categories, hundreds, cards, yearheres, rewards, help, redeem, card, purchases, select, credit, cashback, cash


Cash-back cards can help you save hundreds each year—here's how to get the most out of yours

Cash-back credit cards are one of the most popular types of rewards cards. Cardholders earn a percentage of their spending back, which can be used to offset your balance. If a card offers 2% cash back and you spend $100, you’ll receive $2 back. Cash-back cards offer a minimum of 1% cash back on all purchases, with some cards offering up to 6% cash back in select categories. In some cases, there are even limited-time offers where cardholders can earn even more cash back. For instance, Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card offers 8% cash back on tickets purchased through Vivid Seats through May 2020. These cards are a great choice for people who don’t want to deal with the sometimes confusing points or miles rewards cards. Below, CNBC Select breaks down the different types of cash-back cards and how you can redeem cash back.

Types of cash-back cards

Cash-back cards can be broken up into three main categories: flat-rate, bonus category and rotating category. Here’s how each type works. 1. Flat-rate Some cash-back cards offer the same amount of cash back on every purchase. The best flat-rate cash-back cards earn you at least 2% cash back on all purchases, with some cards offering up to 2.5%, such as the Alliant Cashback Visa® Signature Credit Card. These cards are great for consumers looking for a simple cash-back program that requires minimal effort to reap great rewards. The Citi® Double Cash Card, which offers 2% cash back on every purchase (1% cash back when you buy, plus an additional 1% as you pay for those purchases) and charges no annual fee, makes CNBC Select’s list of the best cash-back cards. 2. Bonus categories Many cash-back cards offer bonus cash back in certain categories, such as grocery stores, travel, gas stations and entertainment. Sometimes cash back in the bonus categories is limited to a certain amount of spending each year, but it can also be unlimited. The Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express gives cardholders 6% cash back at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1%), 6% cash back on select U.S. streaming subscriptions, 3% cash back on transit and at U.S. gas stations, and 1% cash back on all other purchases. 3. Rotating categories Other cash-back cards offer 5% cash back in select categories that rotate throughout the year (typically changing each quarter). Common categories include restaurants, gas stations and grocery stores. These cards are popular among consumers looking to maximize rewards. The Discover it® Cash Back and Chase Freedom® both offer 5% cash back in rotating categories on up to $1,500 in combined purchases after you activate the bonus every quarter. After you reach the limit, it’s 1% on all purchases.

How to redeem cash back

Cash-back cards usually only provide a few redemption options. Some cards allow you to redeem cash back at any amount, while others require you to reach a minimum amount, typically $25. Here are the most common ways you can redeem cash back. Statement credit: Apply cash back as a credit to your account balance. This helps offset the cost of your bill. However, you still need to make the minimum payment toward your balance.

Apply cash back as a credit to your account balance. This helps offset the cost of your bill. However, you still need to make the minimum payment toward your balance. Direct deposit or check: You can often transfer cash back to a linked bank account or request a paper check.

You can often transfer cash back to a linked bank account or request a paper check. Gift cards: Some cash-back cards may allow you to redeem cash back for various gift cards. Information about the Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card, Alliant Cashback Visa® Signature Card, and Chase Freedom® has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, categories, hundreds, cards, yearheres, rewards, help, redeem, card, purchases, select, credit, cashback, cash


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You can trick yourself into saving more. Here’s how

If you’re like a lot of people, you know you need to save more. Now, research has found that taking just two additional steps could help turn that intention into a reality. The Chazen Institute at Columbia Business School found that people are more likely to stick to saving if they got certain support to back their financial goals. Because they are self-employed, one of the most powerful ways of socking away money — automating their savings — does not always work, because their income fluctuates


If you’re like a lot of people, you know you need to save more. Now, research has found that taking just two additional steps could help turn that intention into a reality. The Chazen Institute at Columbia Business School found that people are more likely to stick to saving if they got certain support to back their financial goals. Because they are self-employed, one of the most powerful ways of socking away money — automating their savings — does not always work, because their income fluctuates
You can trick yourself into saving more. Here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saving, savings, need, trick, work, columbia, away, heres, money, help, workedand, school, youre


You can trick yourself into saving more. Here's how

If you’re like a lot of people, you know you need to save more.

Yet actually following through on that goal can be easier said than done.

Now, research has found that taking just two additional steps could help turn that intention into a reality.

The Chazen Institute at Columbia Business School found that people are more likely to stick to saving if they got certain support to back their financial goals.

More from Personal Finance:

Here’s how to feel richer with money you already have

How much more you need in retirement savings, based on age

Why millions of Americans are only $400 away from hardship

Researchers at the school studied low-income microcredit bank clients in Chile. These entrepreneurs operate small businesses and tend to borrow money regularly.

Because they are self-employed, one of the most powerful ways of socking away money — automating their savings — does not always work, because their income fluctuates.

So the researchers at Columbia set out to see if other methods of encouraging savings worked.

And the strategies they identified could also help you accumulate a bigger cash cushion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saving, savings, need, trick, work, columbia, away, heres, money, help, workedand, school, youre


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