100 top firms helping clients meet their financial goals

The industry continues to mature, and financial advisors are always finding ways to address and meet the demands of today’s investors. With that said, the CNBC FA 100 recognizes those advisory firms that continue to find ways to work closely with clients to help them mitigate risk and meet their financial goals. To be sure, financial advisory firms face a great deal of competition, which makes it even more important for firms to focus on growing their client base. To remain competitive, financia


The industry continues to mature, and financial advisors are always finding ways to address and meet the demands of today’s investors. With that said, the CNBC FA 100 recognizes those advisory firms that continue to find ways to work closely with clients to help them mitigate risk and meet their financial goals. To be sure, financial advisory firms face a great deal of competition, which makes it even more important for firms to focus on growing their client base. To remain competitive, financia
100 top firms helping clients meet their financial goals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: jim pavia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, helping, meet, financial, clients, complicated, help, advisory, advisor, client, goals, firms, 100, advisors, life


100 top firms helping clients meet their financial goals

It’s evident that the financial advice business has evolved over the years. The industry continues to mature, and financial advisors are always finding ways to address and meet the demands of today’s investors.

In fact, given the increased complexity of everyone’s financial lives, investors are eager to seek some help and education regarding income investment planning and strategies. Obviously, advisors can play a key role in helping clients grow and protect their wealth. With that said, the CNBC FA 100 recognizes those advisory firms that continue to find ways to work closely with clients to help them mitigate risk and meet their financial goals.

To be sure, financial advisory firms face a great deal of competition, which makes it even more important for firms to focus on growing their client base. To remain competitive, financial advisory firms continue to develop strategies to consistently deliver a great client experience. From developing creative client segmentation practices to intergenerational engagement, which helps advisors serve their client’s children, savvy advisory firms are always looking to find client-focused strategies.

That’s good news for today’s investor who may be considering some professional financial guidance.

More from Financial Advisor 100:

CNBC FA 100 2019 list of top-rated financial advisory firms

What inspired top advisors to help others manage money

10 years on, ‘personal touch’ will dominate financial advice

You may be at the point in your life where you have started to accumulate a decent amount of money in a qualified retirement plan. Or, maybe your life has become a bit more complicated. As we get older, of course, the more complicated our financial lives become. Perhaps you are getting married, starting a family or looking to buy a home or you received an inheritance.

You’ll want to work with someone you can relate to and connect with, someone who understands you and is concerned about you and your life and money issues. A financial advisor can help you make sense of all of these issues. Financial advisors can holistically examine your financial situation and help you craft a plan to ensure you make decisions that are in line with your personal financial goals.

Finding that right advisor to help with your financial needs and goals can be complicated. There are so many variables to consider.

Many advisors may use a high assets under management metric as a selling point when marketing themselves to potential investors. However, AUM isn’t the whole story when a potential client is determining which financial advisory firm is right for them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: jim pavia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, helping, meet, financial, clients, complicated, help, advisory, advisor, client, goals, firms, 100, advisors, life


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25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in


Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience in
25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


25-year-old tech founder is helping teach everyday Americans how to invest

Like a lot of kids, Myles Gage was into sneakers when he was growing up. But his mom suggested an unusual rule: For every pair of Nikes that Gage owned, he should own a share of Nike stock. Learning to think like an investor at a young age, he says, helped him become a tech entrepreneur. Gage, 25, is one of the founders of Rapunzl Investments, a mobile app that lets users simulate stock trading in real time. The platform makes a game out of the markets: Users get $10,000 fictitious dollars to buy and sell stocks, which helps them learn how the markets work and start to experience the excitement and potential benefit of investing. Gage believes that his platform can help young people who lack formal financial education make better decisions and start investing for their future.

Learning early to be ‘financially literate’

Gage says his parents made a lot of financial mistakes and they wanted to make sure their kids didn’t follow in their footsteps: “They wanted us to be financially literate and in a position to make better decisions.” That’s partly why Gage’s mother, who worked for the Chicago Parks District, found a way to get him and his brother, Mario, into Ariel Community Academy, a specialized public school for students K-8 with a focus on financial education. Starting in first grade, students learn core financial tenets like investing and entrepreneurship and get hands-on experience investing in stocks. Attending Ariel made a huge difference in Gage’s life: “The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy,” he says.

The only reason I know about the stock market is because of Ariel Community Academy. Myles Gage CFO, Rapunzl Investments

That knowledge paid off: It helped Gage win a full-ride scholarship to the University of Chicago Laboratory School, a prestigious private high school. “I wrote an essay about how I planned to finance my college tuition. And the main point of that was that I was going to liquidate my stock portfolio,” he says. “I don’t think the judges were expecting a 14-year-old to be talking about liquidating a portfolio, let alone one from the south side of Chicago.”

The origins of Rapunzl

As a high school freshman in 2008, Gage immediately bonded with another student, Brian Curcio. While discussing the stock market and the budding financial crisis, the two came up with the idea of a stock market game, using fictional money, to teach people how the markets work. Over the next few years, the economy recovered. Some investors, who had money to buy stocks when the markets bottomed out, started to see strong returns. Average Americans, however, were often missing out. Gage didn’t think that profits should belong only to a select few, hidden away at the top of a tower like the character of Rapunzel in the 1812 Brothers Grimm fairy tale. Rapunzl the app, Gage and Curcio decided, would make investing accessible. It would give anybody the chance to learn, to figure out how the stock markets work. Then, when users were comfortable, they could actually start investing.

How the app got funded

Through their college years, the two met frequently to refine the concept for Rapunzl. They settled on an idea that would allow users to simulate a stock portfolio without risking real money. But to make their idea come to life, real money is exactly what the two young entrepreneurs needed. So, after graduating in 2016, they organized their ideas and started looking around for seed funding.

Myles Gage with Rapunzl cofounder Brian Curcio. Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC

“We put a mini-pitch deck together and shopped it around to our friends and family, and were able to muster up funds to develop a prototype,” Gage says. They hired a Canadian developer who created an early version of the app and made it available for download in April 2017. Around that time, Rapunzl also did another round of fundraising, which netted the company enough money to continue perfecting the platform. Several months later, the founders brought in a third partner, Chris Thomas, as the company’s CTO.

‘Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl’

To attract users and take aim at their mission of creating a new generation of confident, financially literate investors, Gage and the team headed back to school — literally. Rapunzl partnered with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and started sponsoring conferences, plus essay and investing competitions at schools around the Chicago area. The team also met with John Rogers, the chairman and CEO of Ariel Investments — which also funds and sponsors Ariel Community Academy — who agreed to sponsor the competitions and provide prize money. In 2018, Rapunzl was involved in competitions in more than 70 Chicago-area schools, comprising more than 2,000 students.

Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap. Arne Duncan Former U.S. Secretary of Education

Rapunzl is building on its success in Chicago schools by expanding. Last year, it sponsored competitions in Los Angeles, Boston, and New York, with plans for more cities next year, and colleges, too. It has even managed to catch the attention of former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “Our country needs more innovative approaches like Rapunzl that aim to tackle financial illiteracy and close the achievement gap,” Duncan said, following an announcement about Rapunzl partnering with investing firm Wedbush. Duncan, who doesn’t have any current connection to the app, did play a role in developing the curriculum at Ariel Community Academy.

The app and its founders hope to make a difference

So far, the Rapunzl team has focused their efforts on generating interest in the platform and getting young users hooked on trading. The app doesn’t currently drive revenue, though, and Gage is hopeful that will change. He says at some point in 2020, the platform will be monetized through affiliate marketing and premium subscriptions.

Courtesy Rapunzl Investments LLC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, invest, investing, everyday, rapunzl, gage, founder, stock, app, helping, tech, money, users, school, 25yearold, ariel, teach, americans, financial


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That 50-year low in unemployment isn’t helping worker paychecks

While the September nonfarm payrolls report showed that the 3.5% unemployment rate is at a fresh 50-year low, it also indicated that average hourly earnings are on the decline. Sharp drops in unemployment in the past often have brought commensurate earnings, but not this time around. “There is something real going on that even though it’s a tight labor market, employers are becoming more risk-averse,” said Julia Pollak, labor economist at ZipRecruiter, a leading online employment marketplace. Ho


While the September nonfarm payrolls report showed that the 3.5% unemployment rate is at a fresh 50-year low, it also indicated that average hourly earnings are on the decline. Sharp drops in unemployment in the past often have brought commensurate earnings, but not this time around. “There is something real going on that even though it’s a tight labor market, employers are becoming more risk-averse,” said Julia Pollak, labor economist at ZipRecruiter, a leading online employment marketplace. Ho
That 50-year low in unemployment isn’t helping worker paychecks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employers, labor, wage, workers, paychecks, worker, low, recession, earnings, jobs, helping, market, unemployment, confidence, 50year, isnt, wages


That 50-year low in unemployment isn't helping worker paychecks

The U.S. jobs market’s resilience is not extending to wages, which fell in September for the first time in two years as companies still aren’t ready to meet a tight labor market with higher pay and workers still are not demanding more. While the September nonfarm payrolls report showed that the 3.5% unemployment rate is at a fresh 50-year low, it also indicated that average hourly earnings are on the decline. The one-cent-an-hour slip to $28.09 was the first month-to-month drop since October 2017 and the 2.9% year-over-year rise in wages was the slowest increase since July 2018. Sharp drops in unemployment in the past often have brought commensurate earnings, but not this time around. One reason for the change: Fear. “There is something real going on that even though it’s a tight labor market, employers are becoming more risk-averse,” said Julia Pollak, labor economist at ZipRecruiter, a leading online employment marketplace. “Indicators showing the risk of a recession are making employers a little more panicked. We conduct employer surveys every month, and in those surveys job seekers and employers are showing that they are increasingly nervous about the risk of recessions, trade wars and other sources of uncertainty.” Indeed, even though the economy continues to grow at about a 2% pace, risks have become elevated that a combination of global weakness, the U.S.-China tariff war and geopolitical turmoil could cause a slowdown or recession in the U.S. Sentiment indicators last week showed the manufacturing sector continuing in contraction and the services sector just barely in expansion. The New York Federal Reserve’s recession gauge is at 38%, easily its highest since the financial crisis.

Reasons for optimism and worry

Such jitters are causing employers to be more tepid in the wages they are offering, even as the demand for labor increases and vacant jobs remain hard to fill. There were 1.2 million more jobs than available workers as of the end of August, the most recent month for which Labor Department data is available. Pollak said there are “reasons to be optimistic” that the U.S. will stay out of recession, and that if one comes it’s likely to be shallow. One point of hope she finds is that wages are still continuing to grow for workers on the lower end of the earnings scale.

However, there continues to be concern over whether the low jobless rate represents strength or is signaling an end-cycle peak. David Rosenberg, the often-bearish chief economist and strategist at Gluskin Sheff, points out that the last time unemployment hit 3.5%, in December 1969, a recession followed a month later, adding that the headline jobless rate “has no bearing on the wage backdrop.” “Even if you believe the headline, and ignore the cyclical weakness at your peril, the lack of wage growth is going to be a big problem for the ‘resilient’ consumer heading into the holiday shopping season, even with the delayed tariffs (which I am sure will get delayed again),” Rosenberg said in a note after the release of the jobs report. To be sure, other measures of wages are showing that the recent weakness could be anomalous. The New York Fed, for instance, conducts a reading every four months of worker wages and expectations called the Survey of Consumer Expectations Labor Market Survey. In the most recent results, which extend through July, workers reported an average wage of $66,935, an increase of 7% from the same period a year ago. The average full-time offered wage rose 4.5% to $54,943. Goldman Sachs said its own proprietary wage tracker, which includes the Labor Department’s average hourly earnings tracker plus four other measures, sees a gain of 3.2% for the third quarter. Also, worker confidence continues to be strong, with the job leavers level of 14.6% of the labor force in September just a shade below its highest level in 17 years, according to government data “This is a huge show of ‘confidence’ among job holders suggesting they perceive a labor market which is healthy enough to take the risk of leaving a ‘bird in the hand’ for something better,” wrote Jim Paulsen, chief investment strategist at the Leuthold Group. “And, it is an illustration of household confidence which will certainly be noticed by employers and should help boost business confidence as well.”

Waiting for the Fed


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employers, labor, wage, workers, paychecks, worker, low, recession, earnings, jobs, helping, market, unemployment, confidence, 50year, isnt, wages


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Russia is helping China to build a missile defense system, Putin says

Military ties between China and Russia appear to have taken a leap forward after Russian President Vladimir Putin said his country is helping Beijing build a system to warn against ballistic missile launches. Details of the size and make-up of the missile defense system that Russia will build for China is unknown. At present China employs limited resources which includes a small Russian S-300 system which considered only a modest deterrent against cruise and ballistic missiles. Russia’s existing


Military ties between China and Russia appear to have taken a leap forward after Russian President Vladimir Putin said his country is helping Beijing build a system to warn against ballistic missile launches. Details of the size and make-up of the missile defense system that Russia will build for China is unknown. At present China employs limited resources which includes a small Russian S-300 system which considered only a modest deterrent against cruise and ballistic missiles. Russia’s existing
Russia is helping China to build a missile defense system, Putin says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, putin, missile, helping, defense, system, china, russia, washington, russian, ballistic, build


Russia is helping China to build a missile defense system, Putin says

Military ties between China and Russia appear to have taken a leap forward after Russian President Vladimir Putin said his country is helping Beijing build a system to warn against ballistic missile launches.

Speaking at the Valdai Club international affairs conference in Sochi on Thursday, Putin confirmed the move, adding that it would promote China to a level of defense only currently enjoyed by Russia and the U.S.

“This is a very serious thing that will dramatically increase China’s defense capability because only the U.S. and Russia have such a system now,” Putin said.

Global Forecasting Director at The Economist Intelligence Unit, Agathe Demarais, told CNBC via email Friday that such a system is viewed as “a crucial part of modern nuclear deterrence.”

Details of the size and make-up of the missile defense system that Russia will build for China is unknown. At present China employs limited resources which includes a small Russian S-300 system which considered only a modest deterrent against cruise and ballistic missiles.

Russia’s existing S-400 is claimed to be capable of intercepting ballistic missiles with a range of 3,500 km. That program was controversially sold to NATO-member Turkey this year, much to the displeasure of Washington.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, putin, missile, helping, defense, system, china, russia, washington, russian, ballistic, build


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Only 1.6% of Americans’ charitable giving goes toward nonprofits helping women and girls

Americans gave $6.3 billion to nonprofits focused on women and girls in 2016, according to a comprehensive report released Thursday from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute. “There is a lack of investment in women and girls in this country,” says Teresa Younger, president and CEO of the Ms. Foundation for Women. And not just in the health-care sector, which WPI found received the biggest chunk of the total funding directed toward women and girls. Yet even though so few dollars are going to women


Americans gave $6.3 billion to nonprofits focused on women and girls in 2016, according to a comprehensive report released Thursday from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute. “There is a lack of investment in women and girls in this country,” says Teresa Younger, president and CEO of the Ms. Foundation for Women. And not just in the health-care sector, which WPI found received the biggest chunk of the total funding directed toward women and girls. Yet even though so few dollars are going to women
Only 1.6% of Americans’ charitable giving goes toward nonprofits helping women and girls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, women, nonprofits, charitable, organizations, giving, helping, billion, womens, dedicated, goes, report, total, americans, younger, girls


Only 1.6% of Americans' charitable giving goes toward nonprofits helping women and girls

Americans are incredibly generous when it comes to opening up their pockets for worthy causes. But a new report finds that philanthropic support wanes when it comes to nonprofits dedicated to addressing breast cancer, childhood malnutrition, female entrepreneurship and domestic violence — in other words, women’s issues.

Americans gave $6.3 billion to nonprofits focused on women and girls in 2016, according to a comprehensive report released Thursday from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute. The Institute identified 45,000 organizations registered in the U.S. that it deemed “dedicated to serving primarily women and girls” or closely-associated causes such as domestic violence, Tessa Skidmore, the project manager for the report, tells CNBC Make It.

That includes organizations such as the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, the National Women’s Law Center and YWCA chapters around the country.

And while $6.3 billion may sound like a substantial level of funds, it actually only represents about 1.6% of the total charitable giving Americans put forward in 2016. To put that in perspective, Americans gave a total of $396.5 billion that year, with the biggest chunk, $123.8 billion, earmarked toward religious organizations.

“There is a lack of investment in women and girls in this country,” says Teresa Younger, president and CEO of the Ms. Foundation for Women. “The Women’s March and some of these other movements are heightening a conversation, but I’m not sure how that’s trickling down to the small grassroots orgs that are doing the work within their communities.”

Younger, who tells CNBC Make It that she lives this reality everyday, notes there needs to be “intentional support” of the organizations that have been put in place to help lift up, empower and build the power of women and girls. And not just in the health-care sector, which WPI found received the biggest chunk of the total funding directed toward women and girls.

Yet even though so few dollars are going to women and girls, nonprofits are still able to have significant impact, Younger says. About 71% of nonprofits dedicated to women and girls have budgets of less than $50,000 — and that includes staff wages and benefits. The report speculates this may be due to a heavy reliance on volunteers, but Skidmore says more research is needed.

“In most cases, usually women are running very efficient organizations and paying themselves and relying on the kindness of their communities to allow them to do the work that needs to be done,” Younger says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, women, nonprofits, charitable, organizations, giving, helping, billion, womens, dedicated, goes, report, total, americans, younger, girls


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These costs are taking the biggest bite out of retirees’ wallets. Social Security isn’t helping

Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show just which expenses could be taking the biggest bite out of your wallet. The data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers, or CPI-U. The Senior Citizens League, a non-partisan advocacy group, selected the top costs affecting retirees from the data. But the numbers exclude one big health-care cost for retirees: Medicare premiums. Surveys show that retirees’ total health-care costs are closer to 25%


Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show just which expenses could be taking the biggest bite out of your wallet. The data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers, or CPI-U. The Senior Citizens League, a non-partisan advocacy group, selected the top costs affecting retirees from the data. But the numbers exclude one big health-care cost for retirees: Medicare premiums. Surveys show that retirees’ total health-care costs are closer to 25%
These costs are taking the biggest bite out of retirees’ wallets. Social Security isn’t helping Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, isnt, costs, league, wallets, social, healthcare, retirees, helping, data, biggest, past, statistics, security, bite, medicare, taking, labor, senior


These costs are taking the biggest bite out of retirees' wallets. Social Security isn't helping

If you’re retired, you’ve probably noticed that costs keep going up.

Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show just which expenses could be taking the biggest bite out of your wallet.

One of the main culprits: health insurance, which surged 18.6% from August 2018 to August 2019. That’s second only to intercity bus fare, which went up 21.8% in the past year.

Other things that have gotten costlier in the past 12 months: repairing household items, which rose by 8.7%; men’s outerwear, 8.3%; and potatoes, 6.2%.

The data come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers, or CPI-U. The Senior Citizens League, a non-partisan advocacy group, selected the top costs affecting retirees from the data.

But the numbers exclude one big health-care cost for retirees: Medicare premiums. Surveys show that retirees’ total health-care costs are closer to 25% of their overall income, said Mary Johnson, Social Security and Medicare policy analyst at The Senior Citizens League.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, isnt, costs, league, wallets, social, healthcare, retirees, helping, data, biggest, past, statistics, security, bite, medicare, taking, labor, senior


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Ludacris, Chef José Andrés and others who are helping the victims of Hurricane Dorian

Chefs Jose Andres (right), has helped feed victims of other natural disasters, including Hurricane Maria and Hurricane FlorenceHurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas earlier this week, causing massive destruction and killing at least 20 people. Chef José AndrésThe Spanish chef is playing to his strengths to help in the Bahamas: He and his team are in Nassau serving thousands of meals to those in need. By Tuesday, Andrés, who has helped feed victims of other natural disasters, including Hurrican


Chefs Jose Andres (right), has helped feed victims of other natural disasters, including Hurricane Maria and Hurricane FlorenceHurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas earlier this week, causing massive destruction and killing at least 20 people. Chef José AndrésThe Spanish chef is playing to his strengths to help in the Bahamas: He and his team are in Nassau serving thousands of meals to those in need. By Tuesday, Andrés, who has helped feed victims of other natural disasters, including Hurrican
Ludacris, Chef José Andrés and others who are helping the victims of Hurricane Dorian Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-05  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meals, dorian, chef, bahamas, jos, hurricane, helping, ludacris, andrs, help, weekend, line, victims, million, cruise, relief


Ludacris, Chef José Andrés and others who are helping the victims of Hurricane Dorian

Chefs Jose Andres (right), has helped feed victims of other natural disasters, including Hurricane Maria and Hurricane Florence

Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas earlier this week, causing massive destruction and killing at least 20 people. “My island of Abaco, everything is gone. No banks, no stores, no nothing,” said one resident of the Bahamas, Ramond A. King. “Everything is gone, just bodies.” Corporations and celebrities are mobilizing to offer disaster relief assistance. Here’s what they’re doing to help.

Disney

“The Walt Disney Company, led by Disney Cruise Line, has committed more than $1 million in cash and in-kind support to help relief and recovery efforts for those in The Bahamas affected by Hurricane Dorian,” the company tweeted on Tuesday. “We hope our $1 million donation will provide much-needed relief and help our neighbors, colleagues, and all those impacted by this devastating storm begin the long process of recovery as they work to put their lives and communities back together,” Disney chairman and CEO Bob Iger said in a statement.

Chef José Andrés

The Spanish chef is playing to his strengths to help in the Bahamas: He and his team are in Nassau serving thousands of meals to those in need. By Tuesday, Andrés, who has helped feed victims of other natural disasters, including Hurricane Maria and Hurricane Florence, had already flown 2,000 sandwiches and more than 1,000 oranges to the island. He plans to serve at least 10,000 meals to people in the Bahamas.

Ludacris

The hip-hop star pledged to donate all of the proceeds from LudaDay Weekend, his annual Labor Day Weekend event dedicated to social service, to helping the relief fund. He raised more than $100,000 over the weekend, he announced on Instagram:

Royal Caribbean

“In the wake of Dorian, we’re mobilizing our fleet to help those who need it,” the cruise line tweeted on Wednesday. “We’ll deliver +43k water bottles, 10k meals, generators, supplies & we’re just getting started.”

Carnival Corporation

Together with the Micky & Madeleine Arison Family Foundation, Carnival Corporation’s Carnival Foundation will give $2 million for Dorian relief efforts. “Our company has always been closely tied to The Bahamas with a rich history spanning many years,” Carnival Corp CEO Arnold Donald said in a statement on Wednesday, “so it’s heart-breaking to see the impact of Hurricane Dorian, and our thoughts and prayers are with the people of The Bahamas.”

Norwegian Cruise Line

The cruise line announced that it will be delivering relief supplies donated by Norwegian Cruise Line and the City of Miami to the Bahamas this week. It’s also donating $1 million to the non-profit relief organization All Hands and Hearts “to begin an immediate short-term response,” and will be matching donations dollar for dollar to assist with rebuilding efforts.

How you can help


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-05  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meals, dorian, chef, bahamas, jos, hurricane, helping, ludacris, andrs, help, weekend, line, victims, million, cruise, relief


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How two global organizations are helping to lay the foundations for a renewable energy future

Organizations such as REN21, which describes itself as an “international policy network,” play a significant role in this discussion and debate. It was set up in 2004 following the International Conference on Renewable Energy in Bonn and issues reports “to help drive the global transition to renewable energy.” “So we need to move from an electricity transition to an energy transition.” REN21 is one of several bodies focusing on renewable energy and the environment. Others include Future Earth, w


Organizations such as REN21, which describes itself as an “international policy network,” play a significant role in this discussion and debate. It was set up in 2004 following the International Conference on Renewable Energy in Bonn and issues reports “to help drive the global transition to renewable energy.” “So we need to move from an electricity transition to an energy transition.” REN21 is one of several bodies focusing on renewable energy and the environment. Others include Future Earth, w
How two global organizations are helping to lay the foundations for a renewable energy future Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, helping, international, world, future, lay, network, global, told, energy, renewable, ren21, organizations, transition, foundations, governments, policy


How two global organizations are helping to lay the foundations for a renewable energy future

Around the world, big businesses and governments are searching for ways to increase their use of renewable sources of energy and, at the same time, reduce their impact on the environment.

Organizations such as REN21, which describes itself as an “international policy network,” play a significant role in this discussion and debate.

REN21 members include governments, industry associations, non-governmental organizations and academic institutions.

It was set up in 2004 following the International Conference on Renewable Energy in Bonn and issues reports “to help drive the global transition to renewable energy.”

Rana Adib is REN21’s executive secretary. “Governments and intergovernmental organizations are part of REN21 and the network,” she told CNBC’s Sustainable Energy. “We work with them to generate… knowledge but also to spread the information we are producing and to inform policy making,” she added.

REN21’s reports are available online and are free to view. Looking at the bigger picture, shining light on data in a concise and clear way will be a crucial tool if attitudes are to change and the world is to transition to more renewable sources of energy.

“If we look at the energy that we consume globally we need to keep in mind that most of it, actually more than 80%, is used for heating and cooling as well as for transport,” Thomas Andre, a project manager and analyst at REN21, told CNBC, adding that renewables were “barely increasing” in those two sectors.

“This imbalance is directly linked to another one, which is the lack of political attention in those two sectors as opposed to the electricity one,” Andre said. “So we need to move from an electricity transition to an energy transition.”

REN21 is one of several bodies focusing on renewable energy and the environment. Others include Future Earth, which in the words of its executive director, Amy Luers, is “an international network of researchers and innovators working together to advance the global sustainability agenda.”

Luers told CNBC that as well as responding to requests from the United Nations for policy briefs, Future Earth also worked with cities, local governments, the private sector and civil society.

“What our community does is help to understand complex issues and… look at trade-offs and synergies and find solutions,” she added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, helping, international, world, future, lay, network, global, told, energy, renewable, ren21, organizations, transition, foundations, governments, policy


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How TaskRabbit’s Stacy Brown-Philpot is creating one of the most diverse workforces in Silicon Valley

Stacy Brown-Philpot of TaskRabbit, a company that hires freelancers to do odd jobs, is the first to admit that she doesn’t look like most CEOs in tech. And as one of the few black women CEOs in Silicon Valley, she’s making it her mission to change the landscape, beginning with her own business. Since Brown-Philpot began at TaskRabbit in 2016, she has created a diverse and inclusive workplace. However, some of the more unique tasks have included helping to plan an anniversary surprise and even he


Stacy Brown-Philpot of TaskRabbit, a company that hires freelancers to do odd jobs, is the first to admit that she doesn’t look like most CEOs in tech. And as one of the few black women CEOs in Silicon Valley, she’s making it her mission to change the landscape, beginning with her own business. Since Brown-Philpot began at TaskRabbit in 2016, she has created a diverse and inclusive workplace. However, some of the more unique tasks have included helping to plan an anniversary surprise and even he
How TaskRabbit’s Stacy Brown-Philpot is creating one of the most diverse workforces in Silicon Valley Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: renee morad
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taskrabbits, valley, mission, helping, brownphilpot, tasks, shes, stacy, creating, taskrabbit, women, diverse, inclusive, workforces, silicon, unique


How TaskRabbit's Stacy Brown-Philpot is creating one of the most diverse workforces in Silicon Valley

Stacy Brown-Philpot of TaskRabbit, a company that hires freelancers to do odd jobs, is the first to admit that she doesn’t look like most CEOs in tech. And as one of the few black women CEOs in Silicon Valley, she’s making it her mission to change the landscape, beginning with her own business.

“I’m focusing on changing the face of technology by creating a diverse company where people feel they can bring their whole selves to work,” Brown-Philpot recently told Know Your Value.

Brown-Philpot refers to her staff of 200 as “unicorn employees” who possess a unique set of qualities that are rare and extremely valuable to an organization. Since Brown-Philpot began at TaskRabbit in 2016, she has created a diverse and inclusive workplace. Today, 60 percent of the company’s leadership is women, 48 percent of its employees are Hispanic, African-American, Asian or two or more races and 16 percent identify as LGBTQ.

TaskRabbit’s mission is to make everyday life easier for people, and the platform has grown to incorporate more than 70 metro areas across four countries so far, saving Americans over four million hours of time. The “taskers” themselves earn an average of $34 per hour, which is five times the U.S. minimum wage. Some of the most common tasks include moving household items, assembling furniture, cleaning and doing minor home repairs. However, some of the more unique tasks have included helping to plan an anniversary surprise and even helping a customer find a lost pet cockatoo.

Here are five key steps that Brown-Philpot has taken to ensure that she’s leading TaskRabbit on a diverse and inclusive path.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: renee morad
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taskrabbits, valley, mission, helping, brownphilpot, tasks, shes, stacy, creating, taskrabbit, women, diverse, inclusive, workforces, silicon, unique


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Americans are staying silent on student loan debt—and it’s not helping

Yet the money topic Americans voted as most thorny is one that’s constantly in the news: student loans. While a lot of people will cop to having student loans, it’s less common for people to comfortably disclose actual numbers, Lowry says. To cope, she says she “compartmentalizes” her student loan debt, ignoring it whenever she can. It would help if people talked more openly about student loans and the effect of having them, Jay says. Don’t miss: 36% of college grads with student loans say debt


Yet the money topic Americans voted as most thorny is one that’s constantly in the news: student loans. While a lot of people will cop to having student loans, it’s less common for people to comfortably disclose actual numbers, Lowry says. To cope, she says she “compartmentalizes” her student loan debt, ignoring it whenever she can. It would help if people talked more openly about student loans and the effect of having them, Jay says. Don’t miss: 36% of college grads with student loans say debt
Americans are staying silent on student loan debt—and it’s not helping Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debtand, pay, silent, americans, helping, say, debt, money, loan, school, loans, student, nathan, dont, staying


Americans are staying silent on student loan debt—and it's not helping

When it comes to uncomfortable conversations, Americans would rather talk about pretty much anything else — politics, health issues, religion — than discuss their finances. Yet the money topic Americans voted as most thorny is one that’s constantly in the news: student loans. Over a third of Americans say they see student loan debt as the biggest financial taboo, according to a Harris Poll of over 1,000 U.S. adults commissioned by TD Ameritrade.

So? What gun was held to her head forcing her to sign her name.

I guess to be anyone of any self-esteem anymore, once needs to be a victim. — Mark Frost (@FrostieCash) August 2, 2019

Absolutely no one but her made this choice for her and her inability to reason should not cost me money. 100% her responsibility and not ours! Grow up, get a 2nd job but don’t expect us to fix YOUR problem. — BadGolfer (@MatthewClynch) August 2, 2019

Those types of comments are on loans that are generally considered “good debt.” While a lot of people will cop to having student loans, it’s less common for people to comfortably disclose actual numbers, Lowry says.

Living with student loans long after class lets out

Playing his cards close to his chest is familiar territory for a 40-year-old lawyer living in South Carolina. Jay, who asked to be identified by a pseudonym to protect his privacy, says that while his loans are an open book with with his wife, he only talks in generalities with other family and friends. “Outside of how much we paid for our home, I don’t generally tell people about my finances,” he tells CNBC Make It. Despite graduating from law school eight years ago, Jay says he owes nearly $250,000 in student loans. So far, he’s paid over $80,000 on the loans, yet he owes more now than when he started. “It is frustrating,” he says. But it’s not a complaint he shares widely because he doesn’t want to deal with the judgement around his balance and his decisions. “I went to law school a little later in life. I was married with two kids so I had to borrow a little more than I wanted to,” Jay says. Adele Nathan, a 33-year-old physical therapist in Chicago, is also reluctant to share to discuss the details of her student loan debt with people. “I don’t have any shame associated with it,” she says. “That being said, unless it’s a close friend or family member, I don’t really ever share the amount I had to take out.” Nathan is paying down about $260,000 in student loans she took out for her physical therapy degree. “Most people in my profession had to take out loans for grad school, so it’s common parlance in the workplace,” she says. But while she rates herself as pretty open about money and financial topics, when she’s out with friends who work in different industries, student loans are “just not what we talk about, ” she says. “They just don’t get it,” she adds. Her debt isn’t going anywhere fast, even though she’s paying about $300 a month toward her loans. At that rate, she’s putting about 15% of her monthly take home pay toward her loans, but that doesn’t even cover the interest.

“At my salary, there’s absolutely no way for me to pay this off in less than five years while living in a major U.S. city,” Adele Nathan

“At my salary, there’s absolutely no way for me to pay this off in less than five years while living in a major U.S. city,” Nathan says. To cope, she says she “compartmentalizes” her student loan debt, ignoring it whenever she can. “I allow it to resurface every year when I have to reapply, but then I shove it right back down.” Nathan calls her loans a “baseline stressor, ” but she says it could be much worse. Her coping mechanism has allowed her to, as she puts it, “say yes” to many life experiences, including getting married, starting a family and taking new jobs. Although that may change as Nathan and her husband gear up to buy a home. “I’m waiting for the other shoe to drop — I’m wondering how much [the student loans] will impact our decision to buy and what we’re offered as a mortgage,” Nathan says.

It’s time to open up about loan experiences

Yet despite the reluctance to share the details on their student loans, overall, half of Americans in the Harris Poll say it would be healthier if people felt they could discuss money topics more freely. It would help if people talked more openly about student loans and the effect of having them, Jay says. “All the conversations are in the wrong direction in actually helping people,” he says, referring to media coverage of the Democratic presidential candidates plans to manage the country’s student loan crisis. “I don’t want someone to pay off my loans,” he says. Instead, he’d like more information and education for borrowers, specifically around repayment. “I want people to understand the trap students get stuck in when they can’t afford full payments coming out of school. They get stuck with high interest loans that they can’t refinance for a better loan,” he says. “It would have been helpful if someone was able to spell out for me what it meant to take on this amount of debt,” Nathan says. “I like my job a lot, but I didn’t realize that by signing up for this career, I was firmly shutting the door on everything else until I could pay it back.” Don’t miss: 36% of college grads with student loans say debt wasn’t worth it Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debtand, pay, silent, americans, helping, say, debt, money, loan, school, loans, student, nathan, dont, staying


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