How a ‘superhero’ CEO has made a living helping over 1,000 people find jobs

In West Virginia, coal is as deeply entwined and entrenched in the geographic landscape, the sweeping, rolling Appalachian Mountains, as it is in the culture of the region. His aim: helping the down-and-out and unemployed in rural West Virginia develop skills and find new career paths. To date, Coalfield Development has created 225 full-time jobs and trained more than 1,000 workers. Developing the Coalfield formulaDennison spends his days overseeing Coalfield Development and its dozen or so subs


In West Virginia, coal is as deeply entwined and entrenched in the geographic landscape, the sweeping, rolling Appalachian Mountains, as it is in the culture of the region.
His aim: helping the down-and-out and unemployed in rural West Virginia develop skills and find new career paths.
To date, Coalfield Development has created 225 full-time jobs and trained more than 1,000 workers.
Developing the Coalfield formulaDennison spends his days overseeing Coalfield Development and its dozen or so subs
How a ‘superhero’ CEO has made a living helping over 1,000 people find jobs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, superhero, development, helping, jobs, coalfield, west, ceo, coal, organization, 1000, appalachia, living, virginia, dennison, stewart, job


How a 'superhero' CEO has made a living helping over 1,000 people find jobs

In West Virginia, coal is as deeply entwined and entrenched in the geographic landscape, the sweeping, rolling Appalachian Mountains, as it is in the culture of the region. It’s how millions of people earn and have earned a living. Coal “has a cultural power,” says Brandon Dennison, a 33-year-old native West Virginian. Dennison is the founder and CEO of Coalfield Development Corporation, a community-based nonprofit business incubator located in the tiny Appalachian town of Wayne, West Virginia, 140 miles east of Lexington, Kentucky. “Coal mining is a job people are really, really proud of,” he says. “There’s a pride that a lot of modern America was built on coal.” But as coal production has declined significantly in recent years, so has the number of coal mining jobs. When those jobs disappear, the communities dependent upon them often suffer. A recent report from the Appalachian Regional Commission shows that dozens of counties in the area are at “distressed” economic levels, meaning that their economies are among the worst 10% in the U.S. As much of the world moves on from coal, Dennison has taken on the job of helping coal-dependent communities pivot, too. His aim: helping the down-and-out and unemployed in rural West Virginia develop skills and find new career paths. To date, Coalfield Development has created 225 full-time jobs and trained more than 1,000 workers.

Developing the Coalfield formula

Dennison spends his days overseeing Coalfield Development and its dozen or so subsidiaries. Those include the construction and real estate firm Revitalize Appalachia, carpentry company Saw’s Edge Woodshop, solar enterprise Rewire Appalachia (recently acquired by Solar Holler), and a sustainable agricultural operation called Refresh Appalachia. The organization’s goal is to train, retrain, or otherwise prepare West Virginians for a different economy, one that’s shifted away from coal production. Coalfield helps by finding and hiring unemployed people, enrolling them in community colleges, and allowing them to build skills on the job while also earning a degree.

Brandon Dennison. Courtesy Coalfield Development

Over time, the combo has distilled into what Coalfield refers to as the “33-6-3 model.” That means that workers devote 33 hours per week training on the job, six hours per week doing schoolwork to earn an associate’s degree, and three hours devoted to personal development coaching. “That degree will benefit our workers for the rest of their lives, even if they weren’t working with us,” says Dennison.

Growing up in coal country

Even as a child, Dennison saw that there were deep, systemic issues in and around Appalachia. His parents taught at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia, providing a layer of economic security that many of his peers lacked. At one point, for instance, he realized that some of his schoolmates were living in abject poverty. Some didn’t even have running water. Those early experiences left an impression on Dennison, and it’s one of the primary motivators that led him to start his organization in his home state. “The more I traveled, the more I felt connected to West Virginia,” he says. “West Virginia was really my place. It’s where I belong, and I feel like I can have the greatest impact right in my own backyard.”

I feel like I can have the greatest impact right in my own backyard. Brandon Dennison Founder and CEO, Coalfield Development

After earning a graduate degree from Indiana University, he came back to West Virginia and started working as a grant writer and consultant. Meanwhile, he patched together a mix of grants, donor fundraising, and loans to kick-start Coalfield Development. The organization officially launched in 2010, engaging mostly in small-scale community projects. Coalfield’s first big project was refurbishing an old building in Wayne. That renovation included training workers in clean, energy-efficient construction and destruction techniques, to turn the old residential building into new apartments. Coalfield blossomed into other business areas, creating companies under its nonprofit umbrella that worked in different sectors, such as clothing production and solar panel installation. By 2016, Dennison was able to transition to Coalfield full time. He now earns $80,000 per year running the company.

Expanding Coalfield’s reach

Coalfield was originally focused on helping young people build skills and earn degrees. But after the company opened up opportunities to out-of-work coal miners, Dennison says, it started getting attention — and, crucially, funding — from outside of the state. Carter Stewart, a board member at Coalfield Development and a managing director of the Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation, which provided Coalfield with funding, says that the organization stood out among the many others that come to them for money. Stewart says that’s because Coalfield has an innovative approach to solving problems, and it’s a model that can be adopted elsewhere. Dennison, in particular, won over the DRK Foundation. “We found Brandon to be a very thoughtful, charismatic, passionate leader,” Stewart says. “He’s very much a humble leader with an iron will who’s willing to walk through walls to make sure his organization succeeds.”

He’s very much a humble leader with an iron will who’s willing to walk through walls to make sure his organization succeeds. Carter Stewart Managing director, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation

‘He’s a superhero in West Virginia’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, superhero, development, helping, jobs, coalfield, west, ceo, coal, organization, 1000, appalachia, living, virginia, dennison, stewart, job


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‘She’s my mom. I’m not going to let something bad happen to her.’ How 3 millennials are helping their parents save for retirement

“Throughout my whole working life it’s been, I have to make money so I don’t have to ask my parents for money,” says Jenny. I’m making six figures, of course I’m going to support them. “I’m making six figures, of course I’m going to support them.” Her father took most of the money, Sarah says, along with the house, leaving her mother with virtually no safety net. “As of now, economically speaking, I don’t see it being possible for her to step out on her own and plan for retirement,” Howard tells


“Throughout my whole working life it’s been, I have to make money so I don’t have to ask my parents for money,” says Jenny.
I’m making six figures, of course I’m going to support them.
“I’m making six figures, of course I’m going to support them.”
Her father took most of the money, Sarah says, along with the house, leaving her mother with virtually no safety net.
“As of now, economically speaking, I don’t see it being possible for her to step out on her own and plan for retirement,” Howard tells
‘She’s my mom. I’m not going to let something bad happen to her.’ How 3 millennials are helping their parents save for retirement Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parents, mother, sarah, money, jenny, save, howard, wife, helping, retirement, millennials, let, mom, support, happen, shes


'She's my mom. I'm not going to let something bad happen to her.' How 3 millennials are helping their parents save for retirement

Are you helping your parents with their finances while working toward your own goals? Email reporter Alicia Adamczyk at alicia.adamczyk@nbcuni.com if you’re interested in being featured in a future Make It article. Growing up, Jenny W.* knew not to expect birthday presents. The 29-year-old’s parents immigrated to New York City from China before she was born, and while they worked hard and made enough to get by — never earning more than around $30,000 a year, Jenny says, often qualifying them for food stamps and Medicaid — Jenny and her two younger siblings knew their parents didn’t have extra money to hand out to their kids. She isn’t resentful. Her parents moved to the U.S. to offer their children more opportunities, for which she is grateful. As the oldest, she feels a sense of duty to her parents, and much of her life plan has revolved around getting a high-paying job in order to repay her parents for their sacrifice, she tells CNBC Make It. “Throughout my whole working life it’s been, I have to make money so I don’t have to ask my parents for money,” says Jenny. “My most lofty financial goal is to support my parents in their old age.” She earns a base salary of $135,000 per year in IT, but keeps her expenses low. Besides the occasional trip with friends, much of her money goes to her parents and siblings to cover most of their expenses, including rent, bills and medication. She doesn’t really date — it’s cheaper to be single, plus she values her independence — and prefers to save and invest her money in a way that “feels like I’m living on $50,000.”

They could have gotten much better jobs in their home countries, and they gave it all up to come here to do honest but menial work. I’m making six figures, of course I’m going to support them. Jenny W.

“They could have gotten much better jobs in their home countries, and they gave it all up to come here to do honest but menial work,” she says, noting that her parents have worked as housekeepers and cooks. “I’m making six figures, of course I’m going to support them.”

Boomers are behind on retirement savings

Stepping up after divorce

Sarah H.*, a 33-year-old marketing executive living in Austin, Texas, first started giving her mother money when her parents divorced in 2009. Her father took most of the money, Sarah says, along with the house, leaving her mother with virtually no safety net. While she works full time, her 63-year-old mother often struggles to cover her bills month-to-month, never mind put money away for retirement. Like Jenny, Sarah’s career path has been shaped by the realization that she would have to care for her mother. She switched careers at 28, partly because she knew she’d have to care for her mother, and now makes over $100,000 per year. While she doesn’t regret the change, and is happy to be more financially comfortable, she always has her mother’s needs — now and in the future — in the back of her mind.

When Sarah and her wife got married, it was with the understanding that her mother would likely always need financial help. On top of sending her money for rent and other expenses, Sarah designated her mother as the recipient of a universal life insurance policy as a sort of ad hoc retirement plan. She expects to pay for her mother’s full cost of living one day, or have her move into the house Sarah and her wife share. A knee surgery on the horizon also has Sarah budgeting to pay for the expenses that aren’t covered by any short- or long-term disability payments her mother qualifies for. Sarah acknowledges that her mother has had a “tough life,” and that she feels some sense of responsibility for caring for her, particularly after what she describes as a nasty divorce. “She’s my mom,” says Sarah. “I’m not going to let something bad happen to her.”

‘A surprise blessing’

His parents’ divorce also led Brock Howard to offer financial support to his mother. Growing up, Howard’s family qualified for food stamps, until his father entered the computing industry and they “went from poverty to upper middle class pretty much overnight.” His mother was a stay at home mom until about a decade ago, when she became a pharmacy technician and was able to save and invest in a 401(k) for the first time. But when the 32-year-old’s parents divorced around a year ago, his father took half. His mother now lives with Howard and his wife and children. “As of now, economically speaking, I don’t see it being possible for her to step out on her own and plan for retirement,” Howard tells CNBC Make It. Howard and his wife pay the housing and utility bills, as well as his mother’s cell phone. They are also helping his mother set up some basic financial accounts, and plan to help with medical and long-term care costs in retirement. In return, Howard’s mother watches the kids, which saves the couple on child care.

I get frustrated that you get lumped up in the millennial bubble, that we’re seen as lazy and not planning and not working toward the future, or something bigger than ourselves. Brock Howard


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parents, mother, sarah, money, jenny, save, howard, wife, helping, retirement, millennials, let, mom, support, happen, shes


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Low interest rates are helping stocks, says strategist

Low interest rates are helping stocks, says strategistCNBC’s “Power Lunch” team breaks down markets with Evan Brown of UBS Asset Management and Ron Insana, a CNBC contributor.


Low interest rates are helping stocks, says strategistCNBC’s “Power Lunch” team breaks down markets with Evan Brown of UBS Asset Management and Ron Insana, a CNBC contributor.
Low interest rates are helping stocks, says strategist Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ron, strategistcnbcs, management, low, rates, helping, stocks, power, markets, team, lunch, ubs, strategist, interest


Low interest rates are helping stocks, says strategist

Low interest rates are helping stocks, says strategist

CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team breaks down markets with Evan Brown of UBS Asset Management and Ron Insana, a CNBC contributor.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ron, strategistcnbcs, management, low, rates, helping, stocks, power, markets, team, lunch, ubs, strategist, interest


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Attorney General William Barr says Apple is not helping unlock iPhones used by alleged Pensacola shooter

The comments highlight law enforcement’s frustration with encryption technologies that protect data so that neither Apple nor law enforcement can easily read it. So far Apple has not given us any substantive assistance,” Barr said, next to a poster with a picture of the iPhones. When Barr was asked if he was considering a court order to compel Apple to unlock the iPhones, he declined to comment. Last week, an Apple employee focused on privacy who was speaking at a trade show defended Apple’s use


The comments highlight law enforcement’s frustration with encryption technologies that protect data so that neither Apple nor law enforcement can easily read it.
So far Apple has not given us any substantive assistance,” Barr said, next to a poster with a picture of the iPhones.
When Barr was asked if he was considering a court order to compel Apple to unlock the iPhones, he declined to comment.
Last week, an Apple employee focused on privacy who was speaking at a trade show defended Apple’s use
Attorney General William Barr says Apple is not helping unlock iPhones used by alleged Pensacola shooter Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, access, law, enforcement, apple, barr, fbi, week, helping, shooter, used, unlock, pensacola, attorney, data, general, iphones, william


Attorney General William Barr says Apple is not helping unlock iPhones used by alleged Pensacola shooter

U.S. Attorney General William Barr speaks at the International Conference on Cyber Security at Fordham University School of Law on July 23, 2019 in New York City.

Attorney General William Barr said during a press conference on Monday that Apple had not helped the FBI crack into password-protected iPhones used by Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, who is suspected of killing three people last month in a shooting at a Navy base in Pensacola, Florida.

The comments highlight law enforcement’s frustration with encryption technologies that protect data so that neither Apple nor law enforcement can easily read it.

The speech also previews future clashes between technology companies and governments over whether to build “back doors” that would allow law enforcement elevated access to private data to solve crimes like terrorism.

“We have asked Apple for their help in unlocking the shooter’s iPhones. So far Apple has not given us any substantive assistance,” Barr said, next to a poster with a picture of the iPhones. “This situation perfectly illustrates why it is critical that investigators be able to get access to digital evidence once they have obtained a court order based on probable cause.”

“We call on Apple and other technology companies to help us find a solution so that we can better protect the lives of Americans and prevent future attacks,” he said. Barr has also clashed with Facebook over encrypted messages, which he called “data-in-motion” on Monday.

When Barr was asked if he was considering a court order to compel Apple to unlock the iPhones, he declined to comment. Last week, the FBI sent a letter to Apple’s general counsel asking for help.

Apple did not respond to requests for comment. Last week, a spokesperson said: “We have the greatest respect for law enforcement and have always worked cooperatively to help in their investigations. When the FBI requested information from us relating to this case a month ago we gave them all of the data in our possession and we will continue to support them with the data we have available.”

Apple was involved in a high-profile showdown with the FBI in 2016 when the Justice Department sued it to help it gain access to a phone used by Syed Farook, who was responsible for the mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, that left 14 people dead.

The FBI eventually said that it was able to gain access to the phone using a private vendor, which cracked the phone’s security.

Apple has designed its devices with encryption, which means that it cannot access personal information on locked iPhones without the password to the phone. In the San Bernardino case, Apple said that in order to retrieve data that hasn’t been uploaded to the company’s servers, it would have to build special software.

Several vendors make devices marketed to law enforcement that can crack into iPhones, but the efficacy of those devices can increase or decrease based on security flaws Apple fixes.

Last week, an Apple employee focused on privacy who was speaking at a trade show defended Apple’s use of encryption. She said the company has a team working around the clock to respond to requests from law enforcement but that she doesn’t support building “back doors.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, access, law, enforcement, apple, barr, fbi, week, helping, shooter, used, unlock, pensacola, attorney, data, general, iphones, william


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Tech firm helping Bloomberg campaign lands former Goldman Sachs executive, ex-Facebook employees in hiring blitz

The company was first described to CNBC as the “primary digital agency and technology services provider” for the billionaire’s presidential campaign. A former senior producer at Google, Namik Hawkins, is now an executive producer at Hawkfish, her LinkedIn page says. The company’s LinkedIn page also gives a glimpse into how connected the organization is to Bloomberg himself. A spokesperson for the Bloomberg campaign did not return a request for comment. As for digital ads, Bloomberg has invested


The company was first described to CNBC as the “primary digital agency and technology services provider” for the billionaire’s presidential campaign.
A former senior producer at Google, Namik Hawkins, is now an executive producer at Hawkfish, her LinkedIn page says.
The company’s LinkedIn page also gives a glimpse into how connected the organization is to Bloomberg himself.
A spokesperson for the Bloomberg campaign did not return a request for comment.
As for digital ads, Bloomberg has invested
Tech firm helping Bloomberg campaign lands former Goldman Sachs executive, ex-Facebook employees in hiring blitz Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-06  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sachs, lands, exfacebook, firm, facebook, hiring, tech, linkedin, executive, bloomberg, company, employees, states, page, digital, hawkfish, million, goldman, campaign, helping


Tech firm helping Bloomberg campaign lands former Goldman Sachs executive, ex-Facebook employees in hiring blitz

2020 Democratic presidential hopeful and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks during an event to open a campaign office at Eastern Market in Detroit, Michigan, on December 21, 2019.

Mike Bloomberg’s tech company is bolstering its ranks as it starts to assist the billionaire’s campaign for president.

Hawkfish has picked up at least 50 employees from a wide range of backgrounds. Those who have signed on to work with the digital start-up were initially discovered by CNBC after a review of the company’s new LinkedIn page, which says it has 51 to 200 employees.

The company was first described to CNBC as the “primary digital agency and technology services provider” for the billionaire’s presidential campaign.

The hirings come as the campaign moves more resources into delegate-rich battleground states. A Real Clear Politics polling average has Bloomberg in fifth place, behind former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Those hired include Elisha Wiesel, who was the co-chief information officer at Goldman Sachs for three years before joining Hawkfish. Wiesel’s LinkedIn page labels him as a consultant, and in a post that was published last week on the site, he says he’s “volunteering” his time to “learn from them, and to contribute however I can.”

Bloomberg News recently reported that Wiesel, the son of the late Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Elie Weisel, was joining the campaign and helping the technology efforts, but the story had no mention of Hawkfish.

Others who have joined have experience with tech giants Facebook and Google. Vinay Satish Kumar, a former engineering manager at Facebook, is now with Hawkfish. Kumar says on his page that he spent his time at Facebook building algorithms that “improved the quality of news on Facebook around the world.” A former senior producer at Google, Namik Hawkins, is now an executive producer at Hawkfish, her LinkedIn page says.

Hawkfish’s leadership ranks include longtime Facebook Chief Marketing Officer Gary Briggs and Jeff Glueck, former CEO of location-tracking firm Foursquare.

Bloomberg, who has a net worth of $56 billion, started the company last spring. His campaign has said it helped groups looking to make inroads in state races within Virginia and Kentucky. Democrats in November won control of the Virginia statehouse for the first time in over two decades, while Democrat Andy Beshear narrowly defeated GOP Gov. Matt Bevin in Kentucky. Even though the company has yet to disclose which specific organizations it assisted last year, its LinkedIn page says its clients are political action committees, NGO advocacy groups and political campaigns.

The company’s LinkedIn page also gives a glimpse into how connected the organization is to Bloomberg himself. It says it is supporting candidates in favor of many causes that Bloomberg has championed for well over a decade, including gun safety.

“Hawkfish aims to support candidates and causes who will advance progress on climate change, gun safety, women’s rights, education, access to healthcare, and more,” the page says.

A spokesperson for the Bloomberg campaign did not return a request for comment.

The hiring spree just over a month after Bloomberg entered the race comes as his campaign is pushing out its ground game with 500 organizers and field staff in 30 states. He has put many of his resources into all of the Super Tuesday states scheduled for March 3.

Bloomberg’s ability to quickly hire matches the efforts he’s making to push out his message through TV and digital ads. He has invested over $147 million in broadcast TV spots, with at least $15 million going into delegate-rich California and Texas, the nation’s top two Electoral College states.

As for digital ads, Bloomberg has invested just over $20 million in Google and Facebook ads.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-06  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sachs, lands, exfacebook, firm, facebook, hiring, tech, linkedin, executive, bloomberg, company, employees, states, page, digital, hawkfish, million, goldman, campaign, helping


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NFL Hall of Famer Tony Gonzalez says these 2 books are helping him ‘level up’ in life

Tony Gonzalez is a former NFL tight end who played 17 seasons in the league and was selected 14 times for the Pro Bowl. After retiring from the NFL in 2013, Gonzalez continued his career in sports by becoming an analyst for CBS Sports and Fox Sports. “I love philosophy and spirituality and leveling-up books and science books,” says Gonzalez, who reveals that he doesn’t read sports books. In fact, former NFL tight end Martellus Bennett told CNBC Make It in 2018 that his biggest splurge is books.


Tony Gonzalez is a former NFL tight end who played 17 seasons in the league and was selected 14 times for the Pro Bowl.
After retiring from the NFL in 2013, Gonzalez continued his career in sports by becoming an analyst for CBS Sports and Fox Sports.
“I love philosophy and spirituality and leveling-up books and science books,” says Gonzalez, who reveals that he doesn’t read sports books.
In fact, former NFL tight end Martellus Bennett told CNBC Make It in 2018 that his biggest splurge is books.

NFL Hall of Famer Tony Gonzalez says these 2 books are helping him ‘level up’ in life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nfl, life, zuckerberg, bennett, reading, famer, gonzalez, books, hall, level, helping, end, times, book, tony, read


NFL Hall of Famer Tony Gonzalez says these 2 books are helping him 'level up' in life

Tony Gonzalez is a former NFL tight end who played 17 seasons in the league and was selected 14 times for the Pro Bowl.

After retiring from the NFL in 2013, Gonzalez continued his career in sports by becoming an analyst for CBS Sports and Fox Sports. Now, as an NFL Hall of Famer, podcast host and author, he tells The New York Times that he continues to keep his physical and mental health intact by sleeping at least eight hours a night, meditating, working out and reading books.

“I love philosophy and spirituality and leveling-up books and science books,” says Gonzalez, who reveals that he doesn’t read sports books. As someone who has spent the majority of his life playing and working in sports, he says he believes “you should really cast a big net when it comes to life and learning. In the end, you’re so much better for it.”

Currently, the Fox Sports analyst says he’s reading the book “Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World” by David Epstein. The book, which focuses on the importance of being open to diverse experiences and interests, is “phenomenal,” says Gonzalez.

“I love his books,” says the 43-year-old, about the author Epstein. “I’m going to get him on my podcast.”

Gonzalez, who interviews business and entertainment professionals for his podcast “Wide Open with Tony Gonzalez,” also lists Richard Rohr’s “The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe” as a book he “really like[s].” The spiritual read, which is a New York Times bestseller, draws on scripture and history to articulate “a transformative view of Jesus Christ as a portrait of God’s constant, unfolding work in the world,” according to its listing on Amazon.

In addition to Gonzalez, several other former athletes have openly talked about the impact books have had on their post-retirement journey. In fact, former NFL tight end Martellus Bennett told CNBC Make It in 2018 that his biggest splurge is books. “I have about 3,500 books, maybe more,” he says.

Bennett, who played 10 seasons in the league, credits his reading habit in part to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. In 2015, Zuckerberg challenged himself to read a new book every other week for a year. When Bennett heard the news, he decided to do the same.

“I figured, if Mark Zuckerberg could read one book every two weeks, and he’s running [an] almost trillion-dollar empire, then one thing that little old me could do is read one book every two weeks,” he says.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: Why NFL star Michael Bennett skips direct deposit and keeps his checks ‘until the end of the season’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nfl, life, zuckerberg, bennett, reading, famer, gonzalez, books, hall, level, helping, end, times, book, tony, read


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Americans say strong economy only helping the rich

A majority of Americans say the economy is only benefitting the wealthy, despite record-low unemployment and rising wages. A poll by Pew Research Center found that 69% of Americans say the economy is helping the wealthy, while hurting the poor, those without college degrees and the middle class. Nearly three-quarters of upper-income households say the current economic conditions are “excellent/good,” while a majority of lower-income earners say the economy is “only fair/poor.” “To the extent tha


A majority of Americans say the economy is only benefitting the wealthy, despite record-low unemployment and rising wages.
A poll by Pew Research Center found that 69% of Americans say the economy is helping the wealthy, while hurting the poor, those without college degrees and the middle class.
Nearly three-quarters of upper-income households say the current economic conditions are “excellent/good,” while a majority of lower-income earners say the economy is “only fair/poor.”
“To the extent tha
Americans say strong economy only helping the rich Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: robert frank
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, current, majority, economy, americans, wealthy, unemployment, rich, helping, say, conditions, strong, economic


Americans say strong economy only helping the rich

A majority of Americans say the economy is only benefitting the wealthy, despite record-low unemployment and rising wages.

A poll by Pew Research Center found that 69% of Americans say the economy is helping the wealthy, while hurting the poor, those without college degrees and the middle class.

Responses also differed widely by income group. Nearly three-quarters of upper-income households say the current economic conditions are “excellent/good,” while a majority of lower-income earners say the economy is “only fair/poor.”

“To the extent that current economic conditions are helping particular groups, the public sees the benefits flowing mainly to the most well-off,” according to Pew.

The responses suggest that even with a record-long economic expansion, a 50-year low unemployment rate of 3.5% and wage growth of more than 3% a year, many Americans don’t feel like they are benefiting as much as those at the top.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: robert frank
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, current, majority, economy, americans, wealthy, unemployment, rich, helping, say, conditions, strong, economic


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This brilliant spending strategy is helping one couple pay off $400,000 in student loans in 5 years

Kayla, 32, and Ryan, 33, finished their graduate programs in 2014 with degrees in physical therapy and prosthetics and orthotics, respectively — and a combined 24 student loans. The principal on the couple’s student debt added up to $336,676.17 and it has kept growing, with interest averaging 6.5% across all of their loans. To help them focus on debt repayment, the couple turned to a new spending strategy: a zero-based budget, where your income minus your expenses equals zero and there’s no room


Kayla, 32, and Ryan, 33, finished their graduate programs in 2014 with degrees in physical therapy and prosthetics and orthotics, respectively — and a combined 24 student loans.
The principal on the couple’s student debt added up to $336,676.17 and it has kept growing, with interest averaging 6.5% across all of their loans.
To help them focus on debt repayment, the couple turned to a new spending strategy: a zero-based budget, where your income minus your expenses equals zero and there’s no room
This brilliant spending strategy is helping one couple pay off $400,000 in student loans in 5 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, zerobased, strategy, student, ryan, spending, pay, budget, debt, income, loans, couple, 400000, kayla, helping, brilliant, theyve, andersons


This brilliant spending strategy is helping one couple pay off $400,000 in student loans in 5 years

For Kayla and Ryan Anderson, “zero” doesn’t just represent their goal of being debt-free. It’s also a key number in the spending strategy they’re using to get there. Kayla, 32, and Ryan, 33, finished their graduate programs in 2014 with degrees in physical therapy and prosthetics and orthotics, respectively — and a combined 24 student loans. The principal on the couple’s student debt added up to $336,676.17 and it has kept growing, with interest averaging 6.5% across all of their loans. Their four largest loans accrued interest at a rate of 7.9%. To help them focus on debt repayment, the couple turned to a new spending strategy: a zero-based budget, where your income minus your expenses equals zero and there’s no room for frivolous spending. They adopted it as part of a commitment to Dave Ramsey’s Seven Baby Steps, the second of which is to pay off all of your debt using the snowball method and knock out your smallest balances first. “It’s those structures and that system that have helped us learn a financial lifestyle that is sustainable,” says Kayla. “It’s not like a quick-fix diet.” More from Grow:

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What’s best to buy from Costco for your holiday parties Since 2016, they’ve been chronicling their journey on the Instagram account @DumpingDebtWithDave, where they’ve shared their challenges and victories with over 6,000 followers, and connected with others who owed six figures. “What I’m finding is that we are not alone in this,” says Kayla. After almost five years, seven baby steps, one baby, 12 different jobs and countless hours of overtime, the Andersons have repaid $377,744, and are on track to pay off the remainder by December 2019. That means they’ll have paid back about $400,000 total in five years.

Strategy: A Zero-Based Budget

A zero-dollar based budget ensures that every cent is working towards a greater goal — in this case, being debt-free. Each month, the Andersons kick off their zero-based budget by calculating their combined income and breaking their expenses into different categories. Kayla, a physical therapist, and Ryan, a product development engineer, earn an average combined income of around $115,000 — although that number can fluctuate depending on how many overtime hours they pick up, and what Ryan brings in doing bike tuneups as a side hustle. When they sit down to do their monthly budget, they set micro-goals — like paying off $5,000 a month in debt — and check in on long-term goals, like paying off their debt in full by Christmas 2019. That way, even with income fluctuations, they’ve managed to maintain a strict budget that allows for that steep monthly loan payment.

Ryan Anderson drafts the family budget. Provided

Here’s what their zero-based budget looks like: Categories like food ($400), rent ($1,100), or transportation ($125) are “fixed” expenses that remain the same month to month. Everything else falls under “extras” which include their phone and internet bills ($30 apiece). They also put money aside for emergencies, like car repairs. And they include $50 ($25 each) for “fun money” in the budget to spend as they wish. After allocating funds into those categories, every extra penny goes towards debt, says Kayla. In most months, they put about $4,500 toward their balances. Any extra income from side hustles or tax refunds also goes to reducing their debt; their largest payment was $68,000 Ryan inherited from his grandmother. Having grown up without any real financial stability, Kayla says the desire to create security for her family has motivated her to maintain this tight budget for so long.

Celebration: Root beer

Each time the Andersons reach one of their micro-goals, like paying off one of their loans, they have a micro-reward. “It seems like such a small thing, but we go and we find the fanciest root beer we can find and we split it,” says Kayla. “We just talk about how far we’ve come, and we look back at our numbers and we dream about the future. That has definitely been a big motivator to keep us on the path.” The Andersons have also shared their major updates and successes with their Instagram followers. Their most recent post shared that they’ve met their micro-goal for the month of June: getting under $30,000 of debt. They plan to go big when they become debt-free. “We’re going to get a keg of root beer,” Kayla says. “We’re just going to celebrate with our friends and family who have supported us through this whole crazy journey.”

Opportunity: College, a home, and fancy shampoo


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, zerobased, strategy, student, ryan, spending, pay, budget, debt, income, loans, couple, 400000, kayla, helping, brilliant, theyve, andersons


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Former lobbyist and Biden’s current campaign chairman is helping raise cash for the former VP

Former Vice President Joe Biden is turning to his campaign chairman, who was also formerly a lobbyist, to help him get a boost in the fourth quarter fundraising game. Biden’s aides meanwhile have tried to block lobbyists from gaining access to the former vice president. While Ricchetti is the chairman of the Biden campaign, his firm, Ricchetti Consulting, has been paid over $52,000 for “strategic consulting,” according to Federal Election Commission records. In trying to rebound in the fourth qu


Former Vice President Joe Biden is turning to his campaign chairman, who was also formerly a lobbyist, to help him get a boost in the fourth quarter fundraising game.
Biden’s aides meanwhile have tried to block lobbyists from gaining access to the former vice president.
While Ricchetti is the chairman of the Biden campaign, his firm, Ricchetti Consulting, has been paid over $52,000 for “strategic consulting,” according to Federal Election Commission records.
In trying to rebound in the fourth qu
Former lobbyist and Biden’s current campaign chairman is helping raise cash for the former VP Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, vice, ricchetti, chairman, quarter, event, raise, cash, campaign, bidens, fundraising, president, lobbyists, lobbyist, helping, current, biden


Former lobbyist and Biden's current campaign chairman is helping raise cash for the former VP

Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a meeting at Chickasaw Event Center in New Hampton, Iowa, December 5, 2019.

Former Vice President Joe Biden is turning to his campaign chairman, who was also formerly a lobbyist, to help him get a boost in the fourth quarter fundraising game.

Steve Ricchetti, who previously served as Biden’s chief of staff while a member of President Barack Obama’s administration, will be hosting a fundraiser on Monday in Washington D.C., according to people familiar with the event and an invite obtained by CNBC.

Prior to his role on Biden’s White House team, Ricchetti was a lobbyist for a wide range of clients, including a variety of pharmaceutical titans.

A handful of lobbyists were invited to the fundraising event, according to people familiar with the matter. Biden has said that “from day one” he will not accept donations from lobbyists and the campaign has publicly insisted that’s still the case.

Earlier in the campaign, Biden’s operation took in and later returned donations they received from lobbyists. Biden’s aides meanwhile have tried to block lobbyists from gaining access to the former vice president. Biden is currently having a strong fourth quarter with his fundraising efforts.

While Ricchetti is the chairman of the Biden campaign, his firm, Ricchetti Consulting, has been paid over $52,000 for “strategic consulting,” according to Federal Election Commission records.

The gathering was noted in a weekly update memo to donors, and it listed other events with Biden as the featured guest on the west coast, including in California and Nevada. Biden is likely not attending the Ricchetti fundraiser as his schedule does not mention he’s taking part in the event and only says the former vice president is meeting with advisors.

Biden is not the only candidate who doesn’t take part in fundraisers that are hosted by campaign officials. Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s co-finance chair, Shanti Fry, recently invited donors to attend an event in the Los Angeles area that was scheduled for Dec. 7. The list of hosts included Hollywood actors, writers and producers and it noted that Warren was on the campaign trail in New Hampshire.

Biden just wrapped up a bus tour in Iowa and he too was just in the Granite State for campaign events.

Data compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics shows that the Biden aide was president of lobbying shop, Ricchetti Inc., starting in 2001. He represented clients of pharmaceutical giants such as Eli Lily, Novartis and Pfizer. He also did lobbying work for Fannie Mae in the buildup to the 2008 financial crisis. The firms highest grossing year was in 2007, when they brought in $3.4 million for their services.

A spokesman for Biden declined to comment. Ricchetti did not return a request for comment.

For Biden, the decision to turn to Ricchetti for assistance with campaign fundraising comes at a critical moment for his 2020 presidential run.

In trying to rebound in the fourth quarter, Biden is looking to catch up to his rivals in Sens. Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Mayor Pete Buttigieg after only raising $15 million the prior three months of the campaign. He went into the next quarter with only $8.9 million on hand.

Still, Biden is on track to have one his best fundraising sprees of the campaign.

The Associated Press reported that the Biden campaign raised $15 million over the past two months, with campaign manager Greg Schultz saying in a memo that the former vice president has surpassed his third quarter totals.

The final quarter of the year ends on Dec. 31.

Biden fundraising memo:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, vice, ricchetti, chairman, quarter, event, raise, cash, campaign, bidens, fundraising, president, lobbyists, lobbyist, helping, current, biden


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How smart ideas are helping to accommodate China’s renewable energy drive

A burgeoning economic, political and military power, China is also aiming to lay down a marker on the renewable energy sector. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), China added 1.6 gigawatts (GW) of capacity in 2018. “The technical characteristics of different energy systems are quite different,” Zhang Ning, from Tsinghua University’s Department of Electrical Engineering, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.” “We can use it to indirectly store electricity so that we can accommodate mor


A burgeoning economic, political and military power, China is also aiming to lay down a marker on the renewable energy sector.
According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), China added 1.6 gigawatts (GW) of capacity in 2018.
“The technical characteristics of different energy systems are quite different,” Zhang Ning, from Tsinghua University’s Department of Electrical Engineering, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.”
“We can use it to indirectly store electricity so that we can accommodate mor
How smart ideas are helping to accommodate China’s renewable energy drive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, smart, drive, used, electricity, ideas, 2018, renewable, accommodate, energy, added, china, helping, power, chinas, systems


How smart ideas are helping to accommodate China's renewable energy drive

A burgeoning economic, political and military power, China is also aiming to lay down a marker on the renewable energy sector.

Take offshore wind energy. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), China added 1.6 gigawatts (GW) of capacity in 2018. To put things in perspective, the U.K., Belgium, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands combined added 2.7 GW in 2018.

And when it comes to solar photovoltaic capacity, China also leads the way, adding 44 GW in 2018. This may be lower than 2017, when 53 GW were added, but China still outstrips its nearest rivals by some way: the U.S. added roughly 10.5 GW in 2018, the IEA says.

Capacity refers to the maximum amount that installations can produce, not what they are currently generating.

While China’s renewable energy expansion is large-scale, it also presents challenges, including the curtailment of sources such as wind power thanks to a lack of flexibility in the power system.

The development and integration of multi-energy systems and solutions could be one tool used to tackle this problem.

“The technical characteristics of different energy systems are quite different,” Zhang Ning, from Tsinghua University’s Department of Electrical Engineering, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.”

He explained that while electricity was easy to transmit and use, it needed to be balanced in real-time, adding that batteries — which could be used for this — were expensive.

“However, gas and heating systems (are)… significantly cheaper than storing electricity,” he added. “We can use it to indirectly store electricity so that we can accommodate more renewable energy.”

Methods such as this could become increasingly important in the years ahead, especially when one considers how China is developing renewable energy.

“According to the research of our five year projects by 2030, more than 35% of the energy demand will be supplied by … renewables,” Chongqing Kang, the dean of Tsinghua University’s electrical engineering department, said. “The number will reach 60% to 70% by… 2050,” he added.

On the topic of multi-energy systems and how they can be used to minimize the curtailment of renewable energy, Benson Ireri, from the World Resources Institute, highlighted some of the roles they could play.

“One of them, of course, is in terms of enhancing the flexibility of grid and power system supply, so that then the integration of renewables is much more easier and it’s much more comfortable,” he explained.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, smart, drive, used, electricity, ideas, 2018, renewable, accommodate, energy, added, china, helping, power, chinas, systems


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