Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


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Twilio just spent $2 billion on a company that helps send mass emails

Twilio just spent $2 billion to buy SendGrid, a company that helps send mass emails, the company said Monday. Shares of Twilio fell more than 4 percent in extended trading after the announcement. SendGrid offers companies a cloud-based service for sending emails at a large scale. The acquisition allows software developers to “manage all of their important communication channels — voice, messaging, video, and now email as well,” Twilio said in a statement. Twilio offers software for secure messag


Twilio just spent $2 billion to buy SendGrid, a company that helps send mass emails, the company said Monday. Shares of Twilio fell more than 4 percent in extended trading after the announcement. SendGrid offers companies a cloud-based service for sending emails at a large scale. The acquisition allows software developers to “manage all of their important communication channels — voice, messaging, video, and now email as well,” Twilio said in a statement. Twilio offers software for secure messag
Twilio just spent $2 billion on a company that helps send mass emails Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: sara salinas, abigail stevenson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statementtwilio, offers, messaging, companies, twilio, important, emails, company, billion, helps, spent, sendgrid, send, software, email, mass


Twilio just spent $2 billion on a company that helps send mass emails

Twilio just spent $2 billion to buy SendGrid, a company that helps send mass emails, the company said Monday.

Shares of Twilio fell more than 4 percent in extended trading after the announcement. SendGrid jumped about 15 percent.

SendGrid offers companies a cloud-based service for sending emails at a large scale. The acquisition allows software developers to “manage all of their important communication channels — voice, messaging, video, and now email as well,” Twilio said in a statement.

Twilio offers software for secure messaging platforms and competes with companies such as Avaya and Cisco.

“Increasingly, our customers are asking us to solve all of their strategic communications challenges — regardless of channel. Email is a vital communications channel for companies around the world, and so it was important to us to include this capability in our platform,” Twilio CEO Jeff Lawson said in a statement.

Twilio stock has far outpaced the overall market this year, up more than 220 percent in 2018. As of Monday’s close, shares were within 14 percent of 52-weeks highs.

The all-stock transaction is expected to close in the first half of 2019.

WATCH: Twilio CEO on company’s business model


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: sara salinas, abigail stevenson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statementtwilio, offers, messaging, companies, twilio, important, emails, company, billion, helps, spent, sendgrid, send, software, email, mass


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Streaming helps fuel the boom in smart speakers such as Echo, HomePod

Among those surveyed, Amazon’s Echo devices edged out Google and Apple in terms of popularity. AudienceNet’s findings bolstered a report published by Adobe in September, which said that by 2019, nearly half of American households will own a smart speaker. In August, Samsung announced a new smart speaker to rival the Echo and HomePod. Called the Galaxy Home, the device was part of a new tie-up with Spotify that let users stream seamlessly across a range of Samsung TVs, phones and the Galaxy Home


Among those surveyed, Amazon’s Echo devices edged out Google and Apple in terms of popularity. AudienceNet’s findings bolstered a report published by Adobe in September, which said that by 2019, nearly half of American households will own a smart speaker. In August, Samsung announced a new smart speaker to rival the Echo and HomePod. Called the Galaxy Home, the device was part of a new tie-up with Spotify that let users stream seamlessly across a range of Samsung TVs, phones and the Galaxy Home
Streaming helps fuel the boom in smart speakers such as Echo, HomePod Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: isabel soisson, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, echo, speakers, streaming, smart, music, range, fuel, owners, samsung, boom, audiencenet, helps, study, speaker, listening, homepod


Streaming helps fuel the boom in smart speakers such as Echo, HomePod

AudienceNet found that an estimated 14 percent of the U.S. population now owns a smart speaker, most of which can perform a range of automated tasks — but listening to music is the dominant use case among owners, the firm said. Among those surveyed, Amazon’s Echo devices edged out Google and Apple in terms of popularity.

Yet one noteworthy detail found by the study was that 43 percent of smart-speaker owners surveyed by AudienceNet now use on-demand streaming services — and 37 percent of owners started paying for these services after purchasing their device.

AudienceNet’s findings bolstered a report published by Adobe in September, which said that by 2019, nearly half of American households will own a smart speaker.

Apple, Google and Samsung are among the brands attempting to capitalize on the growing adoption of smart speakers, which is having a ripple effect on how, when and where music gets played.

In August, Samsung announced a new smart speaker to rival the Echo and HomePod. Called the Galaxy Home, the device was part of a new tie-up with Spotify that let users stream seamlessly across a range of Samsung TVs, phones and the Galaxy Home smart speaker. Spotify is the default music streaming service on the Galaxy Home, too.

Along those lines, “43 percent of smart speaker owners also agreed that using their device increased the amount of music playlists they listen to, while around 40 percent discovered more music and 38 percent listened to a broader range of music than they did previously,” AudienceNet said.

Meanwhile, 73 percent of smart-speaker owners say that owning their device has “changed the way they listen to music,” the firm said, with half of them agreeing that they listened to more music and spent longer listening since acquiring their device.

While AM/FM radio is still the most popular listening service in the U.S. at 31 percent of total listening time, on-demand streaming accounted for 27 percent of overall music consumption, AudienceNet found. Radio listening accounted for only 12 percent of listening among 16- to 24-year-olds, the study showed.

Amid the proliferation of mobile devices, smartphones were the most used in consuming music, with the study showing smartphones accounted for 25 percent of all music played.

— CNBC’s Todd Haselton contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: isabel soisson, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, echo, speakers, streaming, smart, music, range, fuel, owners, samsung, boom, audiencenet, helps, study, speaker, listening, homepod


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8 ways to negotiate a six-figure salary like a pro

Cenedella said many workers feel compelled to take the first offer, concerned they’ll be perceived as rude or ungrateful if they negotiate. A record low unemployment rate of 3.7 percent is boosting the confidence of workers and causing more people to leave jobs to pursue jobs with six-figure salaries, said Andrew J. Sherman, a partner at Seyfarth Shaw, who helps small and midsize enterprises negotiate six-figure salary contracts with prospective employees. That means there’s more job-hopping and


Cenedella said many workers feel compelled to take the first offer, concerned they’ll be perceived as rude or ungrateful if they negotiate. A record low unemployment rate of 3.7 percent is boosting the confidence of workers and causing more people to leave jobs to pursue jobs with six-figure salaries, said Andrew J. Sherman, a partner at Seyfarth Shaw, who helps small and midsize enterprises negotiate six-figure salary contracts with prospective employees. That means there’s more job-hopping and
8 ways to negotiate a six-figure salary like a pro Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-06  Authors: julie halpert, rubberball productions, brand x pictures, getty images, -marc cenedella, founder, ceo of ladders, a leading professional career site
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sixfigure, jobs, negotiation, job, ways, helps, salary, pro, negotiate, higher, dont, employer, offer


8 ways to negotiate a six-figure salary like a pro

Last month Marc Cenedella, founder and CEO of Ladders, the leading career platform for jobs paying $100,000 and more, was advising a female executive with 20 years’ experience in marketing. She wasn’t happy with the salary offered by a prospective employer, but she was sheepish about negotiating.

Cenedella advised her to tell the employer that she was hoping to earn $15,000 more because of a move from the Southwest to New York City, which had a higher cost of living and higher commuting costs. She did so, and within three days the company agreed to the increase.

Cenedella said many workers feel compelled to take the first offer, concerned they’ll be perceived as rude or ungrateful if they negotiate. “The biggest mistake people make is that any negotiation is too much negotiation for them,” he said.

Negotiations like this are taking place more often these days. A record low unemployment rate of 3.7 percent is boosting the confidence of workers and causing more people to leave jobs to pursue jobs with six-figure salaries, said Andrew J. Sherman, a partner at Seyfarth Shaw, who helps small and midsize enterprises negotiate six-figure salary contracts with prospective employees. “People are seeing there are more opportunities available to them,” he said.

Cenedella said the days of working in one job most of your career are long gone. Companies “don’t have a loyalty to you, so you don’t need to have loyalty to a company.” That means there’s more job-hopping and opportunities for new negotiations to get you to a higher salary.

Getting to a six-figure salary “is something job seekers should aim for if they’re not there yet,” said Vicki Salemi, a career expert for Monster, a worldwide job site. Sherman said it’s an important socioeconomic benchmark “that helps people define themselves quantitatively.”

It’s not just traditional white-collar jobs that can earn you six figures. A new analysis that Monster conducted using the Gartner TalentNeuron tool of the top 10 job listings offering six-figure salaries in the past year found heavy- and tractor-trailer truck drivers among software developers, sales managers and computer systems engineers. LinkedIn’s 2017 Salary Report found that even those early in their careers can make six figures, citing investment banking analysts and associate brand managers as having a median income of more than $100,000.

So how do you successfully get to six figures? Leading experts weigh in with their top tips.

1. Know your worth. Consult professional organizations, mentors in your industry and colleagues to find out the salary range for someone at your level so you have a solid foundation going into salary negotiations, Salemi said. She suggests practicing the conversation, role-playing with a friend, if you haven’t engaged in this type of negotiation for a while.

At the same time, Sherman cautioned against overvaluing yourself. “Even though it’s a competitive marketplace, some people have an inflated perception of their worth,” he said.

2. Don’t accept the first offer. Employers almost always have an additional $5,000 or $10,000 available, yet most job seekers, concerned about appearing ungrateful, just accept the first salary that’s put on the table, Cenedella said. Consider that as a starting point.

He suggests asking for more by using positive language and separating the negotiation from the role with phrasing like, “This would be a meaningful, wonderful step forward in my career. I’m thrilled about the position, and the only thing separating me from it is the matter of pay. I hope we can get that out of the way.”

He said you can engage in a few rounds of negotiating; don’t stop until the employer says, “This is our final offer.” Even if you’re happy with the first offer, don’t accept it, Salemi said. “It could be even higher, making you even happier.” She says there’s no harm in asking if there’s any possibility to increase the offer. If an employer can’t come through on salary, ask if there are other compensation opportunities, like a signing bonus.

3. Give a reason for asking for more. Perhaps the job requires more travel, taking up more of your time and resulting in more childcare expenses, or is in a new location with a higher cost of living. Cenedella says providing a rationale for the increase “always helps these negotiations.”

4. Clearly communicate your expectations. Let the employer know the critical factors that would encourage you to consider a role outside the one you’re in. That helps the company tailor an offer to you, said Amy Schultz, director of product recruiting at LinkedIn. Dr. Steven Lindner, an industrial organizational psychologist with The WorkPlace Group in Florham Park, New Jersey, who has handled many six-figure job offers over the past 20 years, said it’s important for candidates to think through what they really need to feel good about doing the job.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-06  Authors: julie halpert, rubberball productions, brand x pictures, getty images, -marc cenedella, founder, ceo of ladders, a leading professional career site
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sixfigure, jobs, negotiation, job, ways, helps, salary, pro, negotiate, higher, dont, employer, offer


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Jeff Bezos says his ‘stewardship of the Washington Post’ helps ‘support American democracy’

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos offered some new insight into how he views his ownership of the Washington Post on Thursday, writing that his stewardship helps “support…American democracy.” Bezos bought the Post in 2013. The paper has been a lightning rod of criticism for some conservatives, particularly President Trump, who frequently calls it the ‘Bezos Washington Post’ on social media. Bezos and various editors at the paper have said he does not participate in editorial decisions. Bezos is scheduled


Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos offered some new insight into how he views his ownership of the Washington Post on Thursday, writing that his stewardship helps “support…American democracy.” Bezos bought the Post in 2013. The paper has been a lightning rod of criticism for some conservatives, particularly President Trump, who frequently calls it the ‘Bezos Washington Post’ on social media. Bezos and various editors at the paper have said he does not participate in editorial decisions. Bezos is scheduled
Jeff Bezos says his ‘stewardship of the Washington Post’ helps ‘support American democracy’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-13  Authors: matt rosoff, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, american, amazon, bezos, stewardship, president, sales, paper, views, jeff, post, democracy, washington, helps


Jeff Bezos says his 'stewardship of the Washington Post' helps 'support American democracy'

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos offered some new insight into how he views his ownership of the Washington Post on Thursday, writing that his stewardship helps “support…American democracy.”

The views were expressed in a note Bezos wrote to announce the creation of a $2 billion fund to help fight homelessness and establish high-quality preschools for low-income children.

Bezos bought the Post in 2013. The paper has been a lightning rod of criticism for some conservatives, particularly President Trump, who frequently calls it the ‘Bezos Washington Post’ on social media. It published a number of investigations into President Trump’s business dealings and has been generally critical of the president both during his election campaign and since he took office.

Trump has also criticized Amazon directly, accusing it of not paying its fair share of taxes or postal delivery fees. In fact, Amazon collects sales tax on most sales, although some sales by third-party sellers go untaxed, and the postal service has actually benefited from the increase in deliveries that Amazon has spurred.

Bezos instituted a number of changes at the Post, including setting up a paywall and investing in back-end technology, and the paper went from losing money to turning a profit in 2016, Bezos said in a speech last year. Bezos and various editors at the paper have said he does not participate in editorial decisions.

In the announcement, Bezos mentioned several other projects he’s funded as well:

In addition to Amazon my areas of focus so far have included investment in the future of our planet and civilization through the development of foundational space infrastructure, support of American democracy through stewardship of the Washington Post, and financial contributions to the dedicated and innovative champions of a variety of causes, from cancer research, to marriage equality, to college scholarships for immigrant students, to decreasing political polarization through cross-partisan support of principled, next-generation military vets running for Congress.

Bezos is scheduled to speak at a public dinner on Thursday night in Washington, D.C.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-13  Authors: matt rosoff, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, american, amazon, bezos, stewardship, president, sales, paper, views, jeff, post, democracy, washington, helps


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Why this tech CEO says being an introvert is good for business

She says she is an introvert. She is also the CEO of an innovative biotech company that has raised hundreds of millions of dollars. Being an introvert and being a CEO may seem, at first blush, incompatible. “The advantage, I think, of being an introvert is you listen more. or worse, just listening to yourself speak,” Holmgren tells CNBC Make It.


She says she is an introvert. She is also the CEO of an innovative biotech company that has raised hundreds of millions of dollars. Being an introvert and being a CEO may seem, at first blush, incompatible. “The advantage, I think, of being an introvert is you listen more. or worse, just listening to yourself speak,” Holmgren tells CNBC Make It.
Why this tech CEO says being an introvert is good for business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: catherine clifford, cnbc, andrea kramar
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, speak, holmgren, business, listening, important, helps, introvert, raised, tech, good, think


Why this tech CEO says being an introvert is good for business

Jennifer Holmgren is speaks softly, treads gently and has a warm, friendly demeanor. She says she is an introvert. She is also the CEO of an innovative biotech company that has raised hundreds of millions of dollars.

Being an introvert and being a CEO may seem, at first blush, incompatible. But for Holmgren, 58, introversion helps her be a better executive.

“The advantage, I think, of being an introvert is you listen more. You think before you speak, often, which means that you’re listening, and I think that’s an important,” says Holmgren, speaking with CNBC Make It in Los Angeles in May.

“Sometimes people won’t speak unless called upon, and if you aren’t listening or giving people a space to speak by not continuously talking at them, you may miss an important opportunity, an important idea,” she says.

“I have found that by listening more you enable more people and more ideas. You get a diversity of input because you aren’t just hearing one voice (usually the loudest one!) or worse, just listening to yourself speak,” Holmgren tells CNBC Make It.

LanzaTech, which launched in New Zealand in 2005 and has raised more than $250 million, identified a bacteria found in the gut of rabbits that helps turn factory carbon emissions (pollution) into ethanol, an alcohol that is blended with gasoline to reduce the amount of fossil fuel used by cars.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: catherine clifford, cnbc, andrea kramar
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, speak, holmgren, business, listening, important, helps, introvert, raised, tech, good, think


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Why this recruiter for Tinder and Vimeo says she looks for new hires who have failed before

Sharfi Farhana is the head of executive recruitment and c-suite talent management at IAC, a holding company comprised of more than 150 brands, including Tinder, Vimeo and Match.com. In her current role, Farhana helps some of IAC’s leading companies find the best CEOs and executives for their firms. When searching for these new hires, the 30-year-old tells CNBC Make It that she looks for a few unexpected qualities in a candidate, including a history of failure. She points to Vimeo CEO Anjali Sud


Sharfi Farhana is the head of executive recruitment and c-suite talent management at IAC, a holding company comprised of more than 150 brands, including Tinder, Vimeo and Match.com. In her current role, Farhana helps some of IAC’s leading companies find the best CEOs and executives for their firms. When searching for these new hires, the 30-year-old tells CNBC Make It that she looks for a few unexpected qualities in a candidate, including a history of failure. She points to Vimeo CEO Anjali Sud
Why this recruiter for Tinder and Vimeo says she looks for new hires who have failed before Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-29  Authors: courtney connley, credit, sharfi farhana, gp images, getty image
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, faced, vimeo, failure, sud, really, winning, tinder, failed, helps, including, recruiter, looks, hires, early, farhana


Why this recruiter for Tinder and Vimeo says she looks for new hires who have failed before

Sharfi Farhana is the head of executive recruitment and c-suite talent management at IAC, a holding company comprised of more than 150 brands, including Tinder, Vimeo and Match.com.

In her current role, Farhana helps some of IAC’s leading companies find the best CEOs and executives for their firms. When searching for these new hires, the 30-year-old tells CNBC Make It that she looks for a few unexpected qualities in a candidate, including a history of failure.

“Failure is a key part of life,” she explains. “It’s not always about winning, right? If you’re always winning, then great. But, you know, CEOs of the future need to really have gone through a struggle.”

Farhana emphasizes that experiencing failure and bouncing back from it helps you to become a better decision maker and, ultimately, a better leader. She points to Vimeo CEO Anjali Sud as someone who’s been very transparent about her failures and the impact they’ve had on her career.

In an interview with CNN Money, Sud spoke about the academic struggles she faced at a prestigious high school and the early career rejections she experienced when trying to land a job in investment banking. “I failed a lot in my first year,” said Sud. “I had to work really hard to catch up. I think that was a wake-up call that most people probably don’t get at 14.”

Looking back over her career and the challenges she faced early on, Sud says she’s learned that “failing early and often can be empowering” because “failure is essential to success.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-29  Authors: courtney connley, credit, sharfi farhana, gp images, getty image
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, faced, vimeo, failure, sud, really, winning, tinder, failed, helps, including, recruiter, looks, hires, early, farhana


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This question helps CEOs write more powerful resumes

Crafting the perfect resume is a daunting task even for CEOs and C-suite execs. Like many applicants, they also struggle with aptly describing their prior work experience and explaining what they bring to a new employer, says executive resume writer Laura Smith-Proulx. Employers need to understand what you’ll bring to an organization and how you compare to other applicants. An effective way to tackle this section of the resume, says Smith-Proulx, is by answering this simple question: “What’s my


Crafting the perfect resume is a daunting task even for CEOs and C-suite execs. Like many applicants, they also struggle with aptly describing their prior work experience and explaining what they bring to a new employer, says executive resume writer Laura Smith-Proulx. Employers need to understand what you’ll bring to an organization and how you compare to other applicants. An effective way to tackle this section of the resume, says Smith-Proulx, is by answering this simple question: “What’s my
This question helps CEOs write more powerful resumes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-24  Authors: ruth umoh, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, description, resume, understand, write, smithproulx, question, ceos, workplace, helps, powerful, youll, work, bring, writer, resumes


This question helps CEOs write more powerful resumes

Crafting the perfect resume is a daunting task even for CEOs and C-suite execs. Like many applicants, they also struggle with aptly describing their prior work experience and explaining what they bring to a new employer, says executive resume writer Laura Smith-Proulx.

Getting this description right can be critical. Employers need to understand what you’ll bring to an organization and how you compare to other applicants.

An effective way to tackle this section of the resume, says Smith-Proulx, is by answering this simple question: “What’s my legacy?”

Posing this question as you re-read every bullet point and resume blurb can help you focus on the mark you have made at each company — and know if your description tells that story.

Perhaps, you were great at building consensus, spotting new market opportunities or leading a team. Whatever the case may be, your resume should explicitly state how you effected change and the reader should understand how your workplace changed with you in it. Be descriptive. Use numbers. “Really show those achievements through metrics,” says Smith-Proulx.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-24  Authors: ruth umoh, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, description, resume, understand, write, smithproulx, question, ceos, workplace, helps, powerful, youll, work, bring, writer, resumes


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JAB-backed Krispy Kreme takes majority stake in Insomnia Cookies

Krispy Kreme Doughnut said it is acquiring a majority stake in Insomnia Cookies in a move that helps the coffee and doughnut chain move beyond the glazed treats for which it is known. JAB, which acquired Krispy Kreme in 2016 for $1.35 billion, also owns Keurig Dr Pepper, Peet’s Coffee & Tea and Panera Bread. Insomnia Cookies will continue to operate as an independent, stand-alone company. Insomnia Cookies was founded in 2003 by University of Pennsylvania student Seth Berkowitz. Buying Insomnia C


Krispy Kreme Doughnut said it is acquiring a majority stake in Insomnia Cookies in a move that helps the coffee and doughnut chain move beyond the glazed treats for which it is known. JAB, which acquired Krispy Kreme in 2016 for $1.35 billion, also owns Keurig Dr Pepper, Peet’s Coffee & Tea and Panera Bread. Insomnia Cookies will continue to operate as an independent, stand-alone company. Insomnia Cookies was founded in 2003 by University of Pennsylvania student Seth Berkowitz. Buying Insomnia C
JAB-backed Krispy Kreme takes majority stake in Insomnia Cookies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-20  Authors: lauren hirsch, sarah whitten, source, insomnia cookies
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, takes, jabbacked, stake, helps, coffee, krispy, majority, glazed, deal, jab, insomnia, cookies, kreme, doughnut


JAB-backed Krispy Kreme takes majority stake in Insomnia Cookies

Krispy Kreme Doughnut said it is acquiring a majority stake in Insomnia Cookies in a move that helps the coffee and doughnut chain move beyond the glazed treats for which it is known.

The deal is one more — albeit small — building block in the coffee and restaurant empire that European investment firm JAB Holding has been putting together. JAB, which acquired Krispy Kreme in 2016 for $1.35 billion, also owns Keurig Dr Pepper, Peet’s Coffee & Tea and Panera Bread. Insomnia Cookies will continue to operate as an independent, stand-alone company.

The terms of the transaction, which is set to close in the fourth quarter, were not disclosed. Sources previously told CNBC that the deal values Insomnia Cookies at less than $500 million. CNBC first reported the deal Thursday.

Insomnia Cookies was founded in 2003 by University of Pennsylvania student Seth Berkowitz. Its stores, which stay open and deliver until 3:00 a.m., are often situated near college campuses, helping it to cater to late night revelers. It has more than 135 locations and sells cookies, brownies and cold milk.

Winston-Salem, North Carolina-based Krispy Kreme is best known for its signature fresh and hot glazed doughnuts that roll off its conveyor belts. It has nearly 1,400 retail shops in 32 countries.

Buying Insomnia Cookies helps Krispy Kreme reach more diners than its doughnut loyalists, as well as provide new delivery infrastructure.

Krispy Kreme’s main rival, Dunkin’ Donuts, has experimented with new menu items over the years in efforts to bring in customers at different times of the day.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-20  Authors: lauren hirsch, sarah whitten, source, insomnia cookies
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, takes, jabbacked, stake, helps, coffee, krispy, majority, glazed, deal, jab, insomnia, cookies, kreme, doughnut


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Contactless tech helps debit card use in UK outstrip cash for first time

U.K. consumers made 13.2 billion debit card payments in 2017 compared to 13.1 billion cash payments, according to new research published Monday. This represents the first time that debit card payments have overtaken cash as the U.K.’s most frequently used payment method, trade association U.K. Finance said. Online shopping, smartphones and contactless payment technology have all played a role in this shift, with the latter’s popularity described as a “key driver of debit card growth.” At the end


U.K. consumers made 13.2 billion debit card payments in 2017 compared to 13.1 billion cash payments, according to new research published Monday. This represents the first time that debit card payments have overtaken cash as the U.K.’s most frequently used payment method, trade association U.K. Finance said. Online shopping, smartphones and contactless payment technology have all played a role in this shift, with the latter’s popularity described as a “key driver of debit card growth.” At the end
Contactless tech helps debit card use in UK outstrip cash for first time Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-18  Authors: anmar frangoul, ratmaner, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, contactless, cash, debit, payment, card, outstrip, payments, billion, tech, credit, helps, uk, cards


Contactless tech helps debit card use in UK outstrip cash for first time

U.K. consumers made 13.2 billion debit card payments in 2017 compared to 13.1 billion cash payments, according to new research published Monday. This represents the first time that debit card payments have overtaken cash as the U.K.’s most frequently used payment method, trade association U.K. Finance said.

Online shopping, smartphones and contactless payment technology have all played a role in this shift, with the latter’s popularity described as a “key driver of debit card growth.”

The number of contactless payments – for both debit and credit cards – grew by 97 percent last year, reaching 5.6 billion, with 63 percent of people in the U.K. now using the technology, which allows payments to be made by touching a debit or credit card on a reader.

At the end of last year, almost 119 million contactless cards were in circulation, with 78 percent of debit cards having a “contactless functionality.” For credit cards, this figure was 62 percent.

By contrast, payments made using cash dropped 15 percent last year, although it still remains the second most frequently used form of payment behind debit cards. Over the next few years, debit card payment volumes are seen growing by 49 percent to hit 19.7 billion payments in 2027. Contactless payments will account for 36 percent of all payments in 2027.

“The choice of payment options available in the U.K. is allowing people to choose to pay the way that best suits them,” Stephen Jones, the chief executive of U.K. Finance, said in a statement.

“But we’re far from becoming a cash-free society and despite the U.K. transforming to an economy where cash is less important than it once was, it will remain a payment method that continues to be valued and preferred by many,” Jones added.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-18  Authors: anmar frangoul, ratmaner, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, contactless, cash, debit, payment, card, outstrip, payments, billion, tech, credit, helps, uk, cards


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