‘Shark Tank’ hopeful AquaVault helps give vacationers peace of mind

From that experience, AquaVault was born: The startup’s product offers portable safes that help keep valuables protected from theft. The AquaVault team took their product to “Shark Tank,” seeking $75,000 in exchange for 12 percent stake. In regard to where the company stands today after “Shark Tank,” Samtani said that their team’s growth has since exploded. “Shark Tank is such a powerful platform,” Samtani told CNBC. Don’t miss the AquaVault team pitch their company on “Shark Tank” Sunday 6P ET


From that experience, AquaVault was born: The startup’s product offers portable safes that help keep valuables protected from theft. The AquaVault team took their product to “Shark Tank,” seeking $75,000 in exchange for 12 percent stake. In regard to where the company stands today after “Shark Tank,” Samtani said that their team’s growth has since exploded. “Shark Tank is such a powerful platform,” Samtani told CNBC. Don’t miss the AquaVault team pitch their company on “Shark Tank” Sunday 6P ET
‘Shark Tank’ hopeful AquaVault helps give vacationers peace of mind Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-04  Authors: claire rodgers, sophia fraioli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vacationers, shark, samtani, went, peace, hopeful, helps, aquavault, company, asked, product, tank, valuables, team, mind


'Shark Tank' hopeful AquaVault helps give vacationers peace of mind

The AquaVault team wants to put an end to beach bag theft 1:04 PM ET Fri, 4 Jan 2019 | 01:01

Walking away from your valuables to take a care-free swim at the pool or beach can be an unsettling feeling, and with good reason. Three friends discovered that the hard way, and it helped them start a business.

After Robert Peck, Jonathan Kinas, and Avin Samtani got their items swiped from under their lounge chairs, they knew there needed to be a product that could bring peace of mind. From that experience, AquaVault was born: The startup’s product offers portable safes that help keep valuables protected from theft.

“What we went through is a common problem,” Samtani said in an email to CNBC.

“You’re on vacation laying out and want to go for a swim, but what do you do with your valuables?” he asked. “You’re either constantly looking back at your stuff, staying within sight, or someone has to stay back and keep guard. There is always that uneasy feeling of leaving your stuff unattended.”

The AquaVault team took their product to “Shark Tank,” seeking $75,000 in exchange for 12 percent stake. The results took a turn that nobody saw coming – even the co-founders.

“Everything we did to prepare pretty much flew out the window the moment we stepped in, because they asked us entirely different questions than we had expected,” Samtani said.

Despite the surprise, the co-founders had a rebuttal for every question that came their way. That is, until Mark Cuban asked for the number of units they’ve sold online. The answer being a mere 250.

“Whoa!” Kevin O’Leary said throwing his hands in the air.

“That’s low guys.” Robert Herjavec said. “Maybe there’s a problem.”

Of course, not everyone is going to sway the hearts of the panel of investors, who are notoriously hard-to-please. However, their feedback wasn’t the nail to the coffin of AquaVault’s pitch, and viewers can expect to see the unexpected.

In regard to where the company stands today after “Shark Tank,” Samtani said that their team’s growth has since exploded.

“Shark Tank is such a powerful platform,” Samtani told CNBC. “It instantly gives your company credibility and separates you from others. Running a business is a true roller coaster ride with major highs and lows.

The entrepreneur added: “We went from $87,000 in sales when we first appeared on the show to now generating millions per year with a recent valuation at over $20,000,000.”

Don’t miss the AquaVault team pitch their company on “Shark Tank” Sunday 6P ET on CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-04  Authors: claire rodgers, sophia fraioli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vacationers, shark, samtani, went, peace, hopeful, helps, aquavault, company, asked, product, tank, valuables, team, mind


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Fed’s Williams helps recast views of Fed, says it will be flexible

“The median [interest rate forecast] is not the Fed’s view. In its forecast, it reduced its median interest rate forecast, derived from all Fed officials’ opinions, to two rate hikes from three. Those factors have led to more market chatter about whether the Fed balance sheet program is unnecessarily removing liquidity from markets. Quantitative easing, or the Fed’s purchases of securities after the financial crisis, ballooned the balance sheet. “I did think Williams tried to walk back some of w


“The median [interest rate forecast] is not the Fed’s view. In its forecast, it reduced its median interest rate forecast, derived from all Fed officials’ opinions, to two rate hikes from three. Those factors have led to more market chatter about whether the Fed balance sheet program is unnecessarily removing liquidity from markets. Quantitative easing, or the Fed’s purchases of securities after the financial crisis, ballooned the balance sheet. “I did think Williams tried to walk back some of w
Fed’s Williams helps recast views of Fed, says it will be flexible Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: patti domm, noah berger, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feds, policy, fed, think, recast, market, views, interest, helps, williams, flexible, rate, balance, forecast, sheet


Fed's Williams helps recast views of Fed, says it will be flexible

New York Fed President John Williams took a step Friday toward undoing the blunt blow to markets delivered by the Federal Reserve and Fed Chairman Jerome Powell on Wednesday.

Stocks initially jumped, the dollar rose and bonds sold off, after Williams indicated the Fed would be flexible and could consider changing policy if the economy or financial conditions warrant. But the stock market erased those gains, which had pushed the Dow up over more than 300 points.

In an interview on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street,” Williams made it clear the Fed would be dependent on economic data and other signs of business activity and sentiment before making a decision on interest rates. He also said the Fed will go into next year with its “eyes wide open” and reconsider programs such as its balance sheet reduction, if necessary.

“People are going to tell you the Federal Reserve softened its position, but I really think the market is coming around to the Fed’s views,” said Marc Chandler, chief market strategist at Bannockburn Global Forex. “The median [interest rate forecast] is not the Fed’s view. Williams was playing up that these things are not carved in stone.”

The Fed unnerved markets Wednesday when it hiked interest rates and released a statement that was slightly more hawkish than expected. In its forecast, it reduced its median interest rate forecast, derived from all Fed officials’ opinions, to two rate hikes from three. But some market pros had been hoping the Fed might consider reducing its expectations even further, in line with its forecast that growth would slow next year and it is monitoring global economic weakness.

“It’s kind of just a reassessment trade. People took a step back and looked at what happened Wednesday and came to the conclusion it really isn’t all that different from what we should have expected,” said Ward McCarthy, chief financial economist at Jefferies.

Powell said the Fed was happy to maintain its balance sheet reduction on “autopilot.” That comment and other concerns about the Fed helped drive stocks lower, with the Dow losing more than 800 points Wednesday and Thursday. The Dow was up about 134 points to the psychological 23,000 level in late morning trading.

“I think even though Powell said autopilot, I think it was understood to address economic weakness, the Fed will use other policy tools. Everybody said the Federal Reserve may have made a policy mistake, but I would think today the market is correcting its overexaggerated response. Williams is not breaking any new ground. He saying it differently, but he’s reading from the same chorus book,” said Chandler.

Powell’s comment on the balance sheet rattled markets, as stocks have lost 15 percent or more from their highs and credit spreads have widened in recent weeks. Those factors have led to more market chatter about whether the Fed balance sheet program is unnecessarily removing liquidity from markets.

“We did not make a decision to change the balance sheet normalization right now, but as I said, we’re going to go into the new year with eyes wide open, willing to read the data, and reassess the economic outlook and take the right policy decisions,” Williams told CNBC.

The Fed is allowing about $50 billion a month to roll off its balance sheet as mortgage securities and Treasurys mature. Previously, it was making repurchases to replace all securities that matured.

“As far as the balance sheet goes, that is the great unknown. They’ve never given us a definitive objective of what they want the size to be,” said McCarthy. “They created an impression that they wanted it down to $3 trillion. It’s now about $4 trillion. If they maintain the caps throughout 2019, it will be down to around $3 trillion.”

McCarthy said he expects the balance sheet to become more a part of the policy discussion next year. Quantitative easing, or the Fed’s purchases of securities after the financial crisis, ballooned the balance sheet.

“What became apparent was [QE] was squeezing volatility and creating a one-way trade,” he said. “Shrinking the size of the balance sheet, I think, would increase volatility and make trades that are two-way. So far, that’s what we’re seeing.”

Treasury yields initially moved higher after Williams’ remarks but were steady in late morning trading.

“I did think Williams tried to walk back some of what Powell said,” said Peter Boockvar, chief investment strategist at Bleakley Advisory Group. But Boockvar said for now the Fed continues to reduce the balance sheet. “I don’t think that provided any relief on the rate side.”

McCarthy said the Fed sometimes becomes the “national scapegoat.”

“That’s what’s happening here,” said McCarthy. “It would be truly disturbing if the Fed changed what they thought was proper monetary policy because the market wanted them to do something different. Right now, we’re in the midst of a maelstrom. Nobody said it would be easy. For years, the Fed was criticized for putting the market on drugs. Now the Fed is trying to take the market off those drugs and people are complaining.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: patti domm, noah berger, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feds, policy, fed, think, recast, market, views, interest, helps, williams, flexible, rate, balance, forecast, sheet


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LeBron James reveals the nighttime routine that helps him perform ‘at the highest level’

His trainer, Mike Mancias, agrees that sleep should be a priority, and says he even has a few tricks to ensure that James gets the rest he needs. For LeBron, it’s always in his hotel room, making sure the temperature’s set at a particular – probably 68 to 70 degrees is probably optimal.” James isn’t the only top athlete who relies on a good night’s rest to perform at his best. And I get about seven to nine hours of sleep every night and I wake up and start my day from there. Don’t miss: Rob Gron


His trainer, Mike Mancias, agrees that sleep should be a priority, and says he even has a few tricks to ensure that James gets the rest he needs. For LeBron, it’s always in his hotel room, making sure the temperature’s set at a particular – probably 68 to 70 degrees is probably optimal.” James isn’t the only top athlete who relies on a good night’s rest to perform at his best. And I get about seven to nine hours of sleep every night and I wake up and start my day from there. Don’t miss: Rob Gron
LeBron James reveals the nighttime routine that helps him perform ‘at the highest level’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: courtney connley, jim mcisaac, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveals, lebron, day, probably, perform, getting, routine, highest, james, rest, sleep, gets, level, hours, nighttime, helps, room


LeBron James reveals the nighttime routine that helps him perform 'at the highest level'

This is the crucial money lesson LeBron James’ uncles taught him when he was a kid 9:56 AM ET Mon, 29 Jan 2018 | 01:00

James, who says he sometimes even gets 10 hours of sleep, says that if he doesn’t get a enough rest, then he’ll often take a one to two hour break from his day to sneak in a nap.

His trainer, Mike Mancias, agrees that sleep should be a priority, and says he even has a few tricks to ensure that James gets the rest he needs.

“Without giving everybody all of our secrets, No. 1 is be very, very comfortable in that room,” he says. “Create an environment. For LeBron, it’s always in his hotel room, making sure the temperature’s set at a particular – probably 68 to 70 degrees is probably optimal.”

Mancias said that complete darkness — no television or smartphone light — is also key. “Just turn everything off probably a half hour to 45 minutes before you actually want to go to sleep, and just really committing yourself to that,” he says.

In addition to having a dark room at a comfortable temperature, James also revealed that he uses the Calm sleep app to help him rest peacefully. “I’m the guy who picks ‘rain on leaves,'” he says. “That’s what goes on on my phone throughout the night.”

James isn’t the only top athlete who relies on a good night’s rest to perform at his best. Earlier this year, NFL star Rob Gronkowski told CNBC Make It that he sticks to a strict routine that includes getting at least seven hours of sleep each night.

“You’ve gotta have a routine to get your mind and body set so that it’s always ready to go when you need it to go,” he says. “I usually like to get to bed around a decent time between 11 and 12 at night. And I get about seven to nine hours of sleep every night and I wake up and start my day from there. I get going by staying active throughout the whole day and getting a workout in.”

James, who remains active in the off-season, says that regardless of how much training he does, nothing compares to getting a proper amount of rest.

“I could do all the ice bags and the NormaTecs and everything that we do, that we have as far as our recovery package, while I’m up,” he says. “But when you get in that good sleep, you just wake up, and you feel fresh. You don’t need an alarm clock. You just feel like, ‘Okay. I can tackle this day at the highest level.'”

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Don’t miss: Rob Gronkowski gets 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night—here’s the rest of his routine


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: courtney connley, jim mcisaac, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveals, lebron, day, probably, perform, getting, routine, highest, james, rest, sleep, gets, level, hours, nighttime, helps, room


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Apple buys Platoon, a start-up that helps indie musicians get discovered

Apple is building up its music business with an acquisition of a small tech startup that helps discover and develop emerging musical artists. Apple confirmed to CNBC it purchased Platoon, a company that helps independent artists fund, distribute, and market their content. The deal could help Apple find and develop exclusive artists for Apple Music, helping it stand apart from competitor Spotify. The company is depending on growth in subscription services like Apple Music to offset flattening iPh


Apple is building up its music business with an acquisition of a small tech startup that helps discover and develop emerging musical artists. Apple confirmed to CNBC it purchased Platoon, a company that helps independent artists fund, distribute, and market their content. The deal could help Apple find and develop exclusive artists for Apple Music, helping it stand apart from competitor Spotify. The company is depending on growth in subscription services like Apple Music to offset flattening iPh
Apple buys Platoon, a start-up that helps indie musicians get discovered Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: michelle castillo, robert galbraith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buys, independent, worked, founded, startup, helps, musicians, platoon, music, artists, indie, discovered, feigelson, apple, company


Apple buys Platoon, a start-up that helps indie musicians get discovered

Apple is building up its music business with an acquisition of a small tech startup that helps discover and develop emerging musical artists.

Apple confirmed to CNBC it purchased Platoon, a company that helps independent artists fund, distribute, and market their content. The news was first reported by Music Business Worldwide. The terms of the deal were not disclosed. Platoon had about a dozen employees.

The deal could help Apple find and develop exclusive artists for Apple Music, helping it stand apart from competitor Spotify. The company is depending on growth in subscription services like Apple Music to offset flattening iPhone sales.

Unsigned artists may find it expensive to buy studio time and have access to music editing software. Many don’t have the range of social media tools and access to data to get their music in front of audiences effectively. Platoon finds artists it believes will make it big, gets them on its service, funds them, and helps them get discovered by the public and bigger labels. In effect, it’s like an indie music label.

Some of acts that have worked with Platoon include Billie Eilish, Stefflon Don, Mr. Eazi and YEBBA.

The company was founded by former Skype executive Saul Klein, who also co-founded LoveFilm, and Denzyl Feigelson. Feigelson is a former music talent manager who founded direct-to-consumer record sales company Artists Without A Label, which focuses on selling music from independent artists. He also has worked with Apple on music projects in the past, including the iTunes Festival.

Apple’s largest acquisition-to-date was in the music space. It acquired Beats Electronics for $3 billion in May 2014.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: michelle castillo, robert galbraith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buys, independent, worked, founded, startup, helps, musicians, platoon, music, artists, indie, discovered, feigelson, apple, company


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Bill Gates says his new favorite habit helps him focus—and it only takes 30 minutes per week

Bill Gates used to think of meditation as “a woo-woo thing tied somehow to reincarnation,” he writes on his blog, Gates Notes, and he “didn’t buy into it.” “I’m certainly not an expert, but I now meditate two or three times a week, for about 10 minutes each time,” says the self-made billionaire and Microsoft co-founder. If you want to get into the habit, too, Gates suggests reading “The Headspace Guide to Meditation and Mindfulness” by former Buddhist monk Andy Puddicombe. After years of not buy


Bill Gates used to think of meditation as “a woo-woo thing tied somehow to reincarnation,” he writes on his blog, Gates Notes, and he “didn’t buy into it.” “I’m certainly not an expert, but I now meditate two or three times a week, for about 10 minutes each time,” says the self-made billionaire and Microsoft co-founder. If you want to get into the habit, too, Gates suggests reading “The Headspace Guide to Meditation and Mindfulness” by former Buddhist monk Andy Puddicombe. After years of not buy
Bill Gates says his new favorite habit helps him focus—and it only takes 30 minutes per week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-05  Authors: kathleen elkins, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 30, gates, helps, meditation, exercise, ceo, habit, week, times, takes, favorite, bill, focusand, tells, focus, minutes, meditate, puddicombe


Bill Gates says his new favorite habit helps him focus—and it only takes 30 minutes per week

Bill Gates used to think of meditation as “a woo-woo thing tied somehow to reincarnation,” he writes on his blog, Gates Notes, and he “didn’t buy into it.”

Today, he and his wife Melinda practice consistently.

“I’m certainly not an expert, but I now meditate two or three times a week, for about 10 minutes each time,” says the self-made billionaire and Microsoft co-founder.

“I now see that meditation is simply exercise for the mind, similar to the way we exercise our muscles when we play sports,” he continues. “For me, it has nothing to do with faith or mysticism. It’s about taking a few minutes out of my day, learning how to pay attention to the thoughts in my head, and gaining a little bit of distance from them.”

He says it helps him focus, and science backs him up: Meditation can not only improve focus, but it can keep your brain young, help reduce stress and boost memory.

Gates isn’t the only successful business leader who practices meditation: Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff, Thrive Global CEO Arianna Huffington and billionaire entrepreneur Oprah Winfrey, among others, meditate regularly.

Huffington tells Lifehacker that, besides sleep, mediation is the most effective tool for productivity and performance, and Benioff tells the New York Times that it has helped him listen more closely before making decisions.

If you want to get into the habit, too, Gates suggests reading “The Headspace Guide to Meditation and Mindfulness” by former Buddhist monk Andy Puddicombe. After years of not buying into meditation, Puddicombe was “the person who turned me from skeptic to believer,” says Gates.

Don’t miss: Here’s why Bill Gates stopped listening to music and watching TV for 5 years in his 20s

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-05  Authors: kathleen elkins, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 30, gates, helps, meditation, exercise, ceo, habit, week, times, takes, favorite, bill, focusand, tells, focus, minutes, meditate, puddicombe


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More rain helps put out California fires, but raises landslide risk

More rain is on the way for northern California, helping firefighters extinguish the last of the wildfires, but increasing the risk of landslides in the scorched Sierra Nevada foothills. Between 1 to 3 inches (2.5-7.5 cm) of rain will fall between Friday and Sunday, adding to the 3 inches that already fell this week, the National Weather Service said. “Without that vegetation, all bets are off when the rain hits.” Hundreds of people forced to flee Paradise spent Thanksgiving in warehouses in the


More rain is on the way for northern California, helping firefighters extinguish the last of the wildfires, but increasing the risk of landslides in the scorched Sierra Nevada foothills. Between 1 to 3 inches (2.5-7.5 cm) of rain will fall between Friday and Sunday, adding to the 3 inches that already fell this week, the National Weather Service said. “Without that vegetation, all bets are off when the rain hits.” Hundreds of people forced to flee Paradise spent Thanksgiving in warehouses in the
More rain helps put out California fires, but raises landslide risk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-23  Authors: david mcnew, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, helps, landslide, fires, rain, killed, volunteers, raises, risk, vegetation, weather, inches, thanksgiving, california, spent, remains, paradise


More rain helps put out California fires, but raises landslide risk

More rain is on the way for northern California, helping firefighters extinguish the last of the wildfires, but increasing the risk of landslides in the scorched Sierra Nevada foothills.

Between 1 to 3 inches (2.5-7.5 cm) of rain will fall between Friday and Sunday, adding to the 3 inches that already fell this week, the National Weather Service said.

At least 84 people died in the so-called Camp Fire which started more than two weeks ago, and as many as 560 are believed missing.

The fire was 95 percent contained across 154,000 acres, officials said early on Friday, in and around Paradise, a mountain town of nearly 27,000 people, some 175 miles (280 km) northeast San Francisco.

Hundreds of volunteers and police officers spent the Thanksgiving holiday combing through the wreckage, searching for the remains of victims killed in the blaze as the ongoing rains looked set to complicate their work.

“It’s the vegetation that holds the soil in place,” Brian Hurley, a forecaster with the NWS’s Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland, said.

“Without that vegetation, all bets are off when the rain hits.”

Hundreds of people forced to flee Paradise spent Thanksgiving in warehouses in the nearby city of Chico. Celebrity chef Jose Andres was among the volunteers bringing some festive cheer by cooking Thanksgiving meals for evacuees.

The cause of the Camp Fire, which destroyed more than 13,500 homes, remains under investigation.

A separate California wildfire — the Woolsey Fire, which killed three people and threatened the wealthy beachfront enclave of Malibu near Los Angeles — was declared 100-percent contained on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-23  Authors: david mcnew, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, helps, landslide, fires, rain, killed, volunteers, raises, risk, vegetation, weather, inches, thanksgiving, california, spent, remains, paradise


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Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


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Twilio just spent $2 billion on a company that helps send mass emails

Twilio just spent $2 billion to buy SendGrid, a company that helps send mass emails, the company said Monday. Shares of Twilio fell more than 4 percent in extended trading after the announcement. SendGrid offers companies a cloud-based service for sending emails at a large scale. The acquisition allows software developers to “manage all of their important communication channels — voice, messaging, video, and now email as well,” Twilio said in a statement. Twilio offers software for secure messag


Twilio just spent $2 billion to buy SendGrid, a company that helps send mass emails, the company said Monday. Shares of Twilio fell more than 4 percent in extended trading after the announcement. SendGrid offers companies a cloud-based service for sending emails at a large scale. The acquisition allows software developers to “manage all of their important communication channels — voice, messaging, video, and now email as well,” Twilio said in a statement. Twilio offers software for secure messag
Twilio just spent $2 billion on a company that helps send mass emails Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: sara salinas, abigail stevenson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statementtwilio, offers, messaging, companies, twilio, important, emails, company, billion, helps, spent, sendgrid, send, software, email, mass


Twilio just spent $2 billion on a company that helps send mass emails

Twilio just spent $2 billion to buy SendGrid, a company that helps send mass emails, the company said Monday.

Shares of Twilio fell more than 4 percent in extended trading after the announcement. SendGrid jumped about 15 percent.

SendGrid offers companies a cloud-based service for sending emails at a large scale. The acquisition allows software developers to “manage all of their important communication channels — voice, messaging, video, and now email as well,” Twilio said in a statement.

Twilio offers software for secure messaging platforms and competes with companies such as Avaya and Cisco.

“Increasingly, our customers are asking us to solve all of their strategic communications challenges — regardless of channel. Email is a vital communications channel for companies around the world, and so it was important to us to include this capability in our platform,” Twilio CEO Jeff Lawson said in a statement.

Twilio stock has far outpaced the overall market this year, up more than 220 percent in 2018. As of Monday’s close, shares were within 14 percent of 52-weeks highs.

The all-stock transaction is expected to close in the first half of 2019.

WATCH: Twilio CEO on company’s business model


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: sara salinas, abigail stevenson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statementtwilio, offers, messaging, companies, twilio, important, emails, company, billion, helps, spent, sendgrid, send, software, email, mass


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Streaming helps fuel the boom in smart speakers such as Echo, HomePod

Among those surveyed, Amazon’s Echo devices edged out Google and Apple in terms of popularity. AudienceNet’s findings bolstered a report published by Adobe in September, which said that by 2019, nearly half of American households will own a smart speaker. In August, Samsung announced a new smart speaker to rival the Echo and HomePod. Called the Galaxy Home, the device was part of a new tie-up with Spotify that let users stream seamlessly across a range of Samsung TVs, phones and the Galaxy Home


Among those surveyed, Amazon’s Echo devices edged out Google and Apple in terms of popularity. AudienceNet’s findings bolstered a report published by Adobe in September, which said that by 2019, nearly half of American households will own a smart speaker. In August, Samsung announced a new smart speaker to rival the Echo and HomePod. Called the Galaxy Home, the device was part of a new tie-up with Spotify that let users stream seamlessly across a range of Samsung TVs, phones and the Galaxy Home
Streaming helps fuel the boom in smart speakers such as Echo, HomePod Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: isabel soisson, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, echo, speakers, streaming, smart, music, range, fuel, owners, samsung, boom, audiencenet, helps, study, speaker, listening, homepod


Streaming helps fuel the boom in smart speakers such as Echo, HomePod

AudienceNet found that an estimated 14 percent of the U.S. population now owns a smart speaker, most of which can perform a range of automated tasks — but listening to music is the dominant use case among owners, the firm said. Among those surveyed, Amazon’s Echo devices edged out Google and Apple in terms of popularity.

Yet one noteworthy detail found by the study was that 43 percent of smart-speaker owners surveyed by AudienceNet now use on-demand streaming services — and 37 percent of owners started paying for these services after purchasing their device.

AudienceNet’s findings bolstered a report published by Adobe in September, which said that by 2019, nearly half of American households will own a smart speaker.

Apple, Google and Samsung are among the brands attempting to capitalize on the growing adoption of smart speakers, which is having a ripple effect on how, when and where music gets played.

In August, Samsung announced a new smart speaker to rival the Echo and HomePod. Called the Galaxy Home, the device was part of a new tie-up with Spotify that let users stream seamlessly across a range of Samsung TVs, phones and the Galaxy Home smart speaker. Spotify is the default music streaming service on the Galaxy Home, too.

Along those lines, “43 percent of smart speaker owners also agreed that using their device increased the amount of music playlists they listen to, while around 40 percent discovered more music and 38 percent listened to a broader range of music than they did previously,” AudienceNet said.

Meanwhile, 73 percent of smart-speaker owners say that owning their device has “changed the way they listen to music,” the firm said, with half of them agreeing that they listened to more music and spent longer listening since acquiring their device.

While AM/FM radio is still the most popular listening service in the U.S. at 31 percent of total listening time, on-demand streaming accounted for 27 percent of overall music consumption, AudienceNet found. Radio listening accounted for only 12 percent of listening among 16- to 24-year-olds, the study showed.

Amid the proliferation of mobile devices, smartphones were the most used in consuming music, with the study showing smartphones accounted for 25 percent of all music played.

— CNBC’s Todd Haselton contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: isabel soisson, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, echo, speakers, streaming, smart, music, range, fuel, owners, samsung, boom, audiencenet, helps, study, speaker, listening, homepod


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8 ways to negotiate a six-figure salary like a pro

Cenedella said many workers feel compelled to take the first offer, concerned they’ll be perceived as rude or ungrateful if they negotiate. A record low unemployment rate of 3.7 percent is boosting the confidence of workers and causing more people to leave jobs to pursue jobs with six-figure salaries, said Andrew J. Sherman, a partner at Seyfarth Shaw, who helps small and midsize enterprises negotiate six-figure salary contracts with prospective employees. That means there’s more job-hopping and


Cenedella said many workers feel compelled to take the first offer, concerned they’ll be perceived as rude or ungrateful if they negotiate. A record low unemployment rate of 3.7 percent is boosting the confidence of workers and causing more people to leave jobs to pursue jobs with six-figure salaries, said Andrew J. Sherman, a partner at Seyfarth Shaw, who helps small and midsize enterprises negotiate six-figure salary contracts with prospective employees. That means there’s more job-hopping and
8 ways to negotiate a six-figure salary like a pro Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-06  Authors: julie halpert, rubberball productions, brand x pictures, getty images, -marc cenedella, founder, ceo of ladders, a leading professional career site
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sixfigure, jobs, negotiation, job, ways, helps, salary, pro, negotiate, higher, dont, employer, offer


8 ways to negotiate a six-figure salary like a pro

Last month Marc Cenedella, founder and CEO of Ladders, the leading career platform for jobs paying $100,000 and more, was advising a female executive with 20 years’ experience in marketing. She wasn’t happy with the salary offered by a prospective employer, but she was sheepish about negotiating.

Cenedella advised her to tell the employer that she was hoping to earn $15,000 more because of a move from the Southwest to New York City, which had a higher cost of living and higher commuting costs. She did so, and within three days the company agreed to the increase.

Cenedella said many workers feel compelled to take the first offer, concerned they’ll be perceived as rude or ungrateful if they negotiate. “The biggest mistake people make is that any negotiation is too much negotiation for them,” he said.

Negotiations like this are taking place more often these days. A record low unemployment rate of 3.7 percent is boosting the confidence of workers and causing more people to leave jobs to pursue jobs with six-figure salaries, said Andrew J. Sherman, a partner at Seyfarth Shaw, who helps small and midsize enterprises negotiate six-figure salary contracts with prospective employees. “People are seeing there are more opportunities available to them,” he said.

Cenedella said the days of working in one job most of your career are long gone. Companies “don’t have a loyalty to you, so you don’t need to have loyalty to a company.” That means there’s more job-hopping and opportunities for new negotiations to get you to a higher salary.

Getting to a six-figure salary “is something job seekers should aim for if they’re not there yet,” said Vicki Salemi, a career expert for Monster, a worldwide job site. Sherman said it’s an important socioeconomic benchmark “that helps people define themselves quantitatively.”

It’s not just traditional white-collar jobs that can earn you six figures. A new analysis that Monster conducted using the Gartner TalentNeuron tool of the top 10 job listings offering six-figure salaries in the past year found heavy- and tractor-trailer truck drivers among software developers, sales managers and computer systems engineers. LinkedIn’s 2017 Salary Report found that even those early in their careers can make six figures, citing investment banking analysts and associate brand managers as having a median income of more than $100,000.

So how do you successfully get to six figures? Leading experts weigh in with their top tips.

1. Know your worth. Consult professional organizations, mentors in your industry and colleagues to find out the salary range for someone at your level so you have a solid foundation going into salary negotiations, Salemi said. She suggests practicing the conversation, role-playing with a friend, if you haven’t engaged in this type of negotiation for a while.

At the same time, Sherman cautioned against overvaluing yourself. “Even though it’s a competitive marketplace, some people have an inflated perception of their worth,” he said.

2. Don’t accept the first offer. Employers almost always have an additional $5,000 or $10,000 available, yet most job seekers, concerned about appearing ungrateful, just accept the first salary that’s put on the table, Cenedella said. Consider that as a starting point.

He suggests asking for more by using positive language and separating the negotiation from the role with phrasing like, “This would be a meaningful, wonderful step forward in my career. I’m thrilled about the position, and the only thing separating me from it is the matter of pay. I hope we can get that out of the way.”

He said you can engage in a few rounds of negotiating; don’t stop until the employer says, “This is our final offer.” Even if you’re happy with the first offer, don’t accept it, Salemi said. “It could be even higher, making you even happier.” She says there’s no harm in asking if there’s any possibility to increase the offer. If an employer can’t come through on salary, ask if there are other compensation opportunities, like a signing bonus.

3. Give a reason for asking for more. Perhaps the job requires more travel, taking up more of your time and resulting in more childcare expenses, or is in a new location with a higher cost of living. Cenedella says providing a rationale for the increase “always helps these negotiations.”

4. Clearly communicate your expectations. Let the employer know the critical factors that would encourage you to consider a role outside the one you’re in. That helps the company tailor an offer to you, said Amy Schultz, director of product recruiting at LinkedIn. Dr. Steven Lindner, an industrial organizational psychologist with The WorkPlace Group in Florham Park, New Jersey, who has handled many six-figure job offers over the past 20 years, said it’s important for candidates to think through what they really need to feel good about doing the job.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-06  Authors: julie halpert, rubberball productions, brand x pictures, getty images, -marc cenedella, founder, ceo of ladders, a leading professional career site
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sixfigure, jobs, negotiation, job, ways, helps, salary, pro, negotiate, higher, dont, employer, offer


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