Here’s how much money you give up if you don’t grab your employer’s 401(k) match

Also, employer contributions do not count toward the contribution maximums. Even if you don’t think you’ll be there long enough to be fully vested, even a 20% or 40% vested match is free money. “Even if you don’t think you’ll be there long enough to be fully vested, even a 20% or 40% vested match is free money,” Smith said. And the amount that came from the employer match would be $89,900 — 44% — of it. “But even if you can’t contribute enough to get all of the match, it’s worth at least getting


Also, employer contributions do not count toward the contribution maximums.
Even if you don’t think you’ll be there long enough to be fully vested, even a 20% or 40% vested match is free money.
“Even if you don’t think you’ll be there long enough to be fully vested, even a 20% or 40% vested match is free money,” Smith said.
And the amount that came from the employer match would be $89,900 — 44% — of it.
“But even if you can’t contribute enough to get all of the match, it’s worth at least getting
Here’s how much money you give up if you don’t grab your employer’s 401(k) match Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 401k, smith, matching, employer, grab, employers, vested, heres, dont, match, contributions, money, contribute, worth


Here's how much money you give up if you don't grab your employer's 401(k) match

Jamie Grill | Getty Images

If you don’t contribute to your 401(k) plan, you may be missing out on a big wad of cash from your employer. Most companies that offer these workplace retirement plans will match your contributions up to a certain amount. Depending on your salary and the matching formula used, that could translate into thousands of extra dollars going toward your nest egg every year. And after leaving it there to grow? Your future self would probably thank you. “It’s so important to take every bit of money your company wants to give you,” said Kathryn Hauer, a certified financial planner with Wilson David Investment Advisors in Aiken, South Carolina. “Your employer is saying they’ll give you money, and to get it, you just need to set aside savings for yourself every year.”

About two-thirds (60%) of all workers had access to a 401(k) plan last year, and 72% of those eligible employees participated, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. While there are many reasons for not participating, a number of experts say that passing on a company’s match is basically giving up part of your compensation. And, they compare the match to getting an immediate — and big — return on your contributions. “If you have an employer that in essence is giving you a rate of return of 100% or 50% on your contribution, regardless of whether you’re 18 or 65, you really have to take the money,” said CFP Glen Smith, managing partner of Glen D. Smith and Associates at Raymond James in Flower Mound, Texas. And, of course, if you are able to contribute more than just enough to get the match, that can only help your nest egg grow. The 2020 contribution limit for 401(k) plans is $19,500, with people age 50 and older allowed an extra $6,500 as a “catch-up” contribution for a total of $26,000. More from Invest in You:

How this couple paid off their $300,000 mortgage in 5 years

Here’s the secret to multiplying your savings

Save $1,000 without sacrificing anything you really love Remember, too, that if you have a traditional 401(k), your contributions are made pretax, which reduces your taxable income (and, in turn, how much you pay in taxes). If it’s a Roth, your contributions are made after-tax. And, whether you contribute to a traditional or Roth 401(k), the company’s match always goes into the former and is not taxable compensation. Also, employer contributions do not count toward the contribution maximums. The most common matching formula, according to Fidelity Investments, is a 100% match for the first 3% you contribute with a 50% match for the next 2%. Some companies also make contributions that aren’t based on a matching formula.

Even if you don’t think you’ll be there long enough to be fully vested, even a 20% or 40% vested match is free money. Glen Smith managing partner of Glen D. Smith and Associates at Raymond James

While any contributions you make are always yours, the employer contributions typically are on a vesting schedule — that is, you must work at that company for a certain amount of time before the match is 100% yours. Often, vesting happens gradually — i.e., 20% of the match is vested after one year, 40% after two years, and so on. “Even if you don’t think you’ll be there long enough to be fully vested, even a 20% or 40% vested match is free money,” Smith said. As for what the savings would look like down the road: For illustration purposes, assume your annual salary is $50,000. If you were just to contribute enough to get the employer match, the most common matching formula would mean you contribute 5%, or $2,500, in a year, and your company would put in another $2,000 — totaling $4,500 a year. If you did that for only one year, the money would be worth about $26,200 in 30 years, based on a 6% annual return, according to data provided by Fidelity Investments.

If you were to do that five years in a row, with your salary increasing 2% yearly, your account would be worth roughly $69,000 in 30 years. Ten years in a row? The account would hit $202,300 in three decades. And the amount that came from the employer match would be $89,900 — 44% — of it. Generally speaking, workers can use all the help they can get in saving for retirement. While there are now a record number of 401(k) accounts at Fidelity worth at least $1 million, they represent a sliver of the retirement accounts managed by the company. The median account balance — half are above, half are below — among pre-retirees is far from the $1 million mark, according to Vanguard’s How America Saves Report. For people ages 55 to 64, the median account balance in 2018 was about $61,700. For those ages 45 to 54, it was $40,200. If you’re already feeling financially squeezed, experts say, it may be hard to imagine parting with any more of your paycheck even when it would be money waiting for you when you retire. “I’m sympathetic to how hard it can be to make ends meet,” Hauer said. “But even if you can’t contribute enough to get all of the match, it’s worth at least getting some of it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 401k, smith, matching, employer, grab, employers, vested, heres, dont, match, contributions, money, contribute, worth


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If you invested $1,000 in American Express 10 years ago, here’s how much you’d have now

How American Express got its startAmerican Express dates to 1850, when it started as a freight shipping company. In 1966, it put forth a corporate card program for businesses, and in 1991, created its first loyalty program, now called Membership Rewards. Since then, American Express has continued to reiterate its financial offerings by introducing lines of debit and credit cards as well as banking services. American Express’ stock performanceThrough the years, American Express stock gone up and


How American Express got its startAmerican Express dates to 1850, when it started as a freight shipping company.
In 1966, it put forth a corporate card program for businesses, and in 1991, created its first loyalty program, now called Membership Rewards.
Since then, American Express has continued to reiterate its financial offerings by introducing lines of debit and credit cards as well as banking services.
American Express’ stock performanceThrough the years, American Express stock gone up and
If you invested $1,000 in American Express 10 years ago, here’s how much you’d have now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, american, youd, ago, program, stock, heres, amex, 1000, services, market, financial, company, loyalty, express, invested


If you invested $1,000 in American Express 10 years ago, here's how much you'd have now

How American Express got its start

American Express dates to 1850, when it started as a freight shipping company. The company began introducing financial products and services and by the 1950s, Amex launched its first consumer charge card. In 1966, it put forth a corporate card program for businesses, and in 1991, created its first loyalty program, now called Membership Rewards. The program serves to incentivize users with benefits and encourage member loyalty. Since then, American Express has continued to reiterate its financial offerings by introducing lines of debit and credit cards as well as banking services. Today, it’s one of the world’s largest financial corporations with more than 63 million cardholders.

American Express’ stock performance

Through the years, American Express stock gone up and down. Like many financial institutions, the company saw its stock sink around the time of the 2008 recession. By February 2009, its share price landed at just over $11. In February 2015, the market value of American Express fell by around $8 billion within 48 hours after it announced the loss of a lucrative contract with Costco, which was set to expire in March 2016. The contract termination had shareholders worried about how much revenue Amex would lose and how it would impact their investments.

In October 2017, it was also announced that Kenneth Chenault, chairman and CEO for 17 years, would step down in February 2018 as American Express struggled to find its place in a modern market. Despite the problems, Amex stock returned 5.4% annually under Chenault’s tenure. That’s close to double the 2.6% annual return of the financial sector during that period.

The latest on American Express


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, american, youd, ago, program, stock, heres, amex, 1000, services, market, financial, company, loyalty, express, invested


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Goldman has a defensive portfolio for clients to turn to in rough markets – Here’s what’s in it

Trader Michael Urkonis works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, January 28, 2020. Coronavirus fears triggered a steep sell-off in stocks as investors worry that the epidemic would disrupt the global economic growth. Goldman Sachs has a defensive portfolio it provides clients for times just like these. But the stock basket also has a long track record of beating the market in good times and bad. Here’s what’s in it.


Trader Michael Urkonis works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, January 28, 2020.
Coronavirus fears triggered a steep sell-off in stocks as investors worry that the epidemic would disrupt the global economic growth.
Goldman Sachs has a defensive portfolio it provides clients for times just like these.
But the stock basket also has a long track record of beating the market in good times and bad.
Here’s what’s in it.
Goldman has a defensive portfolio for clients to turn to in rough markets – Here’s what’s in it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stock, times, portfolio, york, worry, triggered, urkonis, trader, markets, defensive, clients, track, whats, heres, works, rough, goldman, turn


Goldman has a defensive portfolio for clients to turn to in rough markets – Here's what's in it

Trader Michael Urkonis works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, January 28, 2020.

(This story is for CNBC Pro subscribers only.)

Coronavirus fears triggered a steep sell-off in stocks as investors worry that the epidemic would disrupt the global economic growth. Goldman Sachs has a defensive portfolio it provides clients for times just like these.

But the stock basket also has a long track record of beating the market in good times and bad.

Here’s what’s in it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stock, times, portfolio, york, worry, triggered, urkonis, trader, markets, defensive, clients, track, whats, heres, works, rough, goldman, turn


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The coronavirus is hurting stocks, but here’s what could be the real problem

The coronavirus is front and center as the cause of Monday’s dramatic stock market sell-off, but investors have more on their minds. One issue that may not be getting enough credit for the uneasiness on Wall Street is the troubling slide in bond market yields. “I don’t think this would be nearly as dramatic this morning were it not for the bond market. “The message in the bond market may not be that much different in stocks,” he said. Stocks are ‘vulnerable’The bond market trends also represent


The coronavirus is front and center as the cause of Monday’s dramatic stock market sell-off, but investors have more on their minds.
One issue that may not be getting enough credit for the uneasiness on Wall Street is the troubling slide in bond market yields.
“I don’t think this would be nearly as dramatic this morning were it not for the bond market.
“The message in the bond market may not be that much different in stocks,” he said.
Stocks are ‘vulnerable’The bond market trends also represent
The coronavirus is hurting stocks, but here’s what could be the real problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bond, real, coronavirus, investors, stock, negative, stocks, problem, market, low, hurting, inflation, yields, heres, prices, rates


The coronavirus is hurting stocks, but here's what could be the real problem

The coronavirus is front and center as the cause of Monday’s dramatic stock market sell-off, but investors have more on their minds. One issue that may not be getting enough credit for the uneasiness on Wall Street is the troubling slide in bond market yields. The 30-year bond is at historic lows, while the benchmark 10-year Treasury is at levels not seen since the Brexit unrest in the summer of 2016. While that usually is a telltale sign that the market is pricing in low economic growth, the current dynamic is adding some twists that have investors unnerved. “I don’t think this would be nearly as dramatic this morning were it not for the bond market. This might have more to do with the bond market pushing on an all-time low,” said Jim Paulsen, chief investment strategist at The Leuthold Group. “It opens up a whole new can of worms of whether bond yields can go negative in the United States.”

The bond moves came amid a sharp sell-off in the stock market, with major indexes seeing losses of 2.5% or more in Monday morning trading. Negative nominal yields are prevalent across much of Europe and in Japan, involving about $11 trillion of global sovereign debt. The entire German yield curve traded in negative territory Monday.

The Fed’s fear

In the U.S., Federal Reserve officials have expressed doubt that government debt ever could see below-zero yields, a phenomenon that happens when bonds are priced so high above par that investors holding to duration receive below the principal amount at maturity. But as investors keep buying bonds and inflation expectations dim, the prospect of negative yields is rising. While borrowers benefit in that situation, banks suffer, and negative yields have done little to boost overall growth in the countries where they prevail. Paulsen, though, said the low rates in the U.S. may not be signaling low growth expectations but rather the belief that inflation will stay down for an extended duration.

“The message in the bond market may not be that much different in stocks,” he said. “Bond yields are down this year, but credit spreads have not widened. That tells me the bond market is saying inflation is down but growth is OK.” Still, the low yields are playing into fears expressed by Federal Reserve officials worried about inflation. Central bankers have been talking up inflation, trying to reach a 2% goal so they can keep short-term rates high enough to provide policy room in the case of a downturn. Markets, though, are looking for more rate cuts; futures traders on Monday were pricing in a 56% chance of a reduction by April, according to the CME’s FedWatch tool.

Stocks are ‘vulnerable’

The bond market trends also represent a tricky calculus for stock market investors. Normally, when stock prices are rising bond prices fall and yields rise as investors demand more of a premium for safe haven fixed income. However, that hasn’t been the case lately, with the correlation between bond prices and stocks at a four-year high, according to Lisa Shalett, chief investment officer at Morgan Stanley Wealth Management. Shalett said this is a case where “this time has been different.” “As rates have gone down, equity investors have redoubled their focus on how low rates will drive valuations higher, which is risky,” she said in a note for clients. “We see stock prices as vulnerable, so if interest rates were to back up suddenly, the diversification that bonds usually provide could fail.” For investors, Paulsen said it will be critical to watch spreads, or the difference between bonds of similar maturities but different credit quality. Widening spreads indicate greater market fear. “If they stay in the range they’ve been in the last year, I think things will hold together,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bond, real, coronavirus, investors, stock, negative, stocks, problem, market, low, hurting, inflation, yields, heres, prices, rates


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Here’s how NFL TV rights are expected to shake out for the rest of the decade, according to sources

NFL owners and the NFL Players Association are likely nearing a collective bargaining agreement after owners approved the terms Thursday. Media companies and the NFL have been waiting for the CBA’s approval before negotiating new broadcast rights for NFL games, which are locked up until 2022. The results will have a major impact on traditional media as millions of Americans cut the cord on pay-TV each year. If the league sticks with the status quo — ViacomCBS and Fox owning Sunday afternoons, C


NFL owners and the NFL Players Association are likely nearing a collective bargaining agreement after owners approved the terms Thursday.
Media companies and the NFL have been waiting for the CBA’s approval before negotiating new broadcast rights for NFL games, which are locked up until 2022.
The results will have a major impact on traditional media as millions of Americans cut the cord on pay-TV each year.
If the league sticks with the status quo — ViacomCBS and Fox owning Sunday afternoons, C
Here’s how NFL TV rights are expected to shake out for the rest of the decade, according to sources Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-22  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, games, viacomcbs, billion, rest, night, companies, rights, heres, traditional, expected, nfl, sources, according, streaming, shake, media, decade


Here's how NFL TV rights are expected to shake out for the rest of the decade, according to sources

NFL owners and the NFL Players Association are likely nearing a collective bargaining agreement after owners approved the terms Thursday. Media companies and the NFL have been waiting for the CBA’s approval before negotiating new broadcast rights for NFL games, which are locked up until 2022.

The results will have a major impact on traditional media as millions of Americans cut the cord on pay-TV each year. Owning live football games is crucial for networks like ESPN to charge expensive affiliate fees to pay-TV distributors, and for Fox and CBS to remain viable against deeper-pocketed competitors like Disney and Comcast.

The NFL knows this, and is expected to jack up renewal rates on all of its major broadcast packages — Thursday night, Sunday afternoon, Sunday night and Monday night, according to people familiar with the matter who asked not to speak publicly because negotiations are private.

Rates on Sunday afternoon games may double, jumping from $1 billion annually to $2 billion annually. ESPN pays $2 billion annually for Monday Night Football and may need to pay $3 billion to keep the package, two of the people said. Renewals will likely be seven or eight-year deals, the people said.

While Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google may be the barbarians at the gate looking to disrupt traditional media, the NFL probably isn’t ready to sell exclusive rights to streamers, according to people familiar the matter. Instead, the current players — Disney (which owns both ESPN and ABC), Comcast (which owns NBC), ViacomCBS (which owns CBS) and Fox — will probably just pay the league a lot more money for what they already have. The NFL is comfortable with existing relationships and isn’t eager to rock the boat on a product that has seen ratings rise the last two years even as almost all other shows on traditional TV have fallen.

Live sports is “the most important Jenga block holding up the entire legacy media ecosystem,” according to LightShed media analyst Rich Greenfield. In other words, the traditional players need to win renewal.

Technology companies like Amazon may buy digital-simulcast packages like they have for the last few years — streaming games to a global audience as they’re simultaneously broadcast on network TV in the U.S. — as well as new, smaller packages carved out by the NFL.

If the league sticks with the status quo — ViacomCBS and Fox owning Sunday afternoons, Comcast owning Sunday Night and Disney taking Monday Night — traditional media will declare victory. Keeping the NFL (and preventing others from owning digital rights) will add enormous value to networks for future retransmission and affiliate fee negotiations while also propping up newer streaming products that may include live sports rights. (ViacomCBS already includes live NFL games in its CBS All Access streaming product.)

But those same media companies will also have to figure out how to to afford the NFL’s increases with an ever-shrinking pool of pay-TV subscribers, which means fewer eyeballs for advertising and fewer subscribers from traditional pay-TV revenue.

If a company like ViacomCBS pays $2 billion a year for the NFL, it will likely lose money on the investment in the early years of the deal and will have to rely on a flourishing streaming business and other future monetization avenues (sports betting, etc.) to make up the difference. The NFL wants to maximize revenue but doesn’t want to drive its media partners out of business, potentially making companies with smaller balance sheets (like Fox and ViacomCBS) more vulnerable to losing their rights deals.

The following is a breakdown of what’s likely to come, according to people familiar with the companies involved and the NFL.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-22  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, games, viacomcbs, billion, rest, night, companies, rights, heres, traditional, expected, nfl, sources, according, streaming, shake, media, decade


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Here’s how to tell a bear market is coming

Bank of America Securities curated a “bear market signposts” list for clients to help predict when stocks might be close to embarking on a bear market. Currently 63% of the bear market signposts have been triggered, up from 47% in January. Since 1968, when 80% of the indicators are triggered, a bear market occurred, meaning stocks fell 20% from their most recent highs. The S&P 500 went on to briefly dip into bear market territory on an intraday basis following that signal, and suffered its worst


Bank of America Securities curated a “bear market signposts” list for clients to help predict when stocks might be close to embarking on a bear market.
Currently 63% of the bear market signposts have been triggered, up from 47% in January.
Since 1968, when 80% of the indicators are triggered, a bear market occurred, meaning stocks fell 20% from their most recent highs.
The S&P 500 went on to briefly dip into bear market territory on an intraday basis following that signal, and suffered its worst
Here’s how to tell a bear market is coming Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-22  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, tell, bank, months, returns, low, coming, market, triggered, earnings, bear, heres, list


Here's how to tell a bear market is coming

A trader works at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, December 19, 2018. Brendan McDermid | Reuters

Trying to time the market can be dangerous, but there are certain signals that the professionals look for when trying to gauge future risk in stocks which could be helpful for regular investors to monitor. Bank of America Securities curated a “bear market signposts” list for clients to help predict when stocks might be close to embarking on a bear market. The list of 19 signals ranges from fundamental to sentiment-related indicators and uses data tracking back more than 50 years. Currently 63% of the bear market signposts have been triggered, up from 47% in January. Since 1968, when 80% of the indicators are triggered, a bear market occurred, meaning stocks fell 20% from their most recent highs. “Stocks appear to be pricing in more good news than bad,” Bank of America equity and quant strategist Savita Subramanian said in a recent note to clients. The signposts list was almost triggered in October of 2018 when it hit 79%. The S&P 500 went on to briefly dip into bear market territory on an intraday basis following that signal, and suffered its worst December since the Great Depression. The Fed raising rates, as they did in 2018, is a trigger on the bear market signal list, as bear markets have always been preceded by the Fed hiking rates by at least 75 basis points from the cycle trough.

Here’s a full list of the bear market indicators from Bank of America:

Federal Reserve raising interest rates Tightening credit conditions Minimum returns in the last 12 months of a bull market have been 11% Minimum returns in the last 24 months of a bull market have been 30% Low quality stocks outperform high quality stocks (over six months) Momentum stocks outperforming (over six to 12 months) Growth stocks outperforming (over six to 12 months) 5% pullback in stocks over the last year Stocks with low price-to-earnings ratio underperform Conference Board’s consumer confidence level has not hit 100 within 24 months Conference Board’s percentage expecting stocks go higher Lack of reward for earnings beats Sell side indicator, a contrarian measure of sell side equity optimism Bank of America Fund Manger Survey shows high levels of cash Inverted yield curve Change in long-term growth expectations Rule of 20, trailing price-to-earnings ratio added to CPI is above 20 Volatility index spikes over 20 at some point within the last 3 months Earnings estimate revisions rule

Bearish signs to watch

Currently, if investors buy a 3-month treasury bill, they will be getting a higher yield than if they buy a 10-year treasury note. This is not normal. Typically, the more long term the holding period of the government security is, the higher the returns. This is a bond market phenomena called the inverted yield curve, which is known to precede recessions and sits as one of Bank of America’s bear market sign posts. Another indicator that is currently triggered is muted price reactions for earnings beats this season. Stocks are getting their thinnest rewards for beating Wall Street’s estimates on earnings since the first quarter of 2018 and the third lowest level since 2000, according to Bank of America. “Historically, small rewards preceded negative S&P 500 returns 60% of the time over subsequent quarters,” Subramanian added. Stocks with low price-to-earnings ratios are also currently underperforming, flashing a bear market warning sign. Stocks with low PE ratios are generally considered undervalued and can be a good buying opportunity. When investors don’t buy into these cheap stocks it normally means they are crowding in high growth names. This means that the most expensive stocks are narrowly driving market returns. Another flashing signal is tightening credit conditions, which occurs when it becomes harder to borrow money from the bank. In times of uncertainty or an economic slowdown, banks will tighten their lending taps to hedge for risk. Each of the last three bear markets started when a positive percentage of banks tightened lending standards. A recent Fed survey showed banks expected credit standards to tighten this year.

Bullish signs to watch


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-22  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, tell, bank, months, returns, low, coming, market, triggered, earnings, bear, heres, list


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Here’s What is Considered a Bad Credit Score

Below, CNBC Select explains what credit score range is considered bad, how to improve a bad credit score and how to get a free credit report. The rundown: Bad credit scoresWhat is a bad credit score? How a bad credit score can hurt youHow to improve a bad credit scoreHow to check your credit score for freeWhat is a bad credit score? Credit score ranges vary based on the credit scoring model used (FICO versus VantageScore) and the credit bureau (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) that pulls the sc


Below, CNBC Select explains what credit score range is considered bad, how to improve a bad credit score and how to get a free credit report.
The rundown: Bad credit scoresWhat is a bad credit score?
How a bad credit score can hurt youHow to improve a bad credit scoreHow to check your credit score for freeWhat is a bad credit score?
Credit score ranges vary based on the credit scoring model used (FICO versus VantageScore) and the credit bureau (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) that pulls the sc
Here’s What is Considered a Bad Credit Score Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bad, history, considered, total, limit, heres, credit, rate, loans, score, utilization, payment


Here's What is Considered a Bad Credit Score

Having a bad credit score isn’t the end of the world, as long as you work toward improving it. While bad credit may make it more difficult to achieve financial milestones, such as being approved for an auto loan or mortgage, there are steps you can take to repair your credit score. Lenders look closely at your credit report when determining whether you qualify for credit, such as credit cards or loans. One of the factors they consider is your credit score. This three-digit number is calculated by analyzing your financial actions, such as debt and payment history, to predict your ability to repay money lent to you. If you have a less than stellar credit score, you should take action as soon as possible, so you can work toward good credit and increase your odds of being approved for financial products like credit cards and loans. Below, CNBC Select explains what credit score range is considered bad, how to improve a bad credit score and how to get a free credit report.

The rundown: Bad credit scores

What is a bad credit score?

How a bad credit score can hurt you

How to improve a bad credit score

How to check your credit score for free

What is a bad credit score?

Credit score ranges vary based on the credit scoring model used (FICO versus VantageScore) and the credit bureau (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) that pulls the score. Below, you can check which credit score range you fall into, using estimates from Experian. Take note that the credit score lenders use varies, though 90% pull your FICO score. FICO Score Very poor: 300 to 579

Fair: 580 to 669

Good: 670 to 739

Very good: 740 to 799

Excellent: 800 to 850 VantageScore Very poor: 300 to 499

Poor: 500 to 600

Fair: 601 to 660

Good: 661 to 780

Excellent: 781 to 850

What factors influence your credit score

Credit scores are calculated differently depending on the credit scoring model. Here are the key factors FICO and VantageScore consider. FICO Score Payment history (35% of your score): Whether you’ve paid past credit accounts on time Amounts owed (30%): The total amount of credit and loans you’re using compared to your total credit limit, also known as your utilization rate Length of credit history (15%): The length of time you’ve had credit New credit (10%): How often you apply for and open new accounts Credit mix (10%): The variety of credit products you have, including credit cards, installment loans, finance company accounts, mortgage loans and so on VantageScore Extremely influential: Payment history Highly influential: Type and duration of credit and percent of credit limit used Moderately influential: Total balances/debt Less influential: Available credit and recent credit behavior and inquiries

How a bad credit score can hurt you

How to improve a bad credit score

If you have bad credit, take some time to review your credit score and identify the cause. Perhaps you’ve missed payments or carried a balance past your bill’s due date. In order to achieve a fair, good or excellent credit score, follow the credit-building tips below. Make on-time payments. Payment history is the most important factor in your credit score, so it’s key to always pay on time. Consider setting up autopay to ensure on-time payments, or opt for reminders through your card issuer or mobile calendar.

Payment history is the most important factor in your credit score, so it’s key to always pay on time. Consider setting up autopay to ensure on-time payments, or opt for reminders through your card issuer or mobile calendar. Pay in full. While you should always make at least your minimum payment, we recommend paying your bill in full every month to reduce your utilization rate, which is the percentage of your total credit limit you’re using. To calculate your utilization rate, divide your total credit card balance by your total credit limit.

While you should always make at least your minimum payment, we recommend paying your bill in full every month to reduce your utilization rate, which is the percentage of your total credit limit you’re using. To calculate your utilization rate, divide your total credit card balance by your total credit limit. Don’t open too many accounts at once. Every time you submit an application for credit, whether it’s a credit card or loan, and regardless if you’re approved or denied, an inquiry appears on your credit report. Inquiries temporarily reduce your credit score by roughly five points, though they rebound within a few months. Try to limit applications as needed and shop around with prequalification tools that don’t hurt your credit score.

How to get a free credit score

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bad, history, considered, total, limit, heres, credit, rate, loans, score, utilization, payment


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Here’s how much money workers would give up for better work-life balance

When it comes to work-life balance, time is money. These workers who reported not having work-life balance said they’d give up between $1,710 to $2,820 in order to achieve it. What’s contributing to the work-life imbalance — and how to improve itYounger workers, part of what some call the “burnout generation,” are also more likely to say they haven’t achieved work-life balance. Indeed, research suggests money and work are the biggest factors contributing to millennials’ stress, making the idea o


When it comes to work-life balance, time is money.
These workers who reported not having work-life balance said they’d give up between $1,710 to $2,820 in order to achieve it.
What’s contributing to the work-life imbalance — and how to improve itYounger workers, part of what some call the “burnout generation,” are also more likely to say they haven’t achieved work-life balance.
Indeed, research suggests money and work are the biggest factors contributing to millennials’ stress, making the idea o
Here’s how much money workers would give up for better work-life balance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyd, say, workers, balance, work, heres, money, better, survey, colliton, personal, worklife


Here's how much money workers would give up for better work-life balance

When it comes to work-life balance, time is money. In fact, for the average worker who says they currently have work-life balance, it would take an extra $10,000 in pay per year for them to give up their personal time, according to a survey of 1,061 U.S. workers by career site Joblist. But for the 35% of workers who say they haven’t been able to establish clear personal and professional boundaries, their desire for better flexibility doesn’t seem to hold as much weight. These workers who reported not having work-life balance said they’d give up between $1,710 to $2,820 in order to achieve it. Corie Colliton, Joblist’s lead researcher, tells CNBC Make It that workers without balance might not know how much they’re missing out on. “Among the workers who currently enjoy a balanced lifestyle, they’d be hard-pressed to give it up,” Colliton says. “This indicates how important flexibility is to professionals who have had the chance to see how it impacts their day-to-day.” Overall, the majority of Americans are optimistic and say that achieving work-life balance is a realistic goal, though broken down by generation, the sentiment is highest among Baby Boomers and lowest among millennials.

What’s contributing to the work-life imbalance — and how to improve it

Younger workers, part of what some call the “burnout generation,” are also more likely to say they haven’t achieved work-life balance. Indeed, research suggests money and work are the biggest factors contributing to millennials’ stress, making the idea of work-life balance all the more elusive. According to a survey from Mind Share Partners, a nonprofit that works with companies to improve mental health resources, half of millennial workers have left a job, either voluntarily or involuntarily, partially due to mental health reasons. The Joblist survey found people who’ve achieved balance are more likely to make plans after work, track time on work tasks, set aside time for personal reflection and take time off. It can also be reasoned that these workers were able to achieve balance in the first place only after becoming better at managing and establishing boundaries around their time. “Adopting new habits is never easy, but professionals who are interested in creating more balance in their lives can start small by writing down or thinking about their idea of what balance looks like,” Colliton says. “Once priorities are established, try setting goals like leaving the office at 5 p.m. once per week or turning your phone off during dinner. Tracking how you spend time at the office can also be beneficial.”

The workers willing to give up the most for better balance


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyd, say, workers, balance, work, heres, money, better, survey, colliton, personal, worklife


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Warren Buffett has investing lieutenants who buy stocks for him. Here’s what they are betting on

Investors turning to Berkshire Hathaway’s portfolio for inspiration from Warren Buffett will find more and more investments are being made or inspired by the ‘Oracle of Omaha’s’ money lieutenants, Todd Combs and Ted Weschler. Combs joined Berkshire in 2010, three years after the conglomerate began searching for someone to help manage its massive stocks portfolio. Weschler arrived at Berkshire two years later. Over the years, Combs and Weschler have added stocks to Berkshire’s portfolio that Buff


Investors turning to Berkshire Hathaway’s portfolio for inspiration from Warren Buffett will find more and more investments are being made or inspired by the ‘Oracle of Omaha’s’ money lieutenants, Todd Combs and Ted Weschler.
Combs joined Berkshire in 2010, three years after the conglomerate began searching for someone to help manage its massive stocks portfolio.
Weschler arrived at Berkshire two years later.
Over the years, Combs and Weschler have added stocks to Berkshire’s portfolio that Buff
Warren Buffett has investing lieutenants who buy stocks for him. Here’s what they are betting on Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, portfolio, buffett, stocks, berkshires, heres, lieutenants, weschler, combs, warren, buy, investing, yearscnbc, betting, inspired, berkshire, wouldnt


Warren Buffett has investing lieutenants who buy stocks for him. Here's what they are betting on

Investors turning to Berkshire Hathaway’s portfolio for inspiration from Warren Buffett will find more and more investments are being made or inspired by the ‘Oracle of Omaha’s’ money lieutenants, Todd Combs and Ted Weschler.

Combs joined Berkshire in 2010, three years after the conglomerate began searching for someone to help manage its massive stocks portfolio. Weschler arrived at Berkshire two years later.

Over the years, Combs and Weschler have added stocks to Berkshire’s portfolio that Buffett wouldn’t necessarily buy given his investment style over the years.

CNBC looked at Berkshire’s portfolio, and at comments made by Buffett himself, to speculate which stocks were most likely bought initially or inspired by Combs or Weschler. They are often smaller stakes in more modern industries.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, portfolio, buffett, stocks, berkshires, heres, lieutenants, weschler, combs, warren, buy, investing, yearscnbc, betting, inspired, berkshire, wouldnt


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