Epcot is getting Disney-fied: From ‘Ratatouille’ to ‘Mary Poppins,’ here’s how the 37-year-old park is changing

A concept image illustrates announced updates to Disney’s Epcot theme park. He pointed to the addition of “Frozen” characters to the Norway pavilion as a model for changes coming to the France pavilion. A “Mary Poppins”-themed area is coming to Disney’s Epcot theme park. An artist’s rendering of the overhaul of Epcot theme park at Walt Disney World in Florida. Disney’s Epcot theme park is adding a “Guardians of the Galaxy” ride.


A concept image illustrates announced updates to Disney’s Epcot theme park.
He pointed to the addition of “Frozen” characters to the Norway pavilion as a model for changes coming to the France pavilion.
A “Mary Poppins”-themed area is coming to Disney’s Epcot theme park.
An artist’s rendering of the overhaul of Epcot theme park at Walt Disney World in Florida.
Disney’s Epcot theme park is adding a “Guardians of the Galaxy” ride.
Epcot is getting Disney-fied: From ‘Ratatouille’ to ‘Mary Poppins,’ here’s how the 37-year-old park is changing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disneyfied, world, theme, little, disney, getting, epcot, pavilion, guests, france, park, poppins, heres, mary, 37yearold, disneys, ratatouille, changing


Epcot is getting Disney-fied: From 'Ratatouille' to 'Mary Poppins,' here's how the 37-year-old park is changing

A concept image illustrates announced updates to Disney’s Epcot theme park. Source: Disney

Big changes are coming to Epcot. The park has been known predominantly for its unique food offerings and annual festivals, but it’s time for an update, says Disney. The company is embarking on a massive park transformation, updating classic attractions, adding more family-friendly experiences and sprinkling a little more Disney flair around the nearly 40-year-old park. Epcot, which focuses on technology and international cultures, has long been a destination for adults but has been, perhaps, a little too mature for younger parkgoers. “We love Epcot,” Michael Hundgen, executive producer for Walt Disney Imagineering, said Thursday. “It’s the only one of its kind, there is only one Epcot, and as we thought about the next evolution of this park, we really harked back to Walt. He said Epcot would always be in a state of becoming, and this is sort of the next chapter of that state of becoming for us.” Disney toured media through several of Epcot’s new but unfinished upgrades, allowing a sneak peek of what’s to come. However, many of the areas were not allowed to be photographed.

A look at a French pantry that guests will drives through during Remy’s Ratatouille Adventure in Epcot in Orlando, Florida. Disney

One of the biggest transformations, and one guests will be able to enjoy next year, is being made to the France pavilion. Disney is adding Remy’s Ratatouille Adventure, a trackless ride that takes guests through a Pixar version of France. With a little imagination, parkgoers can pretend they have been shrunk down to the size of Remy himself. They will be whisked through a French restaurant on little mouse cars, where danger lurks around every turn. Walking through this new experience, members of the media gasped at the massive two-ton fish and ham bones dangling from the ceiling. Little else was revealed about what guests will encounter as they scuttle through the kitchen, but the massive refrigerator, oversized fruits and vegetables, including a four-foot tall orange, were enough to whet appetites for more. France will also add a “Beauty and the Beast” sing-along to its theater and full-scale creperie. “We are doubling down on the things that we know our guests love about Epcot, the festivals, the showcase, Spaceship Earth itself,” Hundgen said. “And we’re creating more experiences for families, creating more experiences that feel inherently Disney — and we mean characters and, of course, our franchises, but also the emotion connections.” The goal is to make Epcot more “timeless” and more “relevant,” Hundgen said, but also a place for all generations and ages, not just adults. He pointed to the addition of “Frozen” characters to the Norway pavilion as a model for changes coming to the France pavilion. Anna, Elsa, Kristoff, Olaf and Sven, who live in Arendelle, a land based on the fjords of Norway, are the perfect intersection between honoring the authenticity of the country of Norway with the magic of Disney. The hope is to replicate that success in the France pavilion and then again with its new additions planned for the United Kingdom pavilion.

A “Mary Poppins”-themed area is coming to Disney’s Epcot theme park. Source: Disney

The first-ever “Mary Poppins” attraction is coming to Epcot, including a whole neighborhood based on Cherry Tree Lane from the film.

New neighborhoods

Walt Disney himself had initially envisioned Epcot, which stands for Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, to be an actual city where people lived and worked with new technology. However, after Disney’s death, the company decided not to build and open a city but instead created a new theme park, infused with emerging technology of the time. Epcot, which opened in 1982, is home to the World Showcase, which features dozens of pavilions of countries from around the globe. This part of the park will remain once Disney’s transformation of Epcot is complete, but it will be joined by three new neighborhoods: Discovery, Celebration and Nature. The new Spaceship Earth will focus on storytelling, Bob Chapek, chairman of parks, said during Disney’s D23 Expo in August. He said many of the scenes that were part of the original will remain but be updated. New moments will also be added. The exit to the ride will be called Dreamer’s Point and have a new statue of Walt Disney. World Celebration will feature a wishing tree, a story fountain and a pavilion for live events.

An artist’s rendering of the overhaul of Epcot theme park at Walt Disney World in Florida. Disney

“It is about rounding out family offerings at Epcot, but it’s, at the same time, about doubling down on the things we know work really well,” Hundgen said. “So, festivals are inherently Epcot, and this new home for our festivals, this festival center that is being built, will really become the purpose-built epicenter for all of the content.” World Discovery will feature a “Guardians of the Galaxy” ride called Guardians of the Galaxy Cosmic Rewind as well as a new Play Pavilion where characters from Disney and Pixar films will appear for meet-and-greets and as part of a digital city.

Disney’s Epcot theme park is adding a “Guardians of the Galaxy” ride. Source: Disney/Marvel

Mission Space will also be updated with a new restaurant. The restaurant is called Space 220, which is set in a space station sitting high above the Earth. It will open this winter.

Space 220 is a new space station-themed restaurant opening at Epcot this winter. Source: Disney

World Nature will feature The Journey of Water experience based on “Moana.” Epcot will also be getting a new nighttime spectacular called Harmonious. It will debut in 2020.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disneyfied, world, theme, little, disney, getting, epcot, pavilion, guests, france, park, poppins, heres, mary, 37yearold, disneys, ratatouille, changing


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Rand Paul’s new bill would let Americans pay off student loan debt with 401(k), IRA savings. Here’s what that means

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., recently introduced a new bill that would allow students and parents to withdraw retirement funds to pay for college or repay their student loans. That means if two parents each have retirement accounts, they could withdraw over $10,000 cumulatively each year to pay for their child or dependent’s education. Americans owe more than $1.6 trillion in student loan debt, and the price of college continues to increase each year. “I don’t think it provides any meaningful relief t


Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., recently introduced a new bill that would allow students and parents to withdraw retirement funds to pay for college or repay their student loans.
That means if two parents each have retirement accounts, they could withdraw over $10,000 cumulatively each year to pay for their child or dependent’s education.
Americans owe more than $1.6 trillion in student loan debt, and the price of college continues to increase each year.
“I don’t think it provides any meaningful relief t
Rand Paul’s new bill would let Americans pay off student loan debt with 401(k), IRA savings. Here’s what that means Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, loan, debt, 401k, loans, financial, parents, let, pauls, means, heres, ira, student, savings, retirement, rand, money


Rand Paul's new bill would let Americans pay off student loan debt with 401(k), IRA savings. Here's what that means

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., recently introduced a new bill that would allow students and parents to withdraw retirement funds to pay for college or repay their student loans. But experts say that might create more financial problems than it solves. The Higher Education Loan Payment and Enhanced Retirement Act, or HELPER Act, introduced by Paul this week, would allow Americans to take out up to $5,250 from a 401(k) or IRA tax- and penalty-free each year to pay for college or make monthly student loan payments. Individuals can also take out funds for educational expenses for spouses or dependents. That means if two parents each have retirement accounts, they could withdraw over $10,000 cumulatively each year to pay for their child or dependent’s education. And while an 18-year-old might not have a 401(k), it is possible they could take funds out of a Roth or traditional IRA if they set one up and worked during high school. Americans owe more than $1.6 trillion in student loan debt, and the price of college continues to increase each year.

Should you draw from retirement to pay for college?

[I’m] not sure what the value is to having legislation deal with the student debt issue at a time when we’re trying to raise awareness that the parents of college-age kids are not saving enough for their own retirements. Jeannette Bajalia Petros Financial

“People are living longer, and the statistics of the elderly poor are growing, particularly with longevity in women,” says Bajalia. “[I’m] not sure what the value is to having legislation deal with the student debt issue at a time when we’re trying to raise awareness that the parents of college-age kids are not saving enough for their own retirements.” One benefit of the plan, though, is that if you are not currently maxing out your retirement account contributions, you could increase your savings to match the debt or tuition payments you’re already making, allowing you to save on the costs overall thanks to the tax break, Denise Nostrom, certified financial advisor and owner of Diversified Financial Solutions, tells CNBC Make It. This would be helpful to graduates right out of school, who have time to recoup any potential lost contributions to their retirements. “It’s going to give them a little impetus to put money in a 401(k) and then be able to use that money to pay down these loans, which will help them pay the loans down quicker and then focus on retirement,” says Nostrom. “You get a little more bang for your buck because it’s pretax dollars.”

It’s going to give them a little impetus to put money in a 401(k) and then be able to use that money to pay down these loans. Denise Nostrom Diversified Financial Solutions

Still, Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, told the Associated Press the bill is not necessarily a boon for graduates with debt. “I don’t think it provides any meaningful relief to distressed student loan borrowers,” Zandi said. “They’re already behind the financial eight ball.”

Improving student loan repayment assistance


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, loan, debt, 401k, loans, financial, parents, let, pauls, means, heres, ira, student, savings, retirement, rand, money


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Here’s when newlyweds will face a ‘marriage tax penalty’

If you tied the knot this year (or plan to this month), it’s worthwhile evaluating what getting married will mean for your 2019 tax situation. No matter when you get married during the year, you’ll be required to file your 2019 tax return next spring as a married couple. There also are other parts of the tax code that can cost married couples more. Singles with modified adjusted gross income above $200,000 pay the tax, while married couples filing jointly pay it if their income exceeds $250,000.


If you tied the knot this year (or plan to this month), it’s worthwhile evaluating what getting married will mean for your 2019 tax situation.
No matter when you get married during the year, you’ll be required to file your 2019 tax return next spring as a married couple.
There also are other parts of the tax code that can cost married couples more.
Singles with modified adjusted gross income above $200,000 pay the tax, while married couples filing jointly pay it if their income exceeds $250,000.
Here’s when newlyweds will face a ‘marriage tax penalty’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, couples, taxes, penalty, 2019, pay, newlyweds, marriage, rate, tax, heres, single, married, face, filing, income


Here's when newlyweds will face a 'marriage tax penalty'

Ah, the joys of new marital bliss. Now … about those tax returns. If you tied the knot this year (or plan to this month), it’s worthwhile evaluating what getting married will mean for your 2019 tax situation. While many couples will see their taxes drop, some will face a “marriage penalty” — paying more than if they had remained unmarried and filed as single taxpayers. In simple terms, the penalty comes into play when tax-bracket thresholds, and deductions or credits, are not double the amount allowed for single filers.

Digital Vision | Photodisc | Getty Images

So, depending on your income, where you live and the deductions or credits you use, a bigger tax bill could be part of your married future. “Marriage penalties exist for both high- and low-income couples, but are most common when two individuals with equal incomes marry,” said DeAnna D’Attilio, director at Acorn Tax Planning in Reston, Virginia. Roughly 2.2 million marriages take place in the U.S. each year, according to government data. Most of them — 78% — occur between May and October, separate information from TheKnot.com shows. While this year’s newlyweds generally won’t face a tax deadline until next April, the sooner you know what to expect, the more time you’ll have to plan accordingly. No matter when you get married during the year, you’ll be required to file your 2019 tax return next spring as a married couple. (Filing separate tax returns as a married couple rarely makes financial sense.)

For high earners, a bigger tax bill can come from a few different sources. For starters, the top federal rate of 37% kicks in at taxable income of $510,300 for single filers in 2019. Yet for married couples, that rate gets applied to income of $612,350 and higher. As an example: Two individuals who each have income of $500,000 would pay the second-highest rate, 35%, on their income if they filed as single taxpayers. However, as a married couple with combined income of $1 million, they would pay 37% on $387,650 of that (the difference between their income and the $612,350 threshold for the highest rate). That would mean paying about $7,750 more in income taxes. There also are other parts of the tax code that can cost married couples more. For instance, while an individual can have up to $200,000 in income before the Medicare surtax of 0.9% kicks in, the limit for married couples is $250,000. Likewise, the income threshold for when a 3.8% investment-income tax kicks in is not doubled. Singles with modified adjusted gross income above $200,000 pay the tax, while married couples filing jointly pay it if their income exceeds $250,000. (The tax applies to things such as interest, dividends, capital gains and rental or royalty income.) Additionally, the limit on the deduction for state and local taxes — also known as SALT — is not doubled for married couples. The $10,000 cap applies to both single filers and married filers. (Married couples filing separately get $5,000 each for the deduction). However, the deduction only is available to taxpayers who itemize. More from Personal Finance:

The top 10 college majors American students regret the most

Here’s where employers stand on 2019 bonuses

Everything you need to know to help save on taxes in 2020 Another potential snag can arise if you’re repaying federal student loans. If one, or both, of you are on an income-based repayment plan — except the Revised Pay as You Earn option — they should consider whether filing separately would make sense in order to avoid the other spouse’s income being used in the repayment calculation, said certified financial planner Jake Northrup. “This is especially applicable when there’s a large discrepancy between the incomes of the spouses,” said Northrup, founder of Experience Your Wealth in Bristol, Rhode Island. Likewise, newlyweds should be cognizant of limits applying to deductions and contributions for traditional and Roth individual retirement accounts, because income from both spouses feeds the equation. “Often, IRA contributions are done earlier in the year, so they should revisit what their joint income will likely look like and whether any changes to their 2019 IRA contributions should be made,” Northrup said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, couples, taxes, penalty, 2019, pay, newlyweds, marriage, rate, tax, heres, single, married, face, filing, income


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Here’s where employers stand on 2019 bonuses

About 2 in 3 companies anticipate giving workers a year-end bonus or perk, according to new data from Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Consider that a quarter of the HR professionals polled anticipate rewarding select workers with a year-end performance bonus, Challenger found. Depending on the size of the payment, getting a bonus could bump you into an even higher income tax bracket. By deferring receipt of the money, you lower your income tax obligation for 2019. Withhold moreThe IRS has been ban


About 2 in 3 companies anticipate giving workers a year-end bonus or perk, according to new data from Challenger, Gray & Christmas.
Consider that a quarter of the HR professionals polled anticipate rewarding select workers with a year-end performance bonus, Challenger found.
Depending on the size of the payment, getting a bonus could bump you into an even higher income tax bracket.
By deferring receipt of the money, you lower your income tax obligation for 2019.
Withhold moreThe IRS has been ban
Here’s where employers stand on 2019 bonuses Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bonuses, taxes, gift, control, stand, 2019, workers, pay, westley, yearend, bonus, tax, heres, employers, income


Here's where employers stand on 2019 bonuses

Charles Taylor | Getty Images

There are less than four weeks left in the year, and your chances of a holiday gift at work are looking pretty good. About 2 in 3 companies anticipate giving workers a year-end bonus or perk, according to new data from Challenger, Gray & Christmas. The Chicago-based recruiting firm polled 250 human resources executives online from Nov. 10 through Dec. 1. Truth be told, those gifts might be nothing to write home about. Three in 10 participants said they would give workers either a monetary award of $100 or less, or a nonmonetary gift — such as a gift basket or extra vacation day. Others might be in line for something a little more substantial. Consider that a quarter of the HR professionals polled anticipate rewarding select workers with a year-end performance bonus, Challenger found. Wall Street employees, for instance, received an average bonus of $153,700 in 2018, according to the New York State Comptroller’s office. Large bonuses can come with hefty taxes, so here’s how to manage.

When it pays to wait

krisanapong detraphiphat | Moment | Getty Images

For some taxpayers, pushing off the bonus into next year might be a good call. Depending on the size of the payment, getting a bonus could bump you into an even higher income tax bracket. “With bonuses, there’s generally some control or no control over when it’s paid,” said Robert Westley, a CPA and member of the American Institute of CPAs’ financial literacy commission. See below for your 2019 brackets. Here are your 2020 brackets. “If there is some control, you can ask if they can pay it to you in January instead of December,” Westley said. By deferring receipt of the money, you lower your income tax obligation for 2019. You can also ask about spreading your bonus over multiple pay periods, he added. Meet with your tax preparer to better gauge where your taxes stand for 2020.

Withhold more

The IRS has been banging the drum on fine-tuning the amount of income tax withheld from your pay. Now is the time to listen. Bonuses are taxed at a different rate than your wages. Employers can either withhold taxes from your bonus at a flat 22% or give you the bonus with your salary and calculate the withholding based on the aggregate. If you don’t withhold the right amount now, you could end up with a smaller refund when you file your 2019 taxes next spring. Worse, you might owe the IRS. “The 22% might not line up with your true tax bracket,” said Westley. “So either request extra withholding at year-end or make an estimated payment to cover the shortfall.”

Be charitable

Getty Images

If you itemize on your tax return, you can boost your charitable giving and nab a deduction. You can give directly to your favorite charity or you can contribute to a donor-advised fund — a tax-favored account that you can use to direct grants to charities. “Bunch” multiple years’ of donations into one year to boost your deduction. “For most people, the deductible expense they have the most control over is the charitable contribution,” said Brian Ellenbecker, senior financial planner at Robert W. Baird in Milwaukee. Work with your financial advisor or accountant on this one, as some assets — highly appreciated stock, for instance — are more tax-efficient than cash.

Save more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bonuses, taxes, gift, control, stand, 2019, workers, pay, westley, yearend, bonus, tax, heres, employers, income


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Here’s why some Peloton users love that ad so many have criticized

For all the outcry about the Peloton holiday ad, some of the company’s enthusiasts are scratching their heads. Haworth told CNBC her Peloton bike, a birthday gift last year, has helped her prioritize her health as she juggles work, family and everything else. While Peloton has been widely criticized this week, she and other Peloton users are defending the ad and the company behind it. “I love this ad, because, in it, I see me,” she wrote, sharing the posts to the official Peloton member group on


For all the outcry about the Peloton holiday ad, some of the company’s enthusiasts are scratching their heads.
Haworth told CNBC her Peloton bike, a birthday gift last year, has helped her prioritize her health as she juggles work, family and everything else.
While Peloton has been widely criticized this week, she and other Peloton users are defending the ad and the company behind it.
“I love this ad, because, in it, I see me,” she wrote, sharing the posts to the official Peloton member group on
Here’s why some Peloton users love that ad so many have criticized Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, post, haworth, bike, work, facebook, love, heres, users, group, criticized, peloton, week


Here's why some Peloton users love that ad so many have criticized

For all the outcry about the Peloton holiday ad, some of the company’s enthusiasts are scratching their heads.

Take Heather Haworth, a California-based in-house counsel for a medical device company, who posted about her thoughts on the ad earlier this week on Facebook. Haworth told CNBC her Peloton bike, a birthday gift last year, has helped her prioritize her health as she juggles work, family and everything else. While Peloton has been widely criticized this week, she and other Peloton users are defending the ad and the company behind it.

“I love this ad, because, in it, I see me,” she wrote, sharing the posts to the official Peloton member group on Facebook, along with a Peloton group for moms called “The Official Peloton Mom Group” and another for Peloton “law moms.”

She said Peloton reached out to her for permission to share the post with reporters. Haworth said she would be honored and agreed. On Wednesday, Peloton responded to the ad’s backlash and sent CNBC Haworth’s Facebook post and a few other PDFs of emails it said came from customers praising the ad. (Peloton redacted the last names and email addresses on the PDFs, so CNBC could not verify they were real.)

Peloton has not commented on the ad beyond its statement on Wednesday.

“I totally get it,” Haworth said of the holiday ad in an interview with CNBC. “I was shocked to see The Today Show, with … everyone just lambasting the commercial. It was just such a weird response to the ad that was so off-base from what I was experiencing and what the community experiences. I never saw what any of them saw.”

She said she felt moved to post, but did worry people would react negatively. Once she did, she said positive comments started flooding in.

“The only negative comments have been, ‘Can we please stop talking about the ad?'” she said.

“I didn’t see this whole thing about this poor woman wanting to lose weight and taking selfies without changing her body. I didn’t see that at all. That’s not what Peloton is about,” she said. “Some people have the goal to lose weight. That’s not the primary goal. It’s overall to be healthy, and to be around for your family for the long term.”

A few users then started taking her language and posting on their own profiles, with the hashtag #iamthepelotonwoman. One poster, Kristen Beck Sweeney, said she’s had her Peloton bike for two years.

“During that time I’ve made so many connections with other [hardworking] moms who struggle daily to find time for themselves to work out,” she said to CNBC via Facebook Messenger. “Over and over we praise Peloton for giving us the tool to take care of ourselves at home but also for fostering the sense of community that comes with it. I relate with that mom in the commercial. I get up early, I stay up late, I do what I need to do to get my workouts done, but also have a career and take care of my family.”

Another Peloton owner, Mollie Lombardi, said she’s found the bike helpful as she recovers from brain surgery. Lombardi, a Boston area-based entrepreneur and HR technologist, has Parkinson’s Disease. Being able to exercise from home prevents her from having to drive to the gym and change clothes, and she said she finds the classes motivating.

“Since the bike arrived, I’ve been working my way up to 30 minutes at least five times a week. It’s great and so much easier now that I have more energy,” she wrote in a recent blog post. “Before, I could work out or live my day, but not do both. In fact, I did a 30- minute ride earlier in the day before I went couch shopping!”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, post, haworth, bike, work, facebook, love, heres, users, group, criticized, peloton, week


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Here’s how to find out which songs and artists you listened to most on Spotify in 2019

(Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)Spotify just rolled out the 2019 version of a popular feature called Spotify Wrapped, which shows the songs and artists you listened to most throughout the year. Spotify Wrapped also also how much time you spent on the service and where the artists you listen to are from. I listened for almost 27,000 minutes and was called a “world citizen” because I listened to artists from 37 countries. This year’s Spotify Wrapped also breaks down your favorite podcasts o


(Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)Spotify just rolled out the 2019 version of a popular feature called Spotify Wrapped, which shows the songs and artists you listened to most throughout the year.
Spotify Wrapped also also how much time you spent on the service and where the artists you listen to are from.
I listened for almost 27,000 minutes and was called a “world citizen” because I listened to artists from 37 countries.
This year’s Spotify Wrapped also breaks down your favorite podcasts o
Here’s how to find out which songs and artists you listened to most on Spotify in 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, listened, artists, 2019, music, starting, spotify, songs, played, heres, wrapped, called


Here's how to find out which songs and artists you listened to most on Spotify in 2019

Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead performs at Shoreline Amphitheatre on May 24, 1992 in Mountain View, California. (Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)

Spotify just rolled out the 2019 version of a popular feature called Spotify Wrapped, which shows the songs and artists you listened to most throughout the year. Spotify has done this several times in the past, and it’s always a fun recap of the year for people who use the music streaming service a lot.

Spotify Wrapped also also how much time you spent on the service and where the artists you listen to are from.

I listened for almost 27,000 minutes and was called a “world citizen” because I listened to artists from 37 countries. It also breaks down your favorite genres. I’m “genre-fluid,” but my top genre was rock.

This year’s Spotify Wrapped also breaks down your favorite podcasts on the app, and tells you your artist of the decade. Mine was the Grateful Dead.

Here’s how to use it:

Visit Spotifywrapped.com from your phone or computer.

Log into Spotify.

Spotify will start to show you info on the music you played in 2019, starting with how your music taste changed with the seasons throughout the year.

Tap the down arrow to move through all of your stats. There are about 15 different pages.

The final one will show you the artists and songs you listened to most, as well as your top genre and minutes spent listening.

Here’s a little bonus: You can listen to the top songs you played in 2019 by opening the Spotify app and tapping the home tab. You’ll see a playlist called “Your Top Songs 2019,” which is sorted starting with the songs you played the most.

There’s also a “Tastebreakers” list that has a whole collection of songs that are similar to ones Spotify knows you like. This year, you can also enjoy a a “Best of the decade for you” list of 100 songs.

CNBC’s Todd Haselton contributed to this post.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, listened, artists, 2019, music, starting, spotify, songs, played, heres, wrapped, called


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Here’s how to ditch that ‘flight shame’ guilt

Isabel Pavia | Moment | Getty ImagesDerived from the Swedish term “flygskam” where the movement originated, “flight shame” is having a notable effect on the way people think about traveling. Investment bank Citi has also warned that “flight shaming” could result in a slowdown in air travel as people look to reduce their carbon footprint. However, if time and money constraints mean you can’t quite afford to spend 15 days at sea like Thunberg, it might be worth considering some other ways you trav


Isabel Pavia | Moment | Getty ImagesDerived from the Swedish term “flygskam” where the movement originated, “flight shame” is having a notable effect on the way people think about traveling.
Investment bank Citi has also warned that “flight shaming” could result in a slowdown in air travel as people look to reduce their carbon footprint.
However, if time and money constraints mean you can’t quite afford to spend 15 days at sea like Thunberg, it might be worth considering some other ways you trav
Here’s how to ditch that ‘flight shame’ guilt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, emissions, environmental, ditch, travel, tour, kristinsson, climate, heres, guilt, flight, carbon, footprint, train, shame


Here's how to ditch that 'flight shame' guilt

Isabel Pavia | Moment | Getty Images

Derived from the Swedish term “flygskam” where the movement originated, “flight shame” is having a notable effect on the way people think about traveling. The concept aims to get people to stop traveling by plane in order to lower carbon emissions and has gained momentum thanks to environmental activists like Greta Thunberg, who opted to travel by boat instead of flying across the Atlantic to attend a United Nations zero emissions summit in August. A study of over 6,000 people internationally by Swiss bank UBS, published in September, led the Swiss bank to predict that annual air traffic growth could halve as consumers became increasingly concerned by climate change. Investment bank Citi has also warned that “flight shaming” could result in a slowdown in air travel as people look to reduce their carbon footprint. Even musicians are getting in on the act, with Coldplay frontman Chris Martin recently saying the world famous band would not tour its latest album over concerns about sustainability. British group Massive Attack, which has been working with environmental activist group Extinction Rebellion, approached climate change research organization the Tyndall Centre to help find solutions for zero emission concerts and tours. However, if time and money constraints mean you can’t quite afford to spend 15 days at sea like Thunberg, it might be worth considering some other ways you travel more sustainably and minimize your “flight shame” guilt.

Switch to other travel

An obvious solution is to consider other “greener” modes of transport, such as train and bus. Tomer Shalit, CEO of Swedish climate software company ClimateView, says this is a particularly virtuous alternative in Sweden, where “almost all electricity is green” and nearly all the rail tracks are electric, resulting in its trains being virtually zero-carbon. For those conscious of time, Shalit suggests taking a sleeper train, something he often does for work to travel between his hometown of Umeå, in the north east of Sweden, and the capital of Stockholm – a nine-hour journey. “The train departs at 9pm and arrives at 6am in both directions which means that your body is being transported to its chosen destination while you are sound asleep,” he says. “My advice would be to try it out a couple of times and if you like it, switch.”

Work out your ‘time versus distance’

Considering just how much time you’re willing to spend “on the road” is important when looking at alternatives to flying, says Andri Kristinsson, CEO of Icelandic personalized digital travel guide Travelade. For example, if you’re planning to go away for the weekend, then you may only want to be on the road for three hours, while you may be comfortable travelling for longer on a week-long vacation, he says. “Once you have a timeframe in mind, sit down and map out what cities or countries you could reach during that time – a ‘time versus distance’ graph, so to speak,” Kristinsson explains.

Ask a local

Using public transport is not only the best way to get an authentic experience of the local area but has the added bonus of reducing your carbon footprint. Skipping a “hop on-hop off” tour bus in favor of joining a walking tour while on holiday can reduce your carbon footprint, Kristinsson points out. “Stay in a small guesthouse or Airbnb and ask your host about what you should experience during your visit – as locals, they will be able to provide you with the best insights,” he adds.

Ditch single-use plastic

Swapping single-use plastics for a reusable cup or bottle, a metal or bamboo straw, as well as carrying a fabric bag and even a portable water purifier while travelling, is a suggestion James Thornton, CEO of adventure travel company Intrepid Travel, makes for lowering your carbon footprint. A report by the Centre for International Environmental Law earlier this year predicted that the production and incineration of plastic would pump more than 850 million metric tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere in 2019. That is the equivalent of the emissions from 189 five-hundred-megawatt coal power plants.

Take a direct flight


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, emissions, environmental, ditch, travel, tour, kristinsson, climate, heres, guilt, flight, carbon, footprint, train, shame


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Here’s how ETF investors are positioned for the historically strongest month of the year

But with economic growth still intact and the setup still largely better than anticipated versus last December’s drop, investors aren’t shying away from equities. “I just think it’s adjustments going into 2020 and some likely gains-taking out of REITs,” he said Monday on CNBC’s “ETF Edge.” “The three-year, the one-year and the one-month [charts] all favor growth,” Hempstead said. Andrew McOrmond, managing director of ETF trading solutions at WallachBeth Capital, agreed that gold will make a come


But with economic growth still intact and the setup still largely better than anticipated versus last December’s drop, investors aren’t shying away from equities.
“I just think it’s adjustments going into 2020 and some likely gains-taking out of REITs,” he said Monday on CNBC’s “ETF Edge.”
“The three-year, the one-year and the one-month [charts] all favor growth,” Hempstead said.
Andrew McOrmond, managing director of ETF trading solutions at WallachBeth Capital, agreed that gold will make a come
Here’s how ETF investors are positioned for the historically strongest month of the year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, gold, positioned, quarter, value, month, strongest, etf, investors, going, historically, think, growth, trading, heres, favor


Here's how ETF investors are positioned for the historically strongest month of the year

The year-end rush has begun.

December, which has been the strongest trading month of the year for the stock market in the past 50 years, started off in the red as weaker-than-expected manufacturing data and a potential pause in U.S.-China trade dealings capped gains for the major averages.

But with economic growth still intact and the setup still largely better than anticipated versus last December’s drop, investors aren’t shying away from equities.

In fact, as nearly 60% of stocks on the New York Stock Exchange trade above their 200-day moving averages and the exchange-traded fund tracking the small-cap Russell 2000, the IWM, hits a fresh 52-week high, some are simply reviewing their positions, industry leaders say.

With ETFs like the iShares U.S. Real Estate ETF (IYR) and the Consumer Staples Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLP) each up over 22% year to date, some buyers are ensuring they lock in gains elsewhere as 2019 comes to a close.

Chris Hempstead, a top ETF consultant and former head of ETF sales at Deutsche Bank, chalked it up to “portfolio reallocation,” saying he doesn’t see investors selling the IYR as “an exit” from the real estate investment trust space.

“I just think it’s adjustments going into 2020 and some likely gains-taking out of REITs,” he said Monday on CNBC’s “ETF Edge.”

That’s characteristic of a December in which thinner trading volumes and healthy investor and consumer sentiments tend to push stocks higher heading into year-end, Hempstead said.

“Stick to what’s really happening. Watch the flows,” he advised. “There has been flow into value, but performance has been in favor of growth. 2020 is going to be an election year. Gold will come back into favor. It will be volatile. We have been desensitized to tweets. So, I think equities are in play and, definitely, the positioning is [that] equities are going to be in focus for 2020.”

Hempstead said the growth segment isn’t out of favor even though value stocks have outperformed growth stocks in the calendar quarter beginning Oct. 1, with the iShares S&P 500 Value ETF (IVE) up nearly 6% versus the iShares S&P 500 Growth ETF (IVW)’s roughly 4% gain.

“The three-year, the one-year and the one-month [charts] all favor growth,” Hempstead said.

Andrew McOrmond, managing director of ETF trading solutions at WallachBeth Capital, agreed that gold will make a comeback.

“I think gold is back in play, like Chris said, once the year starts,” he said in the same “ETF Edge” interview. “There’s just no reason to not position yourself for equities. I don’t think anyone’s going to take a risk [in] the last three weeks of the year, but I could see gold, … in the first quarter, coming back.”

As for the value-growth debate, he said the fact that value stocks such as UnitedHealth Group, Bank of America, Apple and J.P. Morgan are outperforming in the fourth quarter speaks less to investors’ preference for value than for another factor.

“I just think it’s money going to quality,” McOrmond said. “It’s people … [who] have gains already. Why take any risk going into the end of the year?”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, gold, positioned, quarter, value, month, strongest, etf, investors, going, historically, think, growth, trading, heres, favor


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Here’s what each NATO country contributes financially to the world’s strongest military alliance

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump arrived in London for the two-day NATO leaders meeting reiterating that too many members of the world’s most powerful military alliance still aren’t paying enough. Trump has frequently dressed down NATO counterparts and threatened to reduce U.S. military support if allies do not increase spending. In London, Trump singled out German Chancellor Angela Merkel for not meeting the 2% of GDP spending goal set in 2014. “So we’re paying 4 to 4.3% when Germany’s payin


WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump arrived in London for the two-day NATO leaders meeting reiterating that too many members of the world’s most powerful military alliance still aren’t paying enough.
Trump has frequently dressed down NATO counterparts and threatened to reduce U.S. military support if allies do not increase spending.
In London, Trump singled out German Chancellor Angela Merkel for not meeting the 2% of GDP spending goal set in 2014.
“So we’re paying 4 to 4.3% when Germany’s payin
Here’s what each NATO country contributes financially to the world’s strongest military alliance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: amanda macias nate rattner, amanda macias, nate rattner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, spending, london, strongest, heres, alliance, paying, meeting, trump, gdp, military, financially, set, spends, country, allies, contributes, nato


Here's what each NATO country contributes financially to the world's strongest military alliance

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump arrived in London for the two-day NATO leaders meeting reiterating that too many members of the world’s most powerful military alliance still aren’t paying enough.

Trump has frequently dressed down NATO counterparts and threatened to reduce U.S. military support if allies do not increase spending. In London, Trump singled out German Chancellor Angela Merkel for not meeting the 2% of GDP spending goal set in 2014.

“So we’re paying 4 to 4.3% when Germany’s paying 1 to 1.2% at max 1.2% of a much smaller GDP. That’s not fair,” Trump said Tuesday.

According to the latest NATO figures, the U.S. spends less than Trump noted, at 3.42% of GDP on defense while Germany now spends 1.38%, which is an increase of about 11% from last year.

Germany is only one of 19 NATO members that have not met the 2% GDP spending goal set at the 2014 NATO summit in Wales.

Read more: Three charts that show why Trump thinks NATO is a bad deal

Ahead of the leaders meeting in London, NATO Secretary Jens Stoltenberg announced that defense spending across European allies and Canada increased in real terms by 4.6 % in 2019 — making this the fifth consecutive year of growth.

Stoltenberg also said that by the end of 2020, allies will have invested $130 billion more since 2016.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: amanda macias nate rattner, amanda macias, nate rattner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, spending, london, strongest, heres, alliance, paying, meeting, trump, gdp, military, financially, set, spends, country, allies, contributes, nato


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Here’s what happened to the stock market on Tuesday

Dow Jones Industrial Average drops 280 pointsThe Dow slid 280.23 points, or 1.01%, to end the day at 27,502.81. President Donald Trump’s latest comments on the U.S.-China trade war sent stocks tumbling. Trump: We may want to wait on a trade dealTrump suggested on Tuesday he may want to hold off on a U.S.-China trade deal until after next year’s presidential election. That comment sparked Tuesday’s sell-off, which built on the previous session’s sell-off. Caterpillar, semiconductors slideTrade-re


Dow Jones Industrial Average drops 280 pointsThe Dow slid 280.23 points, or 1.01%, to end the day at 27,502.81.
President Donald Trump’s latest comments on the U.S.-China trade war sent stocks tumbling.
Trump: We may want to wait on a trade dealTrump suggested on Tuesday he may want to hold off on a U.S.-China trade deal until after next year’s presidential election.
That comment sparked Tuesday’s sell-off, which built on the previous session’s sell-off.
Caterpillar, semiconductors slideTrade-re
Here’s what happened to the stock market on Tuesday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stock, trade, slid, selloff, market, lower, dow, heres, dropped, uschina, tuesdays, stocks, happened, fell


Here's what happened to the stock market on Tuesday

Dow Jones Industrial Average drops 280 points

The Dow slid 280.23 points, or 1.01%, to end the day at 27,502.81. The S&P 500 dropped 0.66% to close at 3,093.20. The Nasdaq Composite fell 0.55% to 8,520.64. President Donald Trump’s latest comments on the U.S.-China trade war sent stocks tumbling.

Trump: We may want to wait on a trade deal

Trump suggested on Tuesday he may want to hold off on a U.S.-China trade deal until after next year’s presidential election. That comment sparked Tuesday’s sell-off, which built on the previous session’s sell-off. Trump downplayed Tuesday’s slump, calling it “peanuts.” However, those remarks — coupled with more negative trade rhetoric from Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross — have investors on edge after increased expectations that some kind of deal would get signed this month. Failure to do so at this point could make for another turbulent December on Wall Street.

Caterpillar, semiconductors slide

Trade-related stocks dragged the broader market lower on Tuesday. Caterpillar shares slid 2.03% while Boeing and Apple dropped 0.87% and 1.78%, respectively. Chipmakers also dropped. The VanEck Vectors Semiconductor ETF (SMH) closed about 1.40% lower. Nvidia fell 0.76% lower while Micron Technology pulled back 2.5%.

What happens next?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stock, trade, slid, selloff, market, lower, dow, heres, dropped, uschina, tuesdays, stocks, happened, fell


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