The US bond yield curve has inverted. Here’s what it means

However, longer-term bonds are more sensitive to inflation expectations in the economy as inflation eats into the purchasing power of a bond’s future performance. In simple terms, the higher the current rate of inflation and the higher the expected rate of inflation in the future, the higher the yields will rise across the yield curve, as investors will demand this higher yield to compensate for inflation risk. On Friday, Germany’s 10-year government bond yields slipped into negative territory f


However, longer-term bonds are more sensitive to inflation expectations in the economy as inflation eats into the purchasing power of a bond’s future performance. In simple terms, the higher the current rate of inflation and the higher the expected rate of inflation in the future, the higher the yields will rise across the yield curve, as investors will demand this higher yield to compensate for inflation risk. On Friday, Germany’s 10-year government bond yields slipped into negative territory f
The US bond yield curve has inverted. Here’s what it means Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: spriha srivastava
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inverted, yield, means, bonds, inflation, higher, economy, yields, uncertainty, 10year, curve, investors, bond, tend, heres


The US bond yield curve has inverted. Here's what it means

Investors are often motivated by short-term market players when making decisions.

Shorter-dated bonds are highly sensitive to the Federal Reserve policies than longer-dated bonds. However, longer-term bonds are more sensitive to inflation expectations in the economy as inflation eats into the purchasing power of a bond’s future performance.

In simple terms, the higher the current rate of inflation and the higher the expected rate of inflation in the future, the higher the yields will rise across the yield curve, as investors will demand this higher yield to compensate for inflation risk.

When the Fed starts to raise rates, signaling a stronger economy, that pushes up yields as investors sometimes tend to get rid of shorter-term bonds and move into riskier assets. However, when investors see inflation expectations for the longer-term stable, as is the case with the U.S. economy currently, they tend to move into longer-term safe-haven bonds, even though they may offer modest yields.

The latest inversion between the 3-month and 10-year bond yields was a result of several factors such as Fed’s dovish signal over rate hikes in 2019 and a whole set of disappointing data in Europe, along with the uncertainty surrounding Britain’s exit from the European Union.

On Friday, Germany’s 10-year government bond yields slipped into negative territory for the first time since October 2016. German government 10-year bond, an important benchmark for European fixed income assets, is viewed as a safe haven for investors. In times of uncertainty and challenging market environment, investors tend to move their investments from riskier assets into safe havens like gold and German government bonds. The bond yields hitting negative territory shows there is a rising demand for the 10-year paper due to the ongoing uncertainty in the euro zone economy being fueled from a slowdown in Germany, a deadlock among politicians on Brexit, among other issues.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: spriha srivastava
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inverted, yield, means, bonds, inflation, higher, economy, yields, uncertainty, 10year, curve, investors, bond, tend, heres


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Here’s what Warren Buffett thinks about climate change and investing

Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, is for many people the first source to consult when it comes to the development of an investing philosophy. Issues of politics, social policy, ethics and simply making money the right way are themes that Buffett has returned to many times. But one place where Buffett has always drawn the line is making clear his personal views have no place in how he runs Berkshire Hathaway for shareholders. On one issue of rising social and investing impor


Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, is for many people the first source to consult when it comes to the development of an investing philosophy. Issues of politics, social policy, ethics and simply making money the right way are themes that Buffett has returned to many times. But one place where Buffett has always drawn the line is making clear his personal views have no place in how he runs Berkshire Hathaway for shareholders. On one issue of rising social and investing impor
Here’s what Warren Buffett thinks about climate change and investing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: eric rosenbaum, vcg, getty images, marcus yam, los angeles times, timothy fadek, bloomberg, lucas jackson, steve proehl, corbis documentary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buffett, place, energy, investing, making, owns, change, climate, utility, berkshire, warren, social, hathaway, thinks, views, heres


Here's what Warren Buffett thinks about climate change and investing

Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, is for many people the first source to consult when it comes to the development of an investing philosophy. The billionaire investor has has never shied away from sharing his views with the public, either — and not only when it comes to stock market value. Issues of politics, social policy, ethics and simply making money the right way are themes that Buffett has returned to many times.

But one place where Buffett has always drawn the line is making clear his personal views have no place in how he runs Berkshire Hathaway for shareholders. He may be for more taxes on the super-rich, but that doesn’t mean he is against a tax break that helps a Berkshire business. He isn’t going to tell a company he owns how to respond to calls for more corporate support for gun control, an issue that came up at least year’s Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting.

“I don’t believe in imposing my political opinions on the activities of our businesses,” Buffett said.

On one issue of rising social and investing importance, Buffett is still making many trade-offs: climate change.

Berkshire Hathaway Energy, Buffett’s large utility conglomerate, owns western utility PacifiCorp, which has a sizable fleet of coal power plants. Berkshire’s Burlington Northern railroad ships a lot of coal, too. But the Berkshire utility company also is one of the biggest wind energy producers in the U.S. through its MidAmerican Energy utility affiliate based in Iowa, while its NV Energy in Nevada is increasing its renewable generation from 24 percent to a percentage in the high 40s by 2023, mostly using geothermal and solar power.

Berkshire’s largest business of all is insurance, which in recent years has seen massive claims related to natural disasters.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: eric rosenbaum, vcg, getty images, marcus yam, los angeles times, timothy fadek, bloomberg, lucas jackson, steve proehl, corbis documentary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buffett, place, energy, investing, making, owns, change, climate, utility, berkshire, warren, social, hathaway, thinks, views, heres


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Here’s the one ‘big, looming’ threat facing the oil rally, commodity expert says

RBC Capital Markets’ Helima Croft, the firm’s global head of commodity strategy, is generally bullish on oil prices. “The bear case [for oil] is continuing fears about global demand,” Croft said Thursday. They’re very concerned about potentially weak numbers out of China; what does that mean for oil demand? The International Energy Agency warned in February that global oil supply was on track to outpace demand despite global production cuts and U.S. sanctions. Brent crude prices also headed lowe


RBC Capital Markets’ Helima Croft, the firm’s global head of commodity strategy, is generally bullish on oil prices. “The bear case [for oil] is continuing fears about global demand,” Croft said Thursday. They’re very concerned about potentially weak numbers out of China; what does that mean for oil demand? The International Energy Agency warned in February that global oil supply was on track to outpace demand despite global production cuts and U.S. sanctions. Brent crude prices also headed lowe
Here’s the one ‘big, looming’ threat facing the oil rally, commodity expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: lizzy gurdus, scott mlyn, barcroft media, getty images, dario pignatelli, bloomberg, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, opec, global, demand, looming, big, oil, prices, threat, croft, commodity, crude, production, heres, rally, expert, facing, cuts, does


Here's the one 'big, looming' threat facing the oil rally, commodity expert says

Oil prices likely to head higher as OPEC stands firm on production cuts, says RBC’s Helima Croft 2:18 PM ET Thu, 21 March 2019 | 06:10

One oil bull sees a “big, looming” risk bubbling up in the energy market.

RBC Capital Markets’ Helima Croft, the firm’s global head of commodity strategy, is generally bullish on oil prices.

She sees OPEC’s commitment to productions cuts, the United States’ sanctions on Iran and Venezuela and overall demand for crude as healthy drivers of the oil rally, which has taken per-barrel prices up by nearly a third so far this year.

But there’s one major risk that could threaten this recent surge, Croft told CNBC in an interview on “Futures Now.”

“The bear case [for oil] is continuing fears about global demand,” Croft said Thursday. “That is a really big headwind for a lot of people on oil. They’re very concerned still about where trade talks go. They’re very concerned about potentially weak numbers out of China; what does that mean for oil demand? So I really do think that the demand story is the big, looming negative headwind for oil. I think it’s kind of the sum of all fears in terms of the oil market.”

Fears of an oil glut aren’t new. The International Energy Agency warned in February that global oil supply was on track to outpace demand despite global production cuts and U.S. sanctions.

Yet bearish commodity-watchers have brought these worries back to the fore in their conversations with Croft, she said, as U.S.-China trade talks seemingly grow more complicated and tensions between Washington and Saudi Arabia come under scrutiny.

“There is a bit of a lingering fear that President [Donald] Trump could pick up the phone to Saudi Arabia and put pressure on the Saudis and say, ‘You call off this OPEC cut,'” Croft said. “[Bears] look at something like the NOPEC bill, which would declare OPEC a cartel, and they say, ‘If that moves through Congress, will OPEC still want to carry through with the cuts, or will they be so scared that Washington will break them up that they essentially abandon the production cut?'”

Still, Croft isn’t quite in the bear camp. U.S. crude prices have been trading near four-month highs on several bullish factors, including OPEC’s resolve to keep production on the lower end and falling U.S. stockpiles, and she sees the strength continuing in the near term.

“The question is, what does Donald Trump do in May? Does he try to take more Iranian exports off the market? Does he also try to impose secondary sanctions on Venezuela and force Venezuela’s importers out of the market?” she asked. “I think those are the sort of bull stories for oil.”

Croft’s near-term targets are between $56.50 and $63.59 for U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude, and between $66.00 and $73.50 for the international benchmark, Brent crude.

WTI crude prices traded lower Friday, hovering in the $59-a-barrel range. Brent crude prices also headed lower, but maintained what Croft cast as a reliable floor of support at $66 a barrel.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: lizzy gurdus, scott mlyn, barcroft media, getty images, dario pignatelli, bloomberg, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, opec, global, demand, looming, big, oil, prices, threat, croft, commodity, crude, production, heres, rally, expert, facing, cuts, does


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If you hit the $750 million Powerball jackpot, here’s your tax bill

The Powerball jackpot just won’t quit. After no one hit all winning numbers in Saturday night’s drawing, the top prize has jumped to a whopping $750 million. Yet the top marginal tax rate of 37 percent means you’d owe a lot more at tax time. “The big impact on winnings is taxes,” said certified financial planner Dan Routh, a wealth advisor at Exencial Wealth Advisors in Oklahoma City. “If you win, just realize how big the tax bill can be and make sure you’re ready to handle it.”


The Powerball jackpot just won’t quit. After no one hit all winning numbers in Saturday night’s drawing, the top prize has jumped to a whopping $750 million. Yet the top marginal tax rate of 37 percent means you’d owe a lot more at tax time. “The big impact on winnings is taxes,” said certified financial planner Dan Routh, a wealth advisor at Exencial Wealth Advisors in Oklahoma City. “If you win, just realize how big the tax bill can be and make sure you’re ready to handle it.”
If you hit the $750 million Powerball jackpot, here’s your tax bill Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: sarah obrien, photo, justin sullivan, getty images, hero images, cmannphoto, andres ruffo, adam gault
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealth, million, taxes, bill, youre, prize, big, wont, jackpot, tax, wouldnt, 750, win, heres, powerball, youd, hit


If you hit the $750 million Powerball jackpot, here's your tax bill

The Powerball jackpot just won’t quit.

After no one hit all winning numbers in Saturday night’s drawing, the top prize has jumped to a whopping $750 million. And while players daydream about what they’d do with such a windfall, they should remember they wouldn’t really end up with the advertised amount.

Whether you take the prize as an annuity spread out over three decades or as an immediate, reduced lump sum, 24 percent of your win is withheld for federal taxes. Yet the top marginal tax rate of 37 percent means you’d owe a lot more at tax time. And state taxes typically are due as well.

“The big impact on winnings is taxes,” said certified financial planner Dan Routh, a wealth advisor at Exencial Wealth Advisors in Oklahoma City. “If you win, just realize how big the tax bill can be and make sure you’re ready to handle it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: sarah obrien, photo, justin sullivan, getty images, hero images, cmannphoto, andres ruffo, adam gault
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealth, million, taxes, bill, youre, prize, big, wont, jackpot, tax, wouldnt, 750, win, heres, powerball, youd, hit


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The fight over the Mueller report isn’t over yet. Here’s what happens next

The fight over special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation will not end with Attorney General William Barr’s summary of the probe. Barr also said that the probe did not conclude that Trump or anyone in his campaign “conspired or coordinated” with Russia in its influence campaign. Trump, who repeatedly called the probe a “witch hunt,” claimed victory after Barr’s letter became public. But the attorney general’s summary managed to spark new controversy, particularly about how Barr arrive


The fight over special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation will not end with Attorney General William Barr’s summary of the probe. Barr also said that the probe did not conclude that Trump or anyone in his campaign “conspired or coordinated” with Russia in its influence campaign. Trump, who repeatedly called the probe a “witch hunt,” claimed victory after Barr’s letter became public. But the attorney general’s summary managed to spark new controversy, particularly about how Barr arrive
The fight over the Mueller report isn’t over yet. Here’s what happens next Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: jacob pramuk, jabin botsford, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, isnt, fight, letter, mueller, special, russia, probe, trump, summary, happens, investigation, justice, heres, attorney, report, president


The fight over the Mueller report isn't over yet. Here's what happens next

The fight over special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation will not end with Attorney General William Barr’s summary of the probe.

In a letter to key members of Congress on Sunday, the top Justice Department official said Mueller wrote that the report “does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.” While the special counsel himself did not determine whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice by trying to influence the investigation, Barr said he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein concluded there was insufficient evidence to charge the president with obstruction.

Barr also said that the probe did not conclude that Trump or anyone in his campaign “conspired or coordinated” with Russia in its influence campaign.

Trump, who repeatedly called the probe a “witch hunt,” claimed victory after Barr’s letter became public. But the attorney general’s summary managed to spark new controversy, particularly about how Barr arrived at his conclusions in two days following a nearly two-year investigation. Trump may be cleared of obstruction in the opinion of the Justice Department, but other investigations into his conduct will go on.

Here’s what happens next:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: jacob pramuk, jabin botsford, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, isnt, fight, letter, mueller, special, russia, probe, trump, summary, happens, investigation, justice, heres, attorney, report, president


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Here’s a wrap of what Wall Street investors think the Mueller findings mean for the stock market

Wall Street is scrambling to figure out what the conclusions of special counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited investigation means for the stock market. “No one fully contemplated an impeachment: It’s just so hard to do,” said Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities. “But overall the investigation rarely was a big concern for investors. Here are the full comments from market investors, strategists and analysts:Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities”No one full


Wall Street is scrambling to figure out what the conclusions of special counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited investigation means for the stock market. “No one fully contemplated an impeachment: It’s just so hard to do,” said Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities. “But overall the investigation rarely was a big concern for investors. Here are the full comments from market investors, strategists and analysts:Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities”No one full
Here’s a wrap of what Wall Street investors think the Mueller findings mean for the stock market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: thomas franck, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, wrap, going, strategist, mueller, wall, chief, think, stock, concern, investigation, market, big, investors, heres, founder, street, mean


Here's a wrap of what Wall Street investors think the Mueller findings mean for the stock market

Wall Street is scrambling to figure out what the conclusions of special counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited investigation means for the stock market.

While many investment and equity strategists told CNBC that Attorney General William Barr’s letter about Mueller’s report relieves a persistent concern, few had expected a disastrous outcome for President Donald Trump.

“No one fully contemplated an impeachment: It’s just so hard to do,” said Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities. “It’s been like an aching joint. We’ve never seen market reaction to this. It’s always been that one market catalyst that has always been right around the corner.”

“I think the market was going to bounce back anyway and this gives it a little extra oomph,” said Stephen Weiss, founder of Short Hills Capital Partners. “But overall the investigation rarely was a big concern for investors. If there is a big pop on this, you can likely fade it.”

Others, like The Bear Traps Report founder Larry McDonald, were more optimistic and suggested the findings could be a boon to certain sectors.

“It frees him up to focus on infrastructure and housing reform,” McDonald said. “We will rally on this but everything that took us down last week will keep rearing it’s ugly head again.”

Here are the full comments from market investors, strategists and analysts:

Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities

“No one fully contemplated an impeachment: It’s just so hard to do. That’s always been the fallback position. The thinking was there could be disruption, but that it could never unseat the president.” “It’s been like an aching joint. We’ve never seen market reaction to this. It’s always been that one market catalyst that has always been right around the corner.” “We may well have removed a nagging concern, but the current concerns like the China trade war and overseas grief that outweighs that. The disaster du jour on Friday was PMI and the global economy.” “We’re going to pretty much roll into the first-quarter earnings season. And we all knew the economy was slowing, but have we priced that in? Does this earnings reporting season give us a corporate American that guides us down again or have we gotten everything in place?”

Larry McDonald, founder of The Bear Traps Report

“It frees him up to focus on infrastructure and housing reform.” “We will rally on this but everything that took us down last week will keep rearing it’s ugly head again.” “The fact that these tariffs may not be going away is having a negative multiplier effect on the global economy. There’s a massive GDP destruction going on.”

Bruce McCain, chief investment strategist at Key Private Bank

“I think that most people have discounted the findings of the Mueller investigation in comparison to the Chinese trade war and tensions overseas trends.” “I don’t think that it really has had the sort of play in depressing securities or giving them boost. When you resolve uncertainly people like it, but I don’t really see any specific area to watch.”

Stephen Weiss, founder of Short Hills Capital Partners

“I think the market was going to bounce back anyway and this gives it a little extra oomph. But overall the investigation rarely was a big concern for investors. If there is a big pop on this, you can likely fade it.”

Jeff Kilburg, CEO of KKM Financial

“This cloud has now dissipated and this should allow markets to breathe a sigh of relief.” “This could be a real positive for the market if it allows Trump to focus on getting the Chinese trade deal concluded.”

Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group

“While we might have a bounce, the markets I do not believe was focused one iota on the Mueller report. In fact, I’ve never ever myself even once mentioned him and the investigation as a factor impacting markets.”

—With reporting by Fred Imbert and Yun Li


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: thomas franck, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, wrap, going, strategist, mueller, wall, chief, think, stock, concern, investigation, market, big, investors, heres, founder, street, mean


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Here’s what you should know about the IPO process

Some high-profile, privately held companies — including Uber, Lyft, Pinterest and Airbnb — are about to break into the public market by launching an initial public offering. An IPO is the process by which a private company issues its first shares of stock for public sale. Beyond structuring a firm’s shares for sale, the process includes establishing stakeholders and creating regulatory compliance aimed at financial disclosures and transparency. This process exists, experts say, to protect the in


Some high-profile, privately held companies — including Uber, Lyft, Pinterest and Airbnb — are about to break into the public market by launching an initial public offering. An IPO is the process by which a private company issues its first shares of stock for public sale. Beyond structuring a firm’s shares for sale, the process includes establishing stakeholders and creating regulatory compliance aimed at financial disclosures and transparency. This process exists, experts say, to protect the in
Here’s what you should know about the IPO process Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-23  Authors: annie nova, ali balikci, anadolu agency, getty images, martin barraud, hutton supancic, getty images entertainment, george kavallines, -jay r ritter, corporate finance professor at the warrington coll
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stakeholders, shares, uber, structuring, process, transparency, stock, heres, ipo, know, public, sale


Here's what you should know about the IPO process

Some high-profile, privately held companies — including Uber, Lyft, Pinterest and Airbnb — are about to break into the public market by launching an initial public offering.

So, what exactly is an IPO?

An IPO is the process by which a private company issues its first shares of stock for public sale. This is also known as “going public.” Beyond structuring a firm’s shares for sale, the process includes establishing stakeholders and creating regulatory compliance aimed at financial disclosures and transparency. This process exists, experts say, to protect the investor public from purchasing shares in fraudulent companies.

Here’s what else you should know about the IPO process.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-23  Authors: annie nova, ali balikci, anadolu agency, getty images, martin barraud, hutton supancic, getty images entertainment, george kavallines, -jay r ritter, corporate finance professor at the warrington coll
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stakeholders, shares, uber, structuring, process, transparency, stock, heres, ipo, know, public, sale


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If you invested $1,000 in General Motors in 2012, here’s how much you would have now

Shares of automaker General Motors fell more than 3 percent Wednesday after BMW warned of lower profits thanks to international trade tension and potential ripple effects from Brexit. In the same time frame, by comparison, the S&P 500 was up more than 100 percent. While the company’s stock has trended slightly upward over the years, any individual stock can over- or under-perform and past returns do not predict future results. CNBC: GM stock as of Mar. “Countermeasures by the USA’s trading partn


Shares of automaker General Motors fell more than 3 percent Wednesday after BMW warned of lower profits thanks to international trade tension and potential ripple effects from Brexit. In the same time frame, by comparison, the S&P 500 was up more than 100 percent. While the company’s stock has trended slightly upward over the years, any individual stock can over- or under-perform and past returns do not predict future results. CNBC: GM stock as of Mar. “Countermeasures by the USA’s trading partn
If you invested $1,000 in General Motors in 2012, here’s how much you would have now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stock, impact, trade, heres, motors, invested, industry, general, hit, economic, 1000, gm, company, companys


If you invested $1,000 in General Motors in 2012, here's how much you would have now

Shares of automaker General Motors fell more than 3 percent Wednesday after BMW warned of lower profits thanks to international trade tension and potential ripple effects from Brexit.

Still, if you invested in GM in 2012 — after the company officially came out of bankruptcy and began recovering from the major financial crisis that hit the auto industry — you would have made a profit, although a small one: According to CNBC calculations, a $1,000 investment made then would be worth just over $1,800 as of March 21, 2019, a total return over 80 percent. In the same time frame, by comparison, the S&P 500 was up more than 100 percent.

While the company’s stock has trended slightly upward over the years, any individual stock can over- or under-perform and past returns do not predict future results.

Some analysts anticipate problems for the auto industry overall. Per BMW’s annual report, “political and economic developments in Europe remain increasingly uncertain,” and the “unforeseeable impact of Brexit” could elevate trade tensions with the European Union and China.

CNBC: GM stock as of Mar. 21, 2019

“A possible introduction of further trade barriers … could have a significantly adverse impact on the BMW Group’s operations through less favorable conditions for importing vehicles,” the statement read. “Countermeasures by the USA’s trading partners could slow down global economic growth and have a greater-than-expected adverse impact on the export of vehicles.”

In an email to CNBC last month, CFRA analyst Garrett Nelson said, “we are very concerned about GM’s worsening vehicle sales trends,” which were down more than 13 percent in the fourth quarter, “and the company’s exposure to a slowing China market, which we think could challenge the company’s ability to hit their full year earnings guidance.”

President Donald Trump — who slammed GM in November after the company announced plans to cut 14,000 U.S. and Canadian jobs and cancel some of its popular car models — could also impose tariffs on cars imported to the United States. That idea is causing further investor anxiety.

Trump, who held a rally in Ohio on Wednesday, also put pressure on the company to reopen its plant in the state and reverse its plan to invest $2.65 billion in two of its Brazilian plants in Sao Paulo.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stock, impact, trade, heres, motors, invested, industry, general, hit, economic, 1000, gm, company, companys


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Powerball jackpot jumps to $625 million. Here’s the tax bite if you win

Here’s what to do if you can’t pay your taxes on time 3 Hours Ago | 01:09With the odds stacked against players hitting the jackpot — your chance is about 1 in 292 million — the Powerball jackpot has been growing since late December. For Saturday night’s drawing, the cash option — which most winners go with — is $380.6 million. The 24 percent federal withholding would reduce that amount by $91.3 million. That levy ranges from zero to more than 8 percent, depending on where the ticket was purchase


Here’s what to do if you can’t pay your taxes on time 3 Hours Ago | 01:09With the odds stacked against players hitting the jackpot — your chance is about 1 in 292 million — the Powerball jackpot has been growing since late December. For Saturday night’s drawing, the cash option — which most winners go with — is $380.6 million. The 24 percent federal withholding would reduce that amount by $91.3 million. That levy ranges from zero to more than 8 percent, depending on where the ticket was purchase
Powerball jackpot jumps to $625 million. Here’s the tax bite if you win Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: sarah obrien, justin sullivan, getty images, cmannphoto, jamie grill, andres ruffo, adam gault
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, win, team, powerball, heres, bite, jumps, 625, steps, large, jackpot, important, advisor, taxes, thats, winner, million


Powerball jackpot jumps to $625 million. Here's the tax bite if you win

Here’s what to do if you can’t pay your taxes on time 3 Hours Ago | 01:09

With the odds stacked against players hitting the jackpot — your chance is about 1 in 292 million — the Powerball jackpot has been growing since late December.

For Saturday night’s drawing, the cash option — which most winners go with — is $380.6 million. The 24 percent federal withholding would reduce that amount by $91.3 million.

Assuming the winner had no reduction to their taxable income — such as large charitable contributions made from their winnings — another 13 percent, or $49.5 million, would be due to the IRS ($140.8 million in all).

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That would leave the winner with $239.8 million before state taxes. That levy ranges from zero to more than 8 percent, depending on where the ticket was purchased and where the winner lives. In other words, the winner could end up paying more than 45 percent in taxes.

Given the sheer size of the jackpot, experts say it’s important that the eventual winner assemble a team of experienced professionals to help navigate the windfall: an attorney, a tax advisor and a financial advisor.

“There’s a big responsibility that goes with having such a large some of money,” Routh said. “It would be important to surround yourself with a quality team that’s working in your best interest.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: sarah obrien, justin sullivan, getty images, cmannphoto, jamie grill, andres ruffo, adam gault
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, win, team, powerball, heres, bite, jumps, 625, steps, large, jackpot, important, advisor, taxes, thats, winner, million


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More than 53 million Americans shop while drunk — here’s how much it’s costing them

The amount of money that Americans are spending while intoxicated is sobering — and they’re purchasing everything from cars to pets. Millennials spent the most on drunk purchases over the last year, averaging $1,047. Gen Xers spent an average of $469 drunk shopping and baby boomers $466. Shoes and clothes is the second most common drunk purchase at 43 percent, followed by cigarettes at 30 percent. For its study, Finder surveyed 2,100 U.S. adults in February to gauge drunken shopping tendencies.


The amount of money that Americans are spending while intoxicated is sobering — and they’re purchasing everything from cars to pets. Millennials spent the most on drunk purchases over the last year, averaging $1,047. Gen Xers spent an average of $469 drunk shopping and baby boomers $466. Shoes and clothes is the second most common drunk purchase at 43 percent, followed by cigarettes at 30 percent. For its study, Finder surveyed 2,100 U.S. adults in February to gauge drunken shopping tendencies.
More than 53 million Americans shop while drunk — here’s how much it’s costing them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shop, drunken, purchase, finder, spent, 53, heres, survey, shopping, costing, purchases, americans, drunk, intoxicated, million


More than 53 million Americans shop while drunk — here's how much it's costing them

The amount of money that Americans are spending while intoxicated is sobering — and they’re purchasing everything from cars to pets.

A recent survey from personal finance website Finder.com found that 26 percent of Americans — about 53.4 million people — admit to shopping while under the influence of alcohol and collectively, Americans spent $39.4 billion on drunk purchases in the past 12 months, an increase from last year’s $30.43 billion.

That means the average American drunk-shopper spent $736 while intoxicated over the last year.

Millennials spent the most on drunk purchases over the last year, averaging $1,047. Gen Xers spent an average of $469 drunk shopping and baby boomers $466.

So what are people buying? The most popular booze-fueled purchase is food, according to the survey, with 52 percent caving in to their cravings.

Shoes and clothes is the second most common drunk purchase at 43 percent, followed by cigarettes at 30 percent. Other things people admitted to paying for while intoxicated include gambling (28 percent) and narcotics (10 percent).

The survey revealed a few drastic drunken purchases too, like 14 percent of people who booked a vacation, 12 percent who bought a pet, 10 percent who bought a car, 6 percent who purchased artwork and 5 percent who splurged on a motorbike.

However according to Finder, the number of people buying stuff after boozing is on the decline, down from 46 percent of Americans in 2018.

For its study, Finder surveyed 2,100 U.S. adults in February to gauge drunken shopping tendencies.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shop, drunken, purchase, finder, spent, 53, heres, survey, shopping, costing, purchases, americans, drunk, intoxicated, million


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