Stock market investors are ‘piled up’ in a historically failing trade, JPMorgan warns

The market is currently “piled up” in what history shows is a loss-making trade, according to one of JPMorgan’s top stock pickers. So-called “growth stocks” typically generate earnings at an accelerated rate and can often be found in the technology or pharmaceutical sectors. “You look at the last 20 years of Japan, every year you bought the highest decile of expected earnings growth stocks. Lecubarri said the current capital allocation showed many investors were possibly making the same mistake.


The market is currently “piled up” in what history shows is a loss-making trade, according to one of JPMorgan’s top stock pickers.
So-called “growth stocks” typically generate earnings at an accelerated rate and can often be found in the technology or pharmaceutical sectors.
“You look at the last 20 years of Japan, every year you bought the highest decile of expected earnings growth stocks.
Lecubarri said the current capital allocation showed many investors were possibly making the same mistake.
Stock market investors are ‘piled up’ in a historically failing trade, JPMorgan warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-04  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, historically, failing, growth, stocks, piled, lecubarri, firms, warns, strategy, currently, trade, market, stock, investors, earnings, jpmorgan


Stock market investors are 'piled up' in a historically failing trade, JPMorgan warns

The market is currently “piled up” in what history shows is a loss-making trade, according to one of JPMorgan’s top stock pickers.

Eduardo Lecubarri, the global head of small and mid-cap equity strategy at JPMorgan, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” Tuesday that the common perception is currently that in a world of low growth, hunting for companies with the potential to expand quickly is the correct strategy.

So-called “growth stocks” typically generate earnings at an accelerated rate and can often be found in the technology or pharmaceutical sectors. One prime example being Apple.

Lecubarri said picking stocks in the expectation that earnings will continue to rise and drive the firm’s share price higher has actually proven to be a failed strategy for many investors.

“You look at the last 20 years of Japan, every year you bought the highest decile of expected earnings growth stocks. You lost money almost every year,” said the chief strategist, adding that those who focused on European firms using the same tactic would have suffered the same fate in almost every year since 1990.

Lecubarri said the current capital allocation showed many investors were possibly making the same mistake. “So today, the market is piled up in things that in theory is where you want to be, but historically have been a very painful trade,” said Lecubarri.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-04  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, historically, failing, growth, stocks, piled, lecubarri, firms, warns, strategy, currently, trade, market, stock, investors, earnings, jpmorgan


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Australian minister claims PM Scott Morrison has led ‘historically unprecedented’ bush fire effort

Prime Minister Scott Morrison visits a fire damaged property on Kangaroo Island on January 8, 2020. David Mariuz | Pool | Getty ImagesThe Australian prime minister has received praise for his leadership in tackling devastating bush fires that have flared for months. Protestors marched across most of Australia’s state capital cities earlier this month, calling for Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s resignation and slamming the government’s stance on climate change. Speaking to CNBC at the World Econ


Prime Minister Scott Morrison visits a fire damaged property on Kangaroo Island on January 8, 2020.
David Mariuz | Pool | Getty ImagesThe Australian prime minister has received praise for his leadership in tackling devastating bush fires that have flared for months.
Protestors marched across most of Australia’s state capital cities earlier this month, calling for Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s resignation and slamming the government’s stance on climate change.
Speaking to CNBC at the World Econ
Australian minister claims PM Scott Morrison has led ‘historically unprecedented’ bush fire effort Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, countries, bush, unprecedented, historically, scott, claims, australian, fires, morrison, effort, change, led, emissions, prime, minister, cormann


Australian minister claims PM Scott Morrison has led 'historically unprecedented' bush fire effort

Prime Minister Scott Morrison visits a fire damaged property on Kangaroo Island on January 8, 2020. David Mariuz | Pool | Getty Images

The Australian prime minister has received praise for his leadership in tackling devastating bush fires that have flared for months. Protestors marched across most of Australia’s state capital cities earlier this month, calling for Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s resignation and slamming the government’s stance on climate change. Morrison has also been forced to apologize to Australians for initially refusing to cut short an overseas family holiday in the U.S. state of Hawaii while the bush fires raged. His approval rating has taken a huge hit amid the crisis. Speaking to CNBC at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland on Thursday, Australian Finance Minister Mathias Cormann said in spite of the anger, the country’s Prime Minister had “led a historically unprecedented national bush fire response effort.” Asked whether the crisis would provoke a change in the Australian government’s environmental policies, Cormann said the bush fires and climate policies were “two different issues.” He added that Australia was ahead of the majority of countries when it came to addressing the climate crisis. “We have a very ambitious climate change policy, we are absolutely committed to effective action on climate change,” he said. “We are one of only a handful of countries around the world that will not just meet but exceed its emissions reduction targets agreed to in Kyoto by 2020.”

The Kyoto Protocol, first adopted in 1997, is an international treaty setting out greenhouse gas limitations for industrialized countries. “Right now our focus is on the emergency response, getting on top of those fires,” Cormann said, adding: “But once we are on the other side of all this there will be inquiries and processes to assist, how in the future a fire season of this intensity can be responded to in a better fashion.” Cormann claimed that Australia was also on track to beat the emissions reduction targets it had agreed to in the Paris Agreement — a landmark deal adopted in 2015 that saw nations sign up to a framework to prevent global temperatures rising by any more than 2 degrees Celsius. Australia has committed to reducing its 2005 emissions levels by 26% before 2030. “We are a large continent with a small population, so considering the emissions reduction targets we’ve committed to on a per capita basis we will be more than halving emissions and indeed we will be reducing the emissions intensity in our economy by two-thirds,” he said. “That is more ambitious than the U.K., than Canada, than New Zealand, than many other countries around the world.” However, in a report published in November, the U.N. noted Australian policymakers had done little in terms of designing policies to help deliver on its own projections. “With the re-election of Australia’s conservative Government in May, there has been no recent material change in Australian climate policy,” the organization said, adding that its 2030 target for slashing emissions looked “challenging.” Meanwhile, the 2020 Climate Change Performance Index ranked Australia last out of 61 countries when looking at climate policy.

No plans to scrap coal


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, countries, bush, unprecedented, historically, scott, claims, australian, fires, morrison, effort, change, led, emissions, prime, minister, cormann


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After its strongest year in a decade, Apple stock is historically expensive on a price-to-earnings basis

The trailing P/E ratio is the price per share of a stock divided by earnings per share over the last 12 months. Apple’s trailing price-to-earnings, or P/E, ratio steadily climbed this year alongside its stock price. Apple stock is on pace to close out a year of explosive growth, and another key metric has reached a historic high, too. The average P/E ratio in that index is now 26, up from 20 at the start of the year, according to FactSet. Compared with the other megacap tech stocks, Apple’s P/E


The trailing P/E ratio is the price per share of a stock divided by earnings per share over the last 12 months.
Apple’s trailing price-to-earnings, or P/E, ratio steadily climbed this year alongside its stock price.
Apple stock is on pace to close out a year of explosive growth, and another key metric has reached a historic high, too.
The average P/E ratio in that index is now 26, up from 20 at the start of the year, according to FactSet.
Compared with the other megacap tech stocks, Apple’s P/E
After its strongest year in a decade, Apple stock is historically expensive on a price-to-earnings basis Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, historically, expensive, pricetoearnings, ratio, trailing, began, apples, average, earnings, stock, investors, decade, apple, strongest, basis


After its strongest year in a decade, Apple stock is historically expensive on a price-to-earnings basis

The trailing P/E ratio is the price per share of a stock divided by earnings per share over the last 12 months. Investors often use it as a shorthand metric to determine how expensive a stock is, although it’s not perfect, as it does not account for cash or debt and is based on past performance rather than future expectations.

Apple’s trailing price-to-earnings, or P/E, ratio steadily climbed this year alongside its stock price. Apple began the year with a trailing P/E ratio just over 13, according to FactSet, below its five-year average of roughly 16, before finishing 2019 around 24.5.

Apple stock is on pace to close out a year of explosive growth, and another key metric has reached a historic high, too.

The company’s forward-looking P/E, which measures price-per-share divided by expected earnings over the next 12 months, is just under 22, which is also historically expensive. An increase in a company’s P/E ratio could mean that investors expect earnings growth in the future, so they’re willing to pay more now. However, it could also be a warning sign that the stock is overvalued.

Apple has typically had a low P/E ratio compared with its megacap tech peers.

When Apple’s P/E was around 10 in 2016, venture capitalist Marc Andressen said in a tweet, since deleted, that Apple stock “trades like a steel mill on its way out of business.”

While the current figure is unusually high for Apple, it’s still below the average for the S&P 500 information technology index, which consists of 70 companies, but excludes internet companies including Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Alphabet. The average P/E ratio in that index is now 26, up from 20 at the start of the year, according to FactSet.

A number of factors have driven Apple’s P/E ratio up this year, Deutsche Bank analyst Jeriel Ong said, including an overall market drift and bearish expectations on Apple earlier this year. Investors previously modeled iPhones as a perpetually declining business, Ong said, but sentiment has improved and he now expects year-over-year growth.

“Not only did near-term iPhone 11 expectations improve, investors began to look forward to the 5G 2020 iPhone cycle, which is expected to be a supercycle,” he said, adding that Apple’s wearable devices have performed well, too.

“AAPL began to trade at a discount to the S&P 500 back in 2012 with the P/E multiple compressing to 10-12x at that point (S&P500 was 12-13x), so the idea that it should now trade at a 3-4x premium to the S&P500 (at 18.5x) is interesting indeed,” he said.

Compared with the other megacap tech stocks, Apple’s P/E ratio still ranks among the lowest. Amazon is finishing the year with a P/E above 80, Facebook’s is higher than 32, Microsoft’s is above 29, and Google-parent Alphabet’s is over 28.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, historically, expensive, pricetoearnings, ratio, trailing, began, apples, average, earnings, stock, investors, decade, apple, strongest, basis


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What a ‘Santa Claus rally’ is — and whether investors can expect such a gift in their investment portfolio

Historically speaking, there’s been a small lift to stock-market portfolios at the end of the year — a phenomena that many in the financial industry call “the Santa Claus rally.” “The Santa Claus rally is when the market tends to do well over the last two weeks of the year,” he says. It does happen — not 100% of the time, but around 60% of the time,” Lambert says. Some years, investors get coal: Last year, for example, the S&P 500 dropped almost 20% by late December. But historically, Lambert sa


Historically speaking, there’s been a small lift to stock-market portfolios at the end of the year — a phenomena that many in the financial industry call “the Santa Claus rally.”
“The Santa Claus rally is when the market tends to do well over the last two weeks of the year,” he says.
It does happen — not 100% of the time, but around 60% of the time,” Lambert says.
Some years, investors get coal: Last year, for example, the S&P 500 dropped almost 20% by late December.
But historically, Lambert sa
What a ‘Santa Claus rally’ is — and whether investors can expect such a gift in their investment portfolio Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, small, portfolio, week, investment, gift, tends, rally, historically, claus, market, financial, santa, lambert, investors, expect, weeks


What a 'Santa Claus rally' is — and whether investors can expect such a gift in their investment portfolio

Historically speaking, there’s been a small lift to stock-market portfolios at the end of the year — a phenomena that many in the financial industry call “the Santa Claus rally.”

Because Christmas lands within the last week of the year, Santa often gets credit for a small but measurable boost in the markets during that time, says Jason Lambert, the president and CEO of Northwest Financial & Tax Solutions near Portland, Oregon. “The Santa Claus rally is when the market tends to do well over the last two weeks of the year,” he says.

“It’s a real effect. It does happen — not 100% of the time, but around 60% of the time,” Lambert says. Some years, investors get coal: Last year, for example, the S&P 500 dropped almost 20% by late December.

But historically, Lambert says, the stock market tends to gain between 1% and 2% during the last 10 trading days of the year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, small, portfolio, week, investment, gift, tends, rally, historically, claus, market, financial, santa, lambert, investors, expect, weeks


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Here’s how ETF investors are positioned for the historically strongest month of the year

But with economic growth still intact and the setup still largely better than anticipated versus last December’s drop, investors aren’t shying away from equities. “I just think it’s adjustments going into 2020 and some likely gains-taking out of REITs,” he said Monday on CNBC’s “ETF Edge.” “The three-year, the one-year and the one-month [charts] all favor growth,” Hempstead said. Andrew McOrmond, managing director of ETF trading solutions at WallachBeth Capital, agreed that gold will make a come


But with economic growth still intact and the setup still largely better than anticipated versus last December’s drop, investors aren’t shying away from equities.
“I just think it’s adjustments going into 2020 and some likely gains-taking out of REITs,” he said Monday on CNBC’s “ETF Edge.”
“The three-year, the one-year and the one-month [charts] all favor growth,” Hempstead said.
Andrew McOrmond, managing director of ETF trading solutions at WallachBeth Capital, agreed that gold will make a come
Here’s how ETF investors are positioned for the historically strongest month of the year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, gold, positioned, quarter, value, month, strongest, etf, investors, going, historically, think, growth, trading, heres, favor


Here's how ETF investors are positioned for the historically strongest month of the year

The year-end rush has begun.

December, which has been the strongest trading month of the year for the stock market in the past 50 years, started off in the red as weaker-than-expected manufacturing data and a potential pause in U.S.-China trade dealings capped gains for the major averages.

But with economic growth still intact and the setup still largely better than anticipated versus last December’s drop, investors aren’t shying away from equities.

In fact, as nearly 60% of stocks on the New York Stock Exchange trade above their 200-day moving averages and the exchange-traded fund tracking the small-cap Russell 2000, the IWM, hits a fresh 52-week high, some are simply reviewing their positions, industry leaders say.

With ETFs like the iShares U.S. Real Estate ETF (IYR) and the Consumer Staples Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLP) each up over 22% year to date, some buyers are ensuring they lock in gains elsewhere as 2019 comes to a close.

Chris Hempstead, a top ETF consultant and former head of ETF sales at Deutsche Bank, chalked it up to “portfolio reallocation,” saying he doesn’t see investors selling the IYR as “an exit” from the real estate investment trust space.

“I just think it’s adjustments going into 2020 and some likely gains-taking out of REITs,” he said Monday on CNBC’s “ETF Edge.”

That’s characteristic of a December in which thinner trading volumes and healthy investor and consumer sentiments tend to push stocks higher heading into year-end, Hempstead said.

“Stick to what’s really happening. Watch the flows,” he advised. “There has been flow into value, but performance has been in favor of growth. 2020 is going to be an election year. Gold will come back into favor. It will be volatile. We have been desensitized to tweets. So, I think equities are in play and, definitely, the positioning is [that] equities are going to be in focus for 2020.”

Hempstead said the growth segment isn’t out of favor even though value stocks have outperformed growth stocks in the calendar quarter beginning Oct. 1, with the iShares S&P 500 Value ETF (IVE) up nearly 6% versus the iShares S&P 500 Growth ETF (IVW)’s roughly 4% gain.

“The three-year, the one-year and the one-month [charts] all favor growth,” Hempstead said.

Andrew McOrmond, managing director of ETF trading solutions at WallachBeth Capital, agreed that gold will make a comeback.

“I think gold is back in play, like Chris said, once the year starts,” he said in the same “ETF Edge” interview. “There’s just no reason to not position yourself for equities. I don’t think anyone’s going to take a risk [in] the last three weeks of the year, but I could see gold, … in the first quarter, coming back.”

As for the value-growth debate, he said the fact that value stocks such as UnitedHealth Group, Bank of America, Apple and J.P. Morgan are outperforming in the fourth quarter speaks less to investors’ preference for value than for another factor.

“I just think it’s money going to quality,” McOrmond said. “It’s people … [who] have gains already. Why take any risk going into the end of the year?”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, gold, positioned, quarter, value, month, strongest, etf, investors, going, historically, think, growth, trading, heres, favor


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Today is historically the single best day for the stock market all year

Oct. 28 has been the single best day of the year for stocks going back to 1950 with an average return of 0.54% on the S&P 500, according to Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial. The S&P 500 hit a fresh all-time high at the open on Monday, lifted by solid earnings and progress on U.S.-China trade. Of the 202 S&P 500 companies that have reported, 78% have topped analyst expectations, according to FactSet. The second best day of the year has been Dec. 26 with the S&P 500 posting


Oct. 28 has been the single best day of the year for stocks going back to 1950 with an average return of 0.54% on the S&P 500, according to Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial.
The S&P 500 hit a fresh all-time high at the open on Monday, lifted by solid earnings and progress on U.S.-China trade.
Of the 202 S&P 500 companies that have reported, 78% have topped analyst expectations, according to FactSet.
The second best day of the year has been Dec. 26 with the S&P 500 posting
Today is historically the single best day for the stock market all year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, trade, single, today, stock, market, day, best, historically, rally, 500, according


Today is historically the single best day for the stock market all year

Seize the day, investors.

Oct. 28 has been the single best day of the year for stocks going back to 1950 with an average return of 0.54% on the S&P 500, according to Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial.

The S&P 500 hit a fresh all-time high at the open on Monday, lifted by solid earnings and progress on U.S.-China trade. Perhaps the seasonal pattern will get it some extra oomph on Monday.

This time of the year is also the period when investors following the sell-in-May-and-go-away strategy come back to the market, usually in November.

“It kicks off the best six months of the year (November-April) and says goodbye to the worst six months,” Detrick said in a note on Monday. “The last few days of October to the first few days of November is one of the strongest times of the year.

The market staged a relief rally last week after the U.S. and China said they were “close to finalizing” some parts of a trade agreement, paving way for a bigger deal. A strong earnings season also supported the rally. Of the 202 S&P 500 companies that have reported, 78% have topped analyst expectations, according to FactSet.

The second best day of the year has been Dec. 26 with the S&P 500 posting a 0.5% gain, according to LPL Financial.

With a 0.51% loss on average for the S&P 500, Oct. 19 has been the single worst day of the year, the firm noted.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, trade, single, today, stock, market, day, best, historically, rally, 500, according


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Trump talks criminal justice reform at historically black college days after comparing impeachment fight to a ‘lynching’

President Donald Trump on Friday delivered the keynote address at the 2019 Second Step Presidential Justice Forum at the historically black Benedict College in South Carolina. The speech marked President Trump’s first visit to a historically black college since taking office in 2017. Trump’s speech focused on his administration’s passage in 2018 of the First Step Act, one of the few bipartisan bills to get through Congress. Former Vice President Joe Biden said Trump’s comments were “despicable,”


President Donald Trump on Friday delivered the keynote address at the 2019 Second Step Presidential Justice Forum at the historically black Benedict College in South Carolina.
The speech marked President Trump’s first visit to a historically black college since taking office in 2017.
Trump’s speech focused on his administration’s passage in 2018 of the First Step Act, one of the few bipartisan bills to get through Congress.
Former Vice President Joe Biden said Trump’s comments were “despicable,”
Trump talks criminal justice reform at historically black college days after comparing impeachment fight to a ‘lynching’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25  Authors: jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, comments, days, benedict, historically, reform, fight, speech, president, criminal, trumps, political, justice, talks, lynching, impeachment, step


Trump talks criminal justice reform at historically black college days after comparing impeachment fight to a 'lynching'

President Donald Trump takes a question during a press conference in New York, September 25, 2019, on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly.

President Donald Trump on Friday delivered the keynote address at the 2019 Second Step Presidential Justice Forum at the historically black Benedict College in South Carolina.

The speech marked President Trump’s first visit to a historically black college since taking office in 2017.

Trump’s speech focused on his administration’s passage in 2018 of the First Step Act, one of the few bipartisan bills to get through Congress.

“The First Step Act proved we could achieve amazing breakthroughs when we come together as a nation and put the interests of our citizens before the interests of any political party,” Trump said in his speech on Friday.

The law focuses on reducing mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenders, and is one of the few pieces of legislation in Congress to receive support from both sides of the political aisle.

Trump also welcomed Alice Marie Johnson to the stage for remarks, whose prison sentence he commuted in June 2018 following advocacy from Kim Kardashian West.

Trump’s speech comes after a tumultuous week for the president on race relations. Trump drew a heap of backlash on Tuesday for likening the House’s impeachment inquiry against him to a “lynching.” Lynchings were racially motivated attacks led by white mobs against African Americans from the end of the Civil War into the 1960s.

A spokeswoman for Benedict College declined to comment on the president’s lynching comment.

South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott, who is also the only black Republican in the Senate, said “There’s no question that the impeachment process is the closest thing to a political death row trial, so I get his absolute rejection of the process.”

But, Scott added, “I wouldn’t use the word lynching.”

The African American Mayors Association, a co-host of the weekend’s forum at Benedict, said in a statement, “We are offended by the president’s comments on “lynching” and the distortion of the historic horrors of racial violence in this country.”

“We urge the President to retract his comments.”

Trump’s comments drew the ire of the Democratic presidential field, of which 10 candidates are expected to hold town halls during the weekend’s events at Benedict.

Former Vice President Joe Biden said Trump’s comments were “despicable,” in a statement on Twitter.

Biden also apologized for using the same language during President Bill Clinton’s impeachment proceedings in 1998.

African American Sens. Cory Booker and Kamala Harris, who are both running for president and will hold town halls at Benedict over the weekend, excoriated President Trump’s comments in their own Twitter posts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25  Authors: jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, comments, days, benedict, historically, reform, fight, speech, president, criminal, trumps, political, justice, talks, lynching, impeachment, step


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Bernstein upgrades J&J, says valuation is ‘historically cheap’

Would you give up Google for $17,000 a year? The Fed wants to… The Fed is trying to figure out how much free internet services are worth to the economy. Economyread more


Would you give up Google for $17,000 a year? The Fed wants to… The Fed is trying to figure out how much free internet services are worth to the economy. Economyread more
Bernstein upgrades J&J, says valuation is ‘historically cheap’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bernstein, worth, figure, internet, historically, valuation, services, google, free, wants, tothe, cheap, fed, trying, upgrades


Bernstein upgrades J&J, says valuation is 'historically cheap'

Would you give up Google for $17,000 a year? The Fed wants to…

The Fed is trying to figure out how much free internet services are worth to the economy.

Economy

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bernstein, worth, figure, internet, historically, valuation, services, google, free, wants, tothe, cheap, fed, trying, upgrades


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Bernstein upgrades J&J, says valuation is ‘historically cheap’

Would you give up Google for $17,000 a year? The Fed wants to… The Fed is trying to figure out how much free internet services are worth to the economy. Economyread more


Would you give up Google for $17,000 a year? The Fed wants to… The Fed is trying to figure out how much free internet services are worth to the economy. Economyread more
Bernstein upgrades J&J, says valuation is ‘historically cheap’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bernstein, worth, figure, internet, historically, valuation, services, google, free, wants, tothe, cheap, fed, trying, upgrades


Bernstein upgrades J&J, says valuation is 'historically cheap'

Would you give up Google for $17,000 a year? The Fed wants to…

The Fed is trying to figure out how much free internet services are worth to the economy.

Economy

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bernstein, worth, figure, internet, historically, valuation, services, google, free, wants, tothe, cheap, fed, trying, upgrades


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October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies


October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies
October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, say, spooky, reputation, worst, historically, fear, volatility, worry, great, market, day, heres, lambert, financial, experts


October can be spooky for investors — here's why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market.

This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October.

“The big one is October 1987, when the Dow plunged 22% in a single day,” says Jason Lambert, the president and CEO of Northwest Financial & Tax Solutions, near Portland, Oregon. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.”

The Great Depression began after a market crash in October 1929 and the financial crisis that sparked the Great Recession started with an October market meltdown in 2008.

There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies fear,” he says, “even if it doesn’t mean that the market is moving up or down.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, say, spooky, reputation, worst, historically, fear, volatility, worry, great, market, day, heres, lambert, financial, experts


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