Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival

Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy. Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses. Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constituti


Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy. Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses. Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constituti
Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eve, slogans, indian, soura, kashmirs, holy, jammu, hundreds, chant, india, seething, antiindia, kashmiris, marching, kashmir, region, festival, muslim


Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival

Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy.

Hundreds of people protested in Kashmir’s main city of Srinagar on Sunday against India’s decision to curb its autonomy, despite new restrictions on travel and a seventh straight day of communications blackout.

Restrictions that had been temporarily eased on Friday and Saturday — allowing some bakeries, pharmacies and fruit shops to open ahead of the Muslim holy festival of Eid al-Adha — were reinstated in major parts of the city on Sunday afternoon.

Police vans drove around some areas ordering people to shut shop and go home, and most streets were silent by evening, as thousands of troops kept vigil, witnesses said.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government locked down the Muslim-majority region last Sunday, cutting off communications, detaining more than 300 political leaders and activists, and putting a “virtual curfew” into force with numerous roadblocks stopping movement.

Seeking to tighten its grip on the region also claimed by neighboring Pakistan, India announced last Monday that it was scrapping Jammu and Kashmir’s right to frame its own laws and allowed non-residents to buy property there.

Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses.

Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constitutional provision that India revoked last week. A swarm of women and girls in colourful headscarves followed the marching men.

“What do we want? Freedom! When do we want it? Now!” the crowd shouted, marching around the neighborhood.

Some of them held up paper banners, including one that read: “Modi, Kashmir is not your father’s property.”

India’s Home Ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The demonstration in Soura followed a much larger protest in the same area on Friday, when pro-independence youths marched before being repelled by tear gas and pellets.

Leaders in Kashmir had warned of a backlash against the stripping of autonomy in a territory where militants have been fighting Indian rule for nearly 30 years, resulting in the deaths of more than 50,000 people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eve, slogans, indian, soura, kashmirs, holy, jammu, hundreds, chant, india, seething, antiindia, kashmiris, marching, kashmir, region, festival, muslim


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Ripple wants a piece of the global payment system while it fights a cryptocurrency ‘holy war’

Still, it has a long way to go before making a dent in global payments, which is dominated by the world’s biggest banks. Much like public blockchains, Ripple’s network uses advanced cryptography to make sure transactions are secure. Global payments ballooned to $1.9 trillion in 2017 and are forecast to grow to $2 trillion by 2020, according to an October report by McKinsey. Philip Bruno, a partner at McKinsey and co-lead of its global payments practice, said mobile telecommunications have raised


Still, it has a long way to go before making a dent in global payments, which is dominated by the world’s biggest banks. Much like public blockchains, Ripple’s network uses advanced cryptography to make sure transactions are secure. Global payments ballooned to $1.9 trillion in 2017 and are forecast to grow to $2 trillion by 2020, according to an October report by McKinsey. Philip Bruno, a partner at McKinsey and co-lead of its global payments practice, said mobile telecommunications have raised
Ripple wants a piece of the global payment system while it fights a cryptocurrency ‘holy war’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-07  Authors: kate rooney, chris helgren
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transactions, ripple, system, war, global, way, wants, payments, ripples, customers, payment, network, fights, piece, crossborder, holy, banks, cryptocurrency


Ripple wants a piece of the global payment system while it fights a cryptocurrency 'holy war'

Ripple’s biggest goal is to allow customers make cross-border payments. Even while XRP’s price slid 90 percent from its peak a year ago, Ripple says it was signing up an average two customers per week last year as it attempted to break into a legacy software and network business that hasn’t changed much in 45 years.

On Tuesday, Ripple announced it hit the 200-customer milestone, a 350 percent increase in customers sending live payments. It is now operating in more than 40 countries. Still, it has a long way to go before making a dent in global payments, which is dominated by the world’s biggest banks.

SWIFT, an acronym for the Belgium-based Society of Worldwide InterBank Financial Telecommunications, was established by banks in 1973 as a new way to communicate about cross-border payments, and the messaging system remains the go-to network for more than 10,000 member institutions.

Money transmittal between countries can take several days, especially if intermediaries called correspondent banks get involved. Ripple wants to shorten the process to a matter of seconds using something similar to blockchain — the distributed ledger technology that underpins bitcoin and is being tested by companies from Amazon to J.P. Morgan.

Much like public blockchains, Ripple’s network uses advanced cryptography to make sure transactions are secure. But all parties on the system do not have access to a shared ledger. Unlike cryptocurrency transactions, it can only be seen by those with permission to the network and transactions are not completely anonymous.

Even getting a crumb of Swift’s business could be a significant win. Global payments ballooned to $1.9 trillion in 2017 and are forecast to grow to $2 trillion by 2020, according to an October report by McKinsey. Philip Bruno, a partner at McKinsey and co-lead of its global payments practice, said mobile telecommunications have raised expectations for how quickly money is transferred from one place to another.

“We’ve been able to make much faster same day payments domestically with mobile banking,” Bruno said. “There’s now this expectation that if I can pay my brother or my cousin immediately, when I get to work why can’t I do the same thing to pay my global supplier?”

Banks aren’t going to let go of their dominance in cross-border payments that easily. Swift has a global payment initiative to speed the flow of information, and HSBC is among the partner banks testing Swift’s version and blockchain for payments. But as far as is known, not Ripple’s. The bank’s head of innovation Jeremy Balkin told CNBC that global banks “have a huge competitive advantage” when it comes to cross-border payments since they have branches and banking relationships across the world.

Global banks like Citi make “an automatic $8 billion on cross-border payments,” Ripple’s Garlinghouse acknowledged. “I think Citi will be the last customer we ever sign up because it has the highest vested interest in not changing the status quo.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-07  Authors: kate rooney, chris helgren
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transactions, ripple, system, war, global, way, wants, payments, ripples, customers, payment, network, fights, piece, crossborder, holy, banks, cryptocurrency


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‘New’ JRR Tolkien novel hailed as the ‘Holy Grail’ of his works is set to be published this year

A previously unreleased book by “Lord of the Rings” author JRR Tolkien is set to be published later this year and is described by experts as “the Holy Grail of Tolkien texts.” “The Fall of Gondolin” charts the story of a mythical elven city attacked by the Dark Lord, Morgoth. It is set before the “Lord of the Rings” and takes place in what is known in Tolkien’s fiction as the “First Age.” But in around 1951, Tolkien began writing a refashioned account that comes to an abrupt end, according to th


A previously unreleased book by “Lord of the Rings” author JRR Tolkien is set to be published later this year and is described by experts as “the Holy Grail of Tolkien texts.” “The Fall of Gondolin” charts the story of a mythical elven city attacked by the Dark Lord, Morgoth. It is set before the “Lord of the Rings” and takes place in what is known in Tolkien’s fiction as the “First Age.” But in around 1951, Tolkien began writing a refashioned account that comes to an abrupt end, according to th
‘New’ JRR Tolkien novel hailed as the ‘Holy Grail’ of his works is set to be published this year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-13  Authors: arjun kharpal, haywood magee, picture post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gondolin, lord, grail, version, tolkien, fall, rings, hailed, tolkiens, works, book, set, holy, published, jrr, novel


'New' JRR Tolkien novel hailed as the 'Holy Grail' of his works is set to be published this year

A previously unreleased book by “Lord of the Rings” author JRR Tolkien is set to be published later this year and is described by experts as “the Holy Grail of Tolkien texts.”

“The Fall of Gondolin” charts the story of a mythical elven city attacked by the Dark Lord, Morgoth. It is set before the “Lord of the Rings” and takes place in what is known in Tolkien’s fiction as the “First Age.” The “Lord of the Rings” is set in the “Third Age.”

It is set to be published on August 30, 2018.

Parts of “The Fall of Gondolin” were published in “The Book of Lost Tales,” but it’s the first time the story will be published as a standalone text.

The earliest version of the text was composed in 1917. A compressed version of the story was written between 1926 and 1930. But in around 1951, Tolkien began writing a refashioned account that comes to an abrupt end, according to the Tolkien Society.

“We never dared to dream that we would see this published. ‘The Fall of Gondolin’ is, to many in the Tolkien community, the Holy Grail of Tolkien texts as one of Tolkien’s three great tales alongside ‘The Children of Hurin’ and ‘Beren and Luthien’,” the Tolkien Society said in a statement earlier this week.

“The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings” were the only Middle Earth-based stories to be published while Tolkien was alive. He died in 1973.

His son Christopher has edited and published much of the work that is now available.

The book will be published by HarperCollins.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-13  Authors: arjun kharpal, haywood magee, picture post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gondolin, lord, grail, version, tolkien, fall, rings, hailed, tolkiens, works, book, set, holy, published, jrr, novel


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The ‘alt-right’ created a parallel internet. It’s a holy mess

Mr. Wilson, who does not describe himself as alt-right, said he has accepted that building a viable alt-tech business might be impossible, given the practical constraints. But Mark Pitcavage, who studies right-wing extremism at the Anti-Defamation League, told me that alt-tech companies face several structural barriers. There is also a talent shortage among alt-tech companies, many of which rely on activist volunteers, and few of which can afford to pay the kinds of salaries demanded by top-tier


Mr. Wilson, who does not describe himself as alt-right, said he has accepted that building a viable alt-tech business might be impossible, given the practical constraints. But Mark Pitcavage, who studies right-wing extremism at the Anti-Defamation League, told me that alt-tech companies face several structural barriers. There is also a talent shortage among alt-tech companies, many of which rely on activist volunteers, and few of which can afford to pay the kinds of salaries demanded by top-tier
The ‘alt-right’ created a parallel internet. It’s a holy mess Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-12-11  Authors: kevin roose, alejandro alvarez
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, users, alttech, site, tech, companies, services, parallel, holy, altright, wilson, internet, sites, mess, twitter, created, mr


The 'alt-right' created a parallel internet. It's a holy mess

If the alt-right’s ideology harks back to 1940s Germany, its web design might transport you to 1990s GeoCities. Even the movement’s own adherents have grown frustrated. One Gab user, who claimed to be using the site while temporarily suspended from Twitter, complained in a public post about the site’s technical inferiority.

“I’m an investor in Gab,” wrote the user, who goes by the username @AnewThomasPaine. “I believe in the idea, but I’m disappointed in the platform.” In another message, he wrote: “I barely use it as there are few active users, and few essential features even after a year.”

Gab, which claims to have more than 300,000 registered users, was supposed to be an alt-tech success story. The service attracted reams of attention when it launched last year, and it raised more than $1 million in a crowdfunding campaign, making it the rare alt-tech platform with significant resources. Utsav Sanduja, Gab’s chief operating officer, told Slate this year that the company was starting an organization called the “Free Speech Tech Alliance,” and had recruited more than 100 Silicon Valley engineers to help.

But today, Gab is buggy and confusing, and much of the activity on the site appears to come from a small core of frequent users. Several of the well-known figures who once posted on the site have abandoned it. (“I’m a creature of habit, and fell out of habit of posting there,” Mike Cernovich, a notorious right-wing media personality, told me.) The site also had its own censorship drama earlier this year, after moderators removed a post that mocked Heather Heyer, the activist killed during the Charlottesville protests.

Gab’s founder, Andrew Torba, declined to comment on the site’s progress, telling me in a Gab message that “I don’t do interviews with fake news outlets.”

Instead, I spoke with Cody Wilson, a developer in Texas who is behind another alt-tech service. Mr. Wilson’s product, a crowdfunding site called Hatreon, was meant to give alt-right personalities and others a way to raise money for projects deemed too risqué for mainstream crowdfunding platforms such as Patreon and Kickstarter.

Hatreon got off to a fast start, with more than 400 creators raising about $25,000 per month on the platform. But lately, it has fallen into disrepair. According to Mr. Wilson, a major credit card company, which he declined to name, kicked Hatreon off its network last month, preventing many users from funding projects on the site and all but killing the company’s prospects for growth. Today, visitors to Hatreon are greeted by a message saying that “pledging is currently disabled while we upgrade our systems.”

Mr. Wilson, who does not describe himself as alt-right, said he has accepted that building a viable alt-tech business might be impossible, given the practical constraints.

“I don’t understand how any of them plan to be profitable,” he said.

Things aren’t going much better for WrongThink, which went online in late 2016 with aspirations of becoming a free-speech alternative to Facebook and Twitter. A year later, WrongThink has only about 7,000 registered members, according to the site’s founder, who goes by the username Bane Biddix.

Far-right activists have been trying to build alternative tech platforms for years, with little success. A decade ago, white nationalist websites with names like New Saxon and PodBlanc sprang up to compete with Myspace, Friendster, and the other social giants of the era. But most of those sites fizzled when their creators ran out of money or got into legal trouble. And none came close to reaching a large mainstream audience.

Granted, it is still the early days for this new wave of services, which are coming of age during the Trump years and could benefit from changing norms around P.C. culture and acceptable speech. Some alt-right leaders are hopeful that a coming “purge” on Twitter — their phrase for a change in the site’s hate speech policies, which Twitter plans to enforce beginning next week — will send scores of disgruntled users scurrying to alt-tech platforms.

But Mark Pitcavage, who studies right-wing extremism at the Anti-Defamation League, told me that alt-tech companies face several structural barriers. Not only do they have to build a compelling product and attract users — a steep challenge even in the best of circumstances — but they must do it without access to mainstream funding sources, such as venture capital firms and angel investors, which provide much of the fuel for other tech start-ups. They also rely on finding companies that are willing to host their services and process their payments.

“Being on the internet is a group venture,” Mr. Pitcavage said. “You rely on an internet service provider, a domain name service, a credit card processor. It’s a very common thing for one or more of these entities not to want to do business with a white supremacist group.”

There is also a talent shortage among alt-tech companies, many of which rely on activist volunteers, and few of which can afford to pay the kinds of salaries demanded by top-tier programmers.

“Speaking frankly, you’re not getting 10x engineer talent with these people,” said Mr. Wilson of Hatreon, using a popular Silicon Valley term for a star employee. “No one’s lining up for this.”

Alt-tech is also a victim of the same market forces that have held back other small tech start-ups. Much of the internet’s basic architecture is controlled by a handful of gatekeepers — Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon among them. Those companies run back-end services that allow developers to build reliable products, the app stores that allow them to reach a mass audience, and the advertising platforms that allow them to make money. Without the support of Silicon Valley’s giants, it’s nearly impossible to compete, no matter what your political views are.

“If someone with sufficient money and determination magically materialized, I’m not saying it’s impossible, but even then it wouldn’t be easy,” Mr. Pitcavage said.

The good news for the alt-right’s detractors, then, is that the movement’s vision of a flourishing parallel internet seems doomed to fail.

The bad news is that, without a functional alternate ecosystem, it may be harder to quarantine the views of neo-Nazis and other noxious ideologues to little-used corners of the internet, far from the vast majority of users. Facebook, Twitter, and other mainstream services will continue to be the dominant venue for ideological battles, and keeping these platforms free of hate and misinformation will remain those companies’ responsibility. Let’s hope they’re up to the challenge.

Email Kevin Roose at kevin.roose@nytimes.com, or follow him on Facebook at facebook.com/kevinroose and on Twitter @kevinroose.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-12-11  Authors: kevin roose, alejandro alvarez
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, users, alttech, site, tech, companies, services, parallel, holy, altright, wilson, internet, sites, mess, twitter, created, mr


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Climate change deniers are plotting Trump’s path to the holy grail of deregulation

Why not sue the Environmental Protection Agency over its efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions? After all, CO2 is essential to all life on earth, he noted. Schnare also smiled before leaning into the mic. I think we’re going to look at specific farmers, large farmers who are harmed by reductions in CO2. I think that’s where we’re going,” Schnare said.


Why not sue the Environmental Protection Agency over its efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions? After all, CO2 is essential to all life on earth, he noted. Schnare also smiled before leaning into the mic. I think we’re going to look at specific farmers, large farmers who are harmed by reductions in CO2. I think that’s where we’re going,” Schnare said.
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-11-22  Authors: tom dichristopher, jim watson, afp, getty images, joshua roberts, -steven milloy, author, former trump epa transition team member
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, climate, think, member, smiled, agency, farmers, plotting, going, earth, trumps, schnare, deregulation, co2, wont, grail, deniers, change, holy, path


Climate change deniers are plotting Trump's path to the holy grail of deregulation

During a question-and-answer period at the America First Energy Conference in Houston this month, an audience member had an inquiry for panelists at a session billed as one of the day’s most important.

Why not sue the Environmental Protection Agency over its efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions? After all, CO2 is essential to all life on earth, he noted.

Harry MacDougald, an attorney on the panel, smiled and pointed to David Schnare, a former member of President Donald Trump’s EPA transition team who had a combative relationship with climate scientists during his more than three decades at the agency. Schnare also smiled before leaning into the mic.

“We’re going to do that. It won’t be everybody on Earth, but … I think we’re going to look at specific farmers, large farmers who are harmed by reductions in CO2. I think that’s where we’re going,” Schnare said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-11-22  Authors: tom dichristopher, jim watson, afp, getty images, joshua roberts, -steven milloy, author, former trump epa transition team member
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, climate, think, member, smiled, agency, farmers, plotting, going, earth, trumps, schnare, deregulation, co2, wont, grail, deniers, change, holy, path


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Holy Smoke! Vatican to stop selling cigarettes in its shops

The Vatican announced Thursday that it would no longer sell cigarettes to employees in its duty-free shop and supermarket — giving up an estimated 10 million euros ($11 million) a year in profit. Francis made the decision because “the Holy See cannot contribute to an activity that clearly damages the health of people,” the Vatican said. A statement cited the World Health Organization, which says smoking causes more than 7 million deaths annually around the globe. The book, however, also reported


The Vatican announced Thursday that it would no longer sell cigarettes to employees in its duty-free shop and supermarket — giving up an estimated 10 million euros ($11 million) a year in profit. Francis made the decision because “the Holy See cannot contribute to an activity that clearly damages the health of people,” the Vatican said. A statement cited the World Health Organization, which says smoking causes more than 7 million deaths annually around the globe. The book, however, also reported
Holy Smoke! Vatican to stop selling cigarettes in its shops Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-11-09  Authors: giuseppe ciccia, pacific press, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, stop, selling, world, vatican, sales, taxfree, shops, estimated, commercial, reported, holy, book, cigarettes, million, smoke


Holy Smoke! Vatican to stop selling cigarettes in its shops

Pope Francis is saying “Just Say No” to cigarettes.

The Vatican announced Thursday that it would no longer sell cigarettes to employees in its duty-free shop and supermarket — giving up an estimated 10 million euros ($11 million) a year in profit.

Francis made the decision because “the Holy See cannot contribute to an activity that clearly damages the health of people,” the Vatican said. A statement cited the World Health Organization, which says smoking causes more than 7 million deaths annually around the globe.

A 2015 book based on leaked Vatican documents, “Avarice,” reported that cigarette sales bring in an estimated 10 million euros a year to the Vatican City State and are the second-most important source of income after tax-free gas sales. The book, however, also reported that the booming tobacco sales were an example of how the Vatican’s tax-free commercial activities were being abused.

With Italy’s VAT sales tax at 22 percent, anyone who can get their hands on a coveted Vatican “commercial card” does so since it gives them access to a world of high-end, tax-free shopping. With it, lucky cardholders can buy their weekly groceries at the Vatican supermarket, fill their tank at the Vatican gas station, get a prescription filled at the Vatican pharmacy, and do their Christmas shopping at the Vatican’s department store — all duty-free.

And the pickings are excellent: Cuban cigars, Samsung flat-screen TVs, and prestigious wines so sought-after that the Vatican consistently tops the list of highest per-capita wine consumption in the world.

Only Vatican employees, retirees and residents, accredited diplomats and members of religious congregations have the right to a “commercial card” — a number that Ernst & Young estimated in 2013 should not exceed a few thousand people given that the Vatican employs around 5,000 people. And yet, according to the E&Y audit reported in “Avarice,” 41,000 “commercial cards” were in use.

Cardholders are limited to buying 80 boxes of cigarettes a year but the audit found that 278 clients exceeded the limit that year.

The book, written by journalist Emiliano Fittipaldi, hypothesized that cardholders were reselling their cigarettes under the table and making a handsome, unreported profit.

In its statement, the Vatican said while its cigarette sales represented a source of revenue “no profit can be legitimate if it puts lives at risk.”

For the record, Francis doesn’t smoke but plenty of his Vatican advisers do. And while the Vatican officially banned smoking in nearly all enclosed places in 2002, violations abound.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-11-09  Authors: giuseppe ciccia, pacific press, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, stop, selling, world, vatican, sales, taxfree, shops, estimated, commercial, reported, holy, book, cigarettes, million, smoke


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Cramer says Equifax data is ‘the holy grail’ of what ‘bad guys’ want

CNBC’s Jim Cramer says one would think a company such as Equifax would be more prepared for a massive data breach. Equifax knows “exactly what I don’t want the bad guys to get,” Cramer said Friday on “Squawk on the Street.” “I mean is there anything more than what they have in terms of the bad guys saying, ‘the holy grail. On Thursday, Cramer said Equifax should fire its CEO, Richard Smith, after the fallout from the credit reporting agency’s massive data breach. Cramer reiterated his stance on


CNBC’s Jim Cramer says one would think a company such as Equifax would be more prepared for a massive data breach. Equifax knows “exactly what I don’t want the bad guys to get,” Cramer said Friday on “Squawk on the Street.” “I mean is there anything more than what they have in terms of the bad guys saying, ‘the holy grail. On Thursday, Cramer said Equifax should fire its CEO, Richard Smith, after the fallout from the credit reporting agency’s massive data breach. Cramer reiterated his stance on
Cramer says Equifax data is ‘the holy grail’ of what ‘bad guys’ want Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-09-15  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, grail, ceo, credit, consumers, bad, guys, breach, equifax, company, massive, holy, data, cramer


Cramer says Equifax data is 'the holy grail' of what 'bad guys' want

CNBC’s Jim Cramer says one would think a company such as Equifax would be more prepared for a massive data breach.

Equifax knows “exactly what I don’t want the bad guys to get,” Cramer said Friday on “Squawk on the Street.” “I mean is there anything more than what they have in terms of the bad guys saying, ‘the holy grail. This is just the pot of honey.”

On Thursday, Cramer said Equifax should fire its CEO, Richard Smith, after the fallout from the credit reporting agency’s massive data breach.

CNBC had reached out to Equifax for comment.

Cramer reiterated his stance on Friday and said: “This is a company that seems to have no knowledge of what’s really going on.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren said Friday she has begun an investigation into Equifax’s data breach and, along with 11 other fellow Democratic senators, will introduce a bill to give consumers the ability to freeze their credit for free.

The Massachusetts senator said she was “troubled by this attack” and said the bill would stop companies like Equifax from charging consumers for freezing and unfreezing access to their credit files.

Smith is expected to testify on Oct. 3 before a House panel. This comes as nearly 40 states join a probe of the breach, which may affect as many as 143 million Americans.

The CEO apologized in an op-ed published Tuesday in USA Today and vowed the company would “make changes” to ensure it wouldn’t happen again.

—Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-09-15  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, grail, ceo, credit, consumers, bad, guys, breach, equifax, company, massive, holy, data, cramer


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How Goldman Sachs is pursuing the ‘holy grail’ of hiring

Can we figure out what makes great traders great?” Such a “personality” test has some value to it, he said on “Trading Nation,” but offered a laundry list of the pros and cons around this type of assessment. Many, many times when I do interviewing processing for organizations, I’ll tell the people, look, they’re interviewing you, but really, you’re interviewing them. Reuters reported that Goldman Sachs will begin piloting the personality test on U.S. summer intern candidates who would be startin


Can we figure out what makes great traders great?” Such a “personality” test has some value to it, he said on “Trading Nation,” but offered a laundry list of the pros and cons around this type of assessment. Many, many times when I do interviewing processing for organizations, I’ll tell the people, look, they’re interviewing you, but really, you’re interviewing them. Reuters reported that Goldman Sachs will begin piloting the personality test on U.S. summer intern candidates who would be startin
How Goldman Sachs is pursuing the ‘holy grail’ of hiring Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-08-11  Authors: rebecca ungarino
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, sachs, hiring, great, pursuing, youre, job, interviewing, test, process, grail, schools, hirschhorn, goldman, personality, holy, candidates


How Goldman Sachs is pursuing the ‘holy grail’ of hiring

Goldman Sachs plans to begin using a personality test as part of its hiring process in several divisions like banking, trading and finance, and some see this as one of the ultimate ways to figure out what makes prospective candidates in the industry tick.

“I kind of view it as the holy grail. Can we figure out what makes great traders great?” Doug Hirschhorn, a performance coach for financial firms and the author of “8 Ways to Great,” told CNBC on Thursday

Hirschhorn likens the personality testing process to “‘Moneyball’ for hedge funds, or ‘Moneyball’ for the financial industry,” referring to the 2003 book by Michael Lewis (and subsequent film of the same name) chronicling the efforts by Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane to build a winning team by using mathematical rigor to find and hire undervalued players.

In the past, the concept of how to measure the best possible man or woman for the job has been somewhat challenging given the lack of research and lack of attention “from a sample-size perspective,” Hirschhorn said. Such a “personality” test has some value to it, he said on “Trading Nation,” but offered a laundry list of the pros and cons around this type of assessment.

For example: Some top institutions search for the top talent, the cream of the crop, but have an unusual “filter process,” he said, like going to top-ranked schools and essentially ending up with the same handful of people from the same schools. Of course, this has been proven to be not only a phenomenon in finance. At this point, all Supreme Court justices, including the newly confirmed Neil Gorsuch, attended Ivy League schools.

By administering some kind of standardized assessment tool, Hirschhorn argued, companies can cast a wider net across a larger population. Plus, it may cost less than conducting on-site interviews that might be more typical.

Yet “one of the big cons is that you’re labeling people. You’re actually going to put people into a box,” he said, warning of something throughout this process he calls “faking good.” Essentially, applicants may alter their responses in these personality tests based upon what they think the company wants from them, as opposed to what their real personality may reflect. Another con with personality tests may be that test anxiety sets in and throws off applicants.

For applicants, Hirschhorn advises them to “take the test or the interview as if you’re trying to get the job. You want to make sure that you understand the job and that it fits your personality. Many, many times when I do interviewing processing for organizations, I’ll tell the people, look, they’re interviewing you, but really, you’re interviewing them. It’s your decision to join the organization and you have to decide if it’s the right fit for you based on what you know.”

Reuters reported that Goldman Sachs will begin piloting the personality test on U.S. summer intern candidates who would be starting in 2018. The bank reportedly last year also made other efforts to identify strong candidates who may not be from Ivy League schools by opting for first-round interviews via video platform instead of on college campuses.

“We’re shifting from a world where you just used to look at a GPA and resume and walk out with a feeling about an individual that you might want to hire,” Matt Jahansouz, the investment bank’s global head of recruiting, told Reuters. “We can now capture characteristics and data that might not be as obvious to make smarter hiring decisions.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-08-11  Authors: rebecca ungarino
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, sachs, hiring, great, pursuing, youre, job, interviewing, test, process, grail, schools, hirschhorn, goldman, personality, holy, candidates


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Lindsey Graham: ‘There will be holy hell to pay’ if Trump fires Sessions

Sen. Lindsey Graham warned President Donald Trump on Thursday against firing his attorney general — the latest Republican to try to deter Trump from a move that would carry huge consequences for the U.S. government. “If Jeff Sessions is fired, there will be holy hell to pay,” the Republican from South Carolina told reporters, according to video taken by NBC News. Graham also warned of consequences if the Trump administration tries to remove special counsel Robert Mueller, the former FBI director


Sen. Lindsey Graham warned President Donald Trump on Thursday against firing his attorney general — the latest Republican to try to deter Trump from a move that would carry huge consequences for the U.S. government. “If Jeff Sessions is fired, there will be holy hell to pay,” the Republican from South Carolina told reporters, according to video taken by NBC News. Graham also warned of consequences if the Trump administration tries to remove special counsel Robert Mueller, the former FBI director
Lindsey Graham: ‘There will be holy hell to pay’ if Trump fires Sessions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-27  Authors: jacob pramuk, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, trump, holy, republican, pay, graham, senate, hell, lindsey, mueller, warned, special, fires, attorney, general, sessions


Lindsey Graham: 'There will be holy hell to pay' if Trump fires Sessions

Sen. Lindsey Graham warned President Donald Trump on Thursday against firing his attorney general — the latest Republican to try to deter Trump from a move that would carry huge consequences for the U.S. government.

“If Jeff Sessions is fired, there will be holy hell to pay,” the Republican from South Carolina told reporters, according to video taken by NBC News.

A push to fire Sessions — who enraged Trump by recusing himself from the investigation into Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election and whether the Trump campaign colluded with the Kremlin — is seen as a possible precursor to removing the special counsel overseeing that probe. Graham also warned of consequences if the Trump administration tries to remove special counsel Robert Mueller, the former FBI director.

“Any effort to go after Mueller could be the beginning of the end of the Trump presidency, unless Mueller did something wrong. Right now, I have no reason to believe that Mueller is compromised,” Graham said.

Trump has publicly lambasted Sessions several times recently, and his anger stems from the attorney general’s March recusal. Reports have said Trump has talked privately about replacing Sessions, potentially circumventing Congress by making an appointment while the Senate is in recess.

It is unclear how serious Trump is about appointing a new attorney general.

On Wednesday night, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, said “no way” would he fit in confirmation of a new attorney general this year.

Graham said Thursday that he is working on bipartisan legislation to protect Mueller.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-27  Authors: jacob pramuk, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, trump, holy, republican, pay, graham, senate, hell, lindsey, mueller, warned, special, fires, attorney, general, sessions


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Dunkin’ Brands is on a quest for the ‘holy grail’ of food service: Donut delivery

Dunkin’ CEO Nigel Travis: We’re giving the consumer everything they’re looking for 13 Hours Ago | 02:39The CEO of Dunkin’ Brands says delivery is the next worldwide phenomenon in food service. “I think the holy grail in the next few years … is going to be delivery. And that’s going to be a global trend, not a trend just here in the U.S.,” CEO Nigel Travis said on CNBC’s “Closing Bell” Thursday. Travis said delivery will be the dominant trend in coming years because of the changing nature of co


Dunkin’ CEO Nigel Travis: We’re giving the consumer everything they’re looking for 13 Hours Ago | 02:39The CEO of Dunkin’ Brands says delivery is the next worldwide phenomenon in food service. “I think the holy grail in the next few years … is going to be delivery. And that’s going to be a global trend, not a trend just here in the U.S.,” CEO Nigel Travis said on CNBC’s “Closing Bell” Thursday. Travis said delivery will be the dominant trend in coming years because of the changing nature of co
Dunkin’ Brands is on a quest for the ‘holy grail’ of food service: Donut delivery Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-27  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, food, fell, holy, consumer, delivery, trend, service, brands, donut, travis, nigel, quest, grail, technological, theyre, dunkin, ceo


Dunkin' Brands is on a quest for the 'holy grail' of food service: Donut delivery

Dunkin’ CEO Nigel Travis: We’re giving the consumer everything they’re looking for 13 Hours Ago | 02:39

The CEO of Dunkin’ Brands says delivery is the next worldwide phenomenon in food service.

“I think the holy grail in the next few years … is going to be delivery. And that’s going to be a global trend, not a trend just here in the U.S.,” CEO Nigel Travis said on CNBC’s “Closing Bell” Thursday.

Recently, Dunkin’ Brands has taken the kitchen-sink approach to technological innovation.

Dunkin’ Donuts’ mobile app has been around since 2012, and the Baskin-Robbins app launched just last year. DD Perks, Dunkin’s rewards program, had more than 5 million members in 2016, and Travis said the company recently announced a plan to implement curbside pickup at many of its locations.

“We are giving the consumer everything they’re looking for,” Travis said.

Travis said delivery will be the dominant trend in coming years because of the changing nature of consumer demand. “The whole industry is under some pressure from changing demand,” he said. “Consumers are demanding it instantly, they want it delivered, they’re pressured for time.”

Travis said Dunkin’ Donuts is positioned “perfectly” to meet the more demanding consumer base by focusing on speed, delivery and technology. Eighty-five percent of new franchisees, for instance, are equipped with drive-through windows, compared with 70 percent in prior years, Travis said.

Dunkin’s stock fell 0.17 percent during intraday trading on Thursday. The company’s second-quarter earnings release Thursday morning fell short on revenue, and gave a full-year outlook that mostly fell below analysts’ expectations.

Still, Travis said his company’s focus on tech will help Dunkin’ win the day.

“I’m more excited than I’ve ever been by the support of our franchisees getting right behind the technological innovations that we’ve been pushing for some years, and you’ll see a lot more in the future.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-27  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, food, fell, holy, consumer, delivery, trend, service, brands, donut, travis, nigel, quest, grail, technological, theyre, dunkin, ceo


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