Hong Kong accountants join protests, but they’re ‘civilized and calm’

Accountants in Hong Kong took to the streets on Friday to call for the government to accept five demands of the people, including the complete withdrawal of a now-suspended extradition bill. “It’s time for us to stage a really civilized and calm march in the central business district to show that we’re still not happy with how the whole issue has been handled, and (the) government has to respond positively to the demands of the people,” Hong Kong legislator, Kenneth Leung, told CNBC on Friday, a


Accountants in Hong Kong took to the streets on Friday to call for the government to accept five demands of the people, including the complete withdrawal of a now-suspended extradition bill. “It’s time for us to stage a really civilized and calm march in the central business district to show that we’re still not happy with how the whole issue has been handled, and (the) government has to respond positively to the demands of the people,” Hong Kong legislator, Kenneth Leung, told CNBC on Friday, a
Hong Kong accountants join protests, but they’re ‘civilized and calm’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kong, central, civilized, protests, district, theyre, accountants, join, told, territory, demands, hong, withdrawal, took, calm, systems


Hong Kong accountants join protests, but they're 'civilized and calm'

Accountants in Hong Kong took to the streets on Friday to call for the government to accept five demands of the people, including the complete withdrawal of a now-suspended extradition bill.

“It’s time for us to stage a really civilized and calm march in the central business district to show that we’re still not happy with how the whole issue has been handled, and (the) government has to respond positively to the demands of the people,” Hong Kong legislator, Kenneth Leung, told CNBC on Friday, ahead of the march.

The march was set to take place from Chater Garden, in the central district of Hong Kong, to the central government office.

Hong Kong was a British colony until 1997, when it became a special administrative region of China under the “one country, two systems” framework which allows the territory a certain degree of legal and economic autonomy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kong, central, civilized, protests, district, theyre, accountants, join, told, territory, demands, hong, withdrawal, took, calm, systems


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Google shutters more than 200 YouTube channels amid Hong Kong protests

Pompeo says the US message on Huawei is clear. Trump’s words say…U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, who is under house arrest in Canada and facing extradition to America, is not a bargaining chip in the trade…Technologyread more


Pompeo says the US message on Huawei is clear. Trump’s words say…U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, who is under house arrest in Canada and facing extradition to America, is not a bargaining chip in the trade…Technologyread more
Google shutters more than 200 YouTube channels amid Hong Kong protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, words, kong, google, trumps, protests, huawei, tradetechnologyread, channels, secretary, youtube, wanzhou, 200, shutters, mike, hong, amid, state, pompeo, sayus


Google shutters more than 200 YouTube channels amid Hong Kong protests

Pompeo says the US message on Huawei is clear. Trump’s words say…

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, who is under house arrest in Canada and facing extradition to America, is not a bargaining chip in the trade…

Technology

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, words, kong, google, trumps, protests, huawei, tradetechnologyread, channels, secretary, youtube, wanzhou, 200, shutters, mike, hong, amid, state, pompeo, sayus


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Mike Pompeo says ‘something like Tiananmen Square’ in Hong Kong would make a US-China trade deal ‘more difficult’

It would be “more difficult” to reach a trade deal if the protests end “in a way that there was violence — the president said something like Tiananmen Square,” Pompeo said in an interview on “Squawk Box. ” He was referring to the 1989 student-led demonstrations in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, which ended in mass bloodshed after government-deployed soldiers and tanks and fired on those protesters. “I hope that the trade negotiations move forward, and I hope that Hong Kong is resolved in a peaceful


It would be “more difficult” to reach a trade deal if the protests end “in a way that there was violence — the president said something like Tiananmen Square,” Pompeo said in an interview on “Squawk Box. ” He was referring to the 1989 student-led demonstrations in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, which ended in mass bloodshed after government-deployed soldiers and tanks and fired on those protesters. “I hope that the trade negotiations move forward, and I hope that Hong Kong is resolved in a peaceful
Mike Pompeo says ‘something like Tiananmen Square’ in Hong Kong would make a US-China trade deal ‘more difficult’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, difficult, square, tariffs, tiananmen, deal, pompeo, beijing, hong, mike, kong, china, uschina, protests


Mike Pompeo says 'something like Tiananmen Square' in Hong Kong would make a US-China trade deal 'more difficult'

A trade deal between the U.S. and China would be less likely if President Xi Jinping’s government cracks down violently on the large-scale protests in Hong Kong, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told CNBC on Tuesday.

It would be “more difficult” to reach a trade deal if the protests end “in a way that there was violence — the president said something like Tiananmen Square,” Pompeo said in an interview on “Squawk Box. ”

He was referring to the 1989 student-led demonstrations in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, which ended in mass bloodshed after government-deployed soldiers and tanks and fired on those protesters.

“I hope that the trade negotiations move forward, and I hope that Hong Kong is resolved in a peaceful way. Those would be the best outcomes for both China and the United States,” Pompeo said.

Hong Kong has for weeks been roiled by massive protests that have resulted in tense clashes with police.

The protests stemmed from opposition to an extradition bill that critics say would have given Beijing undue control over Hong Kong. But after the bill was suspended, the scope of the protest movement expanded to encompass issues of civil rights and democracy. When Britain handed over Hong Kong to China in 1997, Beijing promised that Hong Kong’s economic and political systems would not be changed for 50 years.

Over the weekend, President Donald Trump said that a trade deal “would be very hard” to do “if they do violence. If it’s another Tiananmen Square … I think it’s a very hard thing to do if there’s violence.”

Republican and Democratic lawmakers alike have come out in support of the protesters. But the movement against Chinese interference complicates the political landscape for Trump, who has sought a trade deal with Beijing that addresses issues such as trade deficits, the alleged theft of intellectual property and forced technology transfers.

Even without factoring in Hong Kong’s impact on negotiations, the trade war between the two economic superpowers has shown little sign of slowing down. The U.S. has imposed 25% tariffs on about $250 billion worth of Chinese imports, while Beijing has responded with its own tariffs on $110 billion in U.S. goods.

Despite the White House’s decision last week to delay some new tariffs on Chinese goods to spare American holiday shoppers, billions in that country’s imports will be taxed on Sept. 1. The rest of that round of tariffs, which will cover roughly the remaining $300 billion in goods bought from China, are slated to go into effect Dec. 15.

China had initially responded to the prospect of new tariffs by announcing that it would no longer buy U.S. agricultural products. The U.S. then labeled China a currency manipulator.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, difficult, square, tariffs, tiananmen, deal, pompeo, beijing, hong, mike, kong, china, uschina, protests


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Luxury brands must now show they are ‘good Chinese citizens’ after T-shirt territory anger, expert says

Western luxury labels will need to demonstrate that they are good Chinese citizens in the face of territorial sensitivities, according to an expert on branding in the region. The apologies came as protests in Hong Kong snowballed into a broader pro-democracy movement, with some activists even demanding full autonomy from Beijing. Wolf added that luxury brands have a difficult balance to make in appealing to consumers, regardless of where they live or their cultural preferences. Jackson Yee, a si


Western luxury labels will need to demonstrate that they are good Chinese citizens in the face of territorial sensitivities, according to an expert on branding in the region. The apologies came as protests in Hong Kong snowballed into a broader pro-democracy movement, with some activists even demanding full autonomy from Beijing. Wolf added that luxury brands have a difficult balance to make in appealing to consumers, regardless of where they live or their cultural preferences. Jackson Yee, a si
Luxury brands must now show they are ‘good Chinese citizens’ after T-shirt territory anger, expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, territory, kong, territorial, chinese, citizens, anger, hong, brands, luxury, world, expert, brand, tshirt, good, wolf, china


Luxury brands must now show they are 'good Chinese citizens' after T-shirt territory anger, expert says

Western luxury labels will need to demonstrate that they are good Chinese citizens in the face of territorial sensitivities, according to an expert on branding in the region.

Fashion brands including Givenchy, Coach and Versace apologized last week when some Chinese social media stars canceled their endorsement deals after text on some of their T-shirts suggested that places such as Hong Kong are separate countries from mainland China.

The apologies came as protests in Hong Kong snowballed into a broader pro-democracy movement, with some activists even demanding full autonomy from Beijing.

But David Wolf, a partner at Allison + Partners who helps multinational companies expand into China, warned that apologies from the luxury brands may not be enough for Chinese people who have “deep patriotic pride.”

“The more sensitive this whole territorial issue becomes, the more challenging the trade issues become between China and the rest of the world, the more that these brands are going to have to kowtow, if you will, and so they should be thinking very creatively about what they can do to demonstrate that they’re good, if you will, Chinese citizens, without at the same time alienating some of their other audiences in territories elsewhere in the world,” he told CNBC by phone.

Wolf added that luxury brands have a difficult balance to make in appealing to consumers, regardless of where they live or their cultural preferences. “It is extraordinarily difficult for these brands to do two things at once, which is first to understand what those sensitivities are, cultural and political around the world, to tiptoe around all those, and at the same time maintain the edginess that’s required of a fashion brand. That’s a very hard road to walk.”

Along with apologizing, Wolf said the fashion labels should “do something to visibly make amends” in the coming fashion season.

Chinese supermodel Liu Wen, a brand ambassador for Coach, owned by Tapestry, said on Weibo she had severed her endorsement deal with the American brand over a T-shirt, which listed Taiwan as a country. Jackson Yee, a singer with Chinese boy band TFBoys, said he was no longer working with Givenchy, the LVMH-owned brand, after one of the band’s world tour T-shirts referred to “Hong Kong, Hong Kong,” and “Macau, Macau.”

Wolf suggested that the Chinese brand ambassadors were also protecting themselves.

“These spokespeople, if they want to continue operating in China, they want to maintain themselves in the good graces of the Chinese government … so they have to make sure that they’re not associated with brands that take lightly issues that China takes seriously, like territorial integrity,” Wolf said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, territory, kong, territorial, chinese, citizens, anger, hong, brands, luxury, world, expert, brand, tshirt, good, wolf, china


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Cathay’s ‘unusual position’ makes it ‘vulnerable to pressure’ from Beijing, analyst says

Rupert Hogg, chief executive officer of Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., attends a news conference in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Mar. The company was recently caught in the Hong Kong protests, where staff reportedly took part in the pro-democracy rallies that have enraged Beijing. Innes-Ker said “companies may find that their employees’ activism turns into a political risk in mainland China, if this campaigning becomes associated with the firm’s brand.” “There are a lot of things within China t


Rupert Hogg, chief executive officer of Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., attends a news conference in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Mar. The company was recently caught in the Hong Kong protests, where staff reportedly took part in the pro-democracy rallies that have enraged Beijing. Innes-Ker said “companies may find that their employees’ activism turns into a political risk in mainland China, if this campaigning becomes associated with the firm’s brand.” “There are a lot of things within China t
Cathay’s ‘unusual position’ makes it ‘vulnerable to pressure’ from Beijing, analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vulnerable, kong, airline, position, analyst, chinese, political, hong, pressure, mainland, makes, resignation, beijing, protests, unusual, cathays, risk, china


Cathay's 'unusual position' makes it 'vulnerable to pressure' from Beijing, analyst says

Rupert Hogg, chief executive officer of Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., attends a news conference in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Mar. 13, 2019. The airline announced Hogg’s resignation on Mar.16. Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Cathay Pacific’s CEO Rupert Hogg officially stepped down on Monday amid what the company called “challenging weeks for the airline.” The company was recently caught in the Hong Kong protests, where staff reportedly took part in the pro-democracy rallies that have enraged Beijing. Hogg’s sudden resignation was announced days after China’s Civil Aviation Administration issued a “major aviation safety risk warning” to the airline. Hong Kong, a special administrative region of China, has seen more than 11 weeks of protests over a now-suspended extradition bill that would have allowed people in the territory to be sent to the mainland for trial.

Most firms in Hong Kong that engage in business with mainland China know that there is always a degree of political risk that needs to be navigated. Duncan Innes-Ker The Economist Intelligence Unit

In a statement released Friday, the company said it remains fully committed to Hong Kong under the principle of “One Country, Two Systems” — which allows the territory a certain degree of legal and economic autonomy.

Cathay’s close China links

Two of the airline’s largest shareholders are Swire Group — a Hong Kong and London-based diversified conglomerate that owns 45% of the airline — and Air China, a Chinese state-owned air carrier group which owns 22.65% of Cathay, according to data provided by Refinitiv. Hogg’s sudden resignation is a special case on its own, said Duncan Innes-Ker, regional director for Asia at The Economist Intelligence Unit. “Cathay is in a slightly unusual position in that a large Chinese (state-owned enterprise) has a significant stake in its share ownership,” Innes-Ker said. “Companies that have an SOE as an equity partner are likely to be especially vulnerable to pressure from the Chinese authorities. Cathay’s China routes are also crucial to its business model and future growth, so this makes it doubly susceptible,” he told CNBC. He explained that “most firms in Hong Kong that engage in business with mainland China know that there is always a degree of political risk that needs to be navigated.”

Innes-Ker said “companies may find that their employees’ activism turns into a political risk in mainland China, if this campaigning becomes associated with the firm’s brand.” Just over a week ago, the airline said employees who “support or take part in illegal protests, violent actions, or overly radical behaviour” would be barred from crewing flights to mainland China. The airline also fired two pilots over their involvement in the protests.

External pressure from Beijing

Since the former British colony was handed over to Beijing in 1997, China has very much recognized it needs Hong Kong, David Dodwell, executive director at HK-APEC Trade Policy Group told CNBC in early August. That was especially true when China was still opening up to the rest of the world, he said at that time. “There are a lot of things within China that can’t be done in China, and Hong Kong is indispensable for that,” Dodwell said. The city is not just a financial capital but also an important “headquarter capital, ” he added, explaining that many Chinese and foreign companies use Hong Kong as their headquarters because of the array of services the city offers.

Protesters take part in a rally against extradition bill on July 1, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Billy H.C. Kwok | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vulnerable, kong, airline, position, analyst, chinese, political, hong, pressure, mainland, makes, resignation, beijing, protests, unusual, cathays, risk, china


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Cathay Pacific Airways CEO resigns, the airline’s board blames ‘recent events’

Rupert Hogg, chief executive officer of Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., attends a news conference in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Mar. The CEO of Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific, Rupert Hogg, is to step down as the company’s leader “in view of recent events.” The airline has been under huge political pressure from Beijing after one of its pilots was found to have taken part in the ongoing protests in Hong Kong. In a statement to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange on Friday, Cathay Pacific’s board con


Rupert Hogg, chief executive officer of Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., attends a news conference in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Mar. The CEO of Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific, Rupert Hogg, is to step down as the company’s leader “in view of recent events.” The airline has been under huge political pressure from Beijing after one of its pilots was found to have taken part in the ongoing protests in Hong Kong. In a statement to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange on Friday, Cathay Pacific’s board con
Cathay Pacific Airways CEO resigns, the airline’s board blames ‘recent events’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, events, kong, cathay, hong, confirmed, pacific, resigns, airline, view, step, ceo, statement, recent, hogg, board, airlines, blames, airways


Cathay Pacific Airways CEO resigns, the airline's board blames 'recent events'

Rupert Hogg, chief executive officer of Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., attends a news conference in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Mar. 13, 2019. The airline announced Hogg’s resignation on Mar.16.

The CEO of Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific, Rupert Hogg, is to step down as the company’s leader “in view of recent events.”

The airline has been under huge political pressure from Beijing after one of its pilots was found to have taken part in the ongoing protests in Hong Kong. Another pilot was then said to have misused company information related to the protests. Both were subsequently sacked by the airline.

In a statement to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange on Friday, Cathay Pacific’s board confirmed that Hogg would step down as CEO despite there not being any matter that shareholders needed to be made aware of.

“He has also confirmed that he has resigned to take responsibility as a leader of the Company in view of recent events and that he is not aware of any disagreement with the Board,” added the statement.

From Monday, Hogg will be replaced by Augustus Tang. The airline also confirmed that Paul Loo has resigned as an Executive Director and Chief Customer and Commercial Officer and, on Monday, will be replaced by Ronald Lam.

In a separate statement issued by the airline, outgoing CEO Hogg said: “These have been challenging weeks for the airline and it is right that Paul and I take responsibility as leaders of the company.”

Cathay’s chairman, John Slosar, added that it was time to put “a new management team in place who can reset confidence”.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, events, kong, cathay, hong, confirmed, pacific, resigns, airline, view, step, ceo, statement, recent, hogg, board, airlines, blames, airways


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Hong Kong protests will be ‘settled or crushed’ ahead of China national celebrations, analyst says

The months-long protests in Hong Kong could come to an end soon, according to strategist David Roche, who said they will “be settled or crushed” before October 1 — the 70th anniversary of China’s National Day. The way China responds to the situation in the city is crucial in determining how markets and U.S.-China trade talks will be affected, he told CNBC on Friday. In fact, the politics go hand in hand with the Chinese economy, Roche said. “I don’t accept this will be a small scale problem in a


The months-long protests in Hong Kong could come to an end soon, according to strategist David Roche, who said they will “be settled or crushed” before October 1 — the 70th anniversary of China’s National Day. The way China responds to the situation in the city is crucial in determining how markets and U.S.-China trade talks will be affected, he told CNBC on Friday. In fact, the politics go hand in hand with the Chinese economy, Roche said. “I don’t accept this will be a small scale problem in a
Hong Kong protests will be ‘settled or crushed’ ahead of China national celebrations, analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kong, roche, economy, hong, beijing, dont, national, settled, analyst, hand, celebrations, china, protests, crushed, ahead, trade, talks


Hong Kong protests will be 'settled or crushed' ahead of China national celebrations, analyst says

The months-long protests in Hong Kong could come to an end soon, according to strategist David Roche, who said they will “be settled or crushed” before October 1 — the 70th anniversary of China’s National Day.

The way China responds to the situation in the city is crucial in determining how markets and U.S.-China trade talks will be affected, he told CNBC on Friday.

In fact, the politics go hand in hand with the Chinese economy, Roche said.

“I don’t accept this will be a small scale problem in a larger China economy. The reason I don’t is because I believe any intervention (from Beijing) to Hong Kong will be immediately, umbilically, linked to what happens to trade talks and international relations globally,” said Roche, who is president at research and investment consulting firm Independent Strategy.

Roche said “Beijing has to weigh in on two things: the political and economic cause.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kong, roche, economy, hong, beijing, dont, national, settled, analyst, hand, celebrations, china, protests, crushed, ahead, trade, talks


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Social media has become a battleground in Hong Kong’s protests

Using social media as a tool to galvanize support during a political movement isn’t new — the image of a yellow umbrella was widely shared on Facebook to show support to Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement in 2014. Hong Kong demonstrators have remained largely anonymous, using social media to avoid being identified and arrested by police authorities. Social media has changed the way people document history, said Tracy Loh, senior lecturer of communication management at Singapore Management Univer


Using social media as a tool to galvanize support during a political movement isn’t new — the image of a yellow umbrella was widely shared on Facebook to show support to Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement in 2014. Hong Kong demonstrators have remained largely anonymous, using social media to avoid being identified and arrested by police authorities. Social media has changed the way people document history, said Tracy Loh, senior lecturer of communication management at Singapore Management Univer
Social media has become a battleground in Hong Kong’s protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, using, hong, loh, used, protesters, movement, media, protests, battleground, demonstrators, videos, social, brutality, kongs


Social media has become a battleground in Hong Kong's protests

Using social media as a tool to galvanize support during a political movement isn’t new — the image of a yellow umbrella was widely shared on Facebook to show support to Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement in 2014. But this time around, the protesters are using social media in a way demonstrating a heightened awareness of cybersecurity and an increased understanding of how to effectively communicate with the medium.

Hong Kong demonstrators have remained largely anonymous, using social media to avoid being identified and arrested by police authorities. Media experts said such tech has played a significant role in the documentation, organization, and assembly of the large-scale demonstrations.

Social media has changed the way people document history, said Tracy Loh, senior lecturer of communication management at Singapore Management University. She told CNBC that social media has played a “more apparent” role in the 2019 protests than ever before.

Just as in the 2014 “Umbrella Movement,” social media is being used by protesters to conceal identities, spread information, mobilize demonstrators and avoid detainment — but it’s now gone beyond that, according to Loh

“I think that what has changed now is that social media is used to win the hearts and minds of the people. Both sides are using images of police brutality and/or protester brutality to further their own agendas,” she said.

The ongoing demonstrations in Hong Kong — a former British colony that was returned to Chinese rule in 1997 — started as peaceful rallies against a single proposed law. They’ve since snowballed into a wider pro-democracy movement, with some even demanding full autonomy from Beijing and occasional outbreaks of violence and disruptions to the city’s operations.

Protesters have circulated images of a female protester that was injured in the eye by members of the police force, and videos of police brutality have been spread to galvanize demonstrators, explained Loh. But, in the meantime, Chinese authorities have also utilized the power of social media, pushing out videos of military vehicles on standby in the neighboring city of Shenzhen and circulating videos of protesters disrupting public transit operations.

Social media has been used “as a tool in the battle for public opinion,” said Loh. She added that it has become more and more difficult for users and consumers of online content because they have to “deal with misinformation and fake news and the associated damages that (such content) can cause.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, using, hong, loh, used, protesters, movement, media, protests, battleground, demonstrators, videos, social, brutality, kongs


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Hong Kong’s tycoons ‘are the problem’ underlying recent unrest, economist says


Hong Kong’s tycoons ‘are the problem’ underlying recent unrest, economist says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unrest, kongs, hong, economist, tycoons, problem, recent, underlying



Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unrest, kongs, hong, economist, tycoons, problem, recent, underlying


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump clarifies ‘personal meeting’ tweet, suggests Xi should meet Hong Kong protesters

President Donald Trump on Thursday said he has “no doubt” that Chinese President Xi Jinping could bring an end to the unrest in Hong Kong by meeting face to face with the protesters. Trump said this in a tweet Thursday morning, less than a day after he first appeared to propose that a “personal meeting” between himself and Xi could bring a speedy end to “the Hong Kong problem. ” All aspects of the U.S.-China relationship have come under intense scrutiny, as the escalating trade war between Beiji


President Donald Trump on Thursday said he has “no doubt” that Chinese President Xi Jinping could bring an end to the unrest in Hong Kong by meeting face to face with the protesters. Trump said this in a tweet Thursday morning, less than a day after he first appeared to propose that a “personal meeting” between himself and Xi could bring a speedy end to “the Hong Kong problem. ” All aspects of the U.S.-China relationship have come under intense scrutiny, as the escalating trade war between Beiji
Trump clarifies ‘personal meeting’ tweet, suggests Xi should meet Hong Kong protesters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suggests, end, washington, clarifies, meet, chinese, personal, meeting, president, hong, kong, xi, trump, face, protesters, bring


Trump clarifies 'personal meeting' tweet, suggests Xi should meet Hong Kong protesters

President Donald Trump on Thursday said he has “no doubt” that Chinese President Xi Jinping could bring an end to the unrest in Hong Kong by meeting face to face with the protesters.

Trump said this in a tweet Thursday morning, less than a day after he first appeared to propose that a “personal meeting” between himself and Xi could bring a speedy end to “the Hong Kong problem. ”

All aspects of the U.S.-China relationship have come under intense scrutiny, as the escalating trade war between Beijing and Washington roils global markets and tensions ratchet up between mainland China and protesters in semiautonomous Hong Kong.

Trump has been criticized for taking an ambiguous stance on the Chinese government’s action in Hong Kong, where hundreds of thousands of people have taken to the streets originally to protest a divisive extradition bill supported by Beijing.

Fights have erupted at the protests, and the threat of increased violence has hovered over the demonstrations, which included storming government buildings and occupying the city’s airport.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suggests, end, washington, clarifies, meet, chinese, personal, meeting, president, hong, kong, xi, trump, face, protesters, bring


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post