Watch: Trump impeachment trial resumes with second day of arguments from House Dems

The Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump is scheduled to resume Thursday as Democratic House managers press their case for the president’s conviction and removal from office. Lead House impeachment manager Adam Schiff on Wednesday delivered a sweeping overview of Trump’s alleged abuses of power and attempts to obstruct Congress. In their presentation, House Democrats are seeking to win approval to call witnesses and introduce documents. The House impeachment inquiry was triggered b


The Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump is scheduled to resume Thursday as Democratic House managers press their case for the president’s conviction and removal from office.
Lead House impeachment manager Adam Schiff on Wednesday delivered a sweeping overview of Trump’s alleged abuses of power and attempts to obstruct Congress.
In their presentation, House Democrats are seeking to win approval to call witnesses and introduce documents.
The House impeachment inquiry was triggered b
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Watch: Trump impeachment trial resumes with second day of arguments from House Dems

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The Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump is scheduled to resume Thursday as Democratic House managers press their case for the president’s conviction and removal from office.

Lead House impeachment manager Adam Schiff on Wednesday delivered a sweeping overview of Trump’s alleged abuses of power and attempts to obstruct Congress.

Democrats were allotted 24 hours over three days to make their case before Trump’s defense team takes to the floor.

In their presentation, House Democrats are seeking to win approval to call witnesses and introduce documents. Democrats need at least four Republicans votes to attain a simple majority.

The House impeachment inquiry was triggered by Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy. In the call, Trump pressed his counterpart to announce an investigation into his Democratic rivals while withholding congressionally approved military aid.

A top government watchdog said last week that the Trump administration broke the law by withholding that military aid to Ukraine last summer “for a policy reason.”

The report from the Government Accountability Office came a day after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi authorized the transmission of the articles of impeachment to the Senate after a monthlong delay.

Trump was formally impeached by the House on Dec. 18 on abuse of power and obstruction of Congress charges.

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White House has started work on second round of tax cuts to boost growth, Mnuchin says

The White House has started work on a second round of tax cuts even as the budget deficit continues to grow, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Thursday. “The president has asked us to start working on what we call ‘tax 2.0,’ and that will be additional tax cuts,” Mnuchin told CNBC during an interview at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “They’ll be tax cuts for the middle class, and we’ll also be looking at other incentives to stimulate economic growth.” Talk of election year


The White House has started work on a second round of tax cuts even as the budget deficit continues to grow, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Thursday.
“The president has asked us to start working on what we call ‘tax 2.0,’ and that will be additional tax cuts,” Mnuchin told CNBC during an interview at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
“They’ll be tax cuts for the middle class, and we’ll also be looking at other incentives to stimulate economic growth.”
Talk of election year
White House has started work on second round of tax cuts to boost growth, Mnuchin says Cached Page below :
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White House has started work on second round of tax cuts to boost growth, Mnuchin says

The White House has started work on a second round of tax cuts even as the budget deficit continues to grow, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Thursday.

“The president has asked us to start working on what we call ‘tax 2.0,’ and that will be additional tax cuts,” Mnuchin told CNBC during an interview at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “They’ll be tax cuts for the middle class, and we’ll also be looking at other incentives to stimulate economic growth.”

Talk of election year tax cuts comes amid a swelling budget deficit that eclipsed $1 trillion for the 2019 calendar year. In addition, total government debt recently passed $23 trillion, despite President Donald Trump’s promises that economic growth would wipe out the deficit and pull down the federal IOU.

Mnuchin maintained that the tax cuts would pay for themselves even as growth as fallen well short of the administration’s promises of 3%-4% annually. He did concede that the level of spending needs to be curtailed.


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Trump impeachment trial: Democrats push for witnesses and documents

House Democrats are ready to press their case Thursday that President Donald Trump should be removed from office, including arguing that the Senate should allow witnesses and documents in the impeachment trial. Democrats also impeached Trump for blocking the House’s investigation into the matter, by refusing to hand over any documents and directing key witnesses not to comply with Congress. As the Democrats put forward their case, they also argued for the Senate to permit new documents and witne


House Democrats are ready to press their case Thursday that President Donald Trump should be removed from office, including arguing that the Senate should allow witnesses and documents in the impeachment trial.
Democrats also impeached Trump for blocking the House’s investigation into the matter, by refusing to hand over any documents and directing key witnesses not to comply with Congress.
As the Democrats put forward their case, they also argued for the Senate to permit new documents and witne
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Trump impeachment trial: Democrats push for witnesses and documents

House Democrats are ready to press their case Thursday that President Donald Trump should be removed from office, including arguing that the Senate should allow witnesses and documents in the impeachment trial.

The seven House managers, led by Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., were given 24 hours to lay out their case that Trump should be convicted and removed from office.

They have up to three days to make their arguments, after which Trump’s lawyers will have the same amount of time to present the defense.

The House impeached Trump on Dec. 18 on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress over his efforts to pressure Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to launch investigations of former Vice President Joe Biden and a debunked conspiracy theory alleging Ukrainian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

While Trump sought those investigations, his administration was withholding hundreds of millions of dollars in congressionally approved military aid to Ukraine as it battled Russia-back forces. Democrats also impeached Trump for blocking the House’s investigation into the matter, by refusing to hand over any documents and directing key witnesses not to comply with Congress.

Schiff and his team kicked off their statements Wednesday by painting a detailed timeline of events encompassing Trump’s dealings with Ukraine, and moving to establish that the president’s actions constitute abuses of his office.

Trump, Schiff said, “does not, under our laws and under our Constitution, have a right to use the powers of his office to corruptly solicit foreign aid, prohibited foreign aid, in his reelection.”

“He does not have the right to withhold official presidential acts to secure that assistance, and he certainly does not have the right to undermine our elections and place our security at risk for his own personal benefit,” Schiff said. “No president, Republican or Democrat, can be permitted to do that.”

Wednesday’s proceedings went until nearly 10 p.m. ET. They are scheduled to restart Thursday at 1 p.m.

Trump’s lawyer Jay Sekulow said Wednesday that the defense lawyers will challenge the House managers’ arguments and present “an affirmative case” in Trump’s defense.

As the Democrats put forward their case, they also argued for the Senate to permit new documents and witness testimony.

“We can and will prove President Trump guilty of the conduct and investigation into his misconduct,” Schiff said toward the end of his final remarks Wednesday. “But you should know who else was involved in the scheme. You should want the whole truth to come out.”

Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo., another House impeachment manager, said Thursday on MSNBC that “with documents, that’s going to be the ultimate judge of how serious [Republicans are] taking this, whether or not they’re just going to be a rubber stamp for the president.”

Democrats have also seized on Trump’s boast in Davos, Switzerland, that “honestly, we have all the material. They don’t have the material.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: kevin breuninger
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Scaramucci: I firmly believe Trump will lose the election

Anthony Scaramucci, former director of communications for the White House and founder of SkyBridge Capital LLC, speaks during the Skybridge Alternatives (SALT) conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Wednesday, May 8, 2019. Joe Buglewicz | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesSkyBridge Managing Partner Anthony Scaramucci believes President Donald Trump will lose the election later this year, accusing his former boss of “bullying,” “gaslighting” and “nonsensical inanity.” However, with income inequality at


Anthony Scaramucci, former director of communications for the White House and founder of SkyBridge Capital LLC, speaks during the Skybridge Alternatives (SALT) conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Wednesday, May 8, 2019.
Joe Buglewicz | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesSkyBridge Managing Partner Anthony Scaramucci believes President Donald Trump will lose the election later this year, accusing his former boss of “bullying,” “gaslighting” and “nonsensical inanity.”
However, with income inequality at
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Scaramucci: I firmly believe Trump will lose the election

Anthony Scaramucci, former director of communications for the White House and founder of SkyBridge Capital LLC, speaks during the Skybridge Alternatives (SALT) conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Wednesday, May 8, 2019. Joe Buglewicz | Bloomberg | Getty Images

SkyBridge Managing Partner Anthony Scaramucci believes President Donald Trump will lose the election later this year, accusing his former boss of “bullying,” “gaslighting” and “nonsensical inanity.” In his address at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Tuesday, Trump promoted his “America First” economic agenda and boasted about the health of the U.S. economy, which he claimed was down to a “whole new approach centered entirely on the well-being of the American worker.” Stock markets have repeatedly hit record highs over the past year, and the president has been keen to credit the sweeping corporate tax cuts his administration introduced in 2017.

However, with income inequality at a 50-year high and the gap widening year-on-year, former White House Director of Communications Scaramucci told CNBC on Thursday that Trump “hasn’t done enough,” with the president’s approval rating “missile-locked” at 42%. “If you look at where the stock market is, economic growth, a lot of the data, if he was just halfway normal, and didn’t do the tweeting, and all the bullying, and all the nonsensical inanity, he would have a much higher approval rating, it would’ve been easier for him to win re-election,” Scaramucci told CNBC’s Karen Tso in Davos. “But he’s missile-locked at a certain position, and he’s now a known entity. Before he ran, there was a lot of speculation of what he could be. Now we know what he is. And so I firmly think he’s going to lose, because 85% of the delegates here in Davos think he’s going to win.” A spokesperson for the White House wasn’t immediately available for comment when contacted by CNBC. Scaramucci claimed that prior to Trump’s election victory in 2016, Davos delegates were certain that he would fail to gain the Republican nomination and that Hillary Clinton would be president.

Checks and balances

Scaramucci projected that around 5% of Republican voters believe that Trump is endangering the “checks and balances” and “sacredness” of the constitution, accusing his fellow Republicans in Congress of lacking “the will or the courage to speak up to protect that document.” Trump’s impeachment trial is currently ongoing in the Senate, but will be conducted without witnesses, and the vote is expected to split along party lines with the Republican majority voting to acquit the president.

In terms of Democratic challengers, Scaramucci projected that a perceived moderate candidate such as Joe Biden, Amy Klobuchar, Pete Buttigieg or Michael Bloomberg would likely win the presidency. However, he suggested that Trump would “destroy” either Bernie Sanders or Elizabeth Warren. In terms of stock market reaction, Scaramucci predicted a slight rise in the event of a Bloomberg presidency, a “not overly negative” impact for Biden, and a 25% market correction should either Warren or Sanders win the keys to the White House.

‘Gaslighting’ and ‘hyper-normalizing’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: elliot smith
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Senate approves impeachment trial rules, rejecting witnesses

The U.S. Senate plunged into President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial with Republicans abruptly abandoning plans to cram opening arguments into two days but solidly rejecting Democratic demands for more witnesses to expose Trump’s “trifecta” of offenses. But it ended near 2 a.m. Wednesday with Republicans easily approving the new trial rules largely on their terms. After one particularly bitter exchange, Roberts intervened, taking the rare step of admonishing both the Democratic House managers


The U.S. Senate plunged into President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial with Republicans abruptly abandoning plans to cram opening arguments into two days but solidly rejecting Democratic demands for more witnesses to expose Trump’s “trifecta” of offenses.
But it ended near 2 a.m. Wednesday with Republicans easily approving the new trial rules largely on their terms.
After one particularly bitter exchange, Roberts intervened, taking the rare step of admonishing both the Democratic House managers
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Senate approves impeachment trial rules, rejecting witnesses

(L-R) House impeachment managers Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY), Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) and Rep. Jason Crow (D-CO) speaks to reporters during a brief media availability before the start of the impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol on January 21, 2020 in Washington, DC.

The U.S. Senate plunged into President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial with Republicans abruptly abandoning plans to cram opening arguments into two days but solidly rejecting Democratic demands for more witnesses to expose Trump’s “trifecta” of offenses.

A marathon session of nearly 13 hours started Tuesday with a setback for Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell and the president’s legal team, exposing a crack in the GOP ranks and the growing political unease over the historic impeachment proceedings unfolding amid a watchful public in an election year. But it ended near 2 a.m. Wednesday with Republicans easily approving the new trial rules largely on their terms.

“It’s about time we bring this power trip in for a landing,” said White House counsel Pat Cipollone, the president’s lead lawyer, lashing out at the House Democrats prosecuting the case.

“It’s a farce,” he said about the impeachment proceeding, “and it should end.”

Chief Justice John Roberts gaveled open the session, with House prosecutors on one side, Trump’s team on the other, in the well of the Senate, as senators sat silently at their desks, under oath to do “impartial justice.” No cellphones or other electronics were allowed.

As the day stretched deep into the night, lawyerly arguments gave way to more pointedly political ones. Tempers flared and senators paced the chamber. Democrats pursued what may be their only chance to force senators to vote on hearing new testimony.

After one particularly bitter exchange, Roberts intervened, taking the rare step of admonishing both the Democratic House managers and the White House counsel to “remember where they are.”

“I think it is appropriate at this point for me to admonish both the House managers and the president’s counsel in equal terms to remember that they are addressing the world’s greatest deliberative body,” the usually reserved Roberts said. He told them that description of the Senate stemmed from a 1905 trial when a senator objected to the word “pettifogging,” because members should “avoid speaking in a manner and using language that is not conducive to civil discourse.”

Over and over, Republicans turned back Democratic amendments to subpoena documents from the White House, State Department, Defense Department and budget office.

By the same 53-47 party-line, they turned away witnesses with front-row seats to Trump’s actions including acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney and John Bolton, the former national security adviser critical of the Ukraine policy.

Only on one amendment, to ensure a vote later on additional witnesses, did a single Republican, Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, join Democrats. But it, too, was rejected 52-48.

As the hours mounted, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer brushed back an offer from McConnell to more quickly stack the votes.

“It’s not our job to make it easy for you,” Rep. Adam Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee leading the prosecution, told the Senate. “Our job is to make it hard to deprive the American people of a fair trial.”

As the visitors’ gallery filled with guests, actress-and-activist Alyssa Milano among them, and Trump’s most ardent House allies lining the back rows, the day quickly took on the cadence of a trial proceeding over whether the president’s actions toward Ukraine warranted removal from office.

Earlier, McConnell stunned senators and delayed the start of proceedings with his decision to back off some of his proposed rules. Republicans were said to be concerned over the political optics of “dark of night” sessions.

Instead, 24 hours of opening arguments for each side will be spread over three days, for a moment swelling Democrats’ momentum as they push to break the standoff over calling new witnesses.

Cipollone led the prosecution, scoffing that the House charges against Trump were “ridiculous,” insisting the president “has done absolutely nothing wrong.”

The White House legal team did not dispute Trump’s actions, when he called Ukraine and asked for a “favor,” which was to investigate Democrat Joe Biden as the U.S. was withholding military aid the ally desperately needed as it faced off with hostile Russia on its border. But the lawyers insisted the president did nothing wrong. “Absolutely no case,” Cipollone said.

Schiff, the California Democrat, opened for the prosecution saying America’s Founders added the remedy of impeachment in the Constitution with “precisely this type of conduct in mind — conduct that abuses the power of office for a personal benefit, that undermines our national security, and that invites foreign interference in the democratic process of an election.”

Said Schiff: “It is the trifecta of constitutional misconduct justifying impeachment.″

The other lead lawyer on Trump’s team, Jay Sekulow, retorted, “I’ll give you a trifecta,” outlining complaints over the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry process.

The impeachment trial, unfolding in an election year, is testing whether Trump’s actions toward Ukraine warrant removal at the same time that voters are forming their own verdict on his White House.

All four senators who are presidential candidates are off the campaign trail, seated as jurors. “My focus is going to be on impeachment,” Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent, told reporters.

The day began as a debate over rules, and it was only when the clerk started reading the dry language of the resolution that the hand-written changes became apparent.

McConnell made the adjustment after encountering resistance from Republicans during a closed-door lunch meeting. Senators worried about the public reaction to cramming the 24 hours of opening arguments from each side into just two days.

Sen. Susan Collins of Maine and Sen. Lisa Murkowksi of Alaska, along with a substantial number of other Republicans, wanted to make the changes, according to people familiar with the situation. Some senators argued that the two-day limit would have helped Democrats cast Republicans as squeezing testimony through in the dead of night.

Collins and Murkowski, who often ally to buck GOP leadership, sat side by side in the Senate through the day’s proceedings.

The turnaround was a swift lesson as White House wishes run into the reality of the Senate. The White House wanted a session kept to a shorter period to both expedite the trial and shift more of the proceedings into late night, according to a person familiar with the matter but unauthorized to discuss it in public.

“READ THE TRANSCRIPTS!” the president tweeted from overseas, at a global leaders conference in Davos, Switzerland.

That’s the transcript of his phone call in which he asked new Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy for “a favor.” The Democrats cite that transcript as solid evidence against Trump, though he repeatedly describes it as “perfect.”

A whistleblower’s complaint led the House to impeach Trump last month on a charge of abuse of power for pushing Ukraine to investigate Democratic rival Biden and his son Hunter Biden as the White House was withholding military aid from Ukraine. Trump also was impeached on a second charge, of obstruction of Congress, in the House probe.

Schumer of New York said Republican senators “felt the heat” and it “shows that they can make other changes, and that we can get documents and witnesses.”

Schumer offered the first of several amendments to the rules — to issue a subpoena for to the White House for “all documents, communications and other records” relating to the Ukraine matter.

It was rejected on a party-line vote, as were the others.

Trump’s legal team, absent its TV-showcase attorneys, Alan Dershowitz and Kenneth Starr who were not in the chamber, argued that in seeking new evidence the House was bringing a half-baked case that would be thrown out in any other court of law.

But Rep. Zoe Lofgren of California, one of the House managers and the first woman to argue for the prosecution in a presidential impeachment trial, said the House wasn’t asking the Senate to do the job for them. “The House is asking the Senate to do its job, to have a trial,” she said. “Have you ever heard of a trial without evidence?″

The White House had instructed officials not to testify in the House inquiry, and refused to turn over witnesses or documents, citing what is says is precedence in defiance of congressional subpoenas.

The ambassadors and national security officials who did appear before the House delivered often striking testimony, highlights that were displayed on television screens during the Senate proceeding.

At one point, Democrat Schiff displayed video of Trump himself suggesting there should be more witnesses testifying.

One by one, the House managers made the case, drawing on their own life experiences.

Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., a former police chief, said she never saw anyone take “such extreme steps to hide evidence.″ Rep. Jason Crow, a former Army Ranger who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, seemed to capture senators’ attention when he told them near he knew the hour was late, but it was morning in Ukraine where soldiers were waking up to fight Russia, depending on U.S. aid.

Legal scholars have long insisted the framers of the Constitution provided impeachment as a remedy for “other high crimes and misdemeanors,” a particularly broad definition that doesn’t mean simply specific criminal acts.

Democrats point in particular to a General Accountability Office report that found the White House violated federal law by stalling money to Ukraine that had been approved by Congress.

No president has ever been removed from office by the Senate. With its 53-47 Republican majority, the Senate is not expected to mount the two-thirds vote needed for conviction.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22
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Trump rips ‘sleazebag’ Nadler before House Democrats state their case in Senate impeachment

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump called House impeachment manager Jerry Nadler “a sleazebag” on Wednesday, hours before he and fellow Democrats were to begin laying out their case in the Senate for Trump’s conviction and removal from office. But hours later at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Trump unloaded on Nadler. In response to a question about the New York Democratic, who heads the House Judiciary Committee, Trump said: “I’ve known him


Amanda Andrade-Rhoades | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump called House impeachment manager Jerry Nadler “a sleazebag” on Wednesday, hours before he and fellow Democrats were to begin laying out their case in the Senate for Trump’s conviction and removal from office.
But hours later at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Trump unloaded on Nadler.
In response to a question about the New York Democratic, who heads the House Judiciary Committee, Trump said: “I’ve known him
Trump rips ‘sleazebag’ Nadler before House Democrats state their case in Senate impeachment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, resolution, democrats, hours, trump, nadler, state, vote, house, rules, trial, sleazebag, impeachment, case, senate, rips


Trump rips 'sleazebag' Nadler before House Democrats state their case in Senate impeachment

House impeachment managers including Representative Adam Schiff, a Democrat from California, left, and Representative Jerry Nadler, a Democrat from New York, right, walk to the Senate floor for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020. Amanda Andrade-Rhoades | Bloomberg | Getty Images

President Donald Trump called House impeachment manager Jerry Nadler “a sleazebag” on Wednesday, hours before he and fellow Democrats were to begin laying out their case in the Senate for Trump’s conviction and removal from office. Capping a tension-filled day, Chief Justice John Roberts, who is presiding over the trial, interjected in the debate early Wednesday to admonish both sides for their harsh language. But hours later at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Trump unloaded on Nadler. In response to a question about the New York Democratic, who heads the House Judiciary Committee, Trump said: “I’ve known him a long time. He’s a sleazebag. Everyone knows that.” The next stage in the trial is set to begin at 1 p.m. ET. In the early hours of Wednesday, the Republican-majority chamber voted along party lines to adopt a resolution from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., laying out the rules for the proceedings. McConnell claimed that his guidelines mirrored the bipartisan rules that were followed in former President Bill Clinton’s 1998 impeachment trial. But the House managers and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., strenuously objected to key parts of the resolution — some of which departed from Clinton’s precedent — arguing that they would result in a rushed trial without proper assurances that salient evidence and witnesses will be heard.

McConnell did make concessions to his proposal from Monday evening, however. As the resolution was read aloud on the Senate floor, it was revealed that the rules will permit each side to stretch out the 24 total hours they’ve been allotted for making arguments over three days, instead of the original two. The changes will also automatically admit into evidence the entire record of the House impeachment probe into Trump last fall. The majority leader’s proposal passed the Senate in a 53-47 vote in the middle of the night, following more than 12 hours of at-times vicious debate on the Senate floor between House managers and Trump’s defense team over a series of amendments put forward by Schumer. In remarks early Wednesday, Nadler addressed the Republican senators in the chamber directly. “Will you permit us to present you with the entire record of the president’s misconduct? Or will you instead choose to be complicit in the president’s coverup?” he asked. “So far, I’m sad to say I see a lot of senators voting for a coverup, voting to deny witnesses, an absolutely indefensible vote, obviously a treacherous vote.” Trump lawyer Pat Cipollone responded: “Mr. Nadler, you owe an apology to the president of the United States and his family, you owe an apology to the Senate, but most of all you owe an apology to the American people.” Shortly after that exchange, Roberts chimed in.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: kevin breuninger
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Watch: House Dems lay out case for Trump’s removal as Senate impeachment trial continues

The Senate impeachment trial against President Donald Trump is scheduled to resume on Wednesday as Democratic House managers begin laying out their case for the president’s conviction and removal from office. The changes will also automatically admit into evidence the entire record of the House impeachment probe into Trump last fall. The rules do not guarantee witnesses, but Senators can still vote during the trial to admit them. The House impeachment inquiry was triggered by Trump’s July 25 pho


The Senate impeachment trial against President Donald Trump is scheduled to resume on Wednesday as Democratic House managers begin laying out their case for the president’s conviction and removal from office.
The changes will also automatically admit into evidence the entire record of the House impeachment probe into Trump last fall.
The rules do not guarantee witnesses, but Senators can still vote during the trial to admit them.
The House impeachment inquiry was triggered by Trump’s July 25 pho
Watch: House Dems lay out case for Trump’s removal as Senate impeachment trial continues Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: yelena dzhanova
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Watch: House Dems lay out case for Trump's removal as Senate impeachment trial continues

[The stream is slated to start at 1 p.m. ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.]

The Senate impeachment trial against President Donald Trump is scheduled to resume on Wednesday as Democratic House managers begin laying out their case for the president’s conviction and removal from office.

The opening arguments follow a day of proceedings on the floor. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday rebuffed Democrats’ pleas to guarantee new witnesses, setting rules that initially gave each side 24 hours over two days to present their arguments in the trial.

Democrats won two key changes to the rules with the help of moderate Republicans, though their other proposed amendments were shot down.

The changes will permit each side to make their arguments over three days, instead of two, as McConnell had proposed. The changes will also automatically admit into evidence the entire record of the House impeachment probe into Trump last fall.

The rules do not guarantee witnesses, but Senators can still vote during the trial to admit them.

The House impeachment inquiry was triggered by Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy. In the call, Trump pressed his counterpart to announce an investigation into Democratic rivals while withholding congressionally approved military aid.

A top government watchdog said last week that the Trump administration broke the law by withholding that military aid to Ukraine last summer “for a policy reason.”

The report from the Government Accountability Office came a day after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi authorized the transmission of the articles of impeachment to the Senate after a monthlong delay.

Trump was formally impeached by the House on Dec. 18 on abuse of power and obstruction of Congress charges.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: yelena dzhanova
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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to visit Ukraine next week, sources say

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the U.S. State Department January 07, 2020 in Washington, DC. Ukrainian officials are preparing for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s visit next week, according to two sources informed by Kyiv about the trip, which is now scheduled for Jan. 30-31. The State Department declined to comment on Pompeo’s upcoming Ukraine visit. Congress authorized an additional $300 million in security assistance for Ukraine in its fiscal 2020 spending package. The tempora


U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the U.S. State Department January 07, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Ukrainian officials are preparing for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s visit next week, according to two sources informed by Kyiv about the trip, which is now scheduled for Jan. 30-31.
The State Department declined to comment on Pompeo’s upcoming Ukraine visit.
Congress authorized an additional $300 million in security assistance for Ukraine in its fiscal 2020 spending package.
The tempora
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to visit Ukraine next week, sources say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: kayla tausche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, sources, zelenskiy, pompeos, 2020, trump, president, ukraine, house, pompeo, washington, visit, state, secretary, mike, week, impeachment


Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to visit Ukraine next week, sources say

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the U.S. State Department January 07, 2020 in Washington, DC.

Ukrainian officials are preparing for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s visit next week, according to two sources informed by Kyiv about the trip, which is now scheduled for Jan. 30-31.

Pompeo canceled a previously planned trip to Ukraine and four other nations slated for early January amid escalating tensions between the United States and Iran that led to protests and heightened security in the region.

The State Department declined to comment on Pompeo’s upcoming Ukraine visit.

During the previous plan, Pompeo was scheduled to meet with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy — the highest-ranking U.S. official to do so since Zelenskiy and President Donald Trump met on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly. During that meeting, which took place the day after House Democrats launched their impeachment inquiry centered on a July 25 phone call between the two leaders, Zelenskiy told reporters he felt no pressure from the United State to investigate the family of former Vice President Joe Biden.

“We had, I think, good phone call. It was normal. We spoke about many things,” Zelenskiy said. “So, I think, and you read [the transcript], that nobody pushed. Pushed me.”

The trip’s timing is expected to come at the end of a whirlwind two weeks in Washington, where Trump’s impeachment trial has explored the relationship between the administration, its personnel and its decision to withhold congressionally approved military aid to Ukraine for several months.

In September, the Trump administration lifted a hold on nearly $400 million in aid to Ukraine for weapons and missile defense systems, shortly after Congress learned of a whistleblower’s concern that Trump was conditioning the money on a corruption investigation into the Bidens.

“It could be coincidence,” White House advisor Kellyanne Conway told Fox News, in response to a question about that timing. “Why wouldn’t it be?”

Congress authorized an additional $300 million in security assistance for Ukraine in its fiscal 2020 spending package. Ukraine experts suggest Pompeo’s visit will seek to reaffirm continued support from Washington, despite the close scrutiny of U.S.-Ukraine ties on Capitol Hill and the absence of leadership at the U.S. embassy in Kyiv.

“One thing Ukrainians want to know is when an American ambassador will be formally nominated,” said Ed Chow, senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

The temporary appointment of former ambassador Bill Taylor, a witness in the House impeachment hearings, expired in early 2020 without a permanent appointment announced.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: kayla tausche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, sources, zelenskiy, pompeos, 2020, trump, president, ukraine, house, pompeo, washington, visit, state, secretary, mike, week, impeachment


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How this 37-year-old makes $34,000 per year in extra income—as an Airbnb host

His main Airbnb property, the Yellow House, is bringing in tens of thousands of dollars a year. In 2018, renting out the house brought in $34,000 in revenue — around four times as much as the average Airbnb property. Pierson started to host visitors through Couchsurfing.com and eventually, after realizing it could help him pay his rent, booking guests on Airbnb. “That was the point when a light bulb went off and I started looking for a house,” Pierson says. While the typical rate for The Yellow


His main Airbnb property, the Yellow House, is bringing in tens of thousands of dollars a year.
In 2018, renting out the house brought in $34,000 in revenue — around four times as much as the average Airbnb property.
Pierson started to host visitors through Couchsurfing.com and eventually, after realizing it could help him pay his rent, booking guests on Airbnb.
“That was the point when a light bulb went off and I started looking for a house,” Pierson says.
While the typical rate for The Yellow
How this 37-year-old makes $34,000 per year in extra income—as an Airbnb host Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, started, 34000, athens, weekends, pierson, incomeas, 37yearold, house, airbnb, extra, makes, property, host, pay, yellow, help


How this 37-year-old makes $34,000 per year in extra income—as an Airbnb host

“You might as well call me Cinderella, because sometimes I feel like all I do is clean,” says Jon Pierson, a 37-year-old Airbnb host living in Athens, Georgia. But all that cleaning pays off, as Pierson has been able to adopt Airbnb as a lucrative side gig. His main Airbnb property, the Yellow House, is bringing in tens of thousands of dollars a year. In 2018, renting out the house brought in $34,000 in revenue — around four times as much as the average Airbnb property. He’s on pace to beat that in 2019. Over the years, Pierson has worked at nonprofits in Albuquerque, as a park ranger in Yellowstone, and for the United States Forest Service in Arizona. These days, he’s a part-time marketer at a music venue, a county landscaping supervisor and a dad to his 8-year-old son, Benjamin, who lives with his mom in Athens. But on top of dad-duty and working two other jobs, Pierson finds himself constantly scrubbing, mopping, and dusting to maintain his status as an Airbnb Superhost.

Pierson’s long, winding road to Airbnb

At 20, after dropping out of college in Maine, Pierson rode his bike across the country via the Trans-America Trail, sleeping on strangers’ couches. That trip, which took him across 15 states and added up to more than 4,000 miles, “changed my life,” he says. More from Grow:

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How a 31-year-old launched a $225,000 dog-care business

Doing this after your interview can boost your chances of getting hired He eventually earned a bachelor’s degree in parks and recreation management from Northern Arizona University in 2008, at age 26. After a few years working in forests and parks, Pierson moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee, where he thought back to his bicycle trip across the country and decided to start hosting travelers. “So many people would stop and offer me a meal or a bed or a shower,” he says. “I wanted to give back, karmically.” Pierson started to host visitors through Couchsurfing.com and eventually, after realizing it could help him pay his rent, booking guests on Airbnb. “I stumbled across Airbnb and started offering my spare bedroom. From there, I started offering my whole place,” he says, “to help pay the bills.” But he ran into trouble when his landlord caught wind of the activity, which violated his lease. “I was a Superhost at that point; I had a great reputation on Airbnb,” he says. He made a deal with his landlord to let him fulfill his remaining reservations, but the landlord wouldn’t renew the lease. “That was the point when a light bulb went off and I started looking for a house,” Pierson says.

At peak times, he can charge $700 a night

Pierson moved to Athens and, with a relative’s help, cobbled together a down payment so he could purchase The Yellow House, a 15-year-old, 1,000-square-foot, two-bedroom cottage, for $127,000. He completed it with used furniture bought for $3,000 and put the house up for rent on Airbnb for $100 per night. “I closed on a Monday, my first guests arrived on Thursday,” he says. “I wasted no time.” Pierson himself became something of a nomad, staying with friends and sometimes at the house when it wasn’t booked.

Jon Pierson’s Yellow House

Pierson’s Airbnb business and his new home, Athens, were a perfect fit. The city has a population of around 125,000 and is home to the University of Georgia, which can attract tens of thousands of visitors on weekends for graduations and football games. Events like those helped make The Yellow House so lucrative. While the typical rate for The Yellow House is now $175 per night, football weekends can raise the rate much higher. For an upcoming game this September between Georgia and Notre Dame, the house booked a year in advance for $700 per night. Graduation weekends fetch similar rates. “I make half my annual mortgage in six weekends,” he says. Pierson’s been so successful on Airbnb that he’s even started managing profiles for other hosts. For 20% of each booking fee, Pierson launches a host’s profile, has professional photographs taken of the property, manages the calendar, and coordinates with all of the guests and cleaning crews. Doing it all generally takes between 10 and 15 hours per week. On a busy weekend, Pierson says he could be running up to six Airbnb stays simultaneously. “That’s where you make your money,” he says.

Pierson’s advice for running an Airbnb


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, started, 34000, athens, weekends, pierson, incomeas, 37yearold, house, airbnb, extra, makes, property, host, pay, yellow, help


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Trump impeachment trial highlights: Bolton-Biden witness trade is ‘off the table,’ Schumer says

House Democrats on Wednesday began the three-day process of laying out their case to the Senate that impeached President Donald Trump should be convicted and removed from office. Lead House impeachment manager Adam Schiff, D-Calif., kicked off the trial proceedings around 1 p.m. The House managers’ opening statement in Trump’s impeachment trial followed a contentious day of debate inside and outside the Senate chamber. While Trump sought those investigations, his administration was withholding h


House Democrats on Wednesday began the three-day process of laying out their case to the Senate that impeached President Donald Trump should be convicted and removed from office.
Lead House impeachment manager Adam Schiff, D-Calif., kicked off the trial proceedings around 1 p.m.
The House managers’ opening statement in Trump’s impeachment trial followed a contentious day of debate inside and outside the Senate chamber.
While Trump sought those investigations, his administration was withholding h
Trump impeachment trial highlights: Bolton-Biden witness trade is ‘off the table,’ Schumer says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senate, table, trade, highlights, impeachment, trial, boltonbiden, witness, schiff, house, trumps, ukraine, president, schumer, aid, democrats, trump


Trump impeachment trial highlights: Bolton-Biden witness trade is 'off the table,' Schumer says

House Democrats on Wednesday began the three-day process of laying out their case to the Senate that impeached President Donald Trump should be convicted and removed from office. Lead House impeachment manager Adam Schiff, D-Calif., kicked off the trial proceedings around 1 p.m. ET, delivering a sweeping overview of Trump’s alleged abuses of power and attempts to obstruct Congress. The House managers’ opening statement in Trump’s impeachment trial followed a contentious day of debate inside and outside the Senate chamber. Trump’s defense team and the Democrats grappled for more than 12 hours over the rules of the trial, each throwing punches so intense that Chief Justice John Roberts was compelled to interject.

Trump, meanwhile, spared no opportunity to attack Democrats over the impeachment “hoax,” slamming House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., as a “sleazeball” before departing the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Here are the biggest highlights of the impeachment trial so far today:

Schiff’s case

Schiff, who led the House in its efforts to pass two articles of impeachment against Trump in December, spoke on the Senate floor for more than two hours. He made lofty arguments about historical precedent, warning that if Trump is not removed, future presidents will feel free to seek foreign help with elections. Trump was impeached over his efforts to pressure Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to launch investigations into his political rival, former Vice President Joe Biden, and his son Hunter, along with a debunked conspiracy theory alleging Ukrainian interference in the 2016 presidential election. While Trump sought those investigations, his administration was withholding hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid to Ukraine without providing a clear explanation. Democrats also impeached Trump for blocking the House’s investigation into the matter, by refusing to hand over any documents and directing key witnesses not to comply with Congress. Schiff began his remarks by tying the founding fathers’ “prescient” views about impeachment to Trump through a quote from Alexander Hamilton: “When a man unprincipled in private life desperate in his fortune, bold in his temper, possessed of considerable talents, having the advantage of military habits — despotic in his ordinary demeanour — known to have scoffed in private at the principles of liberty — when such a man is seen to mount the hobby horse of popularity — to join in the cry of danger to liberty — to take every opportunity of embarrassing the General Government & bringing it under suspicion — to flatter and fall in with all the non sense of the zealots of the day — It may justly be suspected that his object is to throw things into confusion that he may ‘ride the storm and direct the whirlwind.'” Schiff quickly moved to establish that Trump’s dealings with Ukraine constituted abuses of the presidency – a preemptive strike against Trump’s attorneys, who maintain that the president has done nothing wrong. Trump, Schiff said, “does not, under our laws and under our constitution, have a right to use the powers of his office to corruptly solicit foreign aid, prohibited foreign aid, in his re-election.” “He does not have the right to withhold official presidential acts to secure that assistance, and he certainly does not have the right to undermine our elections and place our security at risk for his own personal benefit,” Schiff said. “No president, Republican or Democrat, can be permitted to do that.” Schiff also employed the words of acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, who in October admitted – then tried to walk back – that the Ukraine aid was tied to investigations. If this was allowed to stand, Schiff argued, there was no limit to the presidential malfeasance Americans would be told to just “get over it” in the future. “Are we to accept, ‘Well, the president says there was no quid pro quo, I guess that closes the case!'” Schiff asked rhetorically.

Trump defense: No crime in impeachment charges

One of Trump’s lead defense lawyers, Jay Sekulow, told reporters Wednesday that his team would “rebut” much of what Schiff alleged in his opening statement. Their argument will be based on both “challenging the case that they made” and then making “an affirmative case” in Trump’s defense, Sekulow said. Sekulow singled out Democrats’ implicit charge that Trump’s decision to freeze the aid to Ukraine was directly tied to his request that Ukraine launch investigations into the Bidens. “You noticed that Adam Schiff today talked about quid pro quo,” said Sekulow, using the Latin term phrase meaning ‘this for that’ in reference to Schiff’s remarks about Mulvaney. “Notice what’s not in the articles of impeachment – allegations or accusations of quid pro quo. That’s because they didn’t exist,” Sekulow said. The president’s lawyers are expected to argue that Trump’s decision first to withhold, and then abruptly release, nearly $400 million in aid to Ukraine last summer was unrelated to his request that Ukraine “do us a favor” by investigating the Bidens. They are also expected to argue that the articles of impeachment against Trump themselves do not accuse the president of committing a crime under federal law.

Schumer rejects deal to swap Bolton testimony for Hunter Biden’s

Democrats fought for more than 12 hours Tuesday to ensure that the Republican-majority Senate would issue subpoenas for documents and witnesses, including Mulvaney and former national security advisor John Bolton. But Schumer’s 11 amendments to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s proposed rules were shot down, nearly all along party lines. Over the next several hours, speculation grew on Capitol Hill that a possible deal could be struck whereby Bolton – who vowed that he would appear in the Senate if he was subpoenaed – could be allowed to testify if Hunter Biden was also brought in as a witness. Democrats see Bolton as a key fact witness who was close to the president and the associates who were involved in the efforts toward Ukraine. Many Republicans have adopted Trump’s suspicions about Hunter Biden, who served on the board of a Ukraine natural gas company while his father was vice president. Schumer, however, poured cold water on the idea while speaking to reporters during a recess in proceedings Wednesday afternoon. “No, I think that’s off the table,” Schumer said when asked about the possibility of a witness trade. “That trade is not on the table.”

Trump boasts he has ‘all the material’

Wrapping up a trip to Davos, Switzerland to attend the World Economic Forum, Trump spoke to reporters about the impeachment, where he seemed to inadvertently admit that the White House refusal to turn over documents to Congress was helping his case. “I got to watch enough — I thought our team did a very good job. But honestly, we have all the material. They don’t have the material,” he said. House manager Val Demings, D-Fla., quickly seized upon Trump’s remarks as an admission of guilt on the article of obstructing Congress.

House managers’ plan


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senate, table, trade, highlights, impeachment, trial, boltonbiden, witness, schiff, house, trumps, ukraine, president, schumer, aid, democrats, trump


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