NBA-China controversy shows why US needs to be careful about Huawei, FCC commissioner says

The recent NBA-China controversy illuminates why the U.S. must cautiously approach any decision to allow Huawei’s 5G technology into the country, FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr said Thursday on CNBC. Carr’s comments Thursday came one day after FCC Chairman Ajit Pai expressed similar concerns on Twitter about Huawei, the world’s largest telecom equipment maker. U.S. officials accuse Huawei of being a national security risk, alleging its equipment could facilitate the transfer of data to the Chines


The recent NBA-China controversy illuminates why the U.S. must cautiously approach any decision to allow Huawei’s 5G technology into the country, FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr said Thursday on CNBC.
Carr’s comments Thursday came one day after FCC Chairman Ajit Pai expressed similar concerns on Twitter about Huawei, the world’s largest telecom equipment maker.
U.S. officials accuse Huawei of being a national security risk, alleging its equipment could facilitate the transfer of data to the Chines
NBA-China controversy shows why US needs to be careful about Huawei, FCC commissioner says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, equipment, worlds, needs, careful, laws, shows, fcc, chinese, commissioner, technology, controversy, concerns, carr, huawei, nbachina, data


NBA-China controversy shows why US needs to be careful about Huawei, FCC commissioner says

The recent NBA-China controversy illuminates why the U.S. must cautiously approach any decision to allow Huawei’s 5G technology into the country, FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr said Thursday on CNBC.

“This NBA issue over the last couple weeks shows how China can leverage all sorts of different levers to exert and have people toe its own political line,” Carr said on “Squawk Alley.”

“So I think that is a threat that that same type of influence could be exerted through Chinese-owned equipment in the U.S. market, which is why we’re taking a very close look at the FCC about whether to do something about that,” he said.

Carr’s comments Thursday came one day after FCC Chairman Ajit Pai expressed similar concerns on Twitter about Huawei, the world’s largest telecom equipment maker. The Chinese company’s products are used by 45 of the world’s 50 largest phone carriers, according to The Associated Press.

The NBA found itself enmeshed in a geopolitical incident after Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey expressed his support for Hong Kong protesters. The Chinese government and some businesses in the country responded forcefully, severing ties with the league in various ways.

Earlier this year, the U.S. blacklisted Huawei, and prevented it from doing businesses with American companies — though it was granted a reprieve until November.

U.S. officials accuse Huawei of being a national security risk, alleging its equipment could facilitate the transfer of data to the Chinese government. Huawei has consistently denied the allegations.

Carr, who was nominated to the FCC by President Donald Trump in 2017, said the regulatory agency is invovled in a proceeding “looking at whether to allow funding of Huawei equipment.”

“And at my request we’re also looking closely at whether we need to take equipment out of the network,” Carr said.

Countries around the world are in a race to build out 5G systems, a mobile network that promises fast data speeds and other capabilities to support emerging technologies such as driverless cars.

The U.S. government isn’t the only one to express concerns about Huawei’s potential role in constructing the next-generation infrastructure. Australia and New Zealand have barred the company from their domestic networks.

Those concerns are due, in part, to China’s wide-ranging internet laws, which require technology companies to assist Beijing with loosely defined “intelligence work.”

Interpretations of the laws vary among experts, Carr said.

“There’s a lot of people that say the laws in China don’t expressly authorize them to use this Huawei equipment in the U.S. for spying or other nefarious purposes. There’s been some disagreement about that,” Carr said.

Huawei told CNBC in March that it has never been asked to hand over data to Beijing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, equipment, worlds, needs, careful, laws, shows, fcc, chinese, commissioner, technology, controversy, concerns, carr, huawei, nbachina, data


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Germany set to allow Huawei into 5G networks, defying pressure from the US

The Huawei logo in front of the company’s German headquarters in Duesseldorf, GermanyGermany will not ban Chinese telecoms giant Huawei from helping to build its national 5G networks, snubbing calls from the U.S. to bar the company over national security concerns. The move is a blow to the U.S., which has been pressuring its allies to exclude Huawei from 5G infrastructure, claiming its presence in the networks would enable Chinese espionage. In an emailed statement on Wednesday, a Huawei spokesp


The Huawei logo in front of the company’s German headquarters in Duesseldorf, GermanyGermany will not ban Chinese telecoms giant Huawei from helping to build its national 5G networks, snubbing calls from the U.S. to bar the company over national security concerns.
The move is a blow to the U.S., which has been pressuring its allies to exclude Huawei from 5G infrastructure, claiming its presence in the networks would enable Chinese espionage.
In an emailed statement on Wednesday, a Huawei spokesp
Germany set to allow Huawei into 5G networks, defying pressure from the US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spokesperson, national, defying, set, huawei, networks, presence, german, chinese, germany, pressure, organizations, allow, security


Germany set to allow Huawei into 5G networks, defying pressure from the US

The Huawei logo in front of the company’s German headquarters in Duesseldorf, Germany

Germany will not ban Chinese telecoms giant Huawei from helping to build its national 5G networks, snubbing calls from the U.S. to bar the company over national security concerns.

A spokesperson for Germany’s Interior Ministry confirmed in a phone call Wednesday that the decision had been made on Tuesday.

The move is a blow to the U.S., which has been pressuring its allies to exclude Huawei from 5G infrastructure, claiming its presence in the networks would enable Chinese espionage. Countries including Australia and New Zealand have already banned the company from their domestic networks.

Under Chinese law, organizations can be forced to hand over data to the state if requested to do so, but Huawei has repeatedly denied claims that its presence in 5G networks would act as a back door for China.

In an emailed statement on Wednesday, a Huawei spokesperson told CNBC a “fact and standards-based approach” was the best way to address global cybersecurity challenges.

“We welcome the move the German government has taken to create a level playing field for 5G network vendors,” they said. “Politicizing cyber security will only hinder technology development and social progress while doing nothing to address the security challenges all countries face. Huawei will continue to work openly with regulators, customers, and industry organizations to ensure that mobile networks are secure.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spokesperson, national, defying, set, huawei, networks, presence, german, chinese, germany, pressure, organizations, allow, security


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Huawei’s revenue jumps 27% despite trade tensions between US and China

Richard Yu, chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies Co., presents the P30 series smartphone during a Huawei Technologies Co. launch event in Paris, France, on Tuesday, March 26, 2019. Huawei’s third-quarter revenue jumped 27%, driven by a surge in shipments of smartphones launched before a trade blacklisting by the United States that is expected to hammer its business. Huawei, the world’s biggest maker of telecom network equipment and the No. 2 manufacturer of smartphones, was all but ban


Richard Yu, chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies Co., presents the P30 series smartphone during a Huawei Technologies Co. launch event in Paris, France, on Tuesday, March 26, 2019.
Huawei’s third-quarter revenue jumped 27%, driven by a surge in shipments of smartphones launched before a trade blacklisting by the United States that is expected to hammer its business.
Huawei, the world’s biggest maker of telecom network equipment and the No.
2 manufacturer of smartphones, was all but ban
Huawei’s revenue jumps 27% despite trade tensions between US and China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, despite, trade, huawei, technologies, revenue, states, smartphones, launched, worlds, thirdquarter, united, tensions, huaweis, jumps


Huawei's revenue jumps 27% despite trade tensions between US and China

Richard Yu, chief executive officer of Huawei Technologies Co., presents the P30 series smartphone during a Huawei Technologies Co. launch event in Paris, France, on Tuesday, March 26, 2019.

Huawei’s third-quarter revenue jumped 27%, driven by a surge in shipments of smartphones launched before a trade blacklisting by the United States that is expected to hammer its business.

Huawei, the world’s biggest maker of telecom network equipment and the No. 2 manufacturer of smartphones, was all but banned by the United States in May from doing business with American companies, significantly disrupting its ability to source key parts.

The company has been granted a reprieve until November, meaning it will lose access to some technology next month. Huawei has so far mainly sold smartphones that were launched before the ban.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16
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Google Pixel 4 could take advantage of Huawei’s troubles — but becoming a phone for the masses won’t be easy

Pixel 4 smartphones are displayed during the Made by Google event in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019. ‘Vacuum’ in EuropeHowever, headwinds remain and could make it tough for Google to challenge Huawei, even with the Chinese technology giant’s current issues. At its launch event Tuesday, Google announced the Pixel 4 would be carried by a number of U.S. networks including AT&T and Verizon. “Conversely, a key beachhead in Huawei’s overseas momentum is in Europe, where Google’s Pixel line


Pixel 4 smartphones are displayed during the Made by Google event in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019.
‘Vacuum’ in EuropeHowever, headwinds remain and could make it tough for Google to challenge Huawei, even with the Chinese technology giant’s current issues.
At its launch event Tuesday, Google announced the Pixel 4 would be carried by a number of U.S. networks including AT&T and Verizon.
“Conversely, a key beachhead in Huawei’s overseas momentum is in Europe, where Google’s Pixel line
Google Pixel 4 could take advantage of Huawei’s troubles — but becoming a phone for the masses won’t be easy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, masses, told, europe, carriers, pixel, troubles, huawei, devices, vice, advantage, googles, google, phone, wont, huaweis, easy


Google Pixel 4 could take advantage of Huawei's troubles — but becoming a phone for the masses won't be easy

Pixel 4 smartphones are displayed during the Made by Google event in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019. Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images

“With Huawei facing huge challenges, particularly in Europe, now is the time for Google if it’s serious about moving the needle with Pixel,” Geoff Blaber, vice president of Americas research at CCS Insight, said in a note.

‘Vacuum’ in Europe

However, headwinds remain and could make it tough for Google to challenge Huawei, even with the Chinese technology giant’s current issues. Google’s smartphone strategy under its older Nexus lines of phone was not really about mass market scale. Instead, it used to release the devices to show off the best of what its Android software had to offer so other vendors could follow. But recently, with the Pixel line of phones, it has become serious about being a big handset player. Rick Osterloh, Google’s senior vice president of devices and services, told The Verge in 2017 that the company hopes to be selling in “high volumes in five years.” Huawei’s issues have sparked debate about what other companies could take advantage of. In particular, Europe is seen as a key battleground, since Huawei is the number two player by market share, behind Samsung. Huawei saw its shipments fall 16% year-on-year in the second quarter, according to Canalys. But Google’s lack of relationships with mobile carriers on the continent could make it tough for it to challenge Huawei with the Pixel 4. “The consequences of Huawei’s entity listing has left a vacuum in Europe and a huge opportunity for share gain. However, given the Pixel’s limited operator support in Europe, it’s far more likely to be Samsung that benefits,” Blaber told CNBC in an email, referring the the U.S. blacklist.

In many European countries, carriers are crucial for making expensive, high-end phones a success because they offer fixed-term contracts with monthly payments that often make a device more affordable for consumers. At its launch event Tuesday, Google announced the Pixel 4 would be carried by a number of U.S. networks including AT&T and Verizon. But very few European carriers have the phone. “We have to keep in mind that these two vendors (Google and Huawei) compete on two different battlegrounds: three out of four Pixel phones are sold in the U.S., whereas Huawei is effectively non-existent there,” Bryan Ma, vice president of devices research, told CNBC. “Conversely, a key beachhead in Huawei’s overseas momentum is in Europe, where Google’s Pixel line has had a limited presence.” “Most of the carriers that were announced last night were U.S.-based. So if Google’s priorities are still focused there, then it’s unlikely that they would take much share from Huawei,” Ma said.

Huawei resilience

For its part, Huawei has remained relatively resilient. In the second-quarter of 2019, it was still the second-largest smartphone player in the world. It must be noted however, that the Mate 30, which does not have licensed Google apps, was released in the third quarter. Analyst firms have yet to release third quarter numbers. Huawei also released its own operating system called HarmonyOS in August. The company has insisted on several occasions that it still wants to use Google’s Android. But Richard Yu, the head of Huawei’s consumer division, said the company could “immediately” switch its devices to HarmonyOS if needed.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, masses, told, europe, carriers, pixel, troubles, huawei, devices, vice, advantage, googles, google, phone, wont, huaweis, easy


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Huawei’s side businesses keep it all in the family

Often those side businesses, which range from hotels to food and wine, cater mainly to the Huawei employees and customers. The hotels also mostly serve Huawei employees and clients, though some — such as the Amber House in Nanjing — can be booked by anyone online. Huawei declined to make Steven Ren, Ren Ping or another Smartcom executive available for interview. Hawes said Huawei’s family connections were nothing out of the ordinary for private firms in China. Interviews with nearly a dozen empl


Often those side businesses, which range from hotels to food and wine, cater mainly to the Huawei employees and customers. The hotels also mostly serve Huawei employees and clients, though some — such as the Amber House in Nanjing — can be booked by anyone online. Huawei declined to make Steven Ren, Ren Ping or another Smartcom executive available for interview. Hawes said Huawei’s family connections were nothing out of the ordinary for private firms in China. Interviews with nearly a dozen empl
Huawei’s side businesses keep it all in the family Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ren, rens, zhengfei, huawei, huaweis, mossel, employees, businesses, family, company, campus


Huawei's side businesses keep it all in the family

Ren Zhengfei, CEO of Huawei. Justin Solomon | CNBC

On a hot summer morning at Huawei’s new European-themed campus outside of Shenzhen, a man resembling a younger version of company founder Ren Zhengfei was dressing down two subordinates. “Use your brain to think!” he scolded, apparently dissatisfied at how they were handling visitors at the lavish facility, which features replicas of European cities and monuments. The man was Steven Ren Shulu, 63, the younger brother of Ren Zhengfei, who joined Huawei in 1992 and is now supervisor of the board. The encounter was witnessed by chance by a Reuters reporter during a visit to the campus in August. Huawei may be one of China’s most global companies — with more than 180,000 employees in more than 170 countries running a telecommunications and technology business that generates more than $100 billion annually — but it still has elements of a family firm, with members of Ren’s family playing key roles in web of side businesses, many of which have nothing to do with telecoms. Often those side businesses, which range from hotels to food and wine, cater mainly to the Huawei employees and customers.

The role of Ren’s daughter, chief financial officer Sabrina Meng Wanzhou, is widely known, especially in the wake of her arrest in Canada last December on U.S. charges relating to sanctions violations. Far less visible are Ren’s brother, son and wife, but all play big roles within Huawei’s subsidiaries. The 74-year old Zhengfei Ren officially owns just 1.14% of privately held Huawei, but retains absolute authority, according to insiders at the firm, where he holds veto power and where his speeches are regularly circulated to all staff for study.

Housing and hotels

With the title of Chief Logistics Officer at Huawei, younger brother Steven Ren’s broad brief includes overseeing construction, catering and hospitality. That includes the final phase of the lavish new Songshan Lake campus in Dongguan, with offices for 25,000 employees, as well as a new apartment block for employees near Huawei’s Shenzhen headquarters that is expected to be built by 2023. Huawei declined to answer questions on the scope of its housing benefits for employees.

In this picture taken on May 30, 2019, employees walk to work in the morning at the Huawei Songshan Lake Campus in Dongguan, China’s Guangdong province. Hector Retamal | AFP | Getty Images

It is not uncommon for large Chinese state-owned or private corporations to build infrastructure including housing for employees and to provide hospitality for visiting potential customers, said Colin Hawes, an associate professor at the University of Technology, Sydney who specializes in Chinese corporate governance. Ren Zhengfei’s son, 44-year-old Ren Ping, is now the boss of Shenzhen Smartcom Business, a Huawei subsidiary whose holdings include more than a dozen hotels and serviced apartments in China, Thailand, Saudi Arabia and South Africa. The hotels also mostly serve Huawei employees and clients, though some — such as the Amber House in Nanjing — can be booked by anyone online. At the 5-star Amber Prime Hotel in Dongguan, next to Huawei’s new campus, the stylish rooms come with Huawei AI speakers as well as a special TV channel with clips of Huawei executives’ recent speeches. Huawei declined to make Steven Ren, Ren Ping or another Smartcom executive available for interview.

Wining and dining

Ren Ping is also president of Shanghai Mossel Trade, a subsidiary where Ren Zhengfei’s wife also works, according to Chinese company registration records. Named after Mossel Bay in South Africa, the company sells imported foods from around the world including Huawei-labeled wines, premium beef and fine rice, according to its website. Most of its patrons are internal, though Mossel’s e-commerce platform and bricks-and-mortar stores on Huawei campuses are open to outside customers too. Huawei did not respond to questions about why it set up Mossel in 2010, though a story in the Guardian newspaper in April quoted a spokesman saying it arose after the company took part-payment in the form of wine and beef from an Argentinian customer seeking to avoid currency controls. Some employees told Reuters they found the Mossel goods too pricey, though others said they liked its high-quality selection of wines and foods from around the world – and that the Huawei logo on the products make for good corporate gifts. Huawei’s leisure travel subsidiary, HWTrip.com, another part of Ren Ping’s Smartcom business, appears to have fallen victim to the U.S. government’s campaign against Huawei: a notice on its website says it closed in August as Huawei needed to “focus on its main channel during war times”. Hawes said Huawei’s family connections were nothing out of the ordinary for private firms in China. “It’s partly an issue of whom the CEO can trust, and also a Confucian-style sense of obligation to share one’s success with family members,” Hawes said. Ren has stated on multiple occasions that none of his family members, including Sabrina Meng, would succeed him as Huawei CEO. Interviews with nearly a dozen employees turned up no signs of resentment about the role of Ren’s family members. “I don’t care what the boss’s family does as long as I get my pay and dividends,” said one employee-shareholder who declined to be named.

Watch: Huawei CEO says company considering licensing its 5G tech exclusively to a US firm


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ren, rens, zhengfei, huawei, huaweis, mossel, employees, businesses, family, company, campus


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US reportedly plans to grant licenses for firms to sell goods to blacklisted Huawei

The U.S. government plans to soon issue licenses to American companies to sell certain goods to Chinese technology giant Huawei, the New York Times reported, citing unnamed sources. The U.S. blacklisted the world’s largest telecom-equipment maker earlier this year, and restricted Huawei from doing businesses with American companies. Huawei has been accused of being a national security risk by Washington, which alleged that its equipment could be used to funnel data back to Beijing. That was desp


The U.S. government plans to soon issue licenses to American companies to sell certain goods to Chinese technology giant Huawei, the New York Times reported, citing unnamed sources. The U.S. blacklisted the world’s largest telecom-equipment maker earlier this year, and restricted Huawei from doing businesses with American companies. Huawei has been accused of being a national security risk by Washington, which alleged that its equipment could be used to funnel data back to Beijing. That was desp
US reportedly plans to grant licenses for firms to sell goods to blacklisted Huawei Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, blacklisted, times, reprieve, reportedly, trump, firms, national, sell, plans, huawei, goods, reported, security, licenses, american, grant, york, meeting


US reportedly plans to grant licenses for firms to sell goods to blacklisted Huawei

The U.S. government plans to soon issue licenses to American companies to sell certain goods to Chinese technology giant Huawei, the New York Times reported, citing unnamed sources.

The U.S. blacklisted the world’s largest telecom-equipment maker earlier this year, and restricted Huawei from doing businesses with American companies. Huawei has been accused of being a national security risk by Washington, which alleged that its equipment could be used to funnel data back to Beijing. The Chinese firm has repeatedly denied those allegations.

The administration of President Donald Trump in May granted Huawei a temporary reprieve which allows American firms to provide Huawei with nonsensitive goods as long as they get a specific license from the government. The reprieve was extended for another 90 days on August 19.

However, the government had received over a hundred applications for licenses as of late-August, Reuters reported, though none had been granted. That was despite Trump saying in June at the Group of 20 meeting that he would allow sales to Huawei where there are no national security conflicts.

That could change. The New York Times reported Trump gave the green light for approvals in a meeting last week.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: arjun kharpal
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Major markets in Asia rebound after report Trump may announce Huawei concessions

The Topix index finished its trading day little changed at 1,581.42. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 ended its trading day largely flat at 6,547.10. A South China Morning Post report on Thursday morning in Asia said the two sides made no progress in deputy-level negotiations this week. The trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing this week were highly anticipated. A 15% tariff on an additional $160 billion worth of Chinese imports is also expected to kick in on December 15.


The Topix index finished its trading day little changed at 1,581.42. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 ended its trading day largely flat at 6,547.10. A South China Morning Post report on Thursday morning in Asia said the two sides made no progress in deputy-level negotiations this week. The trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing this week were highly anticipated. A 15% tariff on an additional $160 billion worth of Chinese imports is also expected to kick in on December 15.
Major markets in Asia rebound after report Trump may announce Huawei concessions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, chinese, futures, trump, told, asia, huawei, announce, negotiations, trading, report, day, markets, concessions, major, worth, rebound


Major markets in Asia rebound after report Trump may announce Huawei concessions

Major Asian stock markets recovered from earlier lows to close higher on Thursday as investors watched for developments on the U.S.-China trade front ahead of high-level negotiations between the two economic powerhouses. Mainland Chinese stocks rose on the day, with the Shanghai composite up 0.78% to around 2,947.71 and the Shenzhen component gaining 1.38% to 9,638.10. The Shenzhen composite also advanced 1.413% to approximately 1,631.84. The New York Times reported Wednesday evening stateside that U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration is set to grant licenses that would allow American firms to sell nonsensitive supplies to Huawei. Earlier this year, the White House banned sales to the Chinese telecommunications giant, citing national security concerns. The ban was subsequently delayed by the administration to allow American firms to make other arrangements. Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index was about 0.3% higher, as of its final hour of trading. Elsewhere, the Nikkei 225 in Japan rose 0.45% to close at 21,551.98. The Topix index finished its trading day little changed at 1,581.42. Core machinery orders in the country fell for the second consecutive month in August, according to Cabinet Office data on Thursday. In South Korea, however, the Kospi shed 0.88% to close at 2,028.15 as shares of automaker Hyundai Motor fell 2.32%. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 ended its trading day largely flat at 6,547.10. Overall, the MSCI Asia ex-Japan index was 0.18% higher. Markets in Taiwan were closed on Thursday for a holiday.

US-China trade talks

Investors are monitoring chatter on U.S.-China trade talks, which are set to begin Thursday stateside amid a series of rapid developments. A South China Morning Post report on Thursday morning in Asia said the two sides made no progress in deputy-level negotiations this week. In discussions that were held earlier in the week, China refused to discuss the issue of forced technology transfers, the report said. The SCMP report also said that high-level trade negotiations including Chinese Vice Premier Liu He would be cut to one day now, with the delegation from Beijing set to leave Washington on Thursday instead of Friday as originally planned. For its part, a White House spokesperson told CNBC’s Kayla Tausche: “We are not aware of a change in the Vice Premier’s travels plans at this time.” A senior administration official also told Tausche that Liu is still scheduled to depart on Friday evening. The trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing this week were highly anticipated. The two largest economies have struggled to reach a deal to end their trade war that has now lasted for more than a year. Washington and Beijing have slapped tariffs on billions of dollars worth of each other’s goods. “As of right now, [Pres. Trump] has not made up his mind because he does not know what they’re going to offer,” a senior official said. A principal in the negotiations later told CNBC, however, that Friday’s session is now an “open question.” Bloomberg News also reported overnight that the U.S was considering an agreement to suspend next week’s tariff increase in exchange for a currency pact. The U.S. previously announced it will increase duties on $250 billion worth of Chinese goods from 25% to 30% on October 15. A 15% tariff on an additional $160 billion worth of Chinese imports is also expected to kick in on December 15. “The prize for some sort of trade deal today — no matter how trivial — will be to avoid the implementation of further tariffs,” Robert Carnell, chief economist and head of research for Asia Pacific at ING, wrote in a note. “I think that a ‘nothing achieved’ outcome from today’s talks would return markets to a risk-off mode fairly quickly,” Carnell said. One political science expert told CNBC on Thursday that he was “quite pessimistic about a quick resolution” being reached from the negotiations. “What happens is that there is sort of a truce in the trade talks,” Pushan Dutt, professor of economics and political science at INSEAD, told CNBC on Thursday. “Markets get lulled into expecting that … good things will happen, then along comes a tweet or a tirade and then we’re back int his position of escalating tariffs and tit-for-tat tariffs.”

Asia-Pacific Market Indexes Chart

U.S. stock futures saw wild trading following the SCMP report, with Dow Jones Industrial Average futures plunging more than 300 points at one point. They later saw a recovery from those lows as more developments emerged. As of 2:52 a.m. ET Thursday, futures pointed to an opening decline of 22.01 points for the Dow. S&P 500 and Nasdaq-100 futures also pointed to slight declines for the two indexes at Thursday’s open on Wall Street.

Currencies and oil


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: eustance huang
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Former UK spymaster plays down national security fears over Huawei

China has not tried to use Huawei network equipment for spying in Britain, a former head of the country’s foreign intelligence service said Wednesday. John Sawers, who served as the chief of MI6 from 2009 to 2014, played down national security concerns over the Chinese tech giant, telling an audience in London that Beijing has not “sought to exploit, or been able to exploit, Huawei equipment in our telecoms national infrastructure” for espionage. Intelligence officials in the U.S. have expressed


China has not tried to use Huawei network equipment for spying in Britain, a former head of the country’s foreign intelligence service said Wednesday. John Sawers, who served as the chief of MI6 from 2009 to 2014, played down national security concerns over the Chinese tech giant, telling an audience in London that Beijing has not “sought to exploit, or been able to exploit, Huawei equipment in our telecoms national infrastructure” for espionage. Intelligence officials in the U.S. have expressed
Former UK spymaster plays down national security fears over Huawei Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spymaster, plays, trade, equipment, chinese, tech, concerns, firm, national, exploit, security, hand, fears, huawei


Former UK spymaster plays down national security fears over Huawei

China has not tried to use Huawei network equipment for spying in Britain, a former head of the country’s foreign intelligence service said Wednesday.

John Sawers, who served as the chief of MI6 from 2009 to 2014, played down national security concerns over the Chinese tech giant, telling an audience in London that Beijing has not “sought to exploit, or been able to exploit, Huawei equipment in our telecoms national infrastructure” for espionage.

Intelligence officials in the U.S. have expressed concerns that the company could set up “backdoors” to help the Chinese government spy on Americans. For its part, Huawei has denied it would ever hand over data to Beijing.

MI6’s current chief, Alex Younger, last year flagged concerns about companies like Huawei, specifically targeting “Chinese ownership of these technologies” as a primary risk. Under Chinese law, companies are obliged to hand over data to assist state intelligence.

The Chinese firm has faced intense scrutiny in the U.S., which has added it to a trade blacklist and is looking to extradite its CFO, Meng Wanzhou, from Canada on bank and wire fraud charges. The company’s CEO — and Meng’s father — Ren Zhengfei recently said he is considering offering an exclusive 5G license to a U.S. carrier.

Washington upped the pressure on China’s tech industry earlier this week. It placed another 28 entities on the trade blacklist, alleging they have been implicated in human rights violations related to minority Muslims in northwest China.

Sawers said that Huawei had become a “point of leverage” in the trade battle between the U.S. and China, and that the President Donald Trump administration would likely make concessions on its tough stance on the firm.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spymaster, plays, trade, equipment, chinese, tech, concerns, firm, national, exploit, security, hand, fears, huawei


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China’s surveillance tech is spreading globally, raising concerns about Beijing’s influence

I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. “I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. Maya Wang China researcher at Human Rights WatchNowhere is China’s surveillance state more visible than in Xinjiang, home to China’s Uighur minority. She warned of the dan


I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. “I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. Maya Wang China researcher at Human Rights WatchNowhere is China’s surveillance state more visible than in Xinjiang, home to China’s Uighur minority. She warned of the dan
China’s surveillance tech is spreading globally, raising concerns about Beijing’s influence Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, think, spreading, told, technology, way, raising, surveillance, globally, concerns, china, recognition, influence, chinas, chinese, beijings, data, tech


China's surveillance tech is spreading globally, raising concerns about Beijing's influence

Surveillance cameras are mounted on a post at Tiananmen Square as snow falls in Beijing, China, on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Qilai Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images

China’s push to export its surveillance technology via some of its biggest companies, including to liberal democracies, has raised concerns because of the risk of data being siphoned back to Beijing and the growing influence of the Communist Party, experts told CNBC. The world’s second-largest economy has built a vast surveillance state comprised of millions of cameras powered by facial recognition software. The devices, perched on lamp posts and outside buildings and streets, are able to recognize individuals. Some of China’s most valuable technology firms have been involved in such projects across the country. But this technology is now being exported as the nation’s technology firms expand their global footprint.

Chinese tech companies — particularly Huawei, Hikvision, Dahua, and ZTE — supply artificial intelligence surveillance technology in 63 countries, according to a September report by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace think tank. Of those nations, 36 have signed onto China’s massive infrastructure project, the Belt and Road Initiative, the report said, adding that Huawei supplies technology to the highest number of countries. Some of these so-called “smart city” projects, which include surveillance technologies, are underway in Western countries, particularly in Europe, including Germany, Spain and France, according to analysis by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI).

I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. Samantha Hoffman fellow at Australian Strategic Policy Institute’s Cyber Centre

Experts warned of a number of risks including potential access to data by the Chinese government. “I think that sometimes there is an assumption that ‘oh well when we roll out this technology we aren’t going to use it in a negative way, we are using it to provide services or we are using it in a way that is seen as acceptable, socially acceptable in our society,'” Samantha Hoffman, a fellow at ASPI’s Cyber Centre, told CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast. “But actually (we) can’t be sure of that because the difference isn’t necessarily how the technology is being deployed, but who has access to the data it’s collecting,” she said. “If it’s a Chinese company like Huawei, and that … data goes back to China and can be used by the party in whatever way that it chooses.”

Chinese laws and regulations

Hoffman cited laws in China that appear to compel Chinese firms to hand over data to the government, if asked. She did not accuse Huawei of wrongdoing, but just used the company as an example. Earlier this year, Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said he would “definitely say no” to any request for customer data from Beijing. “I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. It’s not just that other regimes can use it in similar ways, it’s that when it’s exported the (Chinese Communist) Party can attach its interests as well,” Hoffman added.

I think the worse future could be these governments adopting these technologies and adding that arsenal to the existing ones for the control of people. Maya Wang China researcher at Human Rights Watch

Nowhere is China’s surveillance state more visible than in Xinjiang, home to China’s Uighur minority. The territory has made headlines for its detention and “re-education” camps that hold an estimated 1.5 million Muslims, many of them for violating what Amnesty International describes as a “highly restrictive and discriminatory” law that China says is designed to combat extremism. Maya Wang, a China researcher at Human Rights Watch, focuses on Xinjiang and the surveillance activities there. She warned of the dangers of China’s surveillance technology going to authoritarian states. “I think the worse future could be these governments adopting these technologies and adding that arsenal to the existing ones for the control of people,” Wang told CNBC. Earlier this year, an ASPI report highlighted other concerns from China exporting its surveillance tech, including being able to undermine democracies, get an edge on new technologies and in military areas. “You know, domestically and globally, it (Chinese Communist Party) plans to use technology as (a) way to both protect and expand its power,” Hoffman said. “Globally, the implications of that are that the party is trying to reshape global governance in a way that … will ensure the party’s power.”

Privacy backlash

Facial recognition technology has already faced backlash around the world. Last month in the U.S., California lawmakers banned local police from using facial-recognition software in body cameras. The current ban is temporary. Earlier this year, the Financial Times reported that the European Commission, the European Union’s executive arm, was looking at drafting new regulation on the technology. Microsoft CEO also said in January that he would welcome new rules on the use facial recognition. The FT also discovered that a developer involved in London’s King’s Cross area had deployed facial recognition cameras without people’s knowledge. This drew criticism from Britain’s data protection watchdog which said it was “deeply concerned about the growing use of facial recognition technology in public spaces.” Also in the U.K., Liberty — a human rights advocacy group on behalf of a person called Ed Bridges — brought a case against South Wales Police regarding the use of facial recognition. It was seen as one of the first cases of its kind in the world. Bridges claimed to have his face scanned by the police force and argued there were no legal safeguards in place for the use of the tech. “That struck me as being an infringement of my privacy,” Bridges told CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast. “I am a law-abiding citizen, I was doing nothing wrong, I was just going about my business, and yet here the police were in my home city taking my data.” The judges in the case ruled against Liberty and Bridges, and said they were “satisfied that the current legal regime is adequate,” and that the use of the technology did not violate the Human Rights Act. Bridges told CNBC he would appeal and that he’s concerned about the lack of consent from the public. “The issue this comes back to is around consent … When I’m walking through what is a public space … how many of us have that sort of option to stop and go … ‘hang on my face is being scanned, who is doing this, for what purposes?’ We’ve all got lives to lead and I think that’s why it’s important to challenge the use of technology in the way that we are,” he said.

Surveillance and trade war

Chinese technology firms have been the caught in the crosshairs of the U.S.-China trade war. Huawei, the world’s largest telecoms equipment maker, has been blacklisted by the U.S., restricting its access to American technology. Washington has dubbed Huawei a national security risk, saying its gear could be used by Beijing for espionage. The Chinese tech giant has repeatedly denied those allegations. On Monday, the U.S. government widened its net to add another 28 Chinese entities to a blacklist called the Entity List. Hikvision, a firm that makes surveillance products, is one of those companies. Dahua, which deals with surveillance equipment, was also added to the list.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, think, spreading, told, technology, way, raising, surveillance, globally, concerns, china, recognition, influence, chinas, chinese, beijings, data, tech


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Why a tech war could endanger autonomous and connected cars

If you think the U.S.-China trade war is a problem for smartphones and 5G, spare a thought for autonomous and connected cars. Tech players still believe innovation will solve all problems, but what if “Make America Great Again” trumps tech? The smartphone has emerged as the central connected device and is unlikely to be knocked off its perch by more connected devices. But the biggest connected device in the future, at least by size, will be the car. Imagine a self-driving car with chips and sens


If you think the U.S.-China trade war is a problem for smartphones and 5G, spare a thought for autonomous and connected cars. Tech players still believe innovation will solve all problems, but what if “Make America Great Again” trumps tech? The smartphone has emerged as the central connected device and is unlikely to be knocked off its perch by more connected devices. But the biggest connected device in the future, at least by size, will be the car. Imagine a self-driving car with chips and sens
Why a tech war could endanger autonomous and connected cars Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: karen tso
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, huawei, smartphones, trade, car, war, cars, incar, ibm, thought, autonomous, endanger, connected, tech


Why a tech war could endanger autonomous and connected cars

If you think the U.S.-China trade war is a problem for smartphones and 5G, spare a thought for autonomous and connected cars.

U.S. bipartisan lawmakers are considering a money pot for small and rural wireless network operators to rip out Huawei and ZTE equipment where there is a security risk. This has promoted Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei to consider licensing the company’s 5G technology — from hardware to software and chip designs — to a U.S. firm to alleviate security concerns.

The Chinese overture seems logical at least for autos, if roadblocks are to be avoided in the next generation of autos where connectivity will be more important than horsepower.

In-car connectivity requires collaboration but that industry-wide, borderless cooperation is under threat. Even if Beijing and Washington achieve a trade resolution, and that’s questionable with rising heat around impeachment leading up to the presidential race in 2020, then a tech deal is thought to be more elusive. Tech players still believe innovation will solve all problems, but what if “Make America Great Again” trumps tech?

The smartphone has emerged as the central connected device and is unlikely to be knocked off its perch by more connected devices. But the biggest connected device in the future, at least by size, will be the car. Imagine a self-driving car with chips and sensors to safely navigate roads, running on open digital platforms and utilizing smartphones to bring user preferences to a connected car, just like the connected home.

The in-car experience will become king, according to a recent IBM study called Automotive 2030. IBM predicts 15% of new cars sold could be fully autonomous by the end of the next decade, and less time driving will turn the focus to the digital in-car experience.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: karen tso
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, huawei, smartphones, trade, car, war, cars, incar, ibm, thought, autonomous, endanger, connected, tech


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