Huawei may demand more royalties from US firms that rely on its patented tech

Last week, Reuters reported that Huawei had asked Verizon to pay $1 billion in royalties for more than 230 of Huawei’s patents. Ren Zhengfei, the company’s CEO and founder, said this week that Huawei could seek royalties from more firms. How are firms using Huawei patents? “Huawei knows … enforcing patents and asking for royalties is expensive and also not their main business,” Pohlmann told CNBC. Huawei CEO told CNBC on Wednesday that if Senator Rubio’s law was passed, it would hurt America’s


Last week, Reuters reported that Huawei had asked Verizon to pay $1 billion in royalties for more than 230 of Huawei’s patents. Ren Zhengfei, the company’s CEO and founder, said this week that Huawei could seek royalties from more firms. How are firms using Huawei patents? “Huawei knows … enforcing patents and asking for royalties is expensive and also not their main business,” Pohlmann told CNBC. Huawei CEO told CNBC on Wednesday that if Senator Rubio’s law was passed, it would hurt America’s
Huawei may demand more royalties from US firms that rely on its patented tech Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, patent, told, royalties, huawei, technology, verizon, demand, huaweis, firms, patents, tech, rely, patented


Huawei may demand more royalties from US firms that rely on its patented tech

Huawei may demand more royalties from U.S. firms for technology they’re using that’s been patented by the Chinese telecom giant, experts say, as the beleaguered firm looks to fight back against continued pressure from Washington. It would mark a big shift in strategy for Huawei, which typically is not seen as especially litigious in terms of intellectual property rights (IPR), even though it holds some crucial patents that underpin the world of telecommunication. Last week, Reuters reported that Huawei had asked Verizon to pay $1 billion in royalties for more than 230 of Huawei’s patents. The Wall Street Journal reported that the patents related to Huawei range from core network equipment to so-called internet of things technology — defined as physical devices that are linked to one another over the internet. The Verizon case is not a legal case at the moment. Verizon might not be the only company in the crosshairs of Huawei when it comes to patent disputes. Ren Zhengfei, the company’s CEO and founder, said this week that Huawei could seek royalties from more firms. “Over the past years, we were not aggressive seeking IPR royalties to companies that use our IPR — that’s because we were busy pursuing our business growth. Once we have more time off, we may try to get some money from those companies who use our IPR,” Ren said, adding that patents would not be used as a “weapon to hinder the development of human society.”

How are firms using Huawei patents?

Huawei has been effectively banned from selling telecommunications equipment in the U.S., but its technology is still being used by American firms via third parties that employ tech patented by Huawei.

A Huawei logo displayed at a retail store in Beijing. Fred Dufour | AFP | Getty Images

When next-generation mobile networks are created, such as 4G or 5G, global standards need to be agreed upon. These are essentially protocols for how the technology will work globally, so that there’s a systemic coherence that allows smartphones to communicate with networks. So-called standards bodies are tasked with doing this. Companies like Huawei — as well as rivals like Ericsson and Nokia — will contribute to building the architecture of mobile networks through these standards groups. In doing so, these companies devise technologies which they then patent. The patents, which are critical to the standards of say 4G or 5G, will be deemed a “standard essential patent” or SEP.

Huawei has been granted more than 69,000 patents globally related to everything from data transmission to network traffic management, according to data compiled for CNBC by Relecura, an intellectual property (IP) analytics platform. Another 49,379 patent applications are pending. Of those granted, over 57% are in China, while nearly 18% are in the U.S., Huawei’s second-largest market for patents. While the Chinese firm lagged other firms somewhat in terms of SEPs when it came to 4G, it is the leader in the 5G age. Huawei has the largest portfolio of patents for 5G — about 1,554 SEPs — and is ahead of Nokia, Samsung and LG Electronics, according to IPlytics, a market intelligence firm that tracks patents. So even though Huawei’s networking equipment is not being used by major telecom players in the U.S., other vendors that they buy products from could be using technology which is patented by Huawei. Given that Huawei owns so many key patents, the likelihood is that several other American carriers could also be using technology patented by the Chinese firm.

Why take action now?

Patent disputes are not uncommon in the technology and telecom world, and there have been a number of high-profile ones including between Apple and Qualcomm. Even Huawei’s rival Nokia was embroiled in a dispute with Apple in 2016. Huawei has not been particularly aggressive in bringing legal action against companies with regard to intellectual property. However, the thinking within the company could be changing given the continued political pressure, and the demand that Verizon pay $1 billion in royalties could be the first step. “There has been consideration about the role of IP and what it mean(s) in terms of the U.S. and Huawei,” a source at the company told CNBC. “Huawei in the near future will be briefing media and stakeholders about its IPR efforts around 5G,” added the source, who wished to remain anonymous because he is not authorized to speak publicly. Huawei declined to comment when contacted by CNBC. “We have no comment regarding this specific issue because it’s a potential legal matter,” Verizon spokesperson Richard Young told CNBC in an email. “However, these issues are larger than just Verizon. Given the broader geopolitical context, any issue involving Huawei has implications for our entire industry and also raise(s) national and international concerns.”

The U.S. has continued to pile pressure on the Chinese company. Huawei was recently added to a blacklist that restricts American firms from selling products to the company. Experts say this could threaten Huawei’s smartphone business. Huawei was forced to cancel a planned launch for a new laptop in June. The company relies on some key U.S. components for many of its devices. Huawei has also slashed its revenue forecast for the next two years, with CEO Ren saying that the company could take a $30 billion hit to sales as its troubles with the U.S. continue. “Huawei definitely knew about it,” Nikhil Batra, senior telecom research manager at IDC, told CNBC, suggesting the Chinese company was aware that Verizon was using its patents and could potentially extract royalties from the American telco giant. “This is going to be a longer battle. We can all go back … and say it is all coincidental, but there is a reason we haven’t seen this happen until now. It’s because, maybe, they were waiting for an opportune time to strike back,” Batra added. Tim Pohlmann, CEO of IPlytics, said that Huawei hasn’t typically focused on getting royalties, because it was growing very quickly in its smartphone and networking equipment business. But facing a complete ban in the U.S., as well as in some other countries, Huawei could look toward getting more revenue from patent royalties, he said. “Huawei knows … enforcing patents and asking for royalties is expensive and also not their main business,” Pohlmann told CNBC. “Royalties through patents is a small fraction compared to how much revenue they created through smartphones and base stations. But when the latter revenue stream is taken from them, this is just a logical consequence.” Pohlmann noted that this was similar to what Nokia did when their handset business was sold off in the early 2010s.

What’s the US trying to do?

It appears that Senator Marco Rubio has recognized Huawei’s potential to use patents against U.S. companies. On Monday, he filed legislation that would block Huawei from fighting patent disputes in U.S. courts, according to Reuters. That proposal is far from becoming a law. On Twitter earlier this week, Rubio accused Huawei of being a “patent troll.” Huawei CEO told CNBC on Wednesday that if Senator Rubio’s law was passed, it would hurt America’s image as a lawful place. “If his recommendation can get past to the Congress, then … the image of the U.S. as a country ruled by laws, would be damaged,” Ren said, according to a CNBC translation of his remarks in Chinese. Currently, Huawei would be able to fight any patent battles in U.S. courts. “Without any direct legislation by Congress on the issue, the United States federal court system will continue to be available to Huawei for patent infringement claims, just as it is available to any other company,” Robert Mattson, a U.S.-based intellectual property lawyer, told CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, patent, told, royalties, huawei, technology, verizon, demand, huaweis, firms, patents, tech, rely, patented


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Don’t expect the US and China to make any trade progress at G-20, short seller Carson Block says

Investors shouldn’t get their hopes up for the U.S. and China to make any progress on the trade front at the G-20 summit next week, short seller Carson Block said Friday. The Chinese media seems to be digging in and not softening its tone,” Block, founder of Muddy Waters Research, told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street. ” Block lived in China for six years and gained recognition by shorting several Chinese stocks, including Sino-Forest. China and the U.S. have been engaged in a trade war for more tha


Investors shouldn’t get their hopes up for the U.S. and China to make any progress on the trade front at the G-20 summit next week, short seller Carson Block said Friday. The Chinese media seems to be digging in and not softening its tone,” Block, founder of Muddy Waters Research, told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street. ” Block lived in China for six years and gained recognition by shorting several Chinese stocks, including Sino-Forest. China and the U.S. have been engaged in a trade war for more tha
Don’t expect the US and China to make any trade progress at G-20, short seller Carson Block says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, progress, think, block, trade, china, summit, chinese, countries, g20, short, expect, carson, commercial, seller, dont


Don't expect the US and China to make any trade progress at G-20, short seller Carson Block says

Investors shouldn’t get their hopes up for the U.S. and China to make any progress on the trade front at the G-20 summit next week, short seller Carson Block said Friday.

“I don’t think we’re going to have any rapprochement here. The Chinese media seems to be digging in and not softening its tone,” Block, founder of Muddy Waters Research, told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street. ” “They’re preparing, I think, for a long geopolitical battle with the West.”

Block lived in China for six years and gained recognition by shorting several Chinese stocks, including Sino-Forest. More recently, he compared Chinese after-school operator Tal Education to Enron.

China and the U.S. have been engaged in a trade war for more than a year. In that time, the two countries have slapped tariffs on billions of dollars worth of each other’s goods, tightening trade conditions and dampening the U.S. economic outlook.

President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, are scheduled to meet at next week’s G-20 summit in Japan. The two leaders are expected to discuss trade, with the possibility of reaching an accord.

Still, Block does not expect a deal to be reached. He also said China has figured out how to use the open markets and economies of the West against Western countries through its influence on Chinese companies.

“At the end of the day, there can be no business that is based in mainland China that can be assured of acting independently of the government and just for commercial reasons,” Block said. “Huawei and ZTE built themselves because they were strategic priorities of the Chinese government. When Ericsson and Nokia were laying off employees, Huawei was hiring them in Sweden and Norway not because it was a good commercial decision, but because of the long-term vision” of the Chinese government.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, progress, think, block, trade, china, summit, chinese, countries, g20, short, expect, carson, commercial, seller, dont


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Huawei CEO says banks knew about the company’s allegedly criminal activities

Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei says the banks at the center of the U.S. case against his company were fully aware of the nature and activities of the business. In an exclusive interview with CNBC’s Deirdre Bosa on Wednesday, Ren said the banks “have full knowledge of all those business activities,” referring to the allegations of bank and wire fraud against Huawei and Ren’s daughter, Meng Wanzhou, who is also the company’s CFO. It’s the first time Ren has spoken publicly about the specific details in t


Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei says the banks at the center of the U.S. case against his company were fully aware of the nature and activities of the business. In an exclusive interview with CNBC’s Deirdre Bosa on Wednesday, Ren said the banks “have full knowledge of all those business activities,” referring to the allegations of bank and wire fraud against Huawei and Ren’s daughter, Meng Wanzhou, who is also the company’s CFO. It’s the first time Ren has spoken publicly about the specific details in t
Huawei CEO says banks knew about the company’s allegedly criminal activities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: laura batchelor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, daughter, case, ren, meng, ceo, iran, banks, allegedly, companys, wire, criminal, bank, activities, knew, fraud


Huawei CEO says banks knew about the company's allegedly criminal activities

Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei says the banks at the center of the U.S. case against his company were fully aware of the nature and activities of the business.

In an exclusive interview with CNBC’s Deirdre Bosa on Wednesday, Ren said the banks “have full knowledge of all those business activities,” referring to the allegations of bank and wire fraud against Huawei and Ren’s daughter, Meng Wanzhou, who is also the company’s CFO.

It’s the first time Ren has spoken publicly about the specific details in the case against Meng and Huawei.

Huawei and Meng are charged with bank and wire fraud and conspiracy to commit bank and wire fraud in relation to skirting American sanctions on Iran. Meng was arrested in Canada in December and is still there fighting extradition to the U.S.

The U.S. government alleges that Meng lied to HSBC and other banks about Huawei’s relationship with an unofficial subsidiary in Iran called Skycom in order to get banking services.

Huawei and Meng strongly deny wrongdoing. Ren added that one of the banks even met with Meng.

“My daughter was in a cafe and said something to the bank officials,” he said. “We have to talk to the person who had the coffee with Meng.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: laura batchelor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, daughter, case, ren, meng, ceo, iran, banks, allegedly, companys, wire, criminal, bank, activities, knew, fraud


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Condoleezza Rice: China hurt itself by saying it wanted to dominate the tech world

China made a risky choice revealing ambitions to dominate the tech world, Condoleezza Rice told CNBC on Wednesday. Chinese smartphone and networking giant Huawei finds itself at the center of Trump administration concerns about how closely companies are tied to the government. Shortly after President Donald Trump on May 15 declared a national emergency over threats against American technology, the Commerce Department, effectively, blacklisted Huawei from conducting business with U.S. companies.


China made a risky choice revealing ambitions to dominate the tech world, Condoleezza Rice told CNBC on Wednesday. Chinese smartphone and networking giant Huawei finds itself at the center of Trump administration concerns about how closely companies are tied to the government. Shortly after President Donald Trump on May 15 declared a national emergency over threats against American technology, the Commerce Department, effectively, blacklisted Huawei from conducting business with U.S. companies.
Condoleezza Rice: China hurt itself by saying it wanted to dominate the tech world Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, president, dominate, rice, tech, national, condoleezza, hurt, saying, huawei, trump, summit, think, wanted, chinese, china, told, world


Condoleezza Rice: China hurt itself by saying it wanted to dominate the tech world

China made a risky choice revealing ambitions to dominate the tech world, Condoleezza Rice told CNBC on Wednesday.

“The Chinese, I think, made a bit of a mistake when they went out and said we’re going to surpass the U.S. in quantum computing and AI [artificial intelligence] by 2030, ” said Rice, who was secretary of State and national security adviser under former President George W. Bush.

“I told some of my Chinese friends that it was a big mistake” because the U.S. and other nations were already nervous about how China might use technology for spying, she told CNBC’s Becky Quick on “Squawk Box ” from the KPMG Women’s Leadership Summit in Minnesota.

Chinese smartphone and networking giant Huawei finds itself at the center of Trump administration concerns about how closely companies are tied to the government. Huawei has maintained that it is independent.

Shortly after President Donald Trump on May 15 declared a national emergency over threats against American technology, the Commerce Department, effectively, blacklisted Huawei from conducting business with U.S. companies. About a week later, the agency put a 90-day hold on the move.

“I think any Chinese company is going to do what the Chinese government tells them to do,” said Rice, former Stanford provost and now a professor at the university’s graduate school of business. Whether in surveillance, so-called social credit, or promoting national interests, Rice said she thinks “it’s very clear that China is going to use these tools in ways that, I think, would make us all uncomfortable.”

As Washington and Beijing head into trade negotiations at next week’s G-20 summit in Japan, Rice said she’s hoping the countries can negotiate a deal on intellectual property protections and market access to end the punitive tariffs they have levied on each other.

On Tuesday, Trump announced plans to sit down with Chinese President Xi Jinping for an “extended meeting” at the summit where the two leaders are expected to discuss their ongoing trade war and technology disputes. Shortly after Trump’s tweet, Chinese state media said Xi hopes to talk about the fair treatment of Chinese companies by the U.S., in perhaps a reference to the Huawei ban.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, president, dominate, rice, tech, national, condoleezza, hurt, saying, huawei, trump, summit, think, wanted, chinese, china, told, world


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Huawei CEO downplays expected $30 billion revenue miss due to the Trump administration ban

Huawei CEO and founder Ren Zhengfei on Wednesday downplayed the impact of the U.S. ban on the company, just days after company said it expected $30 billion less revenue for the year. He also said Huawei’s consumer business is still strong in China. “I don’t see that problem, because in the Chinese market, the consumer business has not seen a decline,” Ren said. As I look at the declines in the consumer business, that would be about 10% roughly, so it’s not that big.” The Trump administration inv


Huawei CEO and founder Ren Zhengfei on Wednesday downplayed the impact of the U.S. ban on the company, just days after company said it expected $30 billion less revenue for the year. He also said Huawei’s consumer business is still strong in China. “I don’t see that problem, because in the Chinese market, the consumer business has not seen a decline,” Ren said. As I look at the declines in the consumer business, that would be about 10% roughly, so it’s not that big.” The Trump administration inv
Huawei CEO downplays expected $30 billion revenue miss due to the Trump administration ban Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, billion, consumer, administration, ren, zhengfei, downplays, trump, huawei, expected, revenue, ban, miss, company, system, business


Huawei CEO downplays expected $30 billion revenue miss due to the Trump administration ban

Huawei CEO and founder Ren Zhengfei on Wednesday downplayed the impact of the U.S. ban on the company, just days after company said it expected $30 billion less revenue for the year.

In the interview with CNBC’s Deirdre Bosa, Ren said the slashed revenue forecast isn’t a concern since the company will still book more than $100 billion in revenue this year, which would be roughly flat versus 2018. He also said Huawei’s consumer business is still strong in China. The main problem is the overseas business, he said.

“I don’t see that problem, because in the Chinese market, the consumer business has not seen a decline,” Ren said. “It’s just that there might be declines overseas. In the worst case, 40%, but now it’s less than 20%. And that kind of decline is also changing. As I look at the declines in the consumer business, that would be about 10% roughly, so it’s not that big.”

But Ren did not give a clear explanation for how Huawei plans to make up for the decreased demand for its products following the U.S. ban, which the company says is expected to continue over the next two years.

“We are making adjustments internally so we project there might be a slowdown, but until yesterday’s report I didn’t see any slowdown,” Ren said. “And we don’t know what will be the growth by the end of the year. But we believe the $30 billion U.S. will be a very small thing.”

The Huawei ban affects the company’s ability to ship smartphones running Google’s Android operating system. Google has said it will continue to provide security updates for current Huawei devices running Android, but the fate of future devices is still in limbo. Meanwhile, Huawei has said it has its own alternative operating system for smartphones in case it can no longer use Android.

The Trump administration invoked the ban, claiming Huawei poses a national security threat because of its ties to China’s ruling Communist Party.

WATCH: Zhengfei: The US ban on Huawei hurts the US and China


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, billion, consumer, administration, ren, zhengfei, downplays, trump, huawei, expected, revenue, ban, miss, company, system, business


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Microsoft resumes sales of Huawei laptops online

Microsoft on Monday said it has resumed sales of Huawei laptops on its website after a weeks-long stoppage. As a result, we are resuming the sale of existing inventory of Huawei devices at Microsoft Store,” a Microsoft spokesperson told CNBC in an email. Additionally, Microsoft said it would keep delivering software update sto Huawei devices that people own today. Our initial evaluation of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s decision on Huawei has indicated we may continue to offer Microsoft softw


Microsoft on Monday said it has resumed sales of Huawei laptops on its website after a weeks-long stoppage. As a result, we are resuming the sale of existing inventory of Huawei devices at Microsoft Store,” a Microsoft spokesperson told CNBC in an email. Additionally, Microsoft said it would keep delivering software update sto Huawei devices that people own today. Our initial evaluation of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s decision on Huawei has indicated we may continue to offer Microsoft softw
Microsoft resumes sales of Huawei laptops online Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, microsoft, online, laptops, companies, huawei, revenue, windows, business, sales, devices, resumes, recent, told


Microsoft resumes sales of Huawei laptops online

Microsoft on Monday said it has resumed sales of Huawei laptops on its website after a weeks-long stoppage.

The action reflects the evolving dynamic for U.S. companies that have done business with Huawei, which has been caught in the middle of growing U.S.-China trade tension. The move is a sign of cooperation with a company that delivers Windows revenue, which is still core to Microsoft’s business despite its focus on cloud computing products.

Last month a government agency restricted how U.S. companies could sell products to Huawei, and shortly after that Microsoft’s supply of devices like the MateBook X Pro vanished. The agency then eased restrictions for 90 days, leading to changes in the way Google would work with Huawei during that period. Now Huawei Matebook laptops are available once again.

“We have been evaluating, and will continue to respond to, the many business, technical and regulatory complexities stemming from the recent addition of Huawei to the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Export Administration Regulations Entity List. As a result, we are resuming the sale of existing inventory of Huawei devices at Microsoft Store,” a Microsoft spokesperson told CNBC in an email.

Additionally, Microsoft said it would keep delivering software update sto Huawei devices that people own today.

“We remain committed to providing exceptional customer experiences. Our initial evaluation of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s decision on Huawei has indicated we may continue to offer Microsoft software updates to customers with Huawei devices,” Microsoft said.

The comments come after Huawei told CNBC that it could have its own operating system for laptops ready as soon as this fall.

Microsoft receives revenue when companies pay for Windows licenses for devices they produce. Revenue from such customers was up 9% year over year in the most recent quarter, during which Windows overall represented 16% of all revenue.

In recent weeks other U.S. companies have cut their revenue forecasts because they expect to sell less to Huawei.

WATCH: Huawei announces scrapping new laptop launch


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: jordan novet
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Apple will release two iPhones with 5G in 2020, top analyst says

TF International Securities analyst Ming Chi Kuo said in a note on Monday that Apple’s first 5G iPhones will launch in 2020 using modems provided by Qualcomm. Kuo said that two of the 2020 iPhones will use Qualcomm’s 5G modem after the two companies settled a long-standing lawsuit in April. “Apple’s 5G iPhone strategy became more aggressive after the U.S. export ban on Huawei,” Kuo said. “We estimate that 5G iPhone will account for around 60% of total new 2H20 iPhone shipments (vs. consensus’s 2


TF International Securities analyst Ming Chi Kuo said in a note on Monday that Apple’s first 5G iPhones will launch in 2020 using modems provided by Qualcomm. Kuo said that two of the 2020 iPhones will use Qualcomm’s 5G modem after the two companies settled a long-standing lawsuit in April. “Apple’s 5G iPhone strategy became more aggressive after the U.S. export ban on Huawei,” Kuo said. “We estimate that 5G iPhone will account for around 60% of total new 2H20 iPhone shipments (vs. consensus’s 2
Apple will release two iPhones with 5G in 2020, top analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: todd haselton
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Apple will release two iPhones with 5G in 2020, top analyst says

TF International Securities analyst Ming Chi Kuo said in a note on Monday that Apple’s first 5G iPhones will launch in 2020 using modems provided by Qualcomm. The note reiterates a bit of what Kuo said in a similar note published in April.

Kuo said Apple will launch three different iPhone models in 2020 with 6.7-inch, 6.1-inch and 5.4-inch screen sizes. All three models will have OLED screens, which are more colorful than LCD panels. Apple’s iPhone XS Max and iPhone XS, which launched in September 2018, have OLED screens. The more affordable iPhone XR has an LCD panel.

The 2020 6.1-inch model won’t support 5G, while the other two will, Kuo said, suggesting that Apple will continue to offer a cheaper model next year.

Kuo said that two of the 2020 iPhones will use Qualcomm’s 5G modem after the two companies settled a long-standing lawsuit in April. The note says Apple is building its own 5G chip that will be ready for later iPhones in 2022 or 2023 and that “the content of Apple and Qualcomm’s previous settlement includes Qualcomm’s release of partly 5G baseband chip source code to Apple for Apple’s development of [its] own 5G” technologies.

This means Apple’s 2019 iPhones, expected in September, won’t support 5G networks. Samsung already sells a 5G phone, the Galaxy S10 5G, in the U.S. on Verizon and AT&T. Sprint and T-Mobile will also sell it soon. 5G provides faster data speeds and will be used not only in phones, but also to provide better connections in all types of devices, including self-driving cars and cameras in smart cities.

Apple is reportedly ramping up its 5G efforts amid a ban on Huawei technology.

“Apple’s 5G iPhone strategy became more aggressive after the U.S. export ban on Huawei,” Kuo said. “We estimate that 5G iPhone will account for around 60% of total new 2H20 iPhone shipments (vs. consensus’s 20%).”

A report earlier on Monday from Reuters said that U.S. chipmakers Qualcomm and Intel are “quietly” lobbying for the U.S. government to ease the ban on Huawei, however, since Huawei buys an estimated $11 billion of the $70 billion it spends on components from U.S. companies.

The note added that Broadcom will provide power amplifiers for the 5G iPhones that are manufactured by Win-semi. “We estimate that Broadcom and Win-semi’s iPhone PA shipments will significantly grow by 120–130% YoY in both 2020 and 2021, and these two suppliers will be the major winners,” Kuo said.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iphone, iphones, qualcomms, 2020, analyst, huawei, apples, 5g, apple, note, kuo, release


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US chipmakers are reportedly quietly lobbying to ease Huawei ban

Huawei’s American chip suppliers, including Qualcomm and Intel, are quietly pressing the U.S. government to ease its ban on sales to the Chinese tech giant, even as Huawei itself avoids typical government lobbying, people familiar with the situation said. The ban bars U.S. suppliers from selling to Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment company, without special approval, because of what the government said were national security issues. “For technologies that do not relate to n


Huawei’s American chip suppliers, including Qualcomm and Intel, are quietly pressing the U.S. government to ease its ban on sales to the Chinese tech giant, even as Huawei itself avoids typical government lobbying, people familiar with the situation said. The ban bars U.S. suppliers from selling to Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment company, without special approval, because of what the government said were national security issues. “For technologies that do not relate to n
US chipmakers are reportedly quietly lobbying to ease Huawei ban Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, ban, chinese, suppliers, reportedly, ease, quietly, security, intel, lobbying, chipmakers, selling, huawei, situation, technology


US chipmakers are reportedly quietly lobbying to ease Huawei ban

Huawei’s American chip suppliers, including Qualcomm and Intel, are quietly pressing the U.S. government to ease its ban on sales to the Chinese tech giant, even as Huawei itself avoids typical government lobbying, people familiar with the situation said.

Executives from top U.S. chipmakers Intel and Xilinx attended a meeting in late May with the Commerce Department to discuss a response to Huawei’s placement on the black list, one person said.

The ban bars U.S. suppliers from selling to Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment company, without special approval, because of what the government said were national security issues.

Qualcomm has also pressed the Commerce Department over the issue, four people said.

Chip makers argue that Huawei units selling products such as smartphones and computer servers use commonly available parts and are unlikely to present the same security concerns as the Chinese technology firm’s 5G networking gear, according to three people.

“This isn’t about helping Huawei. It’s about preventing harm to American companies,” one of the people said.

Out of $70 billion that Huawei spent buying components in 2018, some $11 billion went to U.S. firms including Qualcomm, Intel and Micron Technology Inc.

Qualcomm, for example, wants to be able to continue shipping chips to Huawei for common devices like phones and smart watches, a person familiar with the company’s situation said.

The Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA), a trade group, acknowledged it arranged consultations with the U.S. government on behalf of the companies to help them comply and brief officials on the impact of the ban on the companies.

“For technologies that do not relate to national security, it seems they shouldn’t fall within the scope of the order. And we have conveyed this perspective to government,” said Jimmy Goodrich, vice president of global policy at SIA.

The ban came soon after the breakdown of talks to end the months-long trade spat between China and the United States, spurred by U.S. allegations of Chinese corporate espionage, intellectual property theft and forced technology transfer.

Google, which sells hardware, software and technical services to Huawei, has also advocated so it can keep selling to the company, Huawei Chairman Liang Hua told reporters in China earlier this month.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, ban, chinese, suppliers, reportedly, ease, quietly, security, intel, lobbying, chipmakers, selling, huawei, situation, technology


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Huawei delays foldable phone launch until September to do extra tests after Samsung’s troubles

Huawei said its foldable phone will launch in September, slightly later than it was reportedly set to, as it does extra tests following the debacle Samsung went through with its rival device. The Mate X, which starts at around 2,299 euros or roughly $2,600, is a 5G-capable device. The Mate X was unveiled in February but has yet to go on sale. Huawei had initially targeted a mid-2019 launch date and in April, Chinese media reported that it was looking at June. Huawei’s spokesperson said the compa


Huawei said its foldable phone will launch in September, slightly later than it was reportedly set to, as it does extra tests following the debacle Samsung went through with its rival device. The Mate X, which starts at around 2,299 euros or roughly $2,600, is a 5G-capable device. The Mate X was unveiled in February but has yet to go on sale. Huawei had initially targeted a mid-2019 launch date and in April, Chinese media reported that it was looking at June. Huawei’s spokesperson said the compa
Huawei delays foldable phone launch until September to do extra tests after Samsung’s troubles Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, samsung, foldable, launch, extra, galaxy, samsungs, troubles, mate, mobile, tests, huawei, company, phone, delays, spokesperson


Huawei delays foldable phone launch until September to do extra tests after Samsung's troubles

Huawei said its foldable phone will launch in September, slightly later than it was reportedly set to, as it does extra tests following the debacle Samsung went through with its rival device.

A spokesperson for the Chinese technology giant told CNBC on Friday that the company is trying to launch the Huawei Mate X globally, focusing on markets that are rolling out next-generation mobile networks known as 5G. The Mate X, which starts at around 2,299 euros or roughly $2,600, is a 5G-capable device.

The Mate X was unveiled in February but has yet to go on sale. Huawei had initially targeted a mid-2019 launch date and in April, Chinese media reported that it was looking at June. But the spokesperson confirmed the official launch will take place in September. He said that the company was doing extra testing with mobile carriers around the world and developers to make sure their apps work when the device is fully unfolded.

Huawei’s spokesperson said the company was more “cautious” after Samsung’s foldable device, the Galaxy Fold, began to break when tested by reviewers in April. Samsung and some of the carriers selling the Galaxy Fold have canceled pre-orders that consumers had already placed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, samsung, foldable, launch, extra, galaxy, samsungs, troubles, mate, mobile, tests, huawei, company, phone, delays, spokesperson


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Cramer: Trump views Huawei as China’s ‘Achilles’ heel,’ and Broadcom found that out the hard way

Trump feels he has to “sacrifice Broadcom on the alter of Huawei” to humble China in trade negotiations, Cramer argued. Last year, Broadcom received about $900 million in revenue from China-based Huawei, a major maker of smartphones and mobile networking gear. “The president regards Huawei as the Achilles’ heel” of Chinese leader Xi Jinping. “What a kiss of death, if you’re a great friend with the president,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street. ” A spokesperson for the White House was not imme


Trump feels he has to “sacrifice Broadcom on the alter of Huawei” to humble China in trade negotiations, Cramer argued. Last year, Broadcom received about $900 million in revenue from China-based Huawei, a major maker of smartphones and mobile networking gear. “The president regards Huawei as the Achilles’ heel” of Chinese leader Xi Jinping. “What a kiss of death, if you’re a great friend with the president,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street. ” A spokesperson for the White House was not imme
Cramer: Trump views Huawei as China’s ‘Achilles’ heel,’ and Broadcom found that out the hard way Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, views, white, achilles, trump, cramer, chinas, hard, company, revenue, tan, broadcom, way, president, house, heel


Cramer: Trump views Huawei as China's 'Achilles' heel,' and Broadcom found that out the hard way

Broadcom CEO Hock Tan is paying the price for misjudging President Donald Trump’s resolve to “bring the Chinese to their knees,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Friday.

Trump feels he has to “sacrifice Broadcom on the alter of Huawei” to humble China in trade negotiations, Cramer argued. Last year, Broadcom received about $900 million in revenue from China-based Huawei, a major maker of smartphones and mobile networking gear.

“The president regards Huawei as the Achilles’ heel” of Chinese leader Xi Jinping. The calculation in effectively blacklisting Huawei from doing business with American companies is that China would never let one of its crown jewels of technology fail, the “Mad Money” host speculated.

Tan may be feeling hard done by Trump, said Cramer, pointing out that the Broadcom CEO in 2017 went to the White House, and joined the president, to announce he was relocating the Singapore-based company back to the United States.

In another knock, the Trump administration last year blocked Broadcom’s $117 billion bid to buy San Diego-based Qualcomm on national security grounds.

“What a kiss of death, if you’re a great friend with the president,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street. ”

“Broadcom is a remarkably good company and it’s going to be hurt” in the crossfire between the world’s two biggest economic superpowers, he explained.

Shares of Broadcom fell sharply at Friday’s open on Wall Street, after the semiconductor maker reported late Thursday weaker-than-expected quarterly revenue. It also announced a 2019 revenue forecast cut, predicting a slowdown in demand stemming from the conflicts between Washington and Beijing. This is being “driven by continued geopolitical uncertainties,” Tan said in a statement.

The company is also seeing the “effects of export restrictions on one of our largest customers,” Tan added, in a reference to the Trump administration last month barring Huawei, without special permission, from buying equipment from U.S. companies. However, the Commerce Department did put a 90-day hold on the move.

The White House has accused Huawei of being too closely tied to China’s communist government and expressed concern about Huawei technology being used for spying against the U.S. For its part, Huawei has repeatedly asserted that it is independent from the Chinese government.

A spokesperson for the White House was not immediately available to respond to CNBC’s request for comment on Cramer’s remarks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, huawei, views, white, achilles, trump, cramer, chinas, hard, company, revenue, tan, broadcom, way, president, house, heel


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