Waymo’s self-driving tech needs one big thing to succeed: More humans

Alphabet’s self-driving car company Waymo has built the world’s smartest vehicles with access to the world’s best artificial intelligence, but there’s one barrier that it might have underestimated: people. Meanwhile, competitors like Uber, Tesla and General Motors subsidiary Cruise are all planning their own self-driving car technology in a market estimated to garner $556.67 billion by 2026. While analysts have valued Waymo at $70 billion, the Phoenix trip suggested the road to profitability wil


Alphabet’s self-driving car company Waymo has built the world’s smartest vehicles with access to the world’s best artificial intelligence, but there’s one barrier that it might have underestimated: people. Meanwhile, competitors like Uber, Tesla and General Motors subsidiary Cruise are all planning their own self-driving car technology in a market estimated to garner $556.67 billion by 2026. While analysts have valued Waymo at $70 billion, the Phoenix trip suggested the road to profitability wil
Waymo’s self-driving tech needs one big thing to succeed: More humans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-17  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drivers, cars, succeed, human, thing, phoenix, officials, tech, needs, company, selfdriving, waymo, big, humans, waymos, car


Waymo's self-driving tech needs one big thing to succeed: More humans

Alphabet’s self-driving car company Waymo has built the world’s smartest vehicles with access to the world’s best artificial intelligence, but there’s one barrier that it might have underestimated: people. In the last few months, the company has gained regulatory approvals, improved its driving systems using Alphabet’a AI assets and partnered with other auto manufacturers. Its cars have driven more miles than any other company’s. But the community closest to Waymo’s main testing grounds in Phoenix, Arizona, said that the human element remains complicated, from hiring more drivers and support staff to working with city officials and emergency response staff. CNBC visited Phoenix to check out Waymo’s progress earlier this month, weeks after the company launched its first actual business, Waymo One, a commercial robotaxi service in the Phoenix area. Meanwhile, competitors like Uber, Tesla and General Motors subsidiary Cruise are all planning their own self-driving car technology in a market estimated to garner $556.67 billion by 2026. While analysts have valued Waymo at $70 billion, the Phoenix trip suggested the road to profitability will require humans to get it there.

Community buy-in

Arizona officials said that they have engaged with Waymo routinely for the past several years. So far, the partnership has only worked because of buy-in from cities, which value citizens as first priorities. For Waymo to expand locations, it will have to duplicate those efforts on a larger scale. Officials of Chandler, Arizona, said the city is revamping some streets and parking lots with self-driving cars in mind. It is also working with police and fire departments — Chandler police chief Sean Duggan said his department worked with the company to identify emergency vehicle siren types so that Waymo could respond. “There were lots of questions with this technology when we started and there are still lots of questions,” Duggan said. “The dialogue is important,” he added. Duggan said the company has also had to work out details like who gets a citation, which required an overarching state-wide protocol in order for each jurisdiction to be uniform. The departments are also having to train staff for how to respond to collisions, which Duggan said have more complexities than the typical vehicle. Speed limits have been a point of contention for other human drivers on the road, officials and local residents told us, noting they drive slower than most other drivers. Local reports claim residents have taken out their anger on the cars in the form of harassing drivers, trying to run the cars off the road, and throwing rocks at them. “They function like a 15-year-old driver hoping to get a driver’s license and not really like a full-blown driver,” said author and mobility expert Dan Albert. Duggan said he and the fire chief have been fielding calls from police chiefs across the country with their concerns or curiosities about the technology, particularly after an Uber self-driving car struck and killed a pedestrian in nearby Tempe in March 2018.

Workforce

Waymo is preparing for a contingent workforce it will need to take care of its fleets. In the last two months, it posted dozens of jobs, including a new role, “Head of Contingent Workforce Management.” It also still needs safety drivers in each car, which Waymo trains. Phoenix passengers told us that sometimes drivers still needs to engage. Chris Ingle, a Waymo One Rider said while he’s had mostly positive experiences, one time, on the freeway, a police officer pulled over a car but the driver quickly grabbed the wheel because, according to him, the Waymo car didn’t stop in time for the extra vehicle that the police pulled over. That, however, was a one-time occurrence, he reiterated. The company also needs maintenance staff for each depot site, where it will do things like wash cars and change oil. “A lot of the business promise and hope for these is that they eliminate labor and eliminate the need for human beings to drive and be stuck in jobs like delivery pizzas,” said Albert “There’s a human interaction that’s still very much a part of that transportation service and we forget about the complete end-to-end user experience of a lot of these transportation functions.” Waymo also needs 24/7 operators to address rider support — at one point, we needed to call it in order for the door to open after it presumed the ride was over. Waymo also has a phone number that police officers can call 24/7 if they need to assign a ticket or other citation, officials told us.

More riders

Up to this point, the company has used human interaction and feedback from Waymo One riders to train its rider experience. In Phoenix, it incorporated rider feedback to display trees, pedestrians and bikes on its displays screens inside the vehicle. Despite larger technical advances, it still needs more riders to train them in Phoenix and in other geographies where weather is more severe. Waymo CEO John Krafcik also said in a recent auto industry podcast that the company needs as many miles as it can get despite having what a spokesperson described as an advanced driving simulator in-house. The need for more riders was the reason Waymo partnered with Lyft for a fleet of 10 cars in Phoenix, which the company announced last month. It was a way to get the testing in front of a wider array of people who may not already know who Waymo is or what they do, a spokesperson said. She added that the company hopes that fleet beyond the currently limited one. UBS, which values Waymo anywhere from $45 billion to $135 billion, said Alphabet’s self-driving car unit could generate as much as $114 billion in revenue by 2030 through ride-sharing services that allow customers to book a ride in one of its self-driving cars.

Mindset change


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-17  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drivers, cars, succeed, human, thing, phoenix, officials, tech, needs, company, selfdriving, waymo, big, humans, waymos, car


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16 Marines arrested on human smuggling, drug charges

Sixteen U.S. Marines were arrested Thursday on a raft of charges including human smuggling and drug-related offenses, the U.S. Marine Corps said. The Marines were arrested at Camp Pendleton, California, one of the largest Marine Corps bases in the U.S., during a battalion formation Thursday morning, a spokesman said in a press release. The arrests were precipitated by information gathered from a previous human smuggling investigation, the press release said. Eight other Marines were also questio


Sixteen U.S. Marines were arrested Thursday on a raft of charges including human smuggling and drug-related offenses, the U.S. Marine Corps said. The Marines were arrested at Camp Pendleton, California, one of the largest Marine Corps bases in the U.S., during a battalion formation Thursday morning, a spokesman said in a press release. The arrests were precipitated by information gathered from a previous human smuggling investigation, the press release said. Eight other Marines were also questio
16 Marines arrested on human smuggling, drug charges Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: kevin breuninger sunny kim, kevin breuninger, sunny kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, human, charges, marine, arrested, questioned, nbc, smuggling, law, release, drug, ncis, 16, press, marines


16 Marines arrested on human smuggling, drug charges

Sixteen U.S. Marines were arrested Thursday on a raft of charges including human smuggling and drug-related offenses, the U.S. Marine Corps said.

The Marines were arrested at Camp Pendleton, California, one of the largest Marine Corps bases in the U.S., during a battalion formation Thursday morning, a spokesman said in a press release. Officials from the 1st Marine Division and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, or NCIS, carried out the arrests.

The arrests were precipitated by information gathered from a previous human smuggling investigation, the press release said.

Eight other Marines were also questioned Thursday on unrelated alleged drug offenses.

“1st Marine Division is committed to justice and the rule of law, and we will continue to fully cooperate with NCIS on this matter,” the Marines said in the press release.

“Any Marines found to be in connection with these alleged activities will be questioned and handled accordingly with respect to due process.”

Thursday’s arrests came just a few weeks after two Marines from the same California military base were arrested on suspicion of smuggling immigrants across the U.S.-Mexico border into San Diego County, NBC News reported at the time.

Those Marines, Byron Law II and David Salazar-Quintero, were pulled over July 3 in a black car carrying three people who claimed they were undocumented Mexican immigrants, according to NBC. Two of those passengers reportedly claimed they were going to pay $8,000 to be smuggled into the U.S., and planned to travel to New Jersey and Los Angeles.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: kevin breuninger sunny kim, kevin breuninger, sunny kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, human, charges, marine, arrested, questioned, nbc, smuggling, law, release, drug, ncis, 16, press, marines


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Elon Musk’s brain-machine start-up plans human trials in 2020

Elon Musk’s ambitious brain-computer start-up Neuralink is looking to start trials on humans next year. “It will take a long time, and you’ll see it coming,” Musk said at Tuesday’s event. Musk believes the technology could eventually assist in cognitive capabilities like speech and sight, according to the New York Times. The New York Times reported that it saw a demonstration of a computer receiving information from a rat in a company lab. At Tuesday’s event Musk also talked about work with monk


Elon Musk’s ambitious brain-computer start-up Neuralink is looking to start trials on humans next year. “It will take a long time, and you’ll see it coming,” Musk said at Tuesday’s event. Musk believes the technology could eventually assist in cognitive capabilities like speech and sight, according to the New York Times. The New York Times reported that it saw a demonstration of a computer receiving information from a rat in a company lab. At Tuesday’s event Musk also talked about work with monk
Elon Musk’s brain-machine start-up plans human trials in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, event, elon, neuralink, musks, 2020, musk, startup, brainmachine, trials, brain, tuesdays, talked, human, york, plans, technology


Elon Musk's brain-machine start-up plans human trials in 2020

Elon Musk’s ambitious brain-computer start-up Neuralink is looking to start trials on humans next year. Musk talked about the project at an event in San Francisco that was streamed live — with an eye toward recruiting more talent — late on Tuesday.

Neuralink aligns with a broader trend of technology minds seeking to merge their approaches with the world of in healthcare. Facebook has previously devoted resources to exploring computer systems that people could communicate with simply by thinking.

The start-up envisions drilling holes into the brain with a custom machine to embed thin threads that connect to a tiny processor, which can then be connected to a smartphone over Bluetooth. Over time it would like to make the installation process as simple as laser-eye surgery.

The company is seeking U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to begin clinical trials as soon as next year, Bloomberg said, and Musk said the start-up wants to have its first human patient equipped with the technology before the end of 2020.

“It will take a long time, and you’ll see it coming,” Musk said at Tuesday’s event. He said in the future there could be an “app store” for different programs that could tap the technology.

Neuralink has operated in relative secrecy ever since Musk, the CEO of Tesla and a co-founder of PayPal, laid out the ideas for the start-up in an lengthy article on Tim Urban’s blog “Wait But Why” in 2017.

“We are aiming to bring something to market that helps with certain severe brain injuries (stroke, cancer lesion, congenital) in about four years,” Musk told Urban.

Musk believes the technology could eventually assist in cognitive capabilities like speech and sight, according to the New York Times. Applications include helping people control computers with their brain activity or restoring the ability to speak, Philip Sabes, senior scientist at Neuralink, said at Tuesday’s event.

Musk said people could communicate with one another using the technology through a kind of telepathy.

He has a larger ambition, though. He said on Tuesday that he hopes to “help secure humanity’s future as a civilization relative to AI,” or artificial intelligence.

Last year, one media outlet reported that Neuralink had been looking to conduct tests on animals. The New York Times reported that it saw a demonstration of a computer receiving information from a rat in a company lab. And a new paper attributed to Neuralink and Musk describes some of the rat research.

“All animal procedures were performed in accordance with the National Research Council’s Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and were approved by the Neuralink Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee,” the paper states.

At Tuesday’s event Musk also talked about work with monkeys.

“A monkey has been able to control the computer with his brain,” he said.

Last year he talked up the project during an appearance on the “Joe Rogan Experience” podcast. “I think we’ll have something interesting to announce in a few months … that’s better than anyone thinks is possible,” he said.

Musk, a co-founder of Neuralink, has invested $100 million in the company, the New York Times said.

WATCH: Mind-reading technology will allow us to control devices with our thoughts


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, event, elon, neuralink, musks, 2020, musk, startup, brainmachine, trials, brain, tuesdays, talked, human, york, plans, technology


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Nursing mothers are selling and donating their milk using Facebook groups, and experts have mixed views about it

The problem is particularly acute for parents of sick or premature infants, who may not be able to digest formula as well as human milk. So to find parents who wanted it, Davis joined several private groups on Facebook that are dedicated to human breast milk exchange. Others are open pages, like the Human Milk 4 Human Babies Global Network, which has more than 80,000 likes. No controlsMost of the groups that have popped up on Facebook specialize in donated milk from mothers like Davis. It’s poss


The problem is particularly acute for parents of sick or premature infants, who may not be able to digest formula as well as human milk. So to find parents who wanted it, Davis joined several private groups on Facebook that are dedicated to human breast milk exchange. Others are open pages, like the Human Milk 4 Human Babies Global Network, which has more than 80,000 likes. No controlsMost of the groups that have popped up on Facebook specialize in donated milk from mothers like Davis. It’s poss
Nursing mothers are selling and donating their milk using Facebook groups, and experts have mixed views about it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-07  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, human, davis, mixed, breast, babies, son, mothers, milk, groups, donated, selling, using, san, views, experts, nursing, donor


Nursing mothers are selling and donating their milk using Facebook groups, and experts have mixed views about it

Bojan Fatur | E+ | Getty Images

Within weeks of giving birth, first-time mother Kyra Davis realized she was producing more milk than her baby needed. So she began storing it in her fridge and freezer at her San Francisco home. Davis had heard about the well-documented shortages at donor banks across the country. The problem is particularly acute for parents of sick or premature infants, who may not be able to digest formula as well as human milk. So to find parents who wanted it, Davis joined several private groups on Facebook that are dedicated to human breast milk exchange. Some of these Facebook groups are closed, meaning that outsiders can view them but cannot join without approval, such as Human Milk For Babies, a group that has more than two thousand members and promotes donation rather than sales of milk, and Buy, Sell, and Donate Breast Milk, with more than 5,000 members. Others are open pages, like the Human Milk 4 Human Babies Global Network, which has more than 80,000 likes.

Kyra Davis and her son Jude Kyra Davis

Davis is now donating her milk to about 7 or 8 families, most of whom she met on Facebook. They’ll pick up 50 ounces or more from her — enough to feed very young babies for at least two days, in most cases — and will often bring small tokens of their appreciation, like a home-cooked meal. Davis does not accept payment for her milk and has donated it in the Bay Area and in Hawaii, where she was recently on vacation. In an interview, Davis said she was driven by a desire to give back. When her infant, Jude, was in the neo-natal intensive care unit at the University of California San Francisco, she was given a “high suction” hospital grade pump to stimulate her supply. She put her energies into that, and her milk came in strongly and quickly. So she thought about donating it to the bank there, but felt overwhelmed by all the logistical hurdles when her son was still in recovery. The American Academy of Pediatrics has made human milk a standard of care for premature babies. But in many cases, the lack of supply has means that the milk is reserved for only the most premature infants. It struck Davis while in the hospital that if she had struggled to produce milk, Jude might not be at the top of the list, as he wasn’t born early.

No controls

Most of the groups that have popped up on Facebook specialize in donated milk from mothers like Davis. But some offer to sell their oversupply for upwards of $3 an ounce. And outside of Facebook, so-called “underground” websites have proliferated that take advantage of the growing demand for breast milk, with some selling it for up to $16 per ounce. That would represent hundreds of dollars a month in out-of-pocket expenses for a family, meaning only wealthy parents could afford it. Davis says she is committed to her own health and well-being, and has stuck to the guidelines about things like alcohol consumption while breastfeeding. She’s also careful about how she stores her milk to prevent contamination. But some medical experts fear that not everyone is as vigilant. Susan Crowe, an obstetrician who sits on the board of a breast milk bank in San Jose, Calif., noted when researchers in 2015 studied samples of breast milk purchased online, they uncovered that about 10 percent had been tainted with cow’s milk. The researchers speculated that it was a way for the sellers to make more money. Crowe said there haven’t been many studies like donated versus sold milk. It’s possible, she noted, that risks are lower for donated milk because the motives are different. But she also explained that at donor banks, breast milk has been pasteurized and tested for infectious diseases, and there are numerous other guardrails in place to ensure it is safe for the infant. With donor milk acquired on Facebook, there are no such guarantees. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics and U.S. Food and Drug administration recommend against internet-based milk-sharing sites, according to the Center for Disease Control, and guide mothers to donation-based human milk banks instead. Meanwhile, some investors are beginning to see an opportunity in the space. Vanessa Larco, a venture capitalist at New Enterprise Associates, experienced her own struggles with breastfeeding after her own son was born. She’s developed an interest in infant nutrition as a result, and has been thinking deeply about opportunities to bridge the gap by making it easier for women to access safe and high-quality donor breast milk when supplies are running low. “I’m deeply passionate about this and have been thinking deeply about the right way to do it,” she said.

‘Breast is best’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-07  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, human, davis, mixed, breast, babies, son, mothers, milk, groups, donated, selling, using, san, views, experts, nursing, donor


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Venezuelan security forces have committed ‘gross violations’ of human rights, UN says

The United Nations has issued a scathing critique of the human rights situation in Venezuela, accusing the government of targeting opponents with a “shocking” number of extrajudicial killings. Following a three-day trip to Venezuela last month, UN human rights chief Michelle Bachelet published a 16-page report accusing security forces loyal to President Nicolas Maduro of committing a series of “gross violations” against dissenters. Referring to these figures, the report said that researchers fro


The United Nations has issued a scathing critique of the human rights situation in Venezuela, accusing the government of targeting opponents with a “shocking” number of extrajudicial killings. Following a three-day trip to Venezuela last month, UN human rights chief Michelle Bachelet published a 16-page report accusing security forces loyal to President Nicolas Maduro of committing a series of “gross violations” against dissenters. Referring to these figures, the report said that researchers fro
Venezuelan security forces have committed ‘gross violations’ of human rights, UN says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gross, security, water, united, violations, venezuelan, number, report, human, rights, venezuela, forces, committed


Venezuelan security forces have committed 'gross violations' of human rights, UN says

A member of Venezuela’s Special Action Forces (FAES) takes part in a security operation in the 70’s neighbourhood, municipality of El Valle, in Caracas, on April 1, 2019.

The United Nations has issued a scathing critique of the human rights situation in Venezuela, accusing the government of targeting opponents with a “shocking” number of extrajudicial killings.

Following a three-day trip to Venezuela last month, UN human rights chief Michelle Bachelet published a 16-page report accusing security forces loyal to President Nicolas Maduro of committing a series of “gross violations” against dissenters.

Special Action Forces were said to have killed 5,287 people last year and another 1,569 by mid-May of this year.

Referring to these figures, the report said that researchers from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) believed there are “reasonable grounds to believe that many of these killings constitute extrajudicial executions committed by the security forces.”

Victims were arrested and shot, with crime scenes manipulated to suggest they had resisted police, the report said Thursday. Bachelet was scheduled to present the findings to the Human Rights Council in Geneva on Friday.

The detailed report, which was based on “558 interviews with victims and witnesses of human rights violations,” described a lawless system of oppression and estimated the actual number of deaths in the country could be much higher.

In most cases, “women and men were subjected to one or more forms of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, including electric shocks, suffocation with plastic bags, water boarding, beatings, sexual violence, water and food deprivation, stress positions and exposure to extreme temperatures.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gross, security, water, united, violations, venezuelan, number, report, human, rights, venezuela, forces, committed


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New York, London and Paris remain the world’s most competitive cities — but perhaps not for long

New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities. That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees. For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and cult


New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities. That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees. For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and cult
New York, London and Paris remain the world’s most competitive cities — but perhaps not for long Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cities, york, competitive, human, long, capital, london, worlds, information, paris, global, remain


New York, London and Paris remain the world's most competitive cities — but perhaps not for long

New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities.

But their prime positions could be up for contention as progress across Europe, Asia and the Middle East shows signs of disrupting the status quo.

That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees.

For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and culture, human capital, political engagement and information exchange.

New York ranked especially highly for business activity and human capital, while Paris performed well for information exchange and London for culture.

The leading trio were joined in the top 10 of the “Global Cities Index” by Tokyo (4th), Hong Kong (5th), Singapore (6th), Los Angeles (7th), Chicago (8th), Beijing (9th) and Washington D.C. (10th).


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cities, york, competitive, human, long, capital, london, worlds, information, paris, global, remain


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Robots are breaking out of their cages on the factory floor, and here’s what they are doing

Today there are, on average, 84 robots for every 10,000 workers in the U.S., according to the International Federation of Robotics. Clara Vu, a former Roomba engineer who co-founded Veo Robotics, developer of cobots that can safely work with humans without being bolted to factory floors. Veo RoboticsVu says the cages are not to keep the robots in but to keep the humans out. Veo Robotics plans to change that. What we hear from every factory, every line manager … is that they can’t hire enough p


Today there are, on average, 84 robots for every 10,000 workers in the U.S., according to the International Federation of Robotics. Clara Vu, a former Roomba engineer who co-founded Veo Robotics, developer of cobots that can safely work with humans without being bolted to factory floors. Veo RoboticsVu says the cages are not to keep the robots in but to keep the humans out. Veo Robotics plans to change that. What we hear from every factory, every line manager … is that they can’t hire enough p
Robots are breaking out of their cages on the factory floor, and here’s what they are doing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: brandon duffy magdalena petrova, brandon duffy, magdalena petrova, stephane kasriel, upwork ceo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doing, robots, factory, veo, robotics, floor, human, cages, robot, humans, heres, breaking, working, workers, vu


Robots are breaking out of their cages on the factory floor, and here's what they are doing

Collaborative robots, or cobots, have been working with humans on the factory floor for years, but when it comes to the large-scale industrial robots that can lift and move massive pieces of manufacturing, the danger to human workers is so great that the robots are bolted down to the factory floor behind fences so a human never comes near them. That is starting to change as robotics becomes more widespread across industries. Today there are, on average, 84 robots for every 10,000 workers in the U.S., according to the International Federation of Robotics. This places the U.S. second to Europe, at 99 units, and ahead of Asia, which to date averages 63 units (though the most roboticized country in the world is South Korea). While these next-generation robots are revolutionizing companies and expanding their bottom line, there is one very real caveat: Their increasing interactivity and mobility opens up the possibility of injury to human co-workers. “[Large-scale industrial] robots in factories today are literally kept in cages,” says Clara Vu, co-founder and vice president of engineering at Veo Robotics, a start-up developing sensor technology to allow industrial robots to work safely side-by-side with humans. Vu, who has been building robots for more than 20 years, got her start working as an intern for iRobot when they were just a tiny start-up in the attic of a shopping mall. Vu wrote the programming language for iRobot’s most well-known product, the Roomba, an autonomous robotic vacuum cleaner that debuted in 2002.

Clara Vu, a former Roomba engineer who co-founded Veo Robotics, developer of cobots that can safely work with humans without being bolted to factory floors. Veo Robotics

Vu says the cages are not to keep the robots in but to keep the humans out. “The robots are bolted to the floor. They’re not going anywhere. But … the robot is not aware of the human, and it can be thousands of pounds, and it’s moving really fast and people can get hurt.” Veo Robotics plans to change that. On Monday the Massachusetts-based company rolled out its new product, called Veo FreeMove, which gives robots spatial awareness of every object and obstacle in their reach. Its monitoring system signals a robot to slow or stop if an unrecognized, human-size object is closer to the robot than an acceptable protective separation distance, or PSD. When the obstruction passes, the robot will continue as programmed, allowing work to proceed without interruption. The price tag: $30,000. Partnering with four of the world’s largest robot manufacturers — Kuka, Fanuc, ABB and Yaskawa — Veo retrofitted 3-D depth sensors and computer vision software into their robots and conducted trials with a number of automotive, household appliance and consumer packaged-goods manufacturers. For now Veo is using Microsoft Xbox Kinect depth cameras but is working on building its own sensors. “The collaborative power and force-limited robots have been very useful for assembly of small things. What we would like to do is extend those advantages to all robots, regardless of the size. Whether it’s a robot that can carry a car, or a robot that can carry a car door, or a robot that moves fast and positions things very precisely,” says Patrick Sobalvarro, Veo’s CEO and co-founder.

What we hear from every factory, every line manager … is that they can’t hire enough production workers. The production labor workforce is aging out, and one of the things we see as an advantage of our system is that physical strength will no longer be required for production workers. Patrick Sobalvarro Veo’s CEO and co-founder


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: brandon duffy magdalena petrova, brandon duffy, magdalena petrova, stephane kasriel, upwork ceo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doing, robots, factory, veo, robotics, floor, human, cages, robot, humans, heres, breaking, working, workers, vu


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Amazon can pay human warehouse workers more thanks to robots, top exec says

Far from taking over warehouse workers’ jobs, robots are actually helping Amazon pay humans higher wages, according to the company’s CEO of its worldwide consumer division, Jeff Wilke. He said small robots bring inventory to workers in the warehouse so they can stay put. “Those small robots have made the job safer, and they’ve made it more efficient, which has allowed us to pay higher wages,” Wilke said. As artificial intelligence has become more advanced, workers in low-skill jobs have feared t


Far from taking over warehouse workers’ jobs, robots are actually helping Amazon pay humans higher wages, according to the company’s CEO of its worldwide consumer division, Jeff Wilke. He said small robots bring inventory to workers in the warehouse so they can stay put. “Those small robots have made the job safer, and they’ve made it more efficient, which has allowed us to pay higher wages,” Wilke said. As artificial intelligence has become more advanced, workers in low-skill jobs have feared t
Amazon can pay human warehouse workers more thanks to robots, top exec says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exec, amazons, wage, workers, robots, wages, jobs, wilke, amazon, bezos, warehouse, pay, thanks, human


Amazon can pay human warehouse workers more thanks to robots, top exec says

Far from taking over warehouse workers’ jobs, robots are actually helping Amazon pay humans higher wages, according to the company’s CEO of its worldwide consumer division, Jeff Wilke.

“We are using robotics and AI to make the job safer and make it easier for people to do what they do best, which is be creative and use their mind,” Wilke said in an interview with CNBC’s Jon Fortt from Amazon’s re:MARS conference in Las Vegas. He said small robots bring inventory to workers in the warehouse so they can stay put.

“Those small robots have made the job safer, and they’ve made it more efficient, which has allowed us to pay higher wages,” Wilke said.

As artificial intelligence has become more advanced, workers in low-skill jobs have feared their roles could be filled by robots. A recent report by the Brookings Institution found that a quarter of U.S. jobs are at “high-risk” for becoming automated. But Amazon’s head of robotics fulfillment Scott Anderson recently told reporters that fully automated warehouses were still “at least 10 years” away, according to Engadget.

Amazon has often been challenged on its warehouse working conditions, including from workers themselves, who have protested the company. Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders had been a vocal critic of Amazon’s wages for workers, even introducing legislation called the “Stop Bad Employers by Zeroing Out Subsidies, or Bezos, Act,” which proposed taxing corporations for every dollar their low-wage workers get in government benefits for health-care and food costs.

Sanders later praised CEO Jeff Bezos for rising to the occasion when the company announced in October it would raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour for all U.S. employees.

In his annual letter to shareholders, Bezos challenged other companies to match Amazon’s pay and benefits.

“Today I challenge our top retail competitors (you know who you are!) to match our employee benefits and our $15 minimum wage. Do it! Better yet, go to $16 and throw the gauntlet back at us. It’s a kind of competition that will benefit everyone,” Bezos wrote.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exec, amazons, wage, workers, robots, wages, jobs, wilke, amazon, bezos, warehouse, pay, thanks, human


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Sri Lanka’s tourism sector counts the human and financial toll of Easter attacks

Sri Lankan hotelier Roman Scott swung into crisis mode after the Easter Sunday attacks, driving across the island to make sure his employees and guests were safe. “First you go through absolute shock and then you start quickly moving … you have to close things down, assess the situation … see what happened to your staff,” he told CNBC on Friday. “All of them have lost family … sadly, we had funerals to deal with,” Scott said. Some 10 years on from Sri Lanka’s three-decade long civil war, t


Sri Lankan hotelier Roman Scott swung into crisis mode after the Easter Sunday attacks, driving across the island to make sure his employees and guests were safe. “First you go through absolute shock and then you start quickly moving … you have to close things down, assess the situation … see what happened to your staff,” he told CNBC on Friday. “All of them have lost family … sadly, we had funerals to deal with,” Scott said. Some 10 years on from Sri Lanka’s three-decade long civil war, t
Sri Lanka’s tourism sector counts the human and financial toll of Easter attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: sri jegarajah
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, lankas, easter, violence, island, wounded, tourism, financial, lankan, scott, fernando, counts, attacks, sector, human, family, toll, sri


Sri Lanka's tourism sector counts the human and financial toll of Easter attacks

Sri Lankan hotelier Roman Scott swung into crisis mode after the Easter Sunday attacks, driving across the island to make sure his employees and guests were safe.

“First you go through absolute shock and then you start quickly moving … you have to close things down, assess the situation … see what happened to your staff,” he told CNBC on Friday.

Luckily, no harm came to them, though many did lose family in the western coastal city of Negombo where dozens died after suicide bombers targeted worshippers attending mass at St Sebastian’s church.

“All of them have lost family … sadly, we had funerals to deal with,” Scott said.

Some 10 years on from Sri Lanka’s three-decade long civil war, the country stands “terribly wounded,” Dilhan Fernando, CEO of Sri Lankan tea company Dilmah, said in an e-mail. The island “experienced violence at a level of ferocity that we did not see even during the 30 year conflict,” he said, adding that “everyone knows someone” who has been affected.

Sri Lankans and business owners like Fernando and Scott are now asking if the Easter Sunday attack was a one-off, or whether it is the start of a cycle of violence that could send an already shaky economy into a downward spiral.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: sri jegarajah
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, lankas, easter, violence, island, wounded, tourism, financial, lankan, scott, fernando, counts, attacks, sector, human, family, toll, sri


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The first major analyst calls on Lyft are out and they’re bullish: ‘Future of human transportation’

The first round of Lyft analyst notes is bullish on the newly public ride-hailing company as brokerages across Wall Street clamor to recommend what one described as “the future of human transportation.” The flood of brokerage literature follows a quiet period after Lyft’s initial public offering on March 29, when it started trading at $72. Such quiet periods are designed to prevent underwriters and investment banks from using potentially confidential information commenting on a security. “Lyft o


The first round of Lyft analyst notes is bullish on the newly public ride-hailing company as brokerages across Wall Street clamor to recommend what one described as “the future of human transportation.” The flood of brokerage literature follows a quiet period after Lyft’s initial public offering on March 29, when it started trading at $72. Such quiet periods are designed to prevent underwriters and investment banks from using potentially confidential information commenting on a security. “Lyft o
The first major analyst calls on Lyft are out and they’re bullish: ‘Future of human transportation’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: thomas franck, gabjones, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, human, quiet, future, transportation, bullish, major, theyre, ju, lyfts, calls, trading, price, analyst, stock, public, lyft


The first major analyst calls on Lyft are out and they're bullish: 'Future of human transportation'

The first round of Lyft analyst notes is bullish on the newly public ride-hailing company as brokerages across Wall Street clamor to recommend what one described as “the future of human transportation.”

Though each analyst presented a unique interpretation of Lyft’s business, most emphasized a large, global marketplace, a short list of competitors and a compelling valuation following early stock underperformance.

The flood of brokerage literature follows a quiet period after Lyft’s initial public offering on March 29, when it started trading at $72. Such quiet periods are designed to prevent underwriters and investment banks from using potentially confidential information commenting on a security.

The stock has since pulled back and closed Monday at $60.94, down more than 15% from its IPO price. It was flat in midmorning trading Tuesday after rising more than 2% in the premarket.

Credit Suisse analyst Stephen Ju, who initiated coverage with an outperform rating and $95 price target, told clients not to worry about short-term stock moves and focus on the company’s strong fundamentals.

“Lyft offers the consumer for the first time in history the option to rent transportation capacity on an as-needed basis,” Ju wrote. “As Lyft’s stated goal is to offer that Transportation as a Service platform, the addressable market of $1.2 trillion in US transportation spend does seem appropriate over the longer term.”

Piper Jaffray gave a bold title to its note, calling the company a “vehicle for change in the future of human transportation.”

Here’s a wrap of all the major analyst opinions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: thomas franck, gabjones, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, human, quiet, future, transportation, bullish, major, theyre, ju, lyfts, calls, trading, price, analyst, stock, public, lyft


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