New York, London and Paris remain the world’s most competitive cities — but perhaps not for long

New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities. That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees. For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and cult


New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities. That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees. For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and cult
New York, London and Paris remain the world’s most competitive cities — but perhaps not for long Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cities, york, competitive, human, long, capital, london, worlds, information, paris, global, remain


New York, London and Paris remain the world's most competitive cities — but perhaps not for long

New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities.

But their prime positions could be up for contention as progress across Europe, Asia and the Middle East shows signs of disrupting the status quo.

That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees.

For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and culture, human capital, political engagement and information exchange.

New York ranked especially highly for business activity and human capital, while Paris performed well for information exchange and London for culture.

The leading trio were joined in the top 10 of the “Global Cities Index” by Tokyo (4th), Hong Kong (5th), Singapore (6th), Los Angeles (7th), Chicago (8th), Beijing (9th) and Washington D.C. (10th).


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cities, york, competitive, human, long, capital, london, worlds, information, paris, global, remain


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Robots are breaking out of their cages on the factory floor, and here’s what they are doing

Today there are, on average, 84 robots for every 10,000 workers in the U.S., according to the International Federation of Robotics. Clara Vu, a former Roomba engineer who co-founded Veo Robotics, developer of cobots that can safely work with humans without being bolted to factory floors. Veo RoboticsVu says the cages are not to keep the robots in but to keep the humans out. Veo Robotics plans to change that. What we hear from every factory, every line manager … is that they can’t hire enough p


Today there are, on average, 84 robots for every 10,000 workers in the U.S., according to the International Federation of Robotics. Clara Vu, a former Roomba engineer who co-founded Veo Robotics, developer of cobots that can safely work with humans without being bolted to factory floors. Veo RoboticsVu says the cages are not to keep the robots in but to keep the humans out. Veo Robotics plans to change that. What we hear from every factory, every line manager … is that they can’t hire enough p
Robots are breaking out of their cages on the factory floor, and here’s what they are doing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: brandon duffy magdalena petrova, brandon duffy, magdalena petrova, stephane kasriel, upwork ceo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doing, robots, factory, veo, robotics, floor, human, cages, robot, humans, heres, breaking, working, workers, vu


Robots are breaking out of their cages on the factory floor, and here's what they are doing

Collaborative robots, or cobots, have been working with humans on the factory floor for years, but when it comes to the large-scale industrial robots that can lift and move massive pieces of manufacturing, the danger to human workers is so great that the robots are bolted down to the factory floor behind fences so a human never comes near them. That is starting to change as robotics becomes more widespread across industries. Today there are, on average, 84 robots for every 10,000 workers in the U.S., according to the International Federation of Robotics. This places the U.S. second to Europe, at 99 units, and ahead of Asia, which to date averages 63 units (though the most roboticized country in the world is South Korea). While these next-generation robots are revolutionizing companies and expanding their bottom line, there is one very real caveat: Their increasing interactivity and mobility opens up the possibility of injury to human co-workers. “[Large-scale industrial] robots in factories today are literally kept in cages,” says Clara Vu, co-founder and vice president of engineering at Veo Robotics, a start-up developing sensor technology to allow industrial robots to work safely side-by-side with humans. Vu, who has been building robots for more than 20 years, got her start working as an intern for iRobot when they were just a tiny start-up in the attic of a shopping mall. Vu wrote the programming language for iRobot’s most well-known product, the Roomba, an autonomous robotic vacuum cleaner that debuted in 2002.

Clara Vu, a former Roomba engineer who co-founded Veo Robotics, developer of cobots that can safely work with humans without being bolted to factory floors. Veo Robotics

Vu says the cages are not to keep the robots in but to keep the humans out. “The robots are bolted to the floor. They’re not going anywhere. But … the robot is not aware of the human, and it can be thousands of pounds, and it’s moving really fast and people can get hurt.” Veo Robotics plans to change that. On Monday the Massachusetts-based company rolled out its new product, called Veo FreeMove, which gives robots spatial awareness of every object and obstacle in their reach. Its monitoring system signals a robot to slow or stop if an unrecognized, human-size object is closer to the robot than an acceptable protective separation distance, or PSD. When the obstruction passes, the robot will continue as programmed, allowing work to proceed without interruption. The price tag: $30,000. Partnering with four of the world’s largest robot manufacturers — Kuka, Fanuc, ABB and Yaskawa — Veo retrofitted 3-D depth sensors and computer vision software into their robots and conducted trials with a number of automotive, household appliance and consumer packaged-goods manufacturers. For now Veo is using Microsoft Xbox Kinect depth cameras but is working on building its own sensors. “The collaborative power and force-limited robots have been very useful for assembly of small things. What we would like to do is extend those advantages to all robots, regardless of the size. Whether it’s a robot that can carry a car, or a robot that can carry a car door, or a robot that moves fast and positions things very precisely,” says Patrick Sobalvarro, Veo’s CEO and co-founder.

What we hear from every factory, every line manager … is that they can’t hire enough production workers. The production labor workforce is aging out, and one of the things we see as an advantage of our system is that physical strength will no longer be required for production workers. Patrick Sobalvarro Veo’s CEO and co-founder


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: brandon duffy magdalena petrova, brandon duffy, magdalena petrova, stephane kasriel, upwork ceo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doing, robots, factory, veo, robotics, floor, human, cages, robot, humans, heres, breaking, working, workers, vu


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Amazon can pay human warehouse workers more thanks to robots, top exec says

Far from taking over warehouse workers’ jobs, robots are actually helping Amazon pay humans higher wages, according to the company’s CEO of its worldwide consumer division, Jeff Wilke. He said small robots bring inventory to workers in the warehouse so they can stay put. “Those small robots have made the job safer, and they’ve made it more efficient, which has allowed us to pay higher wages,” Wilke said. As artificial intelligence has become more advanced, workers in low-skill jobs have feared t


Far from taking over warehouse workers’ jobs, robots are actually helping Amazon pay humans higher wages, according to the company’s CEO of its worldwide consumer division, Jeff Wilke. He said small robots bring inventory to workers in the warehouse so they can stay put. “Those small robots have made the job safer, and they’ve made it more efficient, which has allowed us to pay higher wages,” Wilke said. As artificial intelligence has become more advanced, workers in low-skill jobs have feared t
Amazon can pay human warehouse workers more thanks to robots, top exec says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exec, amazons, wage, workers, robots, wages, jobs, wilke, amazon, bezos, warehouse, pay, thanks, human


Amazon can pay human warehouse workers more thanks to robots, top exec says

Far from taking over warehouse workers’ jobs, robots are actually helping Amazon pay humans higher wages, according to the company’s CEO of its worldwide consumer division, Jeff Wilke.

“We are using robotics and AI to make the job safer and make it easier for people to do what they do best, which is be creative and use their mind,” Wilke said in an interview with CNBC’s Jon Fortt from Amazon’s re:MARS conference in Las Vegas. He said small robots bring inventory to workers in the warehouse so they can stay put.

“Those small robots have made the job safer, and they’ve made it more efficient, which has allowed us to pay higher wages,” Wilke said.

As artificial intelligence has become more advanced, workers in low-skill jobs have feared their roles could be filled by robots. A recent report by the Brookings Institution found that a quarter of U.S. jobs are at “high-risk” for becoming automated. But Amazon’s head of robotics fulfillment Scott Anderson recently told reporters that fully automated warehouses were still “at least 10 years” away, according to Engadget.

Amazon has often been challenged on its warehouse working conditions, including from workers themselves, who have protested the company. Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders had been a vocal critic of Amazon’s wages for workers, even introducing legislation called the “Stop Bad Employers by Zeroing Out Subsidies, or Bezos, Act,” which proposed taxing corporations for every dollar their low-wage workers get in government benefits for health-care and food costs.

Sanders later praised CEO Jeff Bezos for rising to the occasion when the company announced in October it would raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour for all U.S. employees.

In his annual letter to shareholders, Bezos challenged other companies to match Amazon’s pay and benefits.

“Today I challenge our top retail competitors (you know who you are!) to match our employee benefits and our $15 minimum wage. Do it! Better yet, go to $16 and throw the gauntlet back at us. It’s a kind of competition that will benefit everyone,” Bezos wrote.

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Watch: Amazon is making one-day shipping the new standard for Prime members


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exec, amazons, wage, workers, robots, wages, jobs, wilke, amazon, bezos, warehouse, pay, thanks, human


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Sri Lanka’s tourism sector counts the human and financial toll of Easter attacks

Sri Lankan hotelier Roman Scott swung into crisis mode after the Easter Sunday attacks, driving across the island to make sure his employees and guests were safe. “First you go through absolute shock and then you start quickly moving … you have to close things down, assess the situation … see what happened to your staff,” he told CNBC on Friday. “All of them have lost family … sadly, we had funerals to deal with,” Scott said. Some 10 years on from Sri Lanka’s three-decade long civil war, t


Sri Lankan hotelier Roman Scott swung into crisis mode after the Easter Sunday attacks, driving across the island to make sure his employees and guests were safe. “First you go through absolute shock and then you start quickly moving … you have to close things down, assess the situation … see what happened to your staff,” he told CNBC on Friday. “All of them have lost family … sadly, we had funerals to deal with,” Scott said. Some 10 years on from Sri Lanka’s three-decade long civil war, t
Sri Lanka’s tourism sector counts the human and financial toll of Easter attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: sri jegarajah
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, lankas, easter, violence, island, wounded, tourism, financial, lankan, scott, fernando, counts, attacks, sector, human, family, toll, sri


Sri Lanka's tourism sector counts the human and financial toll of Easter attacks

Sri Lankan hotelier Roman Scott swung into crisis mode after the Easter Sunday attacks, driving across the island to make sure his employees and guests were safe.

“First you go through absolute shock and then you start quickly moving … you have to close things down, assess the situation … see what happened to your staff,” he told CNBC on Friday.

Luckily, no harm came to them, though many did lose family in the western coastal city of Negombo where dozens died after suicide bombers targeted worshippers attending mass at St Sebastian’s church.

“All of them have lost family … sadly, we had funerals to deal with,” Scott said.

Some 10 years on from Sri Lanka’s three-decade long civil war, the country stands “terribly wounded,” Dilhan Fernando, CEO of Sri Lankan tea company Dilmah, said in an e-mail. The island “experienced violence at a level of ferocity that we did not see even during the 30 year conflict,” he said, adding that “everyone knows someone” who has been affected.

Sri Lankans and business owners like Fernando and Scott are now asking if the Easter Sunday attack was a one-off, or whether it is the start of a cycle of violence that could send an already shaky economy into a downward spiral.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: sri jegarajah
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, lankas, easter, violence, island, wounded, tourism, financial, lankan, scott, fernando, counts, attacks, sector, human, family, toll, sri


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The first major analyst calls on Lyft are out and they’re bullish: ‘Future of human transportation’

The first round of Lyft analyst notes is bullish on the newly public ride-hailing company as brokerages across Wall Street clamor to recommend what one described as “the future of human transportation.” The flood of brokerage literature follows a quiet period after Lyft’s initial public offering on March 29, when it started trading at $72. Such quiet periods are designed to prevent underwriters and investment banks from using potentially confidential information commenting on a security. “Lyft o


The first round of Lyft analyst notes is bullish on the newly public ride-hailing company as brokerages across Wall Street clamor to recommend what one described as “the future of human transportation.” The flood of brokerage literature follows a quiet period after Lyft’s initial public offering on March 29, when it started trading at $72. Such quiet periods are designed to prevent underwriters and investment banks from using potentially confidential information commenting on a security. “Lyft o
The first major analyst calls on Lyft are out and they’re bullish: ‘Future of human transportation’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: thomas franck, gabjones, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, human, quiet, future, transportation, bullish, major, theyre, ju, lyfts, calls, trading, price, analyst, stock, public, lyft


The first major analyst calls on Lyft are out and they're bullish: 'Future of human transportation'

The first round of Lyft analyst notes is bullish on the newly public ride-hailing company as brokerages across Wall Street clamor to recommend what one described as “the future of human transportation.”

Though each analyst presented a unique interpretation of Lyft’s business, most emphasized a large, global marketplace, a short list of competitors and a compelling valuation following early stock underperformance.

The flood of brokerage literature follows a quiet period after Lyft’s initial public offering on March 29, when it started trading at $72. Such quiet periods are designed to prevent underwriters and investment banks from using potentially confidential information commenting on a security.

The stock has since pulled back and closed Monday at $60.94, down more than 15% from its IPO price. It was flat in midmorning trading Tuesday after rising more than 2% in the premarket.

Credit Suisse analyst Stephen Ju, who initiated coverage with an outperform rating and $95 price target, told clients not to worry about short-term stock moves and focus on the company’s strong fundamentals.

“Lyft offers the consumer for the first time in history the option to rent transportation capacity on an as-needed basis,” Ju wrote. “As Lyft’s stated goal is to offer that Transportation as a Service platform, the addressable market of $1.2 trillion in US transportation spend does seem appropriate over the longer term.”

Piper Jaffray gave a bold title to its note, calling the company a “vehicle for change in the future of human transportation.”

Here’s a wrap of all the major analyst opinions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: thomas franck, gabjones, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, human, quiet, future, transportation, bullish, major, theyre, ju, lyfts, calls, trading, price, analyst, stock, public, lyft


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Cartels may not be the primary culprits of Central American human smuggling to US, a new study says

“At best, we could provide a broad range for the revenues to all types of human smugglers.” The study looked at revenues earned by human smugglers, as well as taxes levied on migrants by drug-trafficking organizations on routes they control. “Transnational criminal organizations and other human smugglers are driven solely by illicit profit and do not care about human life.” The study also estimated the flow of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle countries to the U.S., relying in part on


“At best, we could provide a broad range for the revenues to all types of human smugglers.” The study looked at revenues earned by human smugglers, as well as taxes levied on migrants by drug-trafficking organizations on routes they control. “Transnational criminal organizations and other human smugglers are driven solely by illicit profit and do not care about human life.” The study also estimated the flow of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle countries to the U.S., relying in part on
Cartels may not be the primary culprits of Central American human smuggling to US, a new study says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: jeff daniels, adrees latif
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, migrants, smuggling, organizations, rand, primary, border, culprits, human, smugglers, northern, cartels, american, central, triangle, study, report


Cartels may not be the primary culprits of Central American human smuggling to US, a new study says

Human smuggling from Central American countries to the U.S. reaped revenue of between $200 million and $2.3 billion for smugglers in 2017, but transnational criminal organizations may not be the primary culprits, according to a Rand Corp. report released Monday.

President Donald Trump recently moved to cut foreign aid to the Northern Triangle countries of Central America — Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador — and in January claimed “ruthless coyotes and vicious cartels” are taking advantage of thousands of children who make the journey up to the U.S. border. Trump also cited human trafficking in February when he declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border, freeing up billions of dollars for his border wall.

“We learned that human smuggling involves many different types of actors and that we could not credibly distinguish most criminal organizations’ activities and revenues from those of other actors, including ad hoc groups and independent operators, that engage in human smuggling,” said Victoria Greenfield, lead author on the report and a senior economist at the nonprofit think tank. “At best, we could provide a broad range for the revenues to all types of human smugglers.”

“Although our findings are subject to a high degree of uncertainty, they represent a contribution to the evidence base informing ongoing U.S. government efforts to address threats to homeland security posed by TCOs and other actors that participate in human smuggling,” Rand said.

Also, Rand said because human smuggling operations are often independent and without “formality and strict hierarchical structures,” it might be difficult for the U.S. government to target them with sanctions or other measures effectively.

“Loose networks are difficult to disrupt, ad hoc groups are even less susceptible, and independent operators are easily replaceable,” the report concluded. It added that even if the U.S. government “can apply sanctions to some individuals in a given network or group or to individuals who operate independently, its ability to disrupt their organizations or affect the market may be limited.”

Rand’s 78-page report follows a study it conducted that was sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security. The study looked at revenues earned by human smugglers, as well as taxes levied on migrants by drug-trafficking organizations on routes they control.

“DHS has long warned of the dangers of trafficking and its horrendous impacts on the victims,” DHS press secretary Tyler Houlton said in an emailed statement. “Transnational criminal organizations and other human smugglers are driven solely by illicit profit and do not care about human life.”

According to Rand, the smuggling of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle region to the U.S. generated between $200 million and $2.3 billion for smugglers in 2017. It said the wide range reflects uncertainty about the number of migrants that journey northward, their use of smugglers and the fees they ultimately pay.

Rand estimated that migrants or their handlers paid drug-trafficking organizations taxes, or pisos, of $30 million to $180 million for crossing through their territories in 2017.

The report said cartels or TCOs sometimes “coordinate migrants’ border crossings to divert attention from other illicit activities, and they recruit or coerce some migrants to carry drugs.”

Rand estimated that the human smugglers charge migrants between $6,000 and $10,000 for their services. It said fees vary greatly and depend on whether migrants want to be smuggled into the interior of the U.S. or turn themselves in to border officials and seek asylum.

The study also estimated the flow of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle countries to the U.S., relying in part on government data. It estimated the unlawful migration from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador was at least 218,000 in 2017 but could have been as high as about 345,000 between ports of entry.

A caravan of Central American migrants became an issue in last year’s midterm elections after Trump deployed more than 5,000 troops to the U.S.-Mexico border. Reports have suggested the migrants are fleeing violence and, in some cases, economic hardship in their home countries.

Last month, the U.S. signed a “regional compact” with the three Northern Triangle countries aimed at addressing what the agency called “the migration crisis.” It said the agreement included collaboration to combat human trafficking and migrant smuggling, as well as countering gangs and organized crime activities.

About one-quarter to two-thirds of unlawful migrants from the Northern Triangle region might have hired smugglers in recent years, according to Rand.

The Rand study found that human smuggling can involve taxis, charter buses and tractor-trailers that ferry migrants from the Northern Triangle to locations further north on the journey to the U.S.-Mexico border.

The report also said human smugglers “rely on corruption to protect their activities in the form of bribes to officials.” Also, it said “more organized [smuggler] networks can feature transnational organizational structures, but relatively few appear to meet the bar of being ‘self-perpetuating associations.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: jeff daniels, adrees latif
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, migrants, smuggling, organizations, rand, primary, border, culprits, human, smugglers, northern, cartels, american, central, triangle, study, report


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Cancer ‘vaccine’ shows promise in human trial of lymphoma patients

To do this, they injected one tumor with a stimulant to recruit immune cells, treated the tumor with a low dose of radiation then injected it with a stimulant to activate immune cells. These activated immune cells then travel throughout the body, killing tumors wherever they find them. In three of the patients, the treatment shrunk not only the tumor that was treated but also other ones throughout the body, putting these patients into remission. Dr. Eric Jacobsen, clinical director of the Dana-F


To do this, they injected one tumor with a stimulant to recruit immune cells, treated the tumor with a low dose of radiation then injected it with a stimulant to activate immune cells. These activated immune cells then travel throughout the body, killing tumors wherever they find them. In three of the patients, the treatment shrunk not only the tumor that was treated but also other ones throughout the body, putting these patients into remission. Dr. Eric Jacobsen, clinical director of the Dana-F
Cancer ‘vaccine’ shows promise in human trial of lymphoma patients Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: angelica lavito, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, treated, tumors, cancer, human, vaccine, immune, tumor, treatment, patients, lymphoma, research, body, promise, shows, trial, cells


Cancer 'vaccine' shows promise in human trial of lymphoma patients

They refer to it as a vaccine because it causes a person’s immune system to fight the disease, though it’s not preventive like the flu shot. In this case, the treatment teaches the body to recognize tumors and attack them.

Researchers created the treatment directly inside the tumor. To do this, they injected one tumor with a stimulant to recruit immune cells, treated the tumor with a low dose of radiation then injected it with a stimulant to activate immune cells. These activated immune cells then travel throughout the body, killing tumors wherever they find them.

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In three of the patients, the treatment shrunk not only the tumor that was treated but also other ones throughout the body, putting these patients into remission.

“It’s really promising, and the fact you get not only responses in treated areas, but areas outside the field [of treatment with radiation] is really significant,” said Dr. Silvia Formenti, chairwoman of radiation oncology at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian, who was not involved in the study and is working on a similar treatment.

While promising, the effect was observed in only three people and will need to be tested in larger trials before even going before the Food and Drug Administration for review.

Dr. Eric Jacobsen, clinical director of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute’s lymphoma program, said the results are exciting but cautioned more research needs to be done. Jacobsen was not involved in the study.

“It’s definitely proof of concept, but larger studies are definitely needed and additional strategies to try to get more than three out of 11 patients to respond,” said Jacobsen, who is also developing a lymphoma vaccine, though with a slightly different approach.

Researchers for decades have tried but failed to create cancer vaccines. New research on immunotherapy, or training a person’s immune system to fight disease, has reinvigorated their efforts.

The vaccine activates dendritic cells, which are responsible for initiating immune responses. These cells then instruct T-cells to attack tumors in a person’s body, like generals instructing soldiers how to fight.

“Generals don’t really fight wars, they make the plans,” Brody said.

The research was funded by The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, the Cancer Research Institute and Merck. Celldex and Oncovir provided the materials for the clinical trial and the lab work.

Correction: This story was revised to correct a quote from Dr. Formenti. She said “treated,” not “three.”

WATCH: Pfizer’s bet on cancer market uncertain


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: angelica lavito, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, treated, tumors, cancer, human, vaccine, immune, tumor, treatment, patients, lymphoma, research, body, promise, shows, trial, cells


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50 women sue Salesforce, claiming it helped Backpage in sex trafficking

Fifty women are suing Salesforce, alleging the company profited by helping Backpage to engage in sex trafficking. The women, referred to only as anonymous Jane Does, identify themselves as survivors of sex trafficking, rape and abuse — facilitated through Backpage. The lawsuit claims:In public, including on Twitter, Salesforce boasted about fighting human trafficking using its data tools. But behind closed doors, Salesforce’s data tools were actually providing the backbone of Backpage’s exponent


Fifty women are suing Salesforce, alleging the company profited by helping Backpage to engage in sex trafficking. The women, referred to only as anonymous Jane Does, identify themselves as survivors of sex trafficking, rape and abuse — facilitated through Backpage. The lawsuit claims:In public, including on Twitter, Salesforce boasted about fighting human trafficking using its data tools. But behind closed doors, Salesforce’s data tools were actually providing the backbone of Backpage’s exponent
50 women sue Salesforce, claiming it helped Backpage in sex trafficking Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: sara salinas, frank muldoon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, human, lawsuit, data, sex, women, 50, salesforces, claiming, salesforce, sue, helped, backpage, trafficking, tools


50 women sue Salesforce, claiming it helped Backpage in sex trafficking

Fifty women are suing Salesforce, alleging the company profited by helping Backpage to engage in sex trafficking.

The women, referred to only as anonymous Jane Does, identify themselves as survivors of sex trafficking, rape and abuse — facilitated through Backpage. The lawsuit, filed Monday in Superior Court in San Francisco, paints a dark picture of Salesforce, which has long touted human rights and building technology for the greater good.

CEO Marc Benioff has advocated for gender equality in the workplace and better services for the homeless.

Shares of Salesforce fell nearly 4 percent Wednesday.

The lawsuit claims:

In public, including on Twitter, Salesforce boasted about fighting human trafficking using its data tools. But behind closed doors, Salesforce’s data tools were actually providing the backbone of Backpage’s exponential growth. Salesforce didn’t just provide Backpage with a customer-ready version of its data and marketing tools. Salesforce designed and implemented a heavily customized enterprise database tailored for Backpage’s operations, both locally and internationally. With Salesforce’s guidance, Backpage was able to use Salesforce’s tools to market to new “users” — that is, pimps, johns, and traffickers — on three continents.

A Salesforce spokesperson said the company doesn’t comment on pending litigation, but added: “We are deeply committed to the ethical and humane use of our products and take these allegations seriously.”

Salesforce markets customer acquisition and retention tools for businesses. It’s one of San Francisco’s largest software companies, with a market valuation above $120 billion.

The lawsuit claims Salesforce built custom tools for Backpage, upselling the now-defunct website on higher-priced packages and additional services.

“The evidence of Salesforce’s liability is overwhelming and the damages that have been caused to the victims and our communities as a result are monumental,” Annie McAdams, the lead attorney for the plaintiffs, said in a statement. “It’s simply not enough to say fighting human trafficking is important. Internal policies and procedures have to reflect that commitment.”

Read the full lawsuit:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: sara salinas, frank muldoon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, human, lawsuit, data, sex, women, 50, salesforces, claiming, salesforce, sue, helped, backpage, trafficking, tools


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50 women sue Salesforce, claiming it helped Backpage in sex trafficking

Fifty women are suing Salesforce, alleging the company profited by helping Backpage to engage in sex trafficking. The women, referred to only as anonymous Jane Does, identify themselves as survivors of sex trafficking, rape and abuse — facilitated through Backpage. The lawsuit claims:In public, including on Twitter, Salesforce boasted about fighting human trafficking using its data tools. But behind closed doors, Salesforce’s data tools were actually providing the backbone of Backpage’s exponent


Fifty women are suing Salesforce, alleging the company profited by helping Backpage to engage in sex trafficking. The women, referred to only as anonymous Jane Does, identify themselves as survivors of sex trafficking, rape and abuse — facilitated through Backpage. The lawsuit claims:In public, including on Twitter, Salesforce boasted about fighting human trafficking using its data tools. But behind closed doors, Salesforce’s data tools were actually providing the backbone of Backpage’s exponent
50 women sue Salesforce, claiming it helped Backpage in sex trafficking Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: sara salinas, frank muldoon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sex, claiming, backpage, 50, salesforces, trafficking, salesforce, tools, human, women, data, lawsuit, helped, sue


50 women sue Salesforce, claiming it helped Backpage in sex trafficking

Fifty women are suing Salesforce, alleging the company profited by helping Backpage to engage in sex trafficking.

The women, referred to only as anonymous Jane Does, identify themselves as survivors of sex trafficking, rape and abuse — facilitated through Backpage. The lawsuit, filed Monday in Superior Court in San Francisco, paints a dark picture of Salesforce, which has long touted human rights and building technology for the greater good.

CEO Marc Benioff has advocated for gender equality in the workplace and better services for the homeless.

Shares of Salesforce fell nearly 4 percent Wednesday.

The lawsuit claims:

In public, including on Twitter, Salesforce boasted about fighting human trafficking using its data tools. But behind closed doors, Salesforce’s data tools were actually providing the backbone of Backpage’s exponential growth. Salesforce didn’t just provide Backpage with a customer-ready version of its data and marketing tools. Salesforce designed and implemented a heavily customized enterprise database tailored for Backpage’s operations, both locally and internationally. With Salesforce’s guidance, Backpage was able to use Salesforce’s tools to market to new “users” — that is, pimps, johns, and traffickers — on three continents.

A Salesforce spokesperson said the company doesn’t comment on pending litigation, but added: “We are deeply committed to the ethical and humane use of our products and take these allegations seriously.”

Salesforce markets customer acquisition and retention tools for businesses. It’s one of San Francisco’s largest software companies, with a market valuation above $120 billion.

The lawsuit claims Salesforce built custom tools for Backpage, upselling the now-defunct website on higher-priced packages and additional services.

“The evidence of Salesforce’s liability is overwhelming and the damages that have been caused to the victims and our communities as a result are monumental,” Annie McAdams, the lead attorney for the plaintiffs, said in a statement. “It’s simply not enough to say fighting human trafficking is important. Internal policies and procedures have to reflect that commitment.”

Read the full lawsuit:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: sara salinas, frank muldoon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sex, claiming, backpage, 50, salesforces, trafficking, salesforce, tools, human, women, data, lawsuit, helped, sue


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NASA and the White House want billions so companies will compete to build human moon landers

This year’s introduction of a competitive bidding process means that companies would build their own spacecraft, with help from competitive NASA funding awards, rather than build a NASA-specific spacecraft. Recently appointed NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine supported a White House plan last year to make ACSC a competitive process between companies, two people familiar with the matter told CNBC. The agency has spoken to companies about enabling “regular access to the lunar surface,” NASA said


This year’s introduction of a competitive bidding process means that companies would build their own spacecraft, with help from competitive NASA funding awards, rather than build a NASA-specific spacecraft. Recently appointed NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine supported a White House plan last year to make ACSC a competitive process between companies, two people familiar with the matter told CNBC. The agency has spoken to companies about enabling “regular access to the lunar surface,” NASA said
NASA and the White House want billions so companies will compete to build human moon landers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: michael sheetz, bettmann, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, space, pence, human, house, lunar, white, competitive, landers, surface, moon, companies, build, sls, billions, compete, nasa


NASA and the White House want billions so companies will compete to build human moon landers

The huge increase in this year’s budget request for ACSC is the result of an internal battle at NASA, a person familiar with the situation told CNBC on Monday. This year’s introduction of a competitive bidding process means that companies would build their own spacecraft, with help from competitive NASA funding awards, rather than build a NASA-specific spacecraft.

NASA didn’t respond to CNBC requests for comment.

After the establishment of the National Space Council, President Donald Trump’s administration looked to work with the growing private space sector on multiple NASA programs. A main directive was to create a sustained U.S. presence on the moon. NASA would first send robots to the surface without crews, later following up with astronauts.

Recently appointed NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine supported a White House plan last year to make ACSC a competitive process between companies, two people familiar with the matter told CNBC. But some NASA leaders rejected the idea, wanting to stick with the development of an in-house lunar lander project, one of the people said.

Known as the “Flexible Lunar Explorer” (or FLEx) lander concept, some at NASA wanted a system built for the agency, rather than according to the companies building the spacecraft. This is NASA’s traditional method of awarding contracts, exemplified by the Boeing-built Space Launch System (SLS) rocket – which is now years behind and racking up billions of dollars in cost overruns.

With delays in the SLS program, privately-built rockets are being increasingly considered to launch NASA missions. And now, despite internal hesitancy, NASA is considering commercial alternatives for getting astronauts to the moon’s surface. The agency has spoken to companies about enabling “regular access to the lunar surface,” NASA said in its budget request earlier this month.

The increased funding for ACSC also matches with statements Vice President Mike Pence made on Tuesday at a National Space Council meeting. Pence said it is the White House policy “to return American astronauts to the moon within the next five years.” Although he said the SLS rocket must be accelerated to do so, he urged NASA to reach the moon “by any means necessary.”

“We’re not committed to any one contractor. If our current contractors can’t meet this objective, then we’ll find ones that will,” Pence said. “If American industry can provide critical commercial services without government development then we’ll buy them.”

Musk welcomed Pence’s comments, saying in a tweet that “it would be so inspiring for humanity to see humanity return to the moon!”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: michael sheetz, bettmann, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, space, pence, human, house, lunar, white, competitive, landers, surface, moon, companies, build, sls, billions, compete, nasa


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