A spike in food prices may not cause a recession, but it could spark a humanitarian crisis: Nomura

A surge in food prices could cause a massive humanitarian crisis as more than half the world’s population is vulnerable to such a risk, Nomura wrote in a recent note. “The countries most vulnerable to a surge in food prices account for a small portion of the world economy, but make up a much larger share of the world population,” Nomura’s analysts wrote. “A sustained surge in food prices is unlikely to cause a global economic recession, but it could cause a humanitarian crisis on a global scale.


A surge in food prices could cause a massive humanitarian crisis as more than half the world’s population is vulnerable to such a risk, Nomura wrote in a recent note.
“The countries most vulnerable to a surge in food prices account for a small portion of the world economy, but make up a much larger share of the world population,” Nomura’s analysts wrote.
“A sustained surge in food prices is unlikely to cause a global economic recession, but it could cause a humanitarian crisis on a global scale.
A spike in food prices may not cause a recession, but it could spark a humanitarian crisis: Nomura Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, world, countries, global, nomura, cause, vulnerable, humanitarian, prices, spark, spike, recession, crisis, surge, wrote


A spike in food prices may not cause a recession, but it could spark a humanitarian crisis: Nomura

A Syrian family gather to eat a plate of corn and cabbage on November 6, 2017 in Saqba, Syria.

A surge in food prices could cause a massive humanitarian crisis as more than half the world’s population is vulnerable to such a risk, Nomura wrote in a recent note.

“The countries most vulnerable to a surge in food prices account for a small portion of the world economy, but make up a much larger share of the world population,” Nomura’s analysts wrote. “A sustained surge in food prices is unlikely to cause a global economic recession, but it could cause a humanitarian crisis on a global scale.”

By its count, the bank said the 50 most vulnerable countries in its index make up just 26.1% of global GDP, but 59.1% of the world. Of those countries, all but four are developing economies, Nomura noted in a recent report.

“The vulnerability to a food price surge is very much an EM phenomenon,” Nomura noted.

Concentrated in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, Nomura said these countries tend to have lower nominal GDP per capita, a high share of food in household consumption, and are large net food importers. The bank said several of the economies most exposed are already “war-torn and suffer from extreme poverty.”

According to the Nomura Food Vulnerability Index, the five countries most vulnerable to a sustained rise in food prices are:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: stella soon
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Geena Davis wins honorary Oscar for fighting onscreen gender bias

Geena Davis arrives at the Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences’ 11th Annual Governors Awards at The Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center on October 27, 2019 in Hollywood, California. U.S. actress Geena Davis was awarded an honorary Oscar at the 2019 Governors Awards on Sunday for her efforts to promote a more balanced representation of women onscreen. Davis was handed the famous statuette, representing the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, for her work as founder of the Geen


Geena Davis arrives at the Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences’ 11th Annual Governors Awards at The Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center on October 27, 2019 in Hollywood, California.
U.S. actress Geena Davis was awarded an honorary Oscar at the 2019 Governors Awards on Sunday for her efforts to promote a more balanced representation of women onscreen.
Davis was handed the famous statuette, representing the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, for her work as founder of the Geen
Geena Davis wins honorary Oscar for fighting onscreen gender bias Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wins, gender, picture, oscar, award, fighting, bias, humanitarian, davis, problem, honorary, onscreen, motion, work, geena


Geena Davis wins honorary Oscar for fighting onscreen gender bias

Geena Davis arrives at the Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences’ 11th Annual Governors Awards at The Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center on October 27, 2019 in Hollywood, California.

U.S. actress Geena Davis was awarded an honorary Oscar at the 2019 Governors Awards on Sunday for her efforts to promote a more balanced representation of women onscreen.

Davis was handed the famous statuette, representing the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, for her work as founder of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media which she established in 2004.

Previous winners of the award include Audrey Hepburn, Oprah Winfrey, Elizabeth Taylor and Angelina Jolie.

In her acceptance speech, Davis repeated a call for gender equality in film and television, saying it was a problem that “can be fixed absolutely overnight,” according to a Reuters report.

“However abysmal the numbers are in real life, it’s far worse in fiction – where you make it up,” she said. “We make it worse.”

The actress said writers could start to solve this problem by crossing out a number of the male first names on scripts and replace them with female characters.

“With one stroke, you have created some non-stereotyped characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they have a gender swap,” she added.

Davis recently appeared in six episodes of GLOW, a hit Netflix series about a group of all-female wrestlers. The comedy heavily referenced the lack of equal rights that woman can face in the work place.

Davis won an Oscar in 1989 for her supporting role in “The Accidental Tourist” but is perhaps best known for playing one of the titular characters in the 1991 film “Thelma & Louise”.

The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media aims to target children ages 11 and under with its work. According to the institute’s website, it has influenced gender portrayal in family films such as “Inside Out” and “Monsters University”.

The Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award is given to an “individual in the motion picture industry whose humanitarian efforts have brought credit to the industry” and was named after the Danish actor.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wins, gender, picture, oscar, award, fighting, bias, humanitarian, davis, problem, honorary, onscreen, motion, work, geena


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What’s next for Venezuela? Anti-Maduro allies regroup after the fight for humanitarian aid

Venezuela’s opposition has formally urged the international community to keep all options on the table, after deadly clashes broke out in border towns over the weekend. It comes at a time when the South American nation is in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory. President Donald Trump has consistently refused to rule out the prospect of military intervention in Venezuela and the country’s opposition leader, Juan Guaido, has called on the international


Venezuela’s opposition has formally urged the international community to keep all options on the table, after deadly clashes broke out in border towns over the weekend. It comes at a time when the South American nation is in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory. President Donald Trump has consistently refused to rule out the prospect of military intervention in Venezuela and the country’s opposition leader, Juan Guaido, has called on the international
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: sam meredith, luis robayo, afp, getty images, schneyder mendoza
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, humanitarian, regroup, fight, intervention, deadly, antimaduro, allies, clashes, action, venezuela, options, prospect, community, aid, international, opposition, whats, military


What's next for Venezuela? Anti-Maduro allies regroup after the fight for humanitarian aid

Venezuela’s opposition has formally urged the international community to keep all options on the table, after deadly clashes broke out in border towns over the weekend.

On Saturday, at least three people were killed and hundreds more were left injured, Reuters reported, as opposition activists tried to defy a government ban to bring food supplies, hygiene kits and nutritional supplements into the country.

It comes at a time when the South American nation is in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory.

President Donald Trump has consistently refused to rule out the prospect of military intervention in Venezuela and the country’s opposition leader, Juan Guaido, has called on the international community to “keep all options open.”

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted over the weekend that Washington would “take action against those who oppose the peaceful restoration of democracy in Venezuela.”

To be sure, the prospect of U.S.-led military intervention is clearly being signaled as a form of “action.”

“I think large-scale U.S. military intervention remains unlikely, though the chances are increasing — that’s worrying,” Tom Long, assistant professor in the department of politics and international studies at the University of Warwick, told CNBC via email.

“More than the deadly clashes, what I worry could push towards military action is the lack of options remaining for the opposition and its international allies to increase pressure,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: sam meredith, luis robayo, afp, getty images, schneyder mendoza
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, humanitarian, regroup, fight, intervention, deadly, antimaduro, allies, clashes, action, venezuela, options, prospect, community, aid, international, opposition, whats, military


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Venezuela’s Maduro closes border with Brazil, says Colombia crossings could be next

President Nicolas Maduro has announced the closure of Venezuela’s border crossings with Brazil, as part of a sustained bid to prevent tens of millions of dollars in humanitarian aid flowing into the country. Speaking in a televised address from the country’s largest military base in Caracas on Thursday, Maduro said the border with Brazil would be “completely and absolutely” closed until further notice. The embattled socialist leader also said Thursday he would consider an imminent shutdown of th


President Nicolas Maduro has announced the closure of Venezuela’s border crossings with Brazil, as part of a sustained bid to prevent tens of millions of dollars in humanitarian aid flowing into the country. Speaking in a televised address from the country’s largest military base in Caracas on Thursday, Maduro said the border with Brazil would be “completely and absolutely” closed until further notice. The embattled socialist leader also said Thursday he would consider an imminent shutdown of th
Venezuela’s Maduro closes border with Brazil, says Colombia crossings could be next Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: sam meredith, miraflores palace, handout via reuters, ivan valencia, bloomberg via getty images, luis robayo, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, humanitarian, maduro, colombia, prevent, closes, brazil, aid, leader, president, venezuelas, crossings, border, countrys


Venezuela's Maduro closes border with Brazil, says Colombia crossings could be next

President Nicolas Maduro has announced the closure of Venezuela’s border crossings with Brazil, as part of a sustained bid to prevent tens of millions of dollars in humanitarian aid flowing into the country.

Political tensions in Venezuela are reaching boiling point, with the poverty-stricken nation in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory.

Speaking in a televised address from the country’s largest military base in Caracas on Thursday, Maduro said the border with Brazil would be “completely and absolutely” closed until further notice.

The embattled socialist leader also said Thursday he would consider an imminent shutdown of the country’s border with Colombia.

“It is better to prevent than regret,” Maduro said.

The move comes less than 48 hours before an opposition-led plan to deliver aid from collection points in neighboring countries.

Brazil’s government, which recognizes opposition leader Juan Guaido as Venezuela’s rightful interim president, had pledged to assist with a delivery effort over the weekend.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: sam meredith, miraflores palace, handout via reuters, ivan valencia, bloomberg via getty images, luis robayo, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, humanitarian, maduro, colombia, prevent, closes, brazil, aid, leader, president, venezuelas, crossings, border, countrys


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Venezuela crisis: Maduro and Guaido set for humanitarian aid showdown

Venezuela’s opposition lawmakers are forging ahead with plans to confront a government blockade that has kept tens of millions of dollars in humanitarian aid, mostly supplied by the U.S., from flowing into the country. It comes at a time when tensions in Venezuela are reaching boiling point, with the South American country in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory. On Saturday, hundreds of thousands of volunteers are expected to help National Assembly le


Venezuela’s opposition lawmakers are forging ahead with plans to confront a government blockade that has kept tens of millions of dollars in humanitarian aid, mostly supplied by the U.S., from flowing into the country. It comes at a time when tensions in Venezuela are reaching boiling point, with the South American country in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory. On Saturday, hundreds of thousands of volunteers are expected to help National Assembly le
Venezuela crisis: Maduro and Guaido set for humanitarian aid showdown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: sam meredith, reuters, marco bello tpx images of the day, ivan valencia, bloomberg via getty images, carlos becerra, bloomberg, getty images, yuri cortez, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, showdown, maduro, paparoni, crisis, afraid, set, guaido, opposition, aid, humanitarian, national, venezuela


Venezuela crisis: Maduro and Guaido set for humanitarian aid showdown

Venezuela’s opposition lawmakers are forging ahead with plans to confront a government blockade that has kept tens of millions of dollars in humanitarian aid, mostly supplied by the U.S., from flowing into the country.

It comes at a time when tensions in Venezuela are reaching boiling point, with the South American country in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory.

On Saturday, hundreds of thousands of volunteers are expected to help National Assembly leader Juan Guaido bring in food supplies, hygiene kits and nutritional supplements.

The aid plan is scheduled to take place exactly one month to the day after Guaido took to the streets of Caracas and declared himself as the crisis-stricken country’s rightful interim president.

President Nicolas Maduro has refused to cede power, however, and still has the support of the military. He has consistently rejected letting foreign aid into Venezuela, calling it a “political show” and a cover for a U.S. invasion.

“We have managed to build the biggest voluntary movement of our nation and it will be the most important that this continent will see,” Carlos Paparoni, an opposition lawmaker and head of the National Assembly’s finance committee, told CNBC via telephone.

“This is a country where everyone is afraid of the crisis. This is a country where sick people are scared because they don’t have the medicines they need… where kids die from dehydration… (and) where more and more people search in the garbage for food.”

“This is what we are afraid of, that this keeps on,” Paparoni said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: sam meredith, reuters, marco bello tpx images of the day, ivan valencia, bloomberg via getty images, carlos becerra, bloomberg, getty images, yuri cortez, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, showdown, maduro, paparoni, crisis, afraid, set, guaido, opposition, aid, humanitarian, national, venezuela


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Virgin’s Branson plans humanitarian aid concert on Venezuela border

Richard Branson is organizing a concert to raise funds for a humanitarian aid effort for crisis-stricken Venezuela to be held in the Colombian border city of Cucuta next week, the British billionaire said in a video on social media. An aid convoy supplied by the United States and Colombia arrived in Cucuta last week, where it is being held in warehouses. “Nicolas Maduro’s regime, which is responsible for this crisis, is currently refusing to allow any humanitarian aid into the country,” Branson


Richard Branson is organizing a concert to raise funds for a humanitarian aid effort for crisis-stricken Venezuela to be held in the Colombian border city of Cucuta next week, the British billionaire said in a video on social media. An aid convoy supplied by the United States and Colombia arrived in Cucuta last week, where it is being held in warehouses. “Nicolas Maduro’s regime, which is responsible for this crisis, is currently refusing to allow any humanitarian aid into the country,” Branson
Virgin’s Branson plans humanitarian aid concert on Venezuela border Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: lisa maree williams, getty images, carlos becerra, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, venezuela, concert, effort, cucuta, raise, humanitarian, branson, border, week, virgins, plans, aid, soon, held, video


Virgin's Branson plans humanitarian aid concert on Venezuela border

Richard Branson is organizing a concert to raise funds for a humanitarian aid effort for crisis-stricken Venezuela to be held in the Colombian border city of Cucuta next week, the British billionaire said in a video on social media.

President Nicolas Maduro is resisting foreign efforts to send food and medicine to the hyperinflationary country suffering from rising hunger.

An aid convoy supplied by the United States and Colombia arrived in Cucuta last week, where it is being held in warehouses.

“Nicolas Maduro’s regime, which is responsible for this crisis, is currently refusing to allow any humanitarian aid into the country,” Branson said in the video.

“We must break this impasse or soon, many Venezuelans will be on the verge of starvation or death,” he said, adding the effort aimed to raise $100 million in 60 days.

The concert is scheduled for Feb. 22 and will feature a “wonderful line-up of regional and international artists,” Branson said, without providing details.

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who has invoked articles of the constitution to assume the presidency, says humanitarian aid will begin to flow across the border the next day.

The Virgin Group, which handles media inquiries for Branson, said the video was genuine and that it would provide more information soon.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: lisa maree williams, getty images, carlos becerra, bloomberg
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Venezuela crisis: US condemns Maduro for blocking critical point of entry for humanitarian aid

Venezuela’s armed forces have barricaded a bridge on the country’s western border with Colombia, in a dramatic attempt to prevent a delivery of humanitarian aid. It comes at a time when tensions in Venezuela are reaching boiling point, with the South American country in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory. President Nicolas Maduro, who has the support of the military, has consistently rejected letting foreign aid into the country. In a tweet on Wednes


Venezuela’s armed forces have barricaded a bridge on the country’s western border with Colombia, in a dramatic attempt to prevent a delivery of humanitarian aid. It comes at a time when tensions in Venezuela are reaching boiling point, with the South American country in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory. President Nicolas Maduro, who has the support of the military, has consistently rejected letting foreign aid into the country. In a tweet on Wednes
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Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, western, condemns, maduro, humanitarian, venezuela, blocking, crisis, country, entry, point, forces, political, venezuelas, critical, aid, used


Venezuela crisis: US condemns Maduro for blocking critical point of entry for humanitarian aid

Venezuela’s armed forces have barricaded a bridge on the country’s western border with Colombia, in a dramatic attempt to prevent a delivery of humanitarian aid.

It comes at a time when tensions in Venezuela are reaching boiling point, with the South American country in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory.

The opposition government, led by Juan Guaido, has said it is preparing to deliver tens of millions of dollars in food and medicine over the coming days, with supplies donated by the U.S. and others being stocked in warehouses near the border.

President Nicolas Maduro, who has the support of the military, has consistently rejected letting foreign aid into the country.

In a tweet on Wednesday, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said: “The Maduro regime must let the aid reach the starving people.”

In addition to easing a devastating shortage of basic products in the crisis-stricken country, the opposition’s proposed move to deliver aid is widely seen as an attempt to undermine Maduro’s authority.

The socialist leader has long used subsidized food handouts as a tool to maintain the backing of his supporters.

“A delivery of humanitarian aid will test the loyalty of Venezuela’s armed forces — this moment represents a tipping point,” Diego Moya-Ocampos, principal political analyst for Latin America at IHS Markit, told CNBC via telephone.

“Food has been used as a political weapon to control the population and one of the many reasons Maduro has not allowed humanitarian aid into the country,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-07  Authors: sam meredith, yuri cortez, afp, getty images, ivan valencia, bloomberg via getty images, carlos garcia rawlins
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Venezuela crisis: Major global powers ordered to stop trading oil and gold assets with Maduro

A coalition group of Latin American countries and Canada has urged the Venezuelan military to sever ties with President Nicolas Maduro. It comes at a time when political tensions in Venezuela are reaching boiling point, with the oil-rich, but cash-poor, country in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory. In a statement published Monday, 11 of the 14 members of the Lima Group called for a “peaceful transition through political and diplomatic means without


A coalition group of Latin American countries and Canada has urged the Venezuelan military to sever ties with President Nicolas Maduro. It comes at a time when political tensions in Venezuela are reaching boiling point, with the oil-rich, but cash-poor, country in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory. In a statement published Monday, 11 of the 14 members of the Lima Group called for a “peaceful transition through political and diplomatic means without
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Venezuela crisis: Major global powers ordered to stop trading oil and gold assets with Maduro

A coalition group of Latin American countries and Canada has urged the Venezuelan military to sever ties with President Nicolas Maduro.

It comes at a time when political tensions in Venezuela are reaching boiling point, with the oil-rich, but cash-poor, country in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory.

In a statement published Monday, 11 of the 14 members of the Lima Group called for a “peaceful transition through political and diplomatic means without the use of force.”

The group also underscored the need for an urgent delivery of humanitarian aid and insisted international governments “take measures to prevent the Maduro regime … from doing business in oil, gold and other assets.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: sam meredith, carlos becerra, bloomberg, getty images, carlos garcia rawlins, david kawai, bloomberg via getty images
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Pope calls for Yemen relief as he heads to UAE

“The people are exhausted by the long conflict and many children are hungry, but humanitarian aid isn’t accessible,” Francis said in his noontime Sunday blessing. The Catholic Church believes there are some 1 million Catholics in the UAE. Vaidyanathan, who converted from Hinduism to Catholicism while living in Dubai, said the Emirates’ religious tolerance is commendable given the trends of the region. He dodged a question about whether Francis would raise Yemen’s yearslong war in his private tal


“The people are exhausted by the long conflict and many children are hungry, but humanitarian aid isn’t accessible,” Francis said in his noontime Sunday blessing. The Catholic Church believes there are some 1 million Catholics in the UAE. Vaidyanathan, who converted from Hinduism to Catholicism while living in Dubai, said the Emirates’ religious tolerance is commendable given the trends of the region. He dodged a question about whether Francis would raise Yemen’s yearslong war in his private tal
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-03  Authors: alessandra benedetti – corbis, corbis news, getty images
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Pope calls for Yemen relief as he heads to UAE

Pope Francis made an urgent appeal for an end to the humanitarian crisis in Yemen on Sunday as he embarked on the first-ever papal trip to the Arabian Peninsula, where he is seeking to turn a page in Christian-Muslim relations while also ministering to a unique, thriving island of Catholicism.

Francis called for the urgent observation of a limited cease-fire reached in December and for food and medicine to get to Yemen’s people, who are suffering the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.

He made the appeal at the Vatican before boarding a plane to the United Arab Emirates, which has been Saudi Arabia’s main ally in its war in Yemen — a way to avoid embarrassing his hosts with a public call while in the region.

“The people are exhausted by the long conflict and many children are hungry, but humanitarian aid isn’t accessible,” Francis said in his noontime Sunday blessing. “The cries of these children and their parents rise up” to God.

Francis is travelling to Abu Dhabi to participate in a conference on interreligious dialogue sponsored the Emirates-based Muslim Council of Elders, an initiative that seeks to counter religious fanaticism by promoting a moderate brand of Islam. It’s the brainchild of Sheikh Ahmed el-Tayeb, the grand imam of Egypt’s Al-Azhar, the revered 1,000-year-old seat of Sunni Islam that trains clerics and scholars from around the world.

In a video message to the Emirates on the eve of his trip, Francis paid homage to his “friend and dear brother” el-Tayeb and praised his courage in calling the meeting to assert that “God unites and doesn’t divide.”

“I am pleased with this meeting offered by the Lord to write, on your dear land, a new page in the history of relations among religions and confirm that we are brothers despite our differences,” Francis said.

In a statement Saturday, Al-Azhar described the upcoming meeting as “historic” and praised the “deeply fraternal relationship” between its imam and the pope, which it said even includes birthday greetings.

Francis and el-Tayeb are to address the “Human Fraternity Meeting” Monday that has drawn not only Christian and Muslim representatives but hundreds of Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist and other Christian faith leaders. It’s all part of the Emirates’ “Year of Tolerance” and its effort to show its openness to other faiths in a region otherwise known for severe restrictions on religions outside of Islam.

“It’s something new for the Muslim world, that within the discussion of dialogue, they’re talking about interreligious dialogue across the board,” beyond basic Christian-Muslim relations, said Marco Impagliazzo, president of the Sant’Egidio Community, a Rome-based Catholic organization active in interfaith relations who will be attending the conference.

Francis’ other main initiative in Abu Dhabi is a giant Mass on Tuesday in the city’s main sports arena that is expected to draw some 135,000 people in what some have called the largest show of public Christian worship on the Arabian Peninsula. There, Francis will see firsthand a Catholic community that is big, diverse and dynamic, at a time when the wider Mideast has seen an exodus of Christians fleeing persecution at the hands of the Islamic State group and others.

Of the over 9 million people now living in the UAE, around 1 million are Emirati while the rest are foreigners drawn to the oil-rich federation to work in everything from white-collar finance to construction.

The Catholic Church believes there are some 1 million Catholics in the UAE. Most are Filipino and Indian, many of whom have left behind families for work and can face precarious labor conditions, which human rights groups regularly denounce.

“The church has a unique role because it becomes home,” said Brandon Vaidyanathan, chair of the sociology department at Catholic University in Washington, who grew up in Dubai. “It becomes a place of belonging” in a country where foreigners can live, work and practice their faith but will never gain citizenship.

Vaidyanathan, who converted from Hinduism to Catholicism while living in Dubai, said the Emirates’ religious tolerance is commendable given the trends of the region. He noted the “unprecedented” nature of the government’s invitation to Francis, its donation of lands for churches and even a recent decision to rename a mosque “Mother Mary of Jesus.”

Yet he pointed to the difference between freedom to worship and true religious freedom. Crosses, for example, can only be displayed inside churches, proselytizing for faiths other than Islam is banned and Muslims are forbidden from converting.

Francis will likely focus on issues of religious freedom and fraternity in his public remarks. Unlike all his other foreign trips, he will not deliver a political speech.

Vatican spokesman Alessandro Gisotti said the reason was to give greater emphasis to his speech to the interfaith conference. He dodged a question about whether Francis would raise Yemen’s yearslong war in his private talks with the Emirates’ ruler. The UAE is deeply involved in the Saudi-led war in the Arab world’s poorest country, where tens of thousands have been killed and millions face food and medical shortages.

“I don’t know if the Holy Father will confront it publicly or privately, but certainly on many occasions, even recently, he has underlined the need to search for peace in particular to guarantee the humanitarian rights of the population, especially children,” Gisotti said.

Aid groups working in Yemen hope Francis won’t just rely on his public appeals, but will use his visit to bring his message to the Emirati leadership in person.

CAFOD, the overseas aid group of the Catholic Church in England and Wales, recently joined a coalition of British humanitarian organizations in appealing for Yemen’s limited cease-fire to hold so that humanitarian aid can reach the most vulnerable.

“We have confidence in the greatness of the pope to be our advocate and the advocate for the Yemeni people,” said Giovanna Reda, CAFOD’s head of humanitarian programs for the Middle East.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-03  Authors: alessandra benedetti – corbis, corbis news, getty images
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WEF 2019: Matt Damon on what led to his passion with humanitarian work

When he’s not spending time in front of, or behind the camera, actor Matt Damon is raising awareness about the water crisis that’s affecting people across the globe. In 2009, Damon teamed up with Gary White to launch Water.org, a charity dedicated to delivering safe water and sanitation to everyone. Today, the group has been able to empower over 16 million people, by providing access to clean water and hygiene. Put simply: his upbringing, the actor recently told CNBC. Damon explained how much of


When he’s not spending time in front of, or behind the camera, actor Matt Damon is raising awareness about the water crisis that’s affecting people across the globe. In 2009, Damon teamed up with Gary White to launch Water.org, a charity dedicated to delivering safe water and sanitation to everyone. Today, the group has been able to empower over 16 million people, by providing access to clean water and hygiene. Put simply: his upbringing, the actor recently told CNBC. Damon explained how much of
WEF 2019: Matt Damon on what led to his passion with humanitarian work Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: alexandra gibbs, fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, travel, passion, led, world, told, white, matt, week, waterorg, 2019, water, actor, work, upbringing, humanitarian, damon, wef


WEF 2019: Matt Damon on what led to his passion with humanitarian work

When he’s not spending time in front of, or behind the camera, actor Matt Damon is raising awareness about the water crisis that’s affecting people across the globe.

In 2009, Damon teamed up with Gary White to launch Water.org, a charity dedicated to delivering safe water and sanitation to everyone. Today, the group has been able to empower over 16 million people, by providing access to clean water and hygiene.

So, where did Damon’s drive to promote water equality for everyone come from? Put simply: his upbringing, the actor recently told CNBC.

“I think a lot of it came from my parents. My mother did take me to Mexico and to Guatemala and I did get to see extreme poverty up close as a teenager and that had a profound effect on me,” the award-winning actor told CNBC’s Tania Bryer at the World Economic Forum last week in Davos, Switzerland.

Damon explained how much of an impact travel has had on him growing up, as it gave him the chance to see how other people and nations lived.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: alexandra gibbs, fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, travel, passion, led, world, told, white, matt, week, waterorg, 2019, water, actor, work, upbringing, humanitarian, damon, wef


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