Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there’s something they don’t want you to see

If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders. Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray. Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot. It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like t


If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders.
Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray.
Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot.
It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like t
Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there’s something they don’t want you to see Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spot, kjeragbolten, world, photos, instagrammers, line, love, iconic, dont, getty, wait, soldal, visitors, theres, trolltunga, rock


Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there's something they don't want you to see

If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders. The downside? There are few geological secrets anymore. What was once a tribe’s, then a town’s, and eventually a country’s pride and joy is now subject to the whims of the international traveling world — all 1.4 billion of us. Take Norway’s now-famous Trolltunga. Jutting 2,300 feet above the north side of Ringedalsvatnet lake, the natural rock formation resulted from receding glaciers that broke off large, angular blocks from area mountains. It’s easy to see why photos at the site are an instant hit.

Two visitors gaze off Norway’s Trolltunga. Oleh_Slobodeniuk | E+ | Getty Images

The serenity. The solitude.

Trolltunga in Hardangerfjord, Norway. Morten Rustad | 500px Prime | Getty Images

The stillness of the remote surroundings. But widen the frame a bit, and that’s not the story.

Tourism explosion at Trolltunga

A decade ago, fewer than 800 people a year traveled to Trolltunga. Next year, that figure’s expected to hit 100,000. Trolltunga was formed roughly 10,000 years before the advent of the internet, but social media has played a major role in its massive influx. A photo there seems to combine everything we’ve come to expect from online travel photos: distant lands, a touch of daredevilism, breath-taking scenery and a soul-searchingly authentic experience.

Trolltunga, from a different angle. Kotenko_A | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

“Instagram has elevated the interest in the site that really no conventional marketing campaign can do,” said Bo Vibe, head of digital marketing at Fjord Tours. “Getting the ‘selfie’ on the top becomes the end-all for many visitors.” “Facebook has probably had just as much influence as Instagram,” said Jostein Soldal, CEO of Trolltunga Active, citing effective local and national marketing campaigns, word of mouth and the sheer beauty of the area as other factors. Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray. But that solemn mood conveyed on social media doesn’t match what’s happening just beyond the selfie-frame.

Tourists wait in line to be photographed on Trolltunga. Kotenko_A | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

As tourist numbers have increased, so have the lines. Visitors who arrive in the summer months have been known to wait longer than three hours to get a photograph on the tongue’s tip. The longest waits often result when good weather follows a long period of rain — and when the average number of visitors increases from 800 to 2,000 per day. Travelers who arrive from June to September should mentally prepare for an average wait of 60 to 90 minutes for a photo opp. “If you are prepared that there will be a line and spend the time just enjoying all the impressive poses many of the tourists are doing, the waiting is not a big issue,” said Soldal. Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot.

Trolltunga’s saving grace – it’s hard to get there

Consistently ranked one of the best hikes in Norway, the journey to reach Trolltunga isn’t an easy one. From Skjeggedal, it’s a 10- to 12-hour hike that covers 28 kilometers and an 800-meter ascent. Hikers need to be fit and equipped with food, water, headlights, hiking boots and other gear. Efforts to inform tourists of this have helped reduce rescue operations from an all-time high of 40 in 2016 to just 12 in 2018. Built in the early 1900s, a funicular called Mågelibanen once made the journey to Trolltunga considerably easier, but it closed in 2012. To date, the only way to reach it is by foot, a fact that suits the local population just fine, says Soldal. “We don’t want more visitors,” he said with a laugh. “Plus, if it’s a five-minute walk, the Trolltunga will lose some of its ‘I did it’ factor.” There is a steep, private road that takes travelers 400 meters up the mountain, but it’s still eight hours of hiking from there. Only 30 cars are allowed to park at a time, and the hairpin turns on the drive aren’t for the faint of heart.

Trolltunga isn’t alone

Trolltunga isn’t Norway’s only site to achieve Insta-fame. It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like this:

Norway’s Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock. Oleh_Slobodeniuk | E+ | Getty Images

But with 300,000 visitors a year — roughly three times as many visitors as Trolltunga — it’s better to assume it will look more like this in person.

Hiikers at Preikestolen. Xichao Yu | 500px | Getty Images

The journey to Pulpit Rock is a less-arduous, eight-kilometer hike that can be completed in three to four hours, making it a popular stop on the tourist bus and cruise ship circuit. Instagram is also rife with photos of Kjeragbolten, another picture-perfect geological wonder in Norway.

Woman atop Kjeragbolten. kotangens | iStock | Getty Images

But behind-the-scenes photos show that the line at Kjeragbolten is decidedly less zen.

Hikers wait in line to take a photo at Kjeragbolten. Courtesy of Ali Ronca at amsterdamandbeyond.com

How to avoid the crowds

For a less-congested experience, one option is to book an off-season tour. Winter tours reward visitors with open trails, little to no waits and beautiful snow-covered views, though the hike is more difficult and conditions can be too slick to step out onto the troll’s tongue. Off-season hikes — from October to May — can be dangerous for novices and should not be attempted without a guide. Early morning starts in high season are also possible, though it adds the extra challenge of hiking in darkness.

It’s an area where all logic says is not a place to settle down. And we have managed it for 8,000 years. Jostein Soldal CEO, Trolltunga Active


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spot, kjeragbolten, world, photos, instagrammers, line, love, iconic, dont, getty, wait, soldal, visitors, theres, trolltunga, rock


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Netflix takes over New York’s iconic Paris theater for movie screenings

Streaming giant Netflix has taken over the lease of New York movie theater The Paris, after the venue closed its doors in August. Netflix screened its movie “Marriage Story” at The Paris earlier this month, and on Monday announced a lease agreement to keep the theater open. It will use the theater for special events, screenings and theatrical releases of its film, the company said in an online statement. The Paris was opened in 1948 in a ceremony where Marlene Dietrich cut the ribbon, and origin


Streaming giant Netflix has taken over the lease of New York movie theater The Paris, after the venue closed its doors in August.
Netflix screened its movie “Marriage Story” at The Paris earlier this month, and on Monday announced a lease agreement to keep the theater open.
It will use the theater for special events, screenings and theatrical releases of its film, the company said in an online statement.
The Paris was opened in 1948 in a ceremony where Marlene Dietrich cut the ribbon, and origin
Netflix takes over New York’s iconic Paris theater for movie screenings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, streaming, york, film, movie, paris, netflix, lease, takes, theatrical, theater, movies, screenings, yorks, iconic


Netflix takes over New York's iconic Paris theater for movie screenings

Streaming giant Netflix has taken over the lease of New York movie theater The Paris, after the venue closed its doors in August.

Netflix screened its movie “Marriage Story” at The Paris earlier this month, and on Monday announced a lease agreement to keep the theater open.

It will use the theater for special events, screenings and theatrical releases of its film, the company said in an online statement.

“After 71 years, the Paris Theatre has an enduring legacy, and remains the destination for a one-of-a kind movie-going experience,” said Ted Sarandos, Netflix’s chief content officer. “We are incredibly proud to preserve this historic New York institution so it can continue to be a cinematic home for film lovers.”

The Paris was opened in 1948 in a ceremony where Marlene Dietrich cut the ribbon, and originally showed French movies. It closed in August 2019 after a run of “Pavarotti,” a Ron Howard title. Terms of the Netflix lease were not disclosed.

“Marriage Story” stars Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver as a divorcing couple and will be released online on Netflix December 6. It is being shown at The Paris as well as in some movie theaters across the U.S. and U.K.

Netflix has previously attracted criticism for inclusion in awards ceremonies such as the Oscars, with director Steven Spielberg arguing that the company produces TV movies. But some Netflix movies now have theatrical releases, including the forthcoming films “The Two Popes,” about the relationship between Pope Benedict and Pope Francis, and “I Lost My Body,” an animated film about a hand that escapes from a dissection lab.

Wells Fargo downgraded Netflix on Monday, saying the cost for it to acquire new users would be “more expensive that investors realize.” Earlier this month, Credit Suisse said the launch of streaming service Disney+ had “little to no impact” based on app downloads and Google search analysis. Netflix stock is up 17.9% year-to-date.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, streaming, york, film, movie, paris, netflix, lease, takes, theatrical, theater, movies, screenings, yorks, iconic


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Here’s how the Ford Mustang Mach-E earned the iconic pony badge, after the company scrapped years of work on other designs

“We gave them a mission: not just to make an electric car but to make a great electric car,” said Ford Executive Chairman Bill Ford during the Mach-E’s unveiling Sunday. “But I got to admit, when they came to me and said they can make an electric Mustang, I was pretty skeptical … You don’t mess with an icon.” Before the decision to make it a Mustang, Ford was benchmarking the vehicle as a “compliance” EV, according to company officials. We said, ‘Let’s try to create an electric Mustang,’ ” Farle


“We gave them a mission: not just to make an electric car but to make a great electric car,” said Ford Executive Chairman Bill Ford during the Mach-E’s unveiling Sunday.
“But I got to admit, when they came to me and said they can make an electric Mustang, I was pretty skeptical … You don’t mess with an icon.”
Before the decision to make it a Mustang, Ford was benchmarking the vehicle as a “compliance” EV, according to company officials.
We said, ‘Let’s try to create an electric Mustang,’ ” Farle
Here’s how the Ford Mustang Mach-E earned the iconic pony badge, after the company scrapped years of work on other designs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-23  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, iconic, ford, earned, designs, car, team, work, vehicles, compliance, scrapped, electric, pony, mache, vehicle, mustang


Here's how the Ford Mustang Mach-E earned the iconic pony badge, after the company scrapped years of work on other designs

Ford reveals its first mass-market electric car the Mustang Mach-E, which is an all-electric vehicle that bears the name of the companys iconic muscle car at a ceremony in Hawthorne, California on November 17, 2019. Mark Ralston | AFP | Getty Images

LOS ANGELES – Ford Motor took inspiration from the all-electric Chevrolet Bolt, Nissan Leaf and Ford Focus when developing the 2021 Mustang Mach-E, which made its global debut earlier this week. But engineers and designers weren’t told to benchmark the vehicles. Instead, the vehicles were examples of what not to do for Ford’s first all-new EV under an $11 billion plan to develop 40 new all-electric and hybrid models by 2022, according to officials. Ford viewed the cars as “compliance vehicles” that were produced to meet government regulations, not inspire passion for consumers to consider an EV. “We gave them a mission: not just to make an electric car but to make a great electric car,” said Ford Executive Chairman Bill Ford during the Mach-E’s unveiling Sunday. “But I got to admit, when they came to me and said they can make an electric Mustang, I was pretty skeptical … You don’t mess with an icon.” The idea of a Mustang SUV would have been sacrilegious years ago, but the company eventually felt the vehicle was worthy of wearing the iconic pony badge. It also was a way for the SUV to stand out in an increasingly crowded field of EVs, including Tesla’s highly-anticipated Model Y.

“Winning will not be driven by compliance,” said Ted Cannis, Ford global director of electrification, during a media briefing. “If you’re just a compliance (EV), you’re going to get killed.” Before the decision to make it a Mustang, Ford was benchmarking the vehicle as a “compliance” EV, according to company officials. But that changed after Ford CEO Jim Hackett took over the automaker in May 2017 and tapped Jim Farley as president of global markets, which included the company’s EV plans.

‘Mustang-inspired’

That change in direction included scrapping the compliance EV, which was initially a redesigned Focus sedan EV that had been turned into a crossover, according to officials and design renderings shared by the automaker. In June 2017, it was decided the vehicle would be “Mustang-inspired,” a direction put in motion by Farley. “We thought if you want to modernize Ford, what’s a better product to start with than Mustang? We said, ‘Let’s try to create an electric Mustang,’ ” Farley said during the vehicle’s unveiling Sunday outside of Los Angeles. Modernizing the company meant benchmarking and competing against EV-leader Tesla instead of the company’s traditional competitors. Auto research firm Edmunds reports Tesla represented roughly 80% of all EVs sold in the U.S last year and through the first nine months of 2019. That’s despite a flurry of new or redesigned EVs, many viewed as compliance models, entering the market.

Prior to deciding to make the vehicle “Mustang-inspired,” Ford was working on a compliance EV crossover. Ford

Scrapping a project after years of development is always hard but connecting the vehicle to Mustang – the first time the iconic name has been used on anything but a two-door pony car – added a new layer of pressure, according to Ford executives. “This thing had to be a hero,” said Jason Castriota, Ford brand director for battery-electric vehicles. “We didn’t want it to be eaten up.” The Tesla Model Y and Ford Mach-E are expected to feature similar pricing, performance specification and EV range when they arrive in the second half of 2020.

Is it a Mustang?

Once the direction of “Mustang-inspired” was set in motion, the team was given wide-ranging control of the product and set up operations away from Ford’s global headquarters in Dearborn, Mich. to a small building in a historic Detroit neighborhood. The small team was codenamed Team Edison. The team worked quickly and was given months, sometimes weeks, instead of years during different parts of the vehicle’s creation. As the team built the vehicle, it wasn’t just about making the vehicle look like a Mustang. The vehicle had to feel like one or Bill Ford, a Mustang enthusiast, would not sign off on it. He said he gave the nod to call the vehicle a Mustang after driving it. “When I drove it, I knew it had to be a Mustang,” Ford told reporters after the unveiling. “But frankly, I was getting there before because I believed the team when they were laying all the specs out.”

Ford CEO James Hackett (3rd R) and team members reveal the company’s first mass-market electric car the Mustang Mach-E, which is an all-electric vehicle that bears the name of the companys iconic muscle car at a ceremony in Hawthorne, California on November 17, 2019. Mark Ralston | AFP | Getty Images

Top performance models of the Mustang Mach-E will achieve 0 to 60 mph in the mid-3-second range with an estimated 459 horsepower and 612 lb.-ft. of torque. That makes it faster off the line than a Porsche Macan Turbo and comparable to a Porsche 911 GTS. Other models are expected to have 0 to 60 mph times around six seconds. Aside from its badging and performance, the Mach-E includes Mustang design aspects such as a long hood, rear haunch, aggressive headlights and trademark tri-bar taillamps. The grille of the vehicle also is cut out to resemble the pony car. The vehicle, according to Ford, a known environmentalist, is a dream come true. He compared the importance of the Mach-E to his great-grandfather’s Model T, a vehicle that brought affordable transportation to the middle-class. “This is a Mustang for a new generation, but I also think longtime mustang fans like me will love it as well,” Ford said. “What I’m most excited about is the lasting impact and what this means for the future of Ford Motor Co.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-23  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, iconic, ford, earned, designs, car, team, work, vehicles, compliance, scrapped, electric, pony, mache, vehicle, mustang


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Caterpillar: 3 lessons from an iconic brand about digital competition

Ogi Redzic, chief digital officer at Caterpillar in charge of the industrial giant’s Digital Vision, recently provided CNBC TEC with three lessons Caterpillar has learned as part of its own digital transformation. Technology is complicated, but digital strategy should be clear and simple. Define what success looks like and create a clear and simple digital strategy that aligns to the broader business model. 2. Business customers use tech in their personal lives, and that matters. — By Ogi Redzic


Ogi Redzic, chief digital officer at Caterpillar in charge of the industrial giant’s Digital Vision, recently provided CNBC TEC with three lessons Caterpillar has learned as part of its own digital transformation.
Technology is complicated, but digital strategy should be clear and simple.
Define what success looks like and create a clear and simple digital strategy that aligns to the broader business model.
2. Business customers use tech in their personal lives, and that matters.
— By Ogi Redzic
Caterpillar: 3 lessons from an iconic brand about digital competition Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: ogi redzic, chief digital officer at caterpillar, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brand, customers, clear, technology, competition, business, need, company, lessons, strategy, digital, going, iconic, caterpillar


Caterpillar: 3 lessons from an iconic brand about digital competition

CNBC’s Technology Executive Council is dedicated to the digital transformation of companies and organizations across sectors of the economy. Ogi Redzic, chief digital officer at Caterpillar in charge of the industrial giant’s Digital Vision, recently provided CNBC TEC with three lessons Caterpillar has learned as part of its own digital transformation.

1. Technology is complicated, but digital strategy should be clear and simple.

As part of Caterpillar’s enterprise strategy unveiled in 2017, we determined digital is an enabler to our broader business, not a business itself. That was a big shift in mindset for our company. Define what success looks like and create a clear and simple digital strategy that aligns to the broader business model.

It is equally important to speak about digital activities consistently across the enterprise, so there is a critical need for a simple digital model, with a common lexicon, communicated over and over again.

Then, rather than handling dozens if not hundreds of different projects and applications, you need to focus on a few initiatives that would make the biggest impact on your strategy and create a strong foundation to drive a common experience for your customers.

One area of focus for Caterpillar is predictive analytics. For our customers, unplanned downtime is not an option, so we are making investments in analytics to not only detect failures but predict them before they even happen, saving customers both time and money.

Finally, digital doesn’t mean going for the latest and greatest technology development but applying the appropriate technology for your customers and for your desired business outcome, regardless of where that technology is in its adoption curve. Latest is often not the most appropriate.

2. Business customers use tech in their personal lives, and that matters.

If you wouldn’t tolerate a bad solution as a consumer, you certainly wouldn’t as a B2B customer. Customers expect the same digital solution sophistication level in their business life as they do in their personal lives. You need to be ready for their expectations of simplicity of use and good performance.

While sometimes it is OK to allow technology to work out its kinks first in the consumer space, sometimes you need to lead the development if the benefits for your customers are clear. Caterpillar, for example, has been leveraging telematics — the intersection of telecommunications, transportation and computer science — since the 1990s, and the company is on track to reach 1 million connected assets by the end of 2019. We also debuted our first autonomous mining truck in 1996, well ahead of consumer autonomous driving.

We are still waiting for clear cost view and global deployment plans of 5G.

3. Building individual digital solutions is the easy part.

It’s relatively easy to build individual digital solutions with no reuse in between. Going through digital transformation — where you create a single platform (even if you just abstract multiple platforms underneath) — that helps support the entire company is much more challenging.

You need to have an architect mindset with a grander vision of how everything fits together.

You also need to appropriately manage the digital ecosystem. If you’re not looking across the entire digital landscape of a company, you’re going to duplicate, which creates confusion and disparate customer experiences.

Alignment on decisions will minimize cost and development. For Caterpillar that means not only aligning internally with our business but also with our global network of 168 dealers that serve 193 countries.

— By Ogi Redzic, chief digital officer at Caterpillar and a member of the CNBC Technology Executive Council


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: ogi redzic, chief digital officer at caterpillar, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brand, customers, clear, technology, competition, business, need, company, lessons, strategy, digital, going, iconic, caterpillar


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Fender’s CEO learned this product lesson from Steve Jobs

Fender CEO Andy Mooney poses for a photo at the firm’s Hollywood office ribbon-cutting ceremony on September 22, 2016 in Hollywood, California. And it was during his time at Disney that he met iconic entrepreneur Steve Jobs. Jobs joined the entertainment giant’s board as a result of its acquisition of animation studio Pixar in 2006. According to Mooney, Jobs agreed with his perspective that “great brands are the accumulative effect of great products,” but there was a “but.” Online music ‘nothing


Fender CEO Andy Mooney poses for a photo at the firm’s Hollywood office ribbon-cutting ceremony on September 22, 2016 in Hollywood, California.
And it was during his time at Disney that he met iconic entrepreneur Steve Jobs.
Jobs joined the entertainment giant’s board as a result of its acquisition of animation studio Pixar in 2006.
According to Mooney, Jobs agreed with his perspective that “great brands are the accumulative effect of great products,” but there was a “but.”
Online music ‘nothing
Fender’s CEO learned this product lesson from Steve Jobs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, jobs, metal, fender, guitar, iconic, lesson, fenders, mooney, music, learned, product, brand, bankruptcy, steve


Fender's CEO learned this product lesson from Steve Jobs

Fender CEO Andy Mooney poses for a photo at the firm’s Hollywood office ribbon-cutting ceremony on September 22, 2016 in Hollywood, California. Matt Winkelmeyer | Getty Images

LISBON, Portugal — Before Andy Mooney took the reins at guitar maker Fender, he was an executive at two other companies — Nike and Disney. And it was during his time at Disney that he met iconic entrepreneur Steve Jobs. Mooney says the Apple co-founder was “one of the first people” he met at Disney. Jobs joined the entertainment giant’s board as a result of its acquisition of animation studio Pixar in 2006. “He grilled me on our very first meeting about what my point of view on brands was,” Mooney told CNBC in an interview at the Web Summit technology conference. According to Mooney, Jobs agreed with his perspective that “great brands are the accumulative effect of great products,” but there was a “but.” Mooney recalls that Jobs told him: “Every single product that you make, that you put your brand on, is either a deposit or withdrawal from the bank of brand equity.” That is, the product has to speak to the success of a well-known brand by being an instantly recognizable part of the company’s lineup. Jobs, who died in 2011, was the face of Apple at a time when the company released some of its most iconic products, including the Macintosh family of computers and the iPhone.

“I’d say that every single guitar we’ve made over 70 years — and electric guitar amplifier — was pretty much a deposit in the bank of brand equity,” Mooney said — although he admitted the firm could “do more” in other categories like acoustic guitars and effects pedals.

‘I’m a heavy metal guy’

Fender has for decades been seen as one of the most iconic names in the guitar industry and — inevitably — rock music. Fender’s guitars have been used by everyone from rock pioneer Jimi Hendrix to Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour. When asked about what his favorite guitar was — whether from Fender or one of its rivals such as Gibson — Mooney began by stating: “I’m a heavy metal guy.” He admitted his current go-to guitar is the signature Telecaster used by Jim Root of U.S. metal outfit Slipknot, which Mooney said has a more “simplistic” setup in terms of electric components because “in his outfit, he sweats so much during every show that the guitar would short out and literally go quiet on stage.”

Jim Root of Slipknot performs on stage at Download Festival 2019 on June 15, 2019. Katja Ogrin | Redferns | Getty Images

But all has not been rosy in the guitar sector of late, with headlines around Gibson’s filing for bankruptcy protection last year adding to concerns the industry may be struggling due to changing musical tastes and technology. The firm has since appointed a new team of senior executives to help it return to financial health. Mooney, however, said Gibson’s bankruptcy was more of an isolated case. “Gibson’s bankruptcy had nothing to do with the guitar business,” he said. “The bankruptcy was brought about by ill-considered acquisitions in the consumer electronics space.” One notable acquisition was the firm’s $135 million deal to buy Philips’ audio unit in 2014. “The fretted instruments segment has been growing robustly for over a decade now,” Mooney claimed, adding 2019 “will be a record year for guitar sales worldwide.”

Online music ‘nothing but a positive’

The strategy for Fender more recently has been updating its product line to reflect a digital-native demographic. The company has been launching a handful of new apps, including one that lets people learn how to play and another for tuning guitars. Streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music have faced criticism from some musicians, who argue it’s squeezing artists’ income. But Mooney countered that school of thought, claiming the revenues from digital distribution have actually benefited music artists as well as record labels and publishers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, jobs, metal, fender, guitar, iconic, lesson, fenders, mooney, music, learned, product, brand, bankruptcy, steve


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Olivia Newton-John’s iconic ‘Grease’ finale outfit could sell for $260,000

The iconic tight black pants and leather jacket Olivia Newton-John wore as “cool” Sandy in the finale of the 1978 movie “Grease” will go to auction and could sell for $260,000, according to Julien’s Auctions. After seeing an auction Julien’s held for some of Bette Midler’s performance costumes, Newton-John thought “I could do that! A portion of the proceeds from the Julien’s auction will go to the Olivia Newton-John Cancer & Wellness Research Centre in Melbourne, Australia. Julien’s AuctionsMany


The iconic tight black pants and leather jacket Olivia Newton-John wore as “cool” Sandy in the finale of the 1978 movie “Grease” will go to auction and could sell for $260,000, according to Julien’s Auctions.
After seeing an auction Julien’s held for some of Bette Midler’s performance costumes, Newton-John thought “I could do that!
A portion of the proceeds from the Julien’s auction will go to the Olivia Newton-John Cancer & Wellness Research Centre in Melbourne, Australia.
Julien’s AuctionsMany
Olivia Newton-John’s iconic ‘Grease’ finale outfit could sell for $260,000 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jacket, olivia, sell, 260000, juliens, pants, iconic, tight, auction, john, newtonjohn, grease, finale, wore, newtonjohns, outfit


Olivia Newton-John's iconic 'Grease' finale outfit could sell for $260,000

The iconic tight black pants and leather jacket Olivia Newton-John wore as “cool” Sandy in the finale of the 1978 movie “Grease” will go to auction and could sell for $260,000, according to Julien’s Auctions.

The pants, which Newton-John wore during her “You’re the One that I Want” duet with co-star John Travolta, were so tight that she had to be sewn into them, she told Reuters Television.

Newton-John, now 71, says she kept the outfit and other memorabilia from her movies in her “closets, drawers and in the garage,” and it took her months to go through everything.

“I wanted to hold on to things I love, but then I realized I am never going to wear them again,” Newton-John tells CNBC Make It.

After seeing an auction Julien’s held for some of Bette Midler’s performance costumes, Newton-John thought “I could do that! I need to simplify my life — I’ve just read Marie Kondo!” she says.

A portion of the proceeds from the Julien’s auction will go to the Olivia Newton-John Cancer & Wellness Research Centre in Melbourne, Australia.

Julien’s Auctions

Julien’s Auctions

In addition to her tight black outfit from “Grease,” a “Pink Ladies” jacket that was gift from the film’s cast and crew is also up for auction and could go for up to $4,000, according to Julien’s.

Julien’s Auctions

Newton-John is also auctioning off items from her other popular movies, like Western boots and harem pants from 1980 film “Xanadu,” which Julien’s estimates could go for up $4,000 each.

Julien’s Auctions

Julien’s Auctions

As for memorabilia from Newton-John’s career as a pop star, she is auctioning off, among other things, “this little dress I wore in my Physical Tour — this little black, sparkly dress that I really love,” she said. Newton-John’s Physical Tour was in 1982. Julien’s estimates the dress will go for up to $2,000.

Julien’s Auctions

Many of Newton-John’s friends, including John Travolta, Marie Osmond, Keith Urban and Rebel Wilson, donated items to be included in the auction. John Farrar’s original written lyrics for the song “Hopelessly Devoted to You” from “Grease” will also be sold.

Earlier this year, Newton-John was diagnosed with breast cancer for a third time, after first being diagnosed in 1992.

“I kept thinking that it would be a wonderful idea to auction off my [“Grease”] jacket and pants to raise money for my center,” Newton-John told CNBC Make It. “Somebody had mentioned that they’d raise a lot of money. I thought, ‘well, I have them for goodness sake, that would be a great idea.'”

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Don’t miss: Kurt Cobain’s ‘MTV Unplugged’ sweater could sell for over $300,000


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jacket, olivia, sell, 260000, juliens, pants, iconic, tight, auction, john, newtonjohn, grease, finale, wore, newtonjohns, outfit


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Meatballs and DIY bookcases: The psychology behind Ikea’s iconic success

Some of Ikea’s furniture is made from wood, some is made from particleboard (recycled wood chips fused together), keeping production more affordable. And the trademark simple style of the furniture Ikea sells is not just because it’s a Scandinavian aesthetic. And “most of Ikea’s furniture is available in black, white, or unfinished wood. “I’m not so sure there is enough sensation for audio” in an Ikea store, he says. “We’ve always called the meatballs ‘the best sofa-seller,'” Gerd Diewald, the f


Some of Ikea’s furniture is made from wood, some is made from particleboard (recycled wood chips fused together), keeping production more affordable. And the trademark simple style of the furniture Ikea sells is not just because it’s a Scandinavian aesthetic. And “most of Ikea’s furniture is available in black, white, or unfinished wood. “I’m not so sure there is enough sensation for audio” in an Ikea store, he says. “We’ve always called the meatballs ‘the best sofa-seller,'” Gerd Diewald, the f
Meatballs and DIY bookcases: The psychology behind Ikea’s iconic success Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ikeas, brain, customers, food, iconic, success, bookcases, furniture, store, design, meatballs, ikea, diy, psychology, retail, pradeep


Meatballs and DIY bookcases: The psychology behind Ikea's iconic success

The furniture is cheap, but it looks good

At the heart of Ikea’s success is value: You know what you’re going to get when you shop at Ikea, and it’s going to be affordable. In fact, price is so important to Ikea’s strategy that the company first decides on the price of a piece of furniture and then reverse engineers the construction, the company says. Ikea has a “democratic design approach,” according to Antonella Pucarelli, the chief commercial officer of Ikea retail U.S., which means that it “deliver[s] form, function and quality products at a low price. Even though our products are affordable, we don’t compromise on quality,” she says. (Ikea has had high profile recalls of millions of chests and dressers after several tipped over, killing children. In response, Ikea admitted the chests and dressers could be dangerous and offered free kits to anchor the chests and dressers to the wall, as well as refunds.) Some of Ikea’s furniture is made from wood, some is made from particleboard (recycled wood chips fused together), keeping production more affordable. Ikea furniture is shipped and sold in flat-packs, which makes transporting it cheaper, and customers put it together themselves (or pay for someone to do it for them), keeping labor costs down. And the trademark simple style of the furniture Ikea sells is not just because it’s a Scandinavian aesthetic. It’s easier and cheaper to make affordable versions of such furniture look good. “Ikea’s aesthetic is pared down and minimal, which is not an accident. Uncomplicated forms with very little applied decoration are easier to manufacture. More can be produced in a shorter amount of time, increasing efficiency and decreasing production costs,” Ashlie Broderic, interior designer for Broderic Design, tells CNBC Make It. “The Malm bed is an excellent example of simple rectangular shapes combined to create a very chic bed.” And “most of Ikea’s furniture is available in black, white, or unfinished wood. By producing more items in fewer finishes, Ikea takes advantage of economy of scale,” she says. All this makes Ikea’s “aesthetic per dollar” ratio very high, says neuromarketer and author of “The Buying Brain” Dr. A. K. Pradeep. Ikea’s affordable style is its “category-busting-metric,” or what makes it stand out from all the other brands in that space, he says. The brain looks for a single defining characteristic to differentiate among brands, products and services, and if that’s not easily identified, the brain falls back to price, says Pradeep, who has worked with companies including Coca-Cola, Procter & Gamble, Pepsi, Subway and Mondelez in the neuromarketing space.

The store layout turns retail into retail therapy

Ikea’s stores also appeal to the subconscious mind, which is the primary driver of decision-making, Pradeep tells CNBC Make It. For one thing, the layout of Ikea’s warehouse stores’ showroom floors are generally familiar to shoppers — furniture, pillows and other home goods are staged in mock rooms. “Furniture is set up in its natural environment,” Pradeep says, which your subconscious brain appreciates. “Every single thing there is contextually in position. The brain perceives it, understands its inherent value, and therefore desires it.” But within that context, there are always new and unexpected items to discover along the way. Both of those things are positive triggers in the brain. “A great store will give you the sense of comfort and familiarity and will also give you the pleasure of discovery,” says Pradeep. “That is when retail becomes retail therapy.” Ikea’s vast amounts of white also appeal to the subconscious, a neuromarketing technique tech behemoth Apple also uses liberally. “[I]f Apple was to design a closet it would probably look like an Ikea closet,” Pradeep says. “The brain perceives everything through context. The notion of that white there symbolizes clutter-free, pure, simple, transparent — without saying all those words.” In addition to the smart neuro design, Ikea’s layout nudges customers to spend more money. Ikea sets up the store along a directed walking path that takes customers in one direction through nearly its entire inventory (provided you don’t take short-cuts, which are also available in some places. “We are very conscious of the value of people’s time,” Ikea’s Pucarelli tells CNBC Make It). There are arrows pointing the way on the floor, and signs with a corresponding store map to reinforce the path. “Part of their strategy is to take you past everything,” Alan Penn, a University College London professor who studied how shoppers navigate and buy at Ikea, told the National Post in 2012. “They get you to buy stuff you really hadn’t intended on. And that, I think, is quite a trick.” Further, the guided pathway gets customers into a passive mentality in which they are more prone to suggestion, says Penn. “You follow the yellow brick road. You hand over control of where you are and where you go next. That’s quite psychologically disruptive, and I think that’s the first step toward actually buying.” And then when you are paying for your Ikea finds, there is the smell of sweets baking near checkout. “There’s a part of the brain that fires every time you pay, right? And so by having the scent of baking, of warmth, of sugar — in particular that takes the stress out — they get down the stress of payment,” Pradeep says. One area Ikea could improve its neuro design is audio, says Pradeep. “I’m not so sure there is enough sensation for audio” in an Ikea store, he says. The sounds you hear could be more stimulating, Pradeep says.

There’s cheap, yummy food

Ikea’s cheap food — both in its cafe and at checkout — is as iconic as its furniture and is also a draw for customers. Globally, Ikea sells more than 1 billion Swedish meatballs each year, Pucarelli says. Meatballs and gravy, vegetables and mashed potatoes cost $5.99 at the cafe, as do salmon meatballs with mashed potatoes and vegetables. A blackberry summer salad with blue cheese and walnuts costs $3.99, and three-layer chocolate conspiracy cake is $2.99. Kids meals are $2.99. And members of Ikea’s loyalty program, Ikea Family, get free coffee every visit. The in-store cafe was the brainchild of Ikea’s founder, Ingvar Kamprad, who started the company in 1943 as a mail-order business selling pencils, postcards, and other merchandise in the south of Sweden. (The letters that spell out “Ikea” are the first letters of the founder’s name plus Elmtaryd and Agunnaryd.) “Ingvar was known for saying, ‘You can’t do business with someone on an empty stomach!'” Pucarelli says. Reviews of the food are mixed, but generally positive, according to Yelp. Dimitrios D., who lives in New York City, visited an Ikea in 2018 called the food “surprisingly decent.” It “falls somewhere between cafeteria food and actual restaurant quality (and leaning much more toward cafeteria level). Nonetheless, my salmon fillet platter cost me $6.99,” he said. Karen Y. says that breakfast at Ikea is a family occasion: “My family loves going there for breakfast & then roam around. Is the breakfast great? Nope… but it’s dirt cheap!” she said in a 2017 review. Getting people to eat is also savvy from a neuromarketing perspective, Pradeep tells CNBC Make It. A retail store “is the worst environment for the human brain simply because you’re processing so much information: 20 to 25% of your oxygen intake goes to your brain — very hungry computer, right? So when it computes it consumes so much energy, [it] gets tired,” Pradeep says. “So the smart thing to do would be to have food in the middle of your shopping experience so you could recharge, refuel, go shop some more. Ikea has done that.” “We’ve always called the meatballs ‘the best sofa-seller,'” Gerd Diewald, the former head of Ikea’s food operations in the U.S., told Fast Company in 2017. “Because it’s hard to do business with hungry customers. When you feed them, they stay longer, they can talk about their [potential] purchases, and they make a decision without leaving the store. That was the thinking right at the beginning.”

Do-it-yourself assembly gets customers committed

If everyone has an Ikea story, many of them include a torturous experience putting together a piece of furniture (with its famous pictogram instructions and Allen wrench). With Ikea products, they are “so minimalist and beautifully designed — but my god there are 10 billion parts I got to put together to get the minimalistic design,” Pradeep tells CNBC Make It. For Ikea, that could be a win: You are more likely to feel connected to your purchase if you assemble it. Daniel Mochon, a researcher and associate professor of marketing at Tulane University’s business school, calls this the “Ikea effect.” “We come to overvalue the things that we have created ourselves,” Mochon told Shankar Vedantam, the host of NPR’s podcast “Hidden Brain.” “Imagine that you built a table. Maybe it came out a little bit crooked. Probably your wife or your neighbor would see it for what it is, you know, probably a shoddy piece of workmanship. But to you, that table might seem really great because you’re the one who created it. It is the fruit of your labor, and that is really the idea behind the ‘Ikea effect.'” Of course, feels the need to struggle, and to that point, Ikeas acquired TaskRabbit in Sept., 2017 for an undisclosed sum.

Ikea faces the future


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ikeas, brain, customers, food, iconic, success, bookcases, furniture, store, design, meatballs, ikea, diy, psychology, retail, pradeep


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The world’s first transgender pro boxer is now the face of iconic boxing brand Everlast. Here’s how he did it

Everlast, which launched in 1910, is the world’s leading manufacturer and licensor of boxing, mixed martial arts and fitness equipment. On Sept. 26 he made history again when iconic boxing brand Everlast named him the face of its company — a position previously held by boxing legends Jack Dempsey, Sugar Ray Robinson and Canelo Álvarez. On Dec. 12, 2018, he became the world’s first transgender boxer to compete in a professional fight — and he came away with a win, to boot. Patricio Manuel, the wo


Everlast, which launched in 1910, is the world’s leading manufacturer and licensor of boxing, mixed martial arts and fitness equipment. On Sept. 26 he made history again when iconic boxing brand Everlast named him the face of its company — a position previously held by boxing legends Jack Dempsey, Sugar Ray Robinson and Canelo Álvarez. On Dec. 12, 2018, he became the world’s first transgender boxer to compete in a professional fight — and he came away with a win, to boot. Patricio Manuel, the wo
The world’s first transgender pro boxer is now the face of iconic boxing brand Everlast. Here’s how he did it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, life, brand, iconic, boxer, wasnt, live, know, everlast, heres, boxing, manuel, risk, transgender, pro, trials, face, worlds


The world's first transgender pro boxer is now the face of iconic boxing brand Everlast. Here's how he did it

Everlast, which launched in 1910, is the world’s leading manufacturer and licensor of boxing, mixed martial arts and fitness equipment. The company says Manuel is part of its “new crop of trailblazers,” which also includes an amputee fighter and a family of immigrants from Mexico who are amateur boxers.

On Sept. 26 he made history again when iconic boxing brand Everlast named him the face of its company — a position previously held by boxing legends Jack Dempsey, Sugar Ray Robinson and Canelo Álvarez.

On Dec. 12, 2018, he became the world’s first transgender boxer to compete in a professional fight — and he came away with a win, to boot.

At the age of 34, Patricio Manuel has already made history twice.

Patricio Manuel, the world’s first professional male boxer who is transgender in Everlast campaign.

But the road to getting there wasn’t easy for Manuel. He says he had to risk everything he knew in order to achieve his dream of competing as a male boxer.

Manuel started his boxing career as a female competitor in the early 2000s. He won five national amateur championships and even competed in the 2012 Olympic trials as a woman. But Manuel was eliminated from those trials after suffering a shoulder injury.

While he was recovering, he did a lot of reflecting and finally came to the realization that he was living a lie.

“Once I realized that I was trans, I knew that I needed to live my life being seen as a man,” Manuel tells CNBC Make It.

However, it took him a year before he made a decision to medically transition.

“I was juggling back and forth for a while,” Manuel says. But he didn’t want to be “untruthful” to himself, he says. “For me, that was competing in the female division because that wasn’t how I saw myself. And if I continued to push off my medical transition, I was doing more harm to myself.”

“I realized that I needed to go all-in and risk it all,” he says, which meant he might not be able to compete in boxing — a sport that he loved.

During his transition, Manuel lost his coach, his gym, two jobs and a handful of friends and acquaintances. But the process only made him fight harder, he says.

“Regardless of what your goals are, whether you are trans, whether you are an athlete or not, our dreams have big costs to it, and it all requires risk for us to find that reward,” he says.

He says the challenges he faced were well worth the pain to get him to where he is today.

“I haven’t made it yet,” he says. “I’m already looking at my next goal.”

He wants others to know that in order to achieve success, it is imperative to know yourself and know what you want in life and figure out what you are willing to do — and give up for it.

“We only have one life to live. As cliché as that sounds, I really try to live my life having the least amount of regrets as possible.”

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Don’t miss: Inside ex-bodybuilder Arnold Schwarzenegger’s wellness routine now that he’s 72

What NFL star Tom Brady eats and drinks before a big game


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, life, brand, iconic, boxer, wasnt, live, know, everlast, heres, boxing, manuel, risk, transgender, pro, trials, face, worlds


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Here are some of the most iconic Apple products designed by Jony Ive

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – JUNE 03: Apple chief design officer Jony Ive (L) uses an iPad. Like other iconic Jony Ive designs, part of its attraction was how easily people could scroll through long lists of songs using the wheel design. Apple WatchApple Watch Source: Apple Inc.Today, you’d be hard pressed to walk down the block of a modern city and not see an Apple Watch on someone’s wrist. That changed once Apple introduced the Apple Watch, though, with its touch-screen display, convenient twist “Di


SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – JUNE 03: Apple chief design officer Jony Ive (L) uses an iPad. Like other iconic Jony Ive designs, part of its attraction was how easily people could scroll through long lists of songs using the wheel design. Apple WatchApple Watch Source: Apple Inc.Today, you’d be hard pressed to walk down the block of a modern city and not see an Apple Watch on someone’s wrist. That changed once Apple introduced the Apple Watch, though, with its touch-screen display, convenient twist “Di
Here are some of the most iconic Apple products designed by Jony Ive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mac, jony, getty, designs, watch, design, ive, products, san, apples, iconic, designed, apple


Here are some of the most iconic Apple products designed by Jony Ive

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – JUNE 03: Apple chief design officer Jony Ive (L) uses an iPad. Justin Sullivan | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Apple Chief Design Officer Jony Ive announced on Thursday that he’s leaving the company to start his own company named LoveForm, which will include Apple as a client. Ive, who was close with Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, is the best-known designer of tech products. He’s responsible for most of the Apple products you’ve probably used during his time at the company, which coincided with Apple’s return from near-death to one of the most valuable companies in the world. His designs are so popular, some are on display in museums. Ive had a hand in many product designs, but here are a few of the most iconic.

iMac G3

The Apple iMac G3. Getty Images | Hulton Archive | Getty Images

If you were alive in the 1990s, you remember the iMac G3. It’s still Apple’s most colorful computer ever. It had an iconic “Bondi Blue” shell, though thirteen colors were sold in total. The entire computer was packaged behind the screen, similar to some earlier designs but far more fun than the boring creme colored desktop computers Apple’s competitors were selling.

Power Mac G4 Cube

Apple introduced the Power Mac G4 Cube July 19, 2000, an entirely new class of computer that delivers the performance of a Power Mac G4 in an eight inch cube suspended in a stunning crystal-clear enclosure. Getty Images | Hulton Archive | Getty Images

While perhaps not considered as successful as the iMac G3, the Power Mac G4 Cube is still one of Apple’s most famous designs. It was smaller than other computer towers and the insides pulled out of the cube with a handle, which was easier than unscrewing the side of traditional computers. It also looked a heck of a lot cooler than most other computers.

iPod

Koichi Kamoshida | Getty Images

The iPod was first launched in 2001 and quickly became the must-have MP3 player. Unlike CD players, it allowed people to carry thousands of songs wherever they went. Like other iconic Jony Ive designs, part of its attraction was how easily people could scroll through long lists of songs using the wheel design.

iPhone

Steve Jobs shows off the first iPhone. SHAUN CURRY | AFP | Getty Images

In 2007, Apple turned the smartphone market — dominated by Microsoft, Palm, BlackBerry, Motorola and others — on its head with the release of the first iPhone. Its focus on ease-of-use, a premium design and a multi-touch display helped Apple quickly establish itself as a major player.

iPad

Apple’s iPad is displayed during the launch of Apple’s new tablet computing device in San Francisco. (Photo by Kimberly White/Corbis via Getty Images) Kimberly White | Corbis Historical | Getty Images

Microsoft and other companies had tried to sell tablets, but nobody was able to make them popular until Apple launched the iPad. Like the iPhone, Apple focused on ease-of-use, offering a large screen to browse the web, watch videos and flip through pictures, all things we take for granted today but that, in 2010, felt like magic on the first iPad.

MacBook Air

Apple CEO Steve Jobs smiles as he shows off the new Macbook Air an ultra portable laptop during his keynote speech at the MacWorld Conference & Expo in San Francisco, California, 15 January 2008. Tony Avelar | AFP | Getty Images

Apple had another win with the original MacBook Air. It was so thin that Steve Jobs introduced it by pulling it out of a manila envelope on stage, something no other mainstream laptop at the time could have fit into. Some design aspects, like the keyboard, were so good that most people wish Apple would ditch its current butterfly design for it on its modern laptops.

Apple Watch

Apple Watch Source: Apple Inc.

Today, you’d be hard pressed to walk down the block of a modern city and not see an Apple Watch on someone’s wrist. But before it was introduced, skeptics didn’t think Apple could pull people away from traditional timepieces. That changed once Apple introduced the Apple Watch, though, with its touch-screen display, convenient twist “Digital Crown” controls. And, importantly, it still looks like a relatively normal watch.

AirPods

Apple CEO Tim Cook discusses the AirPods at a media event in San Francisco on Sept. 7, 2016. Beck Diefenbach | Reuters

Here’s another win for Jony Ive. Bluetooth headphones were gaining in popularity a couple of years ago, but Apple entered the market and took control of it with the AirPods. Initially considered a bit silly looking, today they’re pretty much standard wear on fashionable people. Again, Ive’s focus on simplicity helped make them popular: just pop them in and you’re listening to music. Even the charging case — itself a brilliant design choice — has an addictive click mechanism.

Apple Park, the company’s new office campus

Apple Park Courtesy of Apple


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mac, jony, getty, designs, watch, design, ive, products, san, apples, iconic, designed, apple


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Scenes of Notre Dame Cathedral in flames

A devastating blaze engulfed one of France’s most beloved and iconic landmarks, Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, on Monday. The following are some of the horrific scenes as one of the greatest examples of gothic architecture was reduced to ashes.


A devastating blaze engulfed one of France’s most beloved and iconic landmarks, Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, on Monday. The following are some of the horrific scenes as one of the greatest examples of gothic architecture was reduced to ashes.
Scenes of Notre Dame Cathedral in flames Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: adam jeffery, geoffroy van der hasselt, afp, getty images, nicolas liponne, nurphoto, francois guillot, stoyan vassev, tass, mattias wagner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, paris, cathedral, reduced, landmarks, flames, iconic, frances, dame, gothic, notre, greatest, scenes, horrific


Scenes of Notre Dame Cathedral in flames

A devastating blaze engulfed one of France’s most beloved and iconic landmarks, Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, on Monday. The following are some of the horrific scenes as one of the greatest examples of gothic architecture was reduced to ashes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: adam jeffery, geoffroy van der hasselt, afp, getty images, nicolas liponne, nurphoto, francois guillot, stoyan vassev, tass, mattias wagner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, paris, cathedral, reduced, landmarks, flames, iconic, frances, dame, gothic, notre, greatest, scenes, horrific


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