Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions


But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions
Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

Amazon’s relentless pursuit of growth in retail, cloud computing, advertising and consumer devices has put the company squarely in the sights of Washington lawmakers who are concerned about Big Tech’s growing influence over consumers. But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice.

In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) called out abusive business practices. And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions by Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT).

Amazon also confirmed to CNBC that it would soon start accepting cash at the Amazon Go cashierless stores as a growing number of cities and states push for laws that require all stores to serve the unbanked. It’s all part of a strategy to be more likable at a time when tech companies are drawing heat for behavior that looks increasingly anti-competitive.

“I believe Amazon has made the connection between likability and immunity from regulation,” said NYU business professor Scott Galloway, author of “The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google.”

This is a different company from the vigorously defensive, win-at-all-cost Amazon we’re used to seeing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


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Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have

Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month. The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period. However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. “English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other


Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month. The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period. However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. “English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other
Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: chloe taylor, image, david madison, photographers choice, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speakers, market, uk, languages, foreign, eu, skills, employers, emerging, language, fewer, migration, job


Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have

Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month.

Demand for German speakers peaked just before the Brexit referendum in June 2016, according to the data.

The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period.

However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. According to the U.K.’s Office for National Statistics, net migration from the EU is now at its lowest level in a decade, which could signal a reduction in the talent pool when it comes to European language skills.

“Many U.K. employers who require multilingual staff are becoming increasingly unsettled as a perfect storm brews — fewer and fewer linguists are emerging from our education system just as Brexit uncertainty looks to be deterring workers relocating here from the EU,” Bill Richards, U.K. managing director of Indeed, said in a press release.

“English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other languages. While the U.K. market clearly continues to offer many opportunities for those with additional language skills, there is a danger of a shortfall emerging as insufficient supply butts up against rising demand,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: chloe taylor, image, david madison, photographers choice, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speakers, market, uk, languages, foreign, eu, skills, employers, emerging, language, fewer, migration, job


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Black conservative group calls on NAACP to rescind Jussie Smollett’s Image Award nomination

Project 21, an activist group sponsored by the National Center for Public Policy Research, said Smollett “does not deserve honor after arrest for hate crimes hoax.” The Image Awards is an event that celebrates the achievements and performances of people of color as well as individuals or groups who promote social justice through creative endeavors. The Image Award nomination came before Smollett was charged with 16 counts of disorderly misconduct for allegedly lying to the Chicago police. Repres


Project 21, an activist group sponsored by the National Center for Public Policy Research, said Smollett “does not deserve honor after arrest for hate crimes hoax.” The Image Awards is an event that celebrates the achievements and performances of people of color as well as individuals or groups who promote social justice through creative endeavors. The Image Award nomination came before Smollett was charged with 16 counts of disorderly misconduct for allegedly lying to the Chicago police. Repres
Black conservative group calls on NAACP to rescind Jussie Smollett’s Image Award nomination Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: sarah whitten, tasos katopodis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rescind, award, nomination, 21, outstanding, smollett, nominees, naacp, group, awards, image, calls, black, project, smolletts, jussie, conservative


Black conservative group calls on NAACP to rescind Jussie Smollett's Image Award nomination

A black conservative group is calling on the NAACP to drop Jussie Smollett from the list of nominees for an Image Award after the actor was arrested on the suspicion of filing a false police report claiming he was the victim of a hate crime.

Project 21, an activist group sponsored by the National Center for Public Policy Research, said Smollett “does not deserve honor after arrest for hate crimes hoax.”

“Everyone has a reason to be disappointed with Jussie Smollett right now, and these accumulated reasons justify the NAACP taking swift and appropriate action to remove him from consideration for its Image Award,” Council Nedd, co-chairman of Project 21, said in a statement Monday.

Smollett was nominated for outstanding supporting actor in a drama series for his work on “Empire.” The Image Awards is an event that celebrates the achievements and performances of people of color as well as individuals or groups who promote social justice through creative endeavors.

The Image Award nomination came before Smollett was charged with 16 counts of disorderly misconduct for allegedly lying to the Chicago police.

Representatives for Smollett and the NAACP’s Image Awards did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

This isn’t the first time that Project 21 has contested the Image Award’s nominees. In 2004, the group criticized the NAACP for allowing R&B singer R. Kelly to keep his nomination for outstanding album despite the fact that he was under indictment for alleged child pornography violations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: sarah whitten, tasos katopodis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rescind, award, nomination, 21, outstanding, smollett, nominees, naacp, group, awards, image, calls, black, project, smolletts, jussie, conservative


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Judge slams Roger Stone over book that criticizes Robert Mueller

The judge’s awareness of the book came only after her Feb. 21 order prohibiting Stone from making any comments that criticize Mueller or the case against him. In the book, Stone writes: “I now find myself on Crooked Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller’s hit list because I have advised Donald Trump for the past forty years. Neither Stone’s lawyers nor a special counsel spokesman immediately responded to CNBC’s request for comment. Jackson’s order came a day after Mueller informed her that Stone had


The judge’s awareness of the book came only after her Feb. 21 order prohibiting Stone from making any comments that criticize Mueller or the case against him. In the book, Stone writes: “I now find myself on Crooked Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller’s hit list because I have advised Donald Trump for the past forty years. Neither Stone’s lawyers nor a special counsel spokesman immediately responded to CNBC’s request for comment. Jackson’s order came a day after Mueller informed her that Stone had
Judge slams Roger Stone over book that criticizes Robert Mueller Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: dan mangan, kevin breuninger, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slams, image, judge, book, roger, gag, stone, instagram, special, criticizes, order, lawyers, mueller, robert, stones, jackson


Judge slams Roger Stone over book that criticizes Robert Mueller

Jackson only recently had learned that the self-described “dirty trickster” Stone was on the verge of publishing the book, “The Myth of Russian Collusion,” which takes shots at Mueller.

Stone’s online presence appears to have been recently scrubbed of many of his prior attacks on the special counsel. Two websites used by Stone — whoframedrogerstone.com and stonezone.com — have been deleted in recent days. Both sites solicited money for Stone’s legal defense fund, and both took shots at Mueller.

The special counsel is probing Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and possible collusion by the Trump campaign with that meddling.

The judge’s awareness of the book came only after her Feb. 21 order prohibiting Stone from making any comments that criticize Mueller or the case against him. Jackson’s gagging of Stone came after he posted an image on Instagram showing her face next to the crosshair of a rifle’s scope.

Jackson noted last week that Stone’s lawyers had not told her about the forthcoming book when she held the hearing Feb. 21 on the gag order.

In the book, Stone writes: “I now find myself on Crooked Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller’s hit list because I have advised Donald Trump for the past forty years. I am being targeted not because I committed a crime, but because the Deep State liberals want to silence me and pressure me to testify against my good friend.”

In her new order Tuesday, Jackson demanded that Stone’s lawyers by next Monday file a status report in federal court in Washington, D.C., “detailing his efforts to come into compliance with the Court’s rulings.”

She also wants Stone’s lawyer to produce records related to his book deal and its schedule for release, the exact date the book first became available, when he learned the book had been printed, and other details about the book.

Neither Stone’s lawyers nor a special counsel spokesman immediately responded to CNBC’s request for comment.

Jackson seemed to suggest that Stone might have to withdraw the book from publication when she warned Stone that “any costs or consequences that will be occasioned by [the judge’s] clear reiteration of this clear requirement” to comply with the gag order “are … solely attributable to the defendant.”

The judge noted that Stone “deliberately waited until public sales [of the book] were not only ‘imminent,’ but apparently, ongoing, to inform the Court of the publication effort that had been underway for weeks.”

Jackson’s order came a day after Mueller informed her that Stone had posted on Instagram an image of his face under the words “Who framed Roger Stone.” The special counsel’s filing cited a CNBC story on that Instagram post which raised the question of whether the image violated the gag order on Stone barring him from criticizing the prosecution’s case.

Mueller took no position on whether Stone’s post had violated the gag order. Stone deleted the image shortly after CNBC asked his lawyer about it.

On Tuesday, Jackson wrote, “The fact that the order exists at all is entirely the fault of the defendant.”

“He used his public platform in an incendiary and threatening manner,” she wrote, referring to the image of the crosshair next to her face.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: dan mangan, kevin breuninger, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slams, image, judge, book, roger, gag, stone, instagram, special, criticizes, order, lawyers, mueller, robert, stones, jackson


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Robert Mueller notifies judge that Roger Stone shared Instagram image

Special counsel Robert Mueller on Monday notified a federal judge about an Instagram post by President Donald Trump’s friend Roger Stone that could be in violation of the judge’s strict gag order on Stone. The filing by Mueller cited CNBC’s story on Sunday detailing the post by Stone, which contained an image of him under the words “Who framed Roger Stone.” Mueller did not ask Judge Amy Berman to find the self-described “dirty trickster” Stone in violation of her gag order in the case. Stone del


Special counsel Robert Mueller on Monday notified a federal judge about an Instagram post by President Donald Trump’s friend Roger Stone that could be in violation of the judge’s strict gag order on Stone. The filing by Mueller cited CNBC’s story on Sunday detailing the post by Stone, which contained an image of him under the words “Who framed Roger Stone.” Mueller did not ask Judge Amy Berman to find the self-described “dirty trickster” Stone in violation of her gag order in the case. Stone del
Robert Mueller notifies judge that Roger Stone shared Instagram image Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: dan mangan, mark wilson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, order, roger, framed, instagram, image, judge, robert, book, gag, stones, notifies, mueller, stone, shared, filing


Robert Mueller notifies judge that Roger Stone shared Instagram image

Special counsel Robert Mueller on Monday notified a federal judge about an Instagram post by President Donald Trump’s friend Roger Stone that could be in violation of the judge’s strict gag order on Stone.

The filing by Mueller cited CNBC’s story on Sunday detailing the post by Stone, which contained an image of him under the words “Who framed Roger Stone.”

Mueller did not ask Judge Amy Berman to find the self-described “dirty trickster” Stone in violation of her gag order in the case.

Stone, 66, is barred from criticizing Mueller’s team of prosecutors under the gag imposed on Feb. 21 after the longtime Republican operative posted an Instagram image of Jackson’s face next to a rifle scope’s crosshair.

If Stone, who is currently free on a $250,000 signature bond, is found by Jackson to have violated that order, she could have him jailed without bail pending his trial on charges of lying to Congress, witness tampering and obstructing justice.

Stone deleted the “Who framed Roger Stone” image from a series of other rotating images on his Instagram story Sunday shortly after CNBC sent an email to his lawyer asking about it.

The other images suggested that people donate to Stone’s legal defense fund, with one saying “I am committed to proving my innocence. But I need your help,” and another saying, “I’ve always had Trump’s back. Will you have mine?”

“We note for the Court that according to public reporting, on March 3, 2019, the defendant’s Instagram account shared an image with the title ‘who framed Roger Stone.’ A copy of the image is submitted under seal as Exhibit C. 1,” Mueller said in the court filing in federal court in Washington, D.C.

CNBC’s story on the image is referenced in a footnote in that filing.

Stone’s posted the “Framed” Instagram image two days after Jackson ordered his defense lawyers to explain why they did not tell her about the planned publication of a book by Stone that could violate her gag order. The book is entitled “The Myth of Russian Collusion: The Inside Story of How Trump Really Won.”

Jackson’s gag order prohibits Stone from “making statements to the media or in public settings about the Special Counsel’s investigation or this case or any of the participants in the investigation or the case.”

The gag covers “posts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or any other form of social media,” as well as other forms of communication.

Mueller’s spokesman, who declined to comment on Stone’s post on Sunday, did not immediately return a request for comment. Stone’s lawyers did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Earlier Monday, Stone’s attorneys told Jackson in a filing that they belived his new book, which has an updated introduction discussing his case, should be allowed to be published because it was written and edited before the judge issued her gag order.

But Mueller’s filing afterward noted that, “A preview of the defendant’s book, including the updated Introduction referenced in the defendant’s Motion to Clarify, is currently publicly available on Amazon.com and Google Books.”

Stone was arrested in January. He has pleaded not guilty in the case.

Mueller claims Congress about his alleged effort to get the document collection group WikiLeaks to release emails hacked by Russian agents from Democrats, including Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman, during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Stone is alleged to have been in contact with top-ranking Trump campaign officials about efforts to leak damaging information about Clinton.

– Additional reporting by Kevin Breuninger


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: dan mangan, mark wilson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, order, roger, framed, instagram, image, judge, robert, book, gag, stones, notifies, mueller, stone, shared, filing


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New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t


” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t
New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


New York's image is 'a bit tarnished' after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

Wylde said the government had to put something on the table to lure Amazon.

“New York is the highest-taxed place in the country, and when we are competing with every other state and city, in places like Nashville and Dallas — runners-up to our application — it’s pretty hard to compare our tax burden and cost burden there,” she said on “Closing Bell.” ” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.”

Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We shouldn’t be subsidizing companies to provide jobs.”

He called Amazon’s decision a “huge victory” for New Yorkers.

“We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. You actually have to make sure that people are included in the conversation and not displace working-class communities that have been here forever.”

Wylde said while the expected tax revenue is a “big loss” for the city, she is optimistic that New York can move forward.

“We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our tech economy growing. It is our fastest-growing industry, and we need it,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


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New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t


” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t
New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


New York's image is 'a bit tarnished' after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

Wylde said the government had to put something on the table to lure Amazon.

“New York is the highest-taxed place in the country, and when we are competing with every other state and city, in places like Nashville and Dallas — runners-up to our application — it’s pretty hard to compare our tax burden and cost burden there,” she said on “Closing Bell.” ” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.”

Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We shouldn’t be subsidizing companies to provide jobs.”

He called Amazon’s decision a “huge victory” for New Yorkers.

“We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. You actually have to make sure that people are included in the conversation and not displace working-class communities that have been here forever.”

Wylde said while the expected tax revenue is a “big loss” for the city, she is optimistic that New York can move forward.

“We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our tech economy growing. It is our fastest-growing industry, and we need it,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


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Northam’s pic of men in blackface, Klan robe spurs resignation calls

The photo shows one person in blackface and another wearing a Ku Klux Klan robe. “I reflected with my family and classmates from the time and affirmed my conclusion that I am not the person in that photo,” North said, calling the image “offensive, racist and despicable.” “It is because my memory of that episode is so vivid that I truly believe that I am not in that picture of the yearbook,” Northam said. But Northam told Virginia State Senator Louise Lucas earlier on Saturday that it was not him


The photo shows one person in blackface and another wearing a Ku Klux Klan robe. “I reflected with my family and classmates from the time and affirmed my conclusion that I am not the person in that photo,” North said, calling the image “offensive, racist and despicable.” “It is because my memory of that episode is so vivid that I truly believe that I am not in that picture of the yearbook,” Northam said. But Northam told Virginia State Senator Louise Lucas earlier on Saturday that it was not him
Northam’s pic of men in blackface, Klan robe spurs resignation calls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: phil mccausland, win mcnamee, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, northam, pic, men, offensive, realized, racist, resign, blackface, ready, picture, resignation, northams, calls, virginia, robe, klan, yearbook, image, spurs


Northam's pic of men in blackface, Klan robe spurs resignation calls

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam said he will not leave his office despite pressure from prominent lawmakers to resign over a racially offensive photo that appeared on his medical school yearbook page. The photo shows one person in blackface and another wearing a Ku Klux Klan robe.

Northam held a press conference on Saturday afternoon at the governor’s mansion where he once again apologized for the image, but said he had nothing to do with it. He said the first time he saw the photo was on Friday, he did not attend that party and the picture is not of him.

“I reflected with my family and classmates from the time and affirmed my conclusion that I am not the person in that photo,” North said, calling the image “offensive, racist and despicable.”

One of the reasons Northam said he remembers that he is not in the image is because he participated in a dance competition the same year the yearbook was published — 1984 — in which he used shoe polish to darken his face for a Michael Jackson costume.

“It is because my memory of that episode is so vivid that I truly believe that I am not in that picture of the yearbook,” Northam said.

“I certainly take responsibility for what happened in San Antonio,” Northam added later. “I have learned from that. But this was not my picture, that was not my costume, as either black face or KKK.”

The governor said he does not expect everyone to believe his account, at least not immediately, nor does he expect to be immediately forgiven. He said he would not resign because that would be the easier path.

“I am ready to earn your forgiveness, and I am ready to begin today,” he said.

Northam originally apologized Friday on Twitter “for the decision I made to appear as I did in this photo and for the hurt that decision caused then and now.”

But Northam told Virginia State Senator Louise Lucas earlier on Saturday that it was not him in the picture, according to the senator’s spokesperson. The apology Friday, which called the image “clearly racist and offensive,” acknowledged his appearance in the photo and suggests he did, at one point, think he might have been one of the people pictured.

An hour after he made that statement, Northam said he realized that it was not him in the image after all.

“When I was shown this last night it was horrific. It really horrified me. We did what we needed to do last night and that was to reach out and apologize to those who may be hurt, but the more time I’ve had, I’ve realized I have no recollection of dressing up like that,” the governor said at the press conference on Saturday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: phil mccausland, win mcnamee, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, northam, pic, men, offensive, realized, racist, resign, blackface, ready, picture, resignation, northams, calls, virginia, robe, klan, yearbook, image, spurs


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‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ star Terry Crews reveals the biggest money mistake he ever made

“I had them all, and I ran those suckers up,” Crews tells Goudreau in CNBC Make It’s new “Money Talks” series. “I bought VCRs back in the day … TVs, I bought furniture, bought it for my apartment,” says Crews, now 50. And as a newly married 21-year-old college student, Crews didn’t have the money to pay even the monthly minimum on the bills. “Every money mistake I ever made is because I was trying to keep up with people that I was trying to impress, that I really didn’t like anyway,” Crews say


“I had them all, and I ran those suckers up,” Crews tells Goudreau in CNBC Make It’s new “Money Talks” series. “I bought VCRs back in the day … TVs, I bought furniture, bought it for my apartment,” says Crews, now 50. And as a newly married 21-year-old college student, Crews didn’t have the money to pay even the monthly minimum on the bills. “Every money mistake I ever made is because I was trying to keep up with people that I was trying to impress, that I really didn’t like anyway,” Crews say
‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ star Terry Crews reveals the biggest money mistake he ever made Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, crews, didnt, star, ninenine, reveals, mistake, biggest, bought, money, things, ill, big, really, terry, brooklyn, image, inside


'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' star Terry Crews reveals the biggest money mistake he ever made

Terry Crews’ career path has been anything but ordinary: He went from sweeping floors for $8 an hour to playing in the NFL to Hollywood stardom. Today, he stars in NBC shows “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” and “America’s Got Talent,” and he hit the big screen in popular flicks like “Sorry to Bother You” and “Deadpool 2.”

But Crews recently talked to CNBC Make It’s managing editor, Jenna Goudreau, about a completely relatable money mistake he made in his early 20s.

In college, Crews remembers, he had four credit cards — a Discover card, Visa, MasterCard and American Express — thanks to the enticing deals offered for students. And they didn’t collect dust.

“I had them all, and I ran those suckers up,” Crews tells Goudreau in CNBC Make It’s new “Money Talks” series.

“I bought VCRs back in the day … TVs, I bought furniture, bought it for my apartment,” says Crews, now 50.

And as a newly married 21-year-old college student, Crews didn’t have the money to pay even the monthly minimum on the bills.

“I had so much debt that the neighbor in my apartment complex came down…he was like, ‘Dude, the bill collectors are calling me about you,'” Crews says. “I was like, ‘I got a problem.’ Can you imagine getting a knock on the door and the bill collectors are calling your neighbors?”

Crews was so strapped at the time that he’d sneak into the school’s cafeteria to eat for free and was often late on rent, according to his 2014 book, “Manhood.” Eventually he had to return all the stuff he’d bought but couldn’t afford.

The memory, says Crews, is “heartbreaking” because he got himself into all that debt for all the wrong reasons. Crews was using material things to try and project a certain image.

“Every money mistake I ever made is because I was trying to keep up with people that I was trying to impress, that I really didn’t like anyway,” Crews says. “It was all about the image, and if I look like this, I’ll be better, I’ll be more accepted. … If I have these things, I’ll have all the answers.”

Crews was drafted by the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams a few years later in 1991 and played for the Rams, San Diego Chargers and Washington Redskins through 1995. Although it gave him a steady income, it never made him rich. When he made the switch to acting in the early 2000s, he says he sometimes had to work two or three jobs to get by, and even dipped into his savings to survive.

His big break came in 2002 with his role in the movie “Friday After Next” (a gig he ended up scoring through working as a security guard on movie sets). Crews went on to land roles in iconic movies like “White Chicks” and “The Expendables,” as well as the UPN’s hit show “Everybody Hates Chris.”

With fame came some big pay days. But Crews has not only grown his bank account, he’s also expanded his perspective on what true success really means.

“The thing is — and it’s funny because it’s just like some sitcom — the answer was inside you all along,” Crews says. “This is the big thing the whole world is figuring out right now: that the image means nothing.”

You can have things like money, cars and homes, and still be empty inside and plagued by problems, he adds.

“I think the whole world is realizing, ‘Wait a minute … that image has to line up with who you really are,’ you know?” Crews says. “And I think we’re just finding out right now — more than ever — it’s so important that the inside is good, and that people are actually good people.”

Don’t miss: Lucy Hale says this is the one splurge she spends practically her ‘whole bank account’ on

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, crews, didnt, star, ninenine, reveals, mistake, biggest, bought, money, things, ill, big, really, terry, brooklyn, image, inside


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This image of Spain is the first from an all-seeing satellite constellation by startup ICEYE

“X2 has proven successful … this is a 10 times better resolution than last time,” ICEYE CEO Rafal Modrzewski told CNBC. After the successful debut of the X1 satellite in January, ICEYE incorporated more than 50 improvements into X2, Modrzewski said. Once ICEYE has six satellites in the constellation, Modrzewski says the company’s “first step in terms of the commercial service” will be to “provide global 24 hours repeat capability.” This means that ICEYE will be able to provide an image of a pl


“X2 has proven successful … this is a 10 times better resolution than last time,” ICEYE CEO Rafal Modrzewski told CNBC. After the successful debut of the X1 satellite in January, ICEYE incorporated more than 50 improvements into X2, Modrzewski said. Once ICEYE has six satellites in the constellation, Modrzewski says the company’s “first step in terms of the commercial service” will be to “provide global 24 hours repeat capability.” This means that ICEYE will be able to provide an image of a pl
This image of Spain is the first from an all-seeing satellite constellation by startup ICEYE Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, x2, allseeing, satellite, constellation, commercial, iceye, successful, 24, startup, modrzewski, spain, hours, satellites, image, company, service


This image of Spain is the first from an all-seeing satellite constellation by startup ICEYE

“X2 has proven successful … this is a 10 times better resolution than last time,” ICEYE CEO Rafal Modrzewski told CNBC.

After the successful debut of the X1 satellite in January, ICEYE incorporated more than 50 improvements into X2, Modrzewski said. The ICEYE-X2 satellite is much like the beta test of new software, Modrzewski explained. Once testing is complete, the company will began commercial operations with X2, making it the cornerstone of a constellation of SAR satellites.

ICEYE plans to have a network of 18 satellites by 2020, offering near-real time comparisons of changes on the ground. Modrzewski says the company will launch as many as eight in 2019, “depending on how fast we can purchase launches.”

Once ICEYE has six satellites in the constellation, Modrzewski says the company’s “first step in terms of the commercial service” will be to “provide global 24 hours repeat capability.” This means that ICEYE will be able to provide an image of a place on Earth in exactly the same position as an image taken 24 hours previously, showing even small changes.

“None of the current satellites or constellations can guarantee you 24 hours repeat service,” Modrzewski said.

That commercial service capability “is probably sufficient for the company to reach profitability,” Modrzewski said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, x2, allseeing, satellite, constellation, commercial, iceye, successful, 24, startup, modrzewski, spain, hours, satellites, image, company, service


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