Trump creates positive effect on socially responsible investing

Ironically, one has been a rapid increase in interest and adoption of impact investing and other types of values-based investing. Impact investing, or values-based investing, is a type of investing that helps people and/or organizations align their investments with their personal values. There are many varieties of this type of investing, and it goes by many names, including socially responsible investing and green investing. Additionally, a Fidelity study shows 37% of millennials currently own


Ironically, one has been a rapid increase in interest and adoption of impact investing and other types of values-based investing. Impact investing, or values-based investing, is a type of investing that helps people and/or organizations align their investments with their personal values. There are many varieties of this type of investing, and it goes by many names, including socially responsible investing and green investing. Additionally, a Fidelity study shows 37% of millennials currently own
Trump creates positive effect on socially responsible investing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: sonya dreizler, cnbc contributor, founder of solutions with sonya, mandel ngan, afp, getty images, nurphoto, rosemary calvert, bruce sullivan, loren elliott
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, valuesbased, investing, effect, trump, sustainable, impact, socially, values, financial, investors, responsible, creates, interested, positive, trumps


Trump creates positive effect on socially responsible investing

Donald Trump’s surprising ascent to president of the United States has brought many unexpected effects to the financial markets. Ironically, one has been a rapid increase in interest and adoption of impact investing and other types of values-based investing.

Impact investing, or values-based investing, is a type of investing that helps people and/or organizations align their investments with their personal values. There are many varieties of this type of investing, and it goes by many names, including socially responsible investing and green investing.

There has been a rise in assets in sustainable, responsible and impact investment strategies, to $12 trillion at the beginning of 2018, up from $8.72 trillion at the beginning of 2016, according to a US/SIF Foundation report on investing trends.

So while I would definitely wager that most SRI professionals were disappointed that Trump won, the silver lining has been that it’s inspired many investors to align their money with their values. Ironically, the president has been good for the environment.

More from Impact Investing:

Trump executive order brings scrutiny of ESG 401(k) investments

SEC official wants index funds to disclose their ESG activities

New app seeks to let users invest more responsibly

Various industry studies show that most individual investors are interested in sustainable investing. A Morgan Stanley survey found that 75% of individual investors (and 86% of millennials) are interested in sustainable investing, with 80% interested in investments that are customized to meet their values. Additionally, a Fidelity study shows 37% of millennials currently own sustainable investing strategies and another 40% are interested in adding them to their investment strategy.

This increasing demand for impact- and values-based investing certainly has been aided along by socially progressive investors who were spurred by the Trump election to vote with their wallets, according to some financial experts. Many Americans were surprised by Trump’s election, and some found themselves at an inflection point, suddenly wanting to express their values publicly through marches, privately through conversations (and arguments) with loved ones, and through how they spent and invested their money.

To that point, certified financial planner Cathy Curtis, owner of Curtis Financial Planning, said that she saw this directly in her own practice.

“After Trump won, I had a meeting with one of my clients, a thoughtful and politically informed person; she was in shock at Trump’s win,” Curtis said. “During our meeting, my client told me she couldn’t stand the thought of her money being invested in companies whose CEOs were Trump supporters.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: sonya dreizler, cnbc contributor, founder of solutions with sonya, mandel ngan, afp, getty images, nurphoto, rosemary calvert, bruce sullivan, loren elliott
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, valuesbased, investing, effect, trump, sustainable, impact, socially, values, financial, investors, responsible, creates, interested, positive, trumps


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Kremlin says Mueller report shows no evidence of Russian meddling

The Kremlin said on Friday that U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited report did not contain any evidence the Russian state had meddled in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Mueller’s report, released on Thursday, details extensive contacts between Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign and Russian operatives who, it said, sought to tilt the election in Trump’s favor. However, the report did not find evidence of a criminal conspiracy between Trump’s election campaign and Russia. Speaking to


The Kremlin said on Friday that U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited report did not contain any evidence the Russian state had meddled in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Mueller’s report, released on Thursday, details extensive contacts between Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign and Russian operatives who, it said, sought to tilt the election in Trump’s favor. However, the report did not find evidence of a criminal conspiracy between Trump’s election campaign and Russia. Speaking to
Kremlin says Mueller report shows no evidence of Russian meddling Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-19  Authors: reuters, maxim shemetov, file photo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, impact, mueller, kremlin, shows, report, russian, trumps, election, peskov, meddling, having, evidence, relations


Kremlin says Mueller report shows no evidence of Russian meddling

The Kremlin said on Friday that U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited report did not contain any evidence the Russian state had meddled in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Mueller’s report, released on Thursday, details extensive contacts between Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign and Russian operatives who, it said, sought to tilt the election in Trump’s favor.

However, the report did not find evidence of a criminal conspiracy between Trump’s election campaign and Russia.

Speaking to reporters on a conference call, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Moscow regretted the Mueller report was having an impact on its relations with Washington.

“In general, the report still does not include any reasonable evidence at all that Russia allegedly interfered in the U.S. election.

“We, as before, do not accept such allegations,” Peskov said.

“We regret that a document of this quality is having a direct impact on the development of bilateral Russian-U.S. relations that are already not in the best condition,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-19  Authors: reuters, maxim shemetov, file photo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, impact, mueller, kremlin, shows, report, russian, trumps, election, peskov, meddling, having, evidence, relations


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Investors don’t think Mueller report will get in the way of Trump reelection

Read more: The redacted Mueller report is expected Thursday. And the other thing is how does Trump react? But even so, the headlines coming from the Mueller report are not expected to rock the stock market unless they start to seriously weaken Trump. He also said at this point, he does not think investors are convinced Trump will win reelection. Earlier this week, Goldman Sachs economists issued a report saying Trump has a narrow advantage in the 2020 election at this point.


Read more: The redacted Mueller report is expected Thursday. And the other thing is how does Trump react? But even so, the headlines coming from the Mueller report are not expected to rock the stock market unless they start to seriously weaken Trump. He also said at this point, he does not think investors are convinced Trump will win reelection. Earlier this week, Goldman Sachs economists issued a report saying Trump has a narrow advantage in the 2020 election at this point.
Investors don’t think Mueller report will get in the way of Trump reelection Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: patti domm, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, president, trump, think, reelection, economy, impact, does, going, dont, way, investors, mueller


Investors don't think Mueller report will get in the way of Trump reelection

The release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report is unlikely to change the growing sense in markets that President Donald Trump can win reelection if the economy remains solid, analysts say.

A redacted version of Mueller’s report is expected to be released Thursday morning, and it should add context to the four-page summary released last month by Attorney General William Barr. The attorney general said Mueller did not establish conspiracy or coordination between the Trump campaign and the Russians.

The state of the economy next year will end up mattering more, analysts say. Instead of concerning themselves too much with the details that could emerge from the Mueller report, investors are paying more attention to its potential impact on whether the president can reach a trade agreement with China.

“A lot of this is priced in already, and the market is saying that Trump is going to be the candidate,” said Daniel Clifton, head of policy research at Strategas. “The risks of impeachment are very low even if there’s something in that report. I think the consensus view holds, and does it make it easier to get a China deal through? The answer is yes.”

Still, there are uncertainties about what the report could reveal. Analysts expect there to be much focus on details that can be used to argue either way whether there was any appearance of obstruction of justice by the president. Barr said there was insufficient evidence to charge Trump with obstruction, but he also said “while this report does not conclude that President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.”

Mueller’s two-year probe resulted in criminal charges against 35 people and three companies, including the president’s long time personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, his former campaign manager Paul Manafort and the former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Read more: The redacted Mueller report is expected Thursday. Here’s how we got here, and what’s next

“There are a couple of wild cards. How many embarrassing things will be revealed? And the other thing is how does Trump react? If he gets furious about these allegations, there will be a lot of eyebrows raised,” said Horizon Investment’s chief global strategist, Greg Valliere. “The other wildcard is eventually Mueller is going to have to testify. I think the Mueller testimony will be explosive and refocus attention. … When Trump says he’s totally exonerated, he has not been totally exonerated. That has yet to be addressed.”

But even so, the headlines coming from the Mueller report are not expected to rock the stock market unless they start to seriously weaken Trump.

“I don’t think it’s going to have a lot of impact,” said James Paulsen, chief investment strategist at Leuthold Group. “It’s possible that the way it has impact is not so much whether Trump gets impeached or not, but if it tends to alter the political polls either way, then it would have impact.”

Democrats are expected to seize on any questionable issue, and Paulsen said what matters is if it continues to look like Republicans can hold the Senate and White House. He also said at this point, he does not think investors are convinced Trump will win reelection.

“I think a loss of the Republican side would have Wall Street’s expectations dialed back, and there would be concerns around regulations and different tax policies. I think that would hurt outlooks. To the extent it would move the needle one way or other, it would have impact, but I don’t think it will,” he said. “I still think the bigger thing ultimately will be where the economy goes. If the economy does fade or accelerates again going into the election, that’s huge.”

Valliere also said the economy is what ultimately matters most.

“I think there’s a growing sentiment that the Democratic field is not particularly strong, and I think there’s a growing sentiment if the economy stays in decent shape, yes, he is the favorite,” said Valliere.

Earlier this week, Goldman Sachs economists issued a report saying Trump has a narrow advantage in the 2020 election at this point.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: patti domm, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, president, trump, think, reelection, economy, impact, does, going, dont, way, investors, mueller


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says

Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says5 Hours AgoPresident Donald Trump’s comments about the transatlantic relationship between the EU and U.S. are ‘a concern’ for Ireland, whose small and open economy is already being impacted by global trade tensions and Brexit, Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche during the IMF Spring Meetings in Washington, D.C.


Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says5 Hours AgoPresident Donald Trump’s comments about the transatlantic relationship between the EU and U.S. are ‘a concern’ for Ireland, whose small and open economy is already being impacted by global trade tensions and Brexit, Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche during the IMF Spring Meetings in Washington, D.C.
Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: paul faith, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, minister, tensions, growth, washington, impact, trumps, transatlantic, told, spring, trade, having, finance, irish


Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says

Brexit and trade tensions having an impact on Irish growth, finance minister says

5 Hours Ago

President Donald Trump’s comments about the transatlantic relationship between the EU and U.S. are ‘a concern’ for Ireland, whose small and open economy is already being impacted by global trade tensions and Brexit, Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche during the IMF Spring Meetings in Washington, D.C.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: paul faith, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, minister, tensions, growth, washington, impact, trumps, transatlantic, told, spring, trade, having, finance, irish


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Widespread stockpiling ahead of Brexit will impact cost of food, industry expert says

Widespread stockpiling ahead of Brexit will impact cost of food, industry expert says11 Hours AgoIan Wright, CEO of the Food and Drink Federation, discusses the impact of Brexit on the organization’s members.


Widespread stockpiling ahead of Brexit will impact cost of food, industry expert says11 Hours AgoIan Wright, CEO of the Food and Drink Federation, discusses the impact of Brexit on the organization’s members.
Widespread stockpiling ahead of Brexit will impact cost of food, industry expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, industry, members, impact, says11, expert, organizations, brexit, wright, widespread, cost, ahead, stockpiling


Widespread stockpiling ahead of Brexit will impact cost of food, industry expert says

Widespread stockpiling ahead of Brexit will impact cost of food, industry expert says

11 Hours Ago

Ian Wright, CEO of the Food and Drink Federation, discusses the impact of Brexit on the organization’s members.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, industry, members, impact, says11, expert, organizations, brexit, wright, widespread, cost, ahead, stockpiling


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

US wine exports slipped about 5% in 2018, reflecting impact of retaliatory tariffs from China

The value of U.S. wine exports sank nearly 5% to $1.47 billion in 2018, reflecting a strong dollar and retaliatory tariffs, an industry trade group announced Monday. (The Golden State accounts for more than 90% of the nation’s wine exports.) Wine exports to China fell nearly 25% in value last year to $78.7 million and 13% in volume compared with 2017, coming after China last year increased tariffs on U.S. wines imported into mainland China. Meantime, U.S. wine exports to Japan fell 22% in volume


The value of U.S. wine exports sank nearly 5% to $1.47 billion in 2018, reflecting a strong dollar and retaliatory tariffs, an industry trade group announced Monday. (The Golden State accounts for more than 90% of the nation’s wine exports.) Wine exports to China fell nearly 25% in value last year to $78.7 million and 13% in volume compared with 2017, coming after China last year increased tariffs on U.S. wines imported into mainland China. Meantime, U.S. wine exports to Japan fell 22% in volume
US wine exports slipped about 5% in 2018, reflecting impact of retaliatory tariffs from China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: jeff daniels, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2018, trade, china, impact, million, wine, wines, slipped, volume, canada, exports, reflecting, tariffs, value, retaliatory


US wine exports slipped about 5% in 2018, reflecting impact of retaliatory tariffs from China

The value of U.S. wine exports sank nearly 5% to $1.47 billion in 2018, reflecting a strong dollar and retaliatory tariffs, an industry trade group announced Monday.

The weaker exports also follow increased “competition from foreign wine producers who are heavily subsidized by their governments and benefiting from free trade agreements in key markets,” according to the San Francisco-based Wine Institute.

“California wines performed well under very challenging circumstances as top markets continued to embrace our reputation for premium quality, leadership in sustainable wine growing and diverse offerings,” said Robert Koch, president and CEO of the Wine Institute. (The Golden State accounts for more than 90% of the nation’s wine exports.)

According to the trade group, total export volume dipped more than 1% to 375 million liters in 2018, with the volume of exports to China and Japan falling by double-digit percentages. Wine exports to China fell nearly 25% in value last year to $78.7 million and 13% in volume compared with 2017, coming after China last year increased tariffs on U.S. wines imported into mainland China.

Effective last September, China in response to tariffs imposed by the administration of President Donald Trump added a 10% duty on U.S. wine imports on top of a previous 15% levy it implemented in April 2018. With the two duties, the total tax and tariff rates for U.S. wine entering China jumped to nearly 80%.

“The long-term prospects for California wine sales in China, however, remain very strong,” said Christopher Beros, the Wine Institute’s trade director for China and the Pacific Rim.

Exports to Hong Kong were up 10% to $130 million in value last year and up about 9% in volume. For years, Hong Kong has been seen as a “back door” for U.S. wine to enter the mainland Chinese market because of lower import taxes.

“Exports to Hong Kong are a bright spot,” according to Beros. “Clearly some of these wines are being re-exported to other countries including mainland China.”

Meantime, U.S. wine exports to Japan fell 22% in volume terms in 2018 and 1% in value to $93 million. Australian, New Zealand and South American wines have given the U.S. more competition in the Asian marketplace.

“In 2018, U.S. wine exports to Asia experienced a softening compared to the healthy growth rates of the prior two years,” Beros said. He added that exports to Vietnam, which is seen as a promising market for California wines, were up 51% from a small base.

Elsewhere, exports to Canada — the largest single country market for American wine — were up 1% in value to $448.7 million and volume was down 11%. U.S. wine exports to the 28-nation European Union were down 15% to $469.4 million last year while volume was up about 3%.

The Trump administration last May requested the help of the World Trade Organization to resolve a wine dispute with Canada over grocery store shelf access. But the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA, deal announced in late September included Ottawa agreeing to resolve a grocery store access issue and settling the WTO case brought by the U.S.

“Although a weak Canadian dollar has led to rising retail prices, Canadian consumers continue to buy premium and super-premium priced California wines,” according to Rick Slomka, the Wine Institute’s trade director for Canada. “As the retail landscape for wine sales in Canada evolves, we look forward to continued growth in government liquor stores but also anticipate greater access to new grocery distribution channels.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: jeff daniels, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2018, trade, china, impact, million, wine, wines, slipped, volume, canada, exports, reflecting, tariffs, value, retaliatory


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Disney is getting ready to open a massive, $1-billion Star Wars theme park in California

Now, the two sides have “reset” ties as the park prepares to open its largest single-themed land expansion ever, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge. As many other California municipalities struggle to generate new revenue sources, Anaheim is in the enviable position of having a cash cow in its backyard. Anaheim’s hotel tax revenues soared after Disneyland in 2012 opened a 12-acre Cars Land at its California Adventure park. Disneyland officials declined to discuss projections for the new Galaxy’s Edge, whi


Now, the two sides have “reset” ties as the park prepares to open its largest single-themed land expansion ever, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge. As many other California municipalities struggle to generate new revenue sources, Anaheim is in the enviable position of having a cash cow in its backyard. Anaheim’s hotel tax revenues soared after Disneyland in 2012 opened a 12-acre Cars Land at its California Adventure park. Disneyland officials declined to discuss projections for the new Galaxy’s Edge, whi
Disney is getting ready to open a massive, $1-billion Star Wars theme park in California Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-06  Authors: jeff daniels, disney, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, open, hotel, impact, massive, galaxys, tax, positive, wars, getting, theme, california, star, anaheim, park, revenue, land, ready, disney


Disney is getting ready to open a massive, $1-billion Star Wars theme park in California

LOS ANGELES — Just over a year ago, Disneyland Resort’s relationship with its hometown of Anaheim was tense. Now, the two sides have “reset” ties as the park prepares to open its largest single-themed land expansion ever, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge.

As many other California municipalities struggle to generate new revenue sources, Anaheim is in the enviable position of having a cash cow in its backyard. Even Burbank, a city where Disney’s corporate offices are located, has struggled fiscally with deficits in recent years due to worker pensions and other costs.

Anaheim is anticipating the new 14-acre expansion will provide a big boost in tourism and hotel taxes, which make up about half of Anaheim’s annual general budget of $330 million. Galaxy’s Edge reportedly cost Disney about $1 billion.

Several hotels report being sold out for the first few weeks of the Galaxy Edge’s opening on May 31. Anaheim’s hotel tax revenues soared after Disneyland in 2012 opened a 12-acre Cars Land at its California Adventure park.

“We are anticipating millions of annual new visitors here and a very positive impact on the revenue that we see from hotel stays but also to sales tax,” said Mike Lyster, a spokesman for the city of Anaheim. “There is no doubt that Cars Land had a serious impact on bringing more people here to Anaheim and had a very positive impact on the revenue we’ve seen.”

Disneyland officials declined to discuss projections for the new Galaxy’s Edge, which has been in the works for several years. It follows Disney acquiring Lucasfilm and the Star Wars franchise in 2012.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-06  Authors: jeff daniels, disney, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, open, hotel, impact, massive, galaxys, tax, positive, wars, getting, theme, california, star, anaheim, park, revenue, land, ready, disney


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump loves coal, hates climate action but investors are fighting back

President Donald Trump loves climate-wrecking coal and hates the climate-saving Paris Agreement. Meanwhile, forward-looking impact investors hate the problems of burning coal and its financial downside – and love portfolios of companies and funds pursuing climate solutions, which can have stronger returns. This love-hate split has motivated investors – and eco-focused ESG investment funds — seeking to save the planet from Trump’s policies. That same month, the Etho Climate Leadership Index US la


President Donald Trump loves climate-wrecking coal and hates the climate-saving Paris Agreement. Meanwhile, forward-looking impact investors hate the problems of burning coal and its financial downside – and love portfolios of companies and funds pursuing climate solutions, which can have stronger returns. This love-hate split has motivated investors – and eco-focused ESG investment funds — seeking to save the planet from Trump’s policies. That same month, the Etho Climate Leadership Index US la
Trump loves coal, hates climate action but investors are fighting back Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-06  Authors: r paul herman, ceo, founder of hip investor, dominick reuter, afp, getty images, pauline askin, craig f walker, denver post, carsten koall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, investors, impact, coal, companies, action, etho, climate, funds, etf, loves, fighting, esg, investing, hates


Trump loves coal, hates climate action but investors are fighting back

President Donald Trump loves climate-wrecking coal and hates the climate-saving Paris Agreement.

Meanwhile, forward-looking impact investors hate the problems of burning coal and its financial downside – and love portfolios of companies and funds pursuing climate solutions, which can have stronger returns.

This love-hate split has motivated investors – and eco-focused ESG investment funds — seeking to save the planet from Trump’s policies. (Note: ESG stands for “environmental, social and governance.”)

In fact, $12 trillion — or $1 in every $4 of assets professionally managed in the U.S. — is invested in portfolios seeking to be sustainable, responsible and impactful. This is up 38 percent since 2016 and up 18 times since 1995, and it includes more than 180 mutual funds and dozens of exchange-traded funds, according to the US SIF Foundation, the socially responsible investing industry trade association.

More from Impact Investing:

From ESG to SRI, decoding impact investing lingo

Why investors like Bezos and Gates pour money into clean tech

What Warren Buffett thinks about climate change

While Trump seems to hate science, investors are loving physics genius Isaac Newton’s third law of motion: “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.”

Trump’s August 2018 “affordable clean energy” rule seeks to transfer pollution-control laws to the states, likely to result in more polluted air and rivers. But savvy fossil-fuel-free-focused investors are trumping this by avoiding the 18 percent drop in coal stocks (Van Eck KOL ETF) since then, compared to the S&P 500’s flat performance over the eight months from July 28, 2018, to March 27, 2019.

Trump announced in July 2017 the intent to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, which was signed by 195 countries in November 2015. That same month, the Etho Climate Leadership Index US launched its ETF, investing in a diversified mix of 400 equities with lower emissions and carbon footprints — and no fossil-fuel producers.

Since that Etho launch on Nov. 19, 2015, it has cumulatively returned 44 percent, while the S&P500 SPY ETF has returned 34 percent. Etho founder Ian Monroe said: “The most efficient and sustainable companies are simply making investors more money” by reducing energy, water, waste and emissions. Companies that don’t can be much riskier.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-06  Authors: r paul herman, ceo, founder of hip investor, dominick reuter, afp, getty images, pauline askin, craig f walker, denver post, carsten koall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, investors, impact, coal, companies, action, etho, climate, funds, etf, loves, fighting, esg, investing, hates


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Mueller findings have little impact on views of Trump: Poll

News that special counsel Robert Mueller ended his investigation without recommending criminal charges against President Trump has had little effect on public opinion, a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll shows. Just 39 percent said they had read or heard “a lot” of news coverage of the end of the probe. “It was not an event that captured the American public,” said Republican pollster Bill McInturff, who conducts the NBC/WSJ poll with his Democratic counterpart Peter Hart. In the survey, 29 p


News that special counsel Robert Mueller ended his investigation without recommending criminal charges against President Trump has had little effect on public opinion, a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll shows. Just 39 percent said they had read or heard “a lot” of news coverage of the end of the probe. “It was not an event that captured the American public,” said Republican pollster Bill McInturff, who conducts the NBC/WSJ poll with his Democratic counterpart Peter Hart. In the survey, 29 p
Mueller findings have little impact on views of Trump: Poll Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-30  Authors: john harwood, tom williams, cq roll call, getty images, alex wong, getty images news
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, points, americans, say, president, mueller, sen, public, little, trump, findings, survey, impact, views, poll


Mueller findings have little impact on views of Trump: Poll

News that special counsel Robert Mueller ended his investigation without recommending criminal charges against President Trump has had little effect on public opinion, a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll shows.

The proportion of Americans who say the investigation has not increased their doubts about the Trump administration rose by ten points to 57 percent in the survey, while the proportion who say it has increased their doubts fell 12 points to 36 percent since February. But the president’s job approval dropped by three points to 43 percent during the same period.

Behind those offsetting results is the fact that Americans have not been nearly as attuned to news about the Mueller investigation as the political and media worlds have been. Just 39 percent said they had read or heard “a lot” of news coverage of the end of the probe.

“It was not an event that captured the American public,” said Republican pollster Bill McInturff, who conducts the NBC/WSJ poll with his Democratic counterpart Peter Hart.

So far, only Attorney General William Barr’s four-page summary of Mueller’s nearly 400 page report has been publicly released. Barr has promised to release the bulk for the report by mid April, but for now Americans are withholding definitive judgment.

In the survey, 29 percent said they though Mueller had cleared Trump of wrongdoing, while a 40 percent plurality said he had not. Another 31 percent weren’t sure.

And Americans remain split on the prospect of impeachment proceedings. Sixteen percent of the public see enough evidence to begin impeachment hearings now, while another 33 percent say Congress should investigate before deciding the matter. Another 47 percent want Congress to eschew impeachment and allow Trump to complete his term.

Should the president seek re-election to a second term, he’d begin with a solid base of support but a larger group of voters with misgivings about his candidacy. The poll showed 40 percent of Americans would feel enthusiastic or comfortable about supporting him, while 59 percent would have reservations or be very uncomfortable.

Opinion divides more evenly on former Vice President Joe Biden. As he considers whether to enter the race, 47 percent say they’d feel enthusiastic or comfortable backing him, while 48 percent would not.

The early profile of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on this measure, 37 percent vs. 58 percent, resembles Trump’s. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts has a similar standing at 30 percent vs. 51 percent.

Democratic contenders Sen. Kamala Harris of California and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas remain less well known. Both discomfort four in 10 Americans at this stage, while roughly one in four feel positively about their candidacies.

The telephone survey of 1,000 adults, conducted March 23-27, carries a margin for error of 3.1-percentage points.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-30  Authors: john harwood, tom williams, cq roll call, getty images, alex wong, getty images news
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, points, americans, say, president, mueller, sen, public, little, trump, findings, survey, impact, views, poll


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India’s elections outcome will not have a major impact on its markets: Credit Suisse

The Indian market is unlikely to suffer no matter the outcome of India’s parliamentary elections, which is starting next month, according to a Credit Suisse strategist. “My view is that elections don’t affect markets — not the Indian markets,” he told CNBC’s Nancy Hungerford at the Credit Suisse Asian Investment Conference in Hong Kong. Mishra added that opinion polls in India have been massively inaccurate in the past — and that inaccuracy has been rising. As far as investments in the Indian ma


The Indian market is unlikely to suffer no matter the outcome of India’s parliamentary elections, which is starting next month, according to a Credit Suisse strategist. “My view is that elections don’t affect markets — not the Indian markets,” he told CNBC’s Nancy Hungerford at the Credit Suisse Asian Investment Conference in Hong Kong. Mishra added that opinion polls in India have been massively inaccurate in the past — and that inaccuracy has been rising. As far as investments in the Indian ma
India’s elections outcome will not have a major impact on its markets: Credit Suisse Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, major, india, elections, markets, seats, national, opinion, credit, market, indian, indias, impact, polls, suisse, outcome


India's elections outcome will not have a major impact on its markets: Credit Suisse

The Indian market is unlikely to suffer no matter the outcome of India’s parliamentary elections, which is starting next month, according to a Credit Suisse strategist.

Historical performances of major Indian indexes, Sensex and Nifty 50, around the last six elections indicate the polls have had little impact on the market, Neelkanth Mishra, co-head of equity strategy for Asia Pacific, said on Wednesday.

“My view is that elections don’t affect markets — not the Indian markets,” he told CNBC’s Nancy Hungerford at the Credit Suisse Asian Investment Conference in Hong Kong. “There will be some volatility, perhaps. Whatever the market does, I would act opposite that. If there’s a panic selloff, I would buy. If there’s a big surge, I would sell.”

India will hold elections in seven phases starting from April 11 for the lower house of the parliament. Results are set to be announced in May and a new government will be formed subsequently.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ruling party alliance — the National Democratic Alliance — is expected to take a majority of the 543 parliamentary seats up for grabs during the elections, according to some opinion polls.

The Pew Research Center earlier this week said a survey conducted among 2,521 respondents in India between May and July last year indicated that most adults there are satisfied with the direction of the country as well as economic prospects of the next generation.

Still, concerns around national issues such as the lack of employment opportunities as well as the real impact of demonetization and the good and services tax — two major initiatives under the Modi government — persist.

Mishra added that opinion polls in India have been massively inaccurate in the past — and that inaccuracy has been rising. In 2014, polls missed the outcome by as many as 100 seats, he added.

Even if Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party is unable to win as many seats as the opinion polls are predicting, the big worry among investors is the emergence of a so-called “third-front government” where neither the BJP nor the Indian National Congress holds a major sway.

“That creates chaos, uncertainty and instability in the government and people generally don’t like that,” he said.

As far as investments in the Indian markets go, Mishra said the banking sector is becoming an attractive opportunity due to the stress the non-banking finance companies are currently facing. That means banks, a key source of funding for Indian companies, will drive all of the credit growth in the country going forward, he explained.

Over the last several years, India implemented major reforms to clean up its banks — particularly the public sector ones with major exposure to soured loans.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, major, india, elections, markets, seats, national, opinion, credit, market, indian, indias, impact, polls, suisse, outcome


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post