Here’s why the Strait of Hormuz is the world’s most important oil chokepoint

The Strait of Hormuz is a critical gateway to the world’s oil industry, with more than a fifth of global oil supply flowing through a narrow sea channel used by Gulf countries like Iran, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. That’s the equivalent of about 21% of global petroleum liquids consumption — making it the world’s most important oil chokepoint. The EIA defines a chokepoint as a narrow channel along widely used global sea routes that are critical to energy security. Flows through the


The Strait of Hormuz is a critical gateway to the world’s oil industry, with more than a fifth of global oil supply flowing through a narrow sea channel used by Gulf countries like Iran, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. That’s the equivalent of about 21% of global petroleum liquids consumption — making it the world’s most important oil chokepoint. The EIA defines a chokepoint as a narrow channel along widely used global sea routes that are critical to energy security. Flows through the
Here’s why the Strait of Hormuz is the world’s most important oil chokepoint Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, narrow, hormuz, heres, shipping, worlds, important, oil, strait, chokepoint, global, channel, energy, used, supply


Here's why the Strait of Hormuz is the world's most important oil chokepoint

The Strait of Hormuz is a critical gateway to the world’s oil industry, with more than a fifth of global oil supply flowing through a narrow sea channel used by Gulf countries like Iran, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

The strategically important waterway links crude producers in the Middle East with key markets across the world.

Daily oil flow in the Strait averaged 21 million barrels per day in 2018, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). That’s the equivalent of about 21% of global petroleum liquids consumption — making it the world’s most important oil chokepoint.

The EIA defines a chokepoint as a narrow channel along widely used global sea routes that are critical to energy security.

Therefore, the inability of oil to transit a major chokepoint, even temporarily, can lead to substantial supply delays and higher shipping costs — resulting in higher world energy prices.

Most chokepoints can be circumvented by using other shipping channels but some, such as the Strait of Hormuz, have no practical alternatives.

Flows through the narrow channel in 2018 made up about one-third of total global seaborne traded oil. More than one-quarter of global liquefied natural gas trade (LNG) also transited the shipping channel last year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, narrow, hormuz, heres, shipping, worlds, important, oil, strait, chokepoint, global, channel, energy, used, supply


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How throwing her weekly to-do list in the trash helps this executive focus on what’s important

Kate Lewis has a lot on her to-do list. “Once a week I write down everything on my to-do list,” Lewis told The Cut in a recent interview. For so long I had notebooks and downloaded to-do list apps, and as soon as I wrote everything in there, I was mad. While executives like billionaire Virgin Group Founder Richard Branson and “Shark Tank” star Barbara Corcoran swear by making to-do lists to stay organized, others echo Lewis’ advice, finding different ways to make traditional to-do lists work bet


Kate Lewis has a lot on her to-do list. “Once a week I write down everything on my to-do list,” Lewis told The Cut in a recent interview. For so long I had notebooks and downloaded to-do list apps, and as soon as I wrote everything in there, I was mad. While executives like billionaire Virgin Group Founder Richard Branson and “Shark Tank” star Barbara Corcoran swear by making to-do lists to stay organized, others echo Lewis’ advice, finding different ways to make traditional to-do lists work bet
How throwing her weekly to-do list in the trash helps this executive focus on what’s important Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lists, helps, important, executive, weekly, habit, todo, cut, lewis, throwing, focus, stress, good, whats, list, work, wont, trash


How throwing her weekly to-do list in the trash helps this executive focus on what's important

Kate Lewis has a lot on her to-do list.

Lewis is chief content officer of Hearst Magazines. The company’s portfolio includes 300-plus international editions and more than 25 U.S. print brands, including titles like Harper’s Bazaar, Esquire and Marie Claire. Lewis took on the role in August of 2018, becoming only the second person ever to hold the position overseeing all of Hearst’s editors-in-chief and digital directors.

To make sure nothing falls through the cracks, Lewis has developed a unique habit. “Once a week I write down everything on my to-do list,” Lewis told The Cut in a recent interview. “It’s a full page of items in eight-point font, and it’s a tremendously overwhelming thing. Then I throw it out.

“I figure whatever I can remember from what I’ve written down is what I really have to do, and everything else is kind of b——t,” Lewis says. “It’s so good. For so long I had notebooks and downloaded to-do list apps, and as soon as I wrote everything in there, I was mad. So I was like, okay, I’m going to try a new approach, and this has been very effective for me. If you fall off the list, sorry!”

While executives like billionaire Virgin Group Founder Richard Branson and “Shark Tank” star Barbara Corcoran swear by making to-do lists to stay organized, others echo Lewis’ advice, finding different ways to make traditional to-do lists work better for them.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey writes a “do” and “won’t do” list every morning, and he says the latter is often more important. Sharing this habit in a tweet in 2018, his “won’t do” list included drinking alcohol and writing projects (the work tasks on his daily “won’t do” lists eventually get moved up to his “do” list.)

And Lewis’ system may not work for everyone, but she tells The Cut that as someone who’s good at living with stress, it helps her to get her work done.

“I think stress is part of what makes me optimistic, because stress and excitement are related,” Lewis says. “Sometimes stress is just a major downer, but sometimes stress is anticipation — the open door of something new.”

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Don’t miss: Tony Robbins: A to-do list isn’t the best way to achieve your goals—this is


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lists, helps, important, executive, weekly, habit, todo, cut, lewis, throwing, focus, stress, good, whats, list, work, wont, trash


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Self-driving cars face two important challenges, says World Economic Forum executive

Automakers and technology companies have invested billions into researching autonomous vehicles. But the industry has two big challenges it needs to overcome before self-driving cars become widespread — technology and business models that can make money, according to Michelle Avary, head of autonomous mobility at the World Economic Forum. The first, obviously, is a technological challenge,” Avary told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore and Arjun Kharpal at the World Economic Forum in Dalian, China. The other


Automakers and technology companies have invested billions into researching autonomous vehicles. But the industry has two big challenges it needs to overcome before self-driving cars become widespread — technology and business models that can make money, according to Michelle Avary, head of autonomous mobility at the World Economic Forum. The first, obviously, is a technological challenge,” Avary told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore and Arjun Kharpal at the World Economic Forum in Dalian, China. The other
Self-driving cars face two important challenges, says World Economic Forum executive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selfdriving, model, autonomous, forum, important, technology, challenges, industry, companies, avary, world, face, big, business, executive, economic, cars


Self-driving cars face two important challenges, says World Economic Forum executive

Close-up of self driving minivan, with LIDAR and other sensor units and logo visible, part of Google parent company Alphabet Inc, driving past historic railroad station with sign reading Mountain View, in the Silicon Valley town of Mountain View, California, with safety driver visible, October 28, 2018.

Automakers and technology companies have invested billions into researching autonomous vehicles.

But the industry has two big challenges it needs to overcome before self-driving cars become widespread — technology and business models that can make money, according to Michelle Avary, head of autonomous mobility at the World Economic Forum.

“We’ve got a couple of big challenges in front of us. The first, obviously, is a technological challenge,” Avary told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore and Arjun Kharpal at the World Economic Forum in Dalian, China.

“Really making sure that the technology is working in the areas of perception, which is vision — being able to identify objects and then understand how to move around them. That has yet to be solved.”

The industry relies on collaboration and sharing of data among companies to build the technology. If the ongoing trade tensions between the U.S. and China prevent firms from sharing geography-specific datasets, Avary said it will “actually stymie the growth of the industry” and prevent companies from operating outside their own countries.

Still, Avary said, there’s likely going to be more mergers and acquisitions as well as partnerships happening in the space between auto manufacturers and technology companies.

Recently, smartphone giant Apple purchased an autonomous vehicle start-up, Drive.ai, which confirmed the iPhone-maker’s continued interest in self-driving car software.

“The two sides need each other and the market is enormous, so, I think there’s a lot of opportunities for everyone to come out as winners,” she said.

The other big challenge, according to Avary, is the business model for self-driving vehicles.

“We see some big divergence between the whole idea of the business model of the robo-taxi versus what we see in areas like commercial trucking, mining and construction, where the business model case might be more readily made,” she said.

Robo-taxis refer to driverless ride-sharing services, which are being tested in various areas around the United States. Last month, Waymo, a subsidiary of Google-parent Alphabet, made some of its self-driving minivans available to customers of ride-sharing company Lyft. The latter’s rival Uber is also working to deploy self-driving cars without safety drivers in limited areas.

For its part, Waymo is developing autonomous vehicles and related services, and has signed deals with Renault and Nissan to develop self-driving cars and trucks for use in France, Japan and possibly other countries in Europe and Asia.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selfdriving, model, autonomous, forum, important, technology, challenges, industry, companies, avary, world, face, big, business, executive, economic, cars


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People around the world still think English is the most valuable language to learn, study shows

English is universally accepted as the most important language for children to learn — but Mandarin is catching up, according to new research. The most widely spoken language of China came in second place in every country. In the U.S., 73% of adults believed English was the most important language to know, followed by Spanish. In Europe, English was overwhelmingly seen as the most important language to learn, with 91% of people in Poland ranking it first. According to language translating websit


English is universally accepted as the most important language for children to learn — but Mandarin is catching up, according to new research. The most widely spoken language of China came in second place in every country. In the U.S., 73% of adults believed English was the most important language to know, followed by Spanish. In Europe, English was overwhelmingly seen as the most important language to learn, with 91% of people in Poland ranking it first. According to language translating websit
People around the world still think English is the most valuable language to learn, study shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spanish, valuable, world, english, spoken, learn, respondents, polled, think, language, shows, children, important, study, mandarin


People around the world still think English is the most valuable language to learn, study shows

English is universally accepted as the most important language for children to learn — but Mandarin is catching up, according to new research.

U.K. market research firm YouGov polled more than 25,000 adults across 23 countries on which language was the most important to learn in 2019. Participants were able to select up to four responses.

The study showed that English was overwhelmingly seen as the most vital language for children today, with every country polled putting it ahead of Mandarin. The most widely spoken language of China came in second place in every country.

On average, 31% of those polled — excluding people in China — believed speaking Mandarin was an important asset for today’s children.

French and Spanish followed as the next most important languages, with just under a third of respondents in nations excluding France and Spain seeing them as important.

In the U.S., 73% of adults believed English was the most important language to know, followed by Spanish. Mandarin was named the third most useful language, with 28% of participants saying children should learn it.

Brits also saw English, Spanish and Mandarin as the most important languages to learn.

Eighty-four percent of Chinese respondents ranked English as one of the most important languages to be taught, with 81% saying the same about Mandarin.

In Europe, English was overwhelmingly seen as the most important language to learn, with 91% of people in Poland ranking it first.

Thailand and Australia, after China, were the nations where the largest proportion of respondents felt it was important for children to be taught Mandarin.

People in India, Egypt and Germany were least likely to see Mandarin as an important skill to learn.

According to language translating website Babbel, Mandarin was the most widely spoken language in the world last year, used by around 1 billion people worldwide. Spanish is the second-most spoken language, followed by English, Babbel reports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spanish, valuable, world, english, spoken, learn, respondents, polled, think, language, shows, children, important, study, mandarin


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Analysts say Ive was one of Apple’s most important people, but they’re not worried about the stock

Apple said he is leaving later this year to start an independent design company that “will count Apple among its primary clients.” Analysts rued the announcement, as Ive had been with Apple for nearly 30 years. As Apple’s chief design officer, Ive styled the vast majority of Apple products over the past two decades, including the iPhone. Nomura Instinet analysts called his leaving “a sentimental negative,” as “he represents a particularly strong connection to Apple iconic heritage.” Here’s what


Apple said he is leaving later this year to start an independent design company that “will count Apple among its primary clients.” Analysts rued the announcement, as Ive had been with Apple for nearly 30 years. As Apple’s chief design officer, Ive styled the vast majority of Apple products over the past two decades, including the iPhone. Nomura Instinet analysts called his leaving “a sentimental negative,” as “he represents a particularly strong connection to Apple iconic heritage.” Here’s what
Analysts say Ive was one of Apple’s most important people, but they’re not worried about the stock Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, important, analysts, theyre, apple, ive, worried, stock, apples, negative, mr, ives, design, say, departure, impact


Analysts say Ive was one of Apple's most important people, but they're not worried about the stock

The announcement of the impending departure of longtime Apple longtime design leader Sir Jonathan “Jony” Ive came as little surprise to Wall Street analysts but it did drag on the company’s stock nonetheless.

Shares of Apple slipped 1% in early trading Friday from Thursday’s close of $199.74.

Apple said he is leaving later this year to start an independent design company that “will count Apple among its primary clients.”

Analysts rued the announcement, as Ive had been with Apple for nearly 30 years. As Apple’s chief design officer, Ive styled the vast majority of Apple products over the past two decades, including the iPhone.

“In our judgment, we view Jony Ive as one of the most important people at AAPL and perhaps second only to CEO Tim Cook presently in terms of impact to AAPL’s success,” Deutsche Bank said in a note to investors.

Nomura Instinet analysts called his leaving “a sentimental negative,” as “he represents a particularly strong connection to Apple iconic heritage.”

“His departure, therefore, should prompt much nostalgia, and may lead some investors to question Apple’s ability to retain leading industrial design,” Nomura said.

However, the analysts did not see this as a significant enough loss to the company to adjust their ratings or price targets. Nomura said the firm believes “this a sensible and even expected time for Mr. Ive to disengage,” while Evercore ISI said there will be little impact beyond the slight negative from the announcement.

“While Mr. Ive’s departure is a headline negative for the stock, given AAPL’s deep design bench and future relationship with Mr. Ive’s new company, we think any impact should be fairly limited,” Evercore ISI said.

Here’s what every major analyst had to say about Ive’s departure.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, important, analysts, theyre, apple, ive, worried, stock, apples, negative, mr, ives, design, say, departure, impact


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What to watch in markets for the week ahead: After G-20, focus shifts to jobs report

After the weekend’s G-20 headlines, the jobs report is the big focus for markets in the coming week, along with OPEC’s two-day meeting Monday and Tuesday. A lagging indicator, the jobs data may provide some guidance on the well being of consumers, which drive about 70% of the U.S. economy. Consumer spending increased just 0.2% in May, leading some economists Friday to slash their expectations for both consumption in the second quarter and second quarter economic growth. JP Morgan economists trim


After the weekend’s G-20 headlines, the jobs report is the big focus for markets in the coming week, along with OPEC’s two-day meeting Monday and Tuesday. A lagging indicator, the jobs data may provide some guidance on the well being of consumers, which drive about 70% of the U.S. economy. Consumer spending increased just 0.2% in May, leading some economists Friday to slash their expectations for both consumption in the second quarter and second quarter economic growth. JP Morgan economists trim
What to watch in markets for the week ahead: After G-20, focus shifts to jobs report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ahead, second, important, watch, fed, cut, jobs, markets, quarter, week, g20, weak, shifts, focus, report, data


What to watch in markets for the week ahead: After G-20, focus shifts to jobs report

The monthly jobs number is always important but this time around it could be even bigger news, since it may actually help tell us how much the Fed will cut interest rates this summer.

The report won’t be the only bit of data the Fed will look at before it meets July 30, but it could show whether the economy has hit a weak enough streak in hiring that the Fed will want to act.

Economists expect 158,000 jobs were created in June, up sharply from the disappointing 75,000 added in May, according to Refinitiv. The unemployment rate is expected to remain unchanged at 3.6% and average hourly earnings are expected to rise by 0.3%.

“It’s going to be better than last month. Otherwise, we’ve got a problem,” said Joseph LaVorgna, chief economist at Natixis Americas. “We’re saying it’s something like 130,000. If it’s weak, the markets are going to assume the Fed’s going 50 [basis points]. If you have a number in June, like you had in May, they would go 50.”

After the weekend’s G-20 headlines, the jobs report is the big focus for markets in the coming week, along with OPEC’s two-day meeting Monday and Tuesday. OPEC is widely expected to extend 1.2 million barrels a day in production cuts in a deal with Russia, and oil isn’t expected to react much, unless there’s a surprise.

Markets also kick off the third quarter in the holiday-shortened Fourth of July week, after one of the best first halves in more than 20 years for stocks.

The jobs report follows some other important data in the coming week, and comes as the slowing in the economy is taking a worrisome turn and beginning to hit some of the consumer-related data. A lagging indicator, the jobs data may provide some guidance on the well being of consumers, which drive about 70% of the U.S. economy.

Both consumer confidence and consumer sentiment readings in June were weaker amid concerns about trade. Consumer spending increased just 0.2% in May, leading some economists Friday to slash their expectations for both consumption in the second quarter and second quarter economic growth. JP Morgan economists trimmed their second quarter GDP forecast to 1.5% from 1.9%

The economy now exits the second quarter, and first half of the year with some big doubts hanging over the outlook. That makes some of the data in the coming week, the first week of the third quarter, even more relevant. For instance, ISM manufacturing and PMI manufacturing data are released Monday. Both are important to the outlook or the manufacturing sector, which has been weak. Car sales are released Tuesday, and they will also be an important look into manufacturing and the consumer.

“If the jobs number is good but let’s say the CPI and retail sales data turns out to be a lot softer, or GDP revised meaningfully down, it’s not just employment. The possibility of the Fed doing more than 25 [basis points] does not end with the employment report,” LaVorgna said.

The May jobs report was an important turning point for markets, changing the minority view of some economists that the Fed could cut interest rates into a consensus expectation. But that consensus has not settled on when and how much the Fed will chop rate.

The Fed signaled after its June meeting that it was leaning towards a cut, exiting its neutral posture, and that it could act soon if it had to.

So the jobs report, “is important for better or worse. The market’s been bullying the Fed for the last couple of decades and if anything, it’s gotten even more powerful. If it’s weak, the market is going to push them to do more, but the Fed will be fearful of disappointing the market. They’ll also be fearful the economy is weak against the backdrop of trade uncertainty,” said LaVorgna.

At this point, fed funds futures are pricing in a full quarter point rate cut for the July meeting and about a half cut more. Economists mostly expect two cuts this year, whether starting in July or September, with another likely by either September or December.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ahead, second, important, watch, fed, cut, jobs, markets, quarter, week, g20, weak, shifts, focus, report, data


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Learn money and investing basics in less time than an episode of The Office

You’re working as hard as you can, living the only life that seems possible, but that should not mean just keeping afloat. Well, if you don’t want to work forever, it is a worthwhile investment to spend some time learning some money basics. These eight short videos will help educate you on how to make the most of your money and live your best possible life. It is making money for the bank when they lend it out to others. You can earn more too when money is deposited in the right kind of interest


You’re working as hard as you can, living the only life that seems possible, but that should not mean just keeping afloat. Well, if you don’t want to work forever, it is a worthwhile investment to spend some time learning some money basics. These eight short videos will help educate you on how to make the most of your money and live your best possible life. It is making money for the bank when they lend it out to others. You can earn more too when money is deposited in the right kind of interest
Learn money and investing basics in less time than an episode of The Office Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: mackenzie sigalos rosy ngo, mackenzie sigalos, rosy ngo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, office, health, money, basics, episode, investing, making, important, youre, know, learn, need, help, life


Learn money and investing basics in less time than an episode of The Office

You’re working as hard as you can, living the only life that seems possible, but that should not mean just keeping afloat. Yet who has time to make budgets and figure out financial planning? Well, if you don’t want to work forever, it is a worthwhile investment to spend some time learning some money basics. And it does not require a huge amount of time. These eight short videos will help educate you on how to make the most of your money and live your best possible life. All you need is 20 minutes to start on a path to financial freedom.

1. The 3 most important numbers in your financial story

Your credit score impacts almost all expenses in your life, from getting a mobile phone to buying a house. Having a good grasp on how it’s determined can help you get the best deal.

2. All you need to know to start making a budget

You know you need one, but having a basic framework for the main buckets in your life will help you understand the ins and outs of budgeting.

3. You have to have it, so know what you’re paying for health insurance

No budget would be complete or accurate if you do not also have a good understanding of health insurance premiums and deductibles. Staying on top of your insurance will keep both your pocketbook and health in good shape.

4. Got money in the bank? Make sure it’s in the right type of account

If you are accumulating more money in a savings account because you’ve made a budget and are spending wisely on health care, you should not let the extra cash just sit there. It is making money for the bank when they lend it out to others. You can earn more too when money is deposited in the right kind of interest-bearing bank accounts.

5. How to stay on track with retirement goals

Make reaching these milestones during each decade you’re working a goal to make sure you’ll have enough saved for a relaxing retirement.

6. The most important concept in investing

If you missed any of the retirement goal benchmarks covered in the last video, understanding the most important concept in investing, compound interest, may help put you on a smarter investing path now.

7. Making the most from mutual funds

Chances are high you own mutual funds if you have a 401(k) plan. Here’s the 411 on one of the most common investing tools.

8. ‘Nothing is certain but death and taxes.’ You can only control one of them


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: mackenzie sigalos rosy ngo, mackenzie sigalos, rosy ngo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, office, health, money, basics, episode, investing, making, important, youre, know, learn, need, help, life


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Personal branding: How to make your mark at work through 5 simple steps

“Your personal brand is your business armor — it’s how you get recognized and remembered. And use that to define your USP and construct your personal brand,” Wosskow said, adding that jotting it all down is essential. Whether it’s your professional LinkedIn page or personal networking accounts, your online profile is “a very clear, very instant representation of your personal brand,” Jones writes. If you’re looking to win over a prospective employer or a future work contact, keep your online pro


“Your personal brand is your business armor — it’s how you get recognized and remembered. And use that to define your USP and construct your personal brand,” Wosskow said, adding that jotting it all down is essential. Whether it’s your professional LinkedIn page or personal networking accounts, your online profile is “a very clear, very instant representation of your personal brand,” Jones writes. If you’re looking to win over a prospective employer or a future work contact, keep your online pro
Personal branding: How to make your mark at work through 5 simple steps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: alexandra gibbs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wosskow, jones, steps, pitch, online, mark, youre, work, personal, brand, simple, networking, branding, way, important


Personal branding: How to make your mark at work through 5 simple steps

All of us are looking to make a good impression when it comes to advancing our careers, and thanks to the digital age, there are all sorts of techniques to embrace if you’re looking to stand out from the crowd. Yet, one of the fundamental attributes you should have at your disposal is knowing how to market yourself effectively. “Your personal brand is your business armor — it’s how you get recognized and remembered. It is shorthand for everything you stand for,” writes Anna Jones, co-founder of networking club AllBright, in the recently-published book she co-wrote called “Believe. Build. Become. ”

AllBright co-founders: Debbie Wosskow OBE (L) and Anna Jones (R) Photo credit: Taran Wilkhu | Courtesy of AllBright

Ultimately, this concise rundown of what you represent professionally allows you to showcase your personality, values and unique selling propositions (USPs). In “Believe. Build. Become. “, AllBright co-founders Anna Jones and Debbie Wosskow, offer practical advice for those hoping to develop their skills and mentality, to thrive as leaders and entrepreneurs — including how to construct your own personal brand.

Crafting your personal brand

Perfecting your USPs and elevator pitch Whether you’re selling a product or pitching an idea, having a unique selling point is paramount if you want to be memorable — and the same goes for creating a stellar personal brand. Consider what makes you stand out — whether that’s certain skills, achievements or characteristics that make you who you are — and then refine it into a succinct summary. For AllBright co-founder Debbie Wosskow, who launched three businesses prior to establishing the networking club for businesswomen, the serial entrepreneur has her own way of crafting an elevator pitch. “For me, it’s always (about having) three key messages and practice this in front of the mirror. And I would really think about what that is,” Wosskow told CNBC over the phone.

She added that it’s important to play this pitch out with your support network and ask for feedback. “It’s something Anna and I do a lot, asking ‘How did I come across?’ and ‘What do you think?’ And use that to define your USP and construct your personal brand,” Wosskow said, adding that jotting it all down is essential. Power of communication You may have an excellent personal summary, but if you cannot effectively communicate it, success may be a lot harder to obtain. As Jones notes, your communication style can illustrate a lot about who you are, and in the book, she recommends assertive communication, over passive or aggressive. “You can be forthright without being a bully, but equally you need to be empathetic without being submissive,” Jones writes, adding that it’s important to gauge how others will respond. Consider your body language and what signals it gives off to others. One way to go about this is power posing, which involves various parts of the body, like posture, maintaining eye contact and delivering confident handshakes. Meantime, listening to what others say and don’t say, can help boost relationships and potentially provide you with more insight into the other person’s intentions.

Another aspect to consider is how you communicate through what you write. As Jones states, “everything you write down should follow the same rules.” A CV for instance is the initial window into impressing a potential employer, so this professionalism and choice of language should be upheld throughout other work activities, whether that’s penning an email or report. Finally, practice makes perfect. To refine your communication style, keep speaking up. Be authentic Being true to who you are and your values while owning your actions not only offers others an insight into what to expect from you, but also can establish trust. In “Believe. Build. Become. “, Jones notes that while authenticity is essential, it should align with professionalism, meaning “acting in a way appropriate for the job.” One example Jones offers is being “a loud joker” — this behavior may help you bond with colleagues, but it’s unlikely that it’ll be appropriate for boardrooms. Another key point: Don’t undersell yourself. “What we can see with women and from what I’ve seen from being on the other side of the table as an investor, is women being apologetic or underselling themselves and their vision. A lot of this is around language and how they feel about themselves,” Wosskow tells CNBC, explaining the importance of having clear focus, while not being apologetic or unauthentic. Appearance In 2006, Princeton University researchers Alex Todorov and Janine Willis, conducted a study which suggested that our brains can decide whether a person is trustworthy or attractive within a tenth of a second. So, if you’re trying to impress a future employer or investor, it’s important to consider dressing the part.

AzmanL | E+ | Getty Images

One key example is the job interview, and management expert Suzy Welch has several tips on dressing the part, including doing your homework beforehand, not fretting about being overdressed and wearing confidence-boosting clothes. “During an interview, you should feel good about yourself,” Welch previously told CNBC. At the end of the day, it’s not only important to dress the part, but to feel comfortable — and let your confidence shine through. Standing out online How you present yourself online is important now, more than ever. Whether it’s your professional LinkedIn page or personal networking accounts, your online profile is “a very clear, very instant representation of your personal brand,” Jones writes. If you’re looking to win over a prospective employer or a future work contact, keep your online profile updated and professional. According to a 2018 survey by CareerBuilder, 70 percent of employers polled admitted to using social networking sites to research candidates who applied for a role. In addition, half or more of those bosses were checking to see the candidate’s qualifications matched their resume or if they had professional online persona. After you’ve created an online profile that reflects you, make sure it sells you in the best light. Think of it this way: you are the best person who can pitch yourself to others. For Wosskow, the most crucial tool to have in your personal brand toolkit is “being memorable.” As Jones notes, everybody can be searched for online, so make sure that “your digital footprint is one that you are happy with. If it’s not, change it, now.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: alexandra gibbs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wosskow, jones, steps, pitch, online, mark, youre, work, personal, brand, simple, networking, branding, way, important


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Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Beyond Meat, Zoom Video, DocuSign and more

The jobs report is coming and it doesn’t get more important than… The economy was expected to add a solid 180,000 jobs in May, but if the payroll number is way off, that could be a game changer for markets. Market Insiderread more


The jobs report is coming and it doesn’t get more important than… The economy was expected to add a solid 180,000 jobs in May, but if the payroll number is way off, that could be a game changer for markets. Market Insiderread more
Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Beyond Meat, Zoom Video, DocuSign and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: nadine el-bawab
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hours, number, payroll, video, meat, marketsmarket, way, jobs, important, moves, insiderread, stocks, thanthe, solid, zoom, biggest, report, docusign, making


Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Beyond Meat, Zoom Video, DocuSign and more

The jobs report is coming and it doesn’t get more important than…

The economy was expected to add a solid 180,000 jobs in May, but if the payroll number is way off, that could be a game changer for markets.

Market Insider

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: nadine el-bawab
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hours, number, payroll, video, meat, marketsmarket, way, jobs, important, moves, insiderread, stocks, thanthe, solid, zoom, biggest, report, docusign, making


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The May jobs report is coming and economic reports don’t get much more important than this one

The May jobs report follows April’s surprisingly robust 263,000 payrolls, but other data, like retail sales and manufacturing data have been sending mixed messages. “What makes this report really, really interesting is the possibility that an ADP-like number actually could panic the Fed into a rate cut this month,” said LaVorgna. He expects 175,000 jobs were added in May and said a much better or worse jobs report could cause turbulence in the bond market and influence the discussion at the Fed.


The May jobs report follows April’s surprisingly robust 263,000 payrolls, but other data, like retail sales and manufacturing data have been sending mixed messages. “What makes this report really, really interesting is the possibility that an ADP-like number actually could panic the Fed into a rate cut this month,” said LaVorgna. He expects 175,000 jobs were added in May and said a much better or worse jobs report could cause turbulence in the bond market and influence the discussion at the Fed.
The May jobs report is coming and economic reports don’t get much more important than this one Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, number, bond, economists, fed, jobs, rates, coming, important, dont, rate, cut, economic, reports, report, market


The May jobs report is coming and economic reports don't get much more important than this one

The May jobs report follows April’s surprisingly robust 263,000 payrolls, but other data, like retail sales and manufacturing data have been sending mixed messages. Economists also expect hourly wages rose by 0.3% in May and unemployment was unchanged at 3.6%, according to Dow Jones.

“What’s interesting about the employment report is it raises the chance that the Fed could move,” said LaVorgna.

Other Fed officials, like St. Louis Fed President James Bullard, also made dovish comments about cutting rates. Then Fed Chair Jerome Powell told a Fed conference in Chicago this week that trade is having an uncertain affect on the economy, and the Fed “will act as appropriate to sustain the expansion.”

“There’s clearly been a shift in Fed rhetoric,” said Joseph LaVorgna, chief U.S. economist Americas at Natixis. He said Fed Vice Chair Richard Clarida helped first stir the speculation that the Fed would lower rates when he discussed several weeks ago how the fact the central bank in the past had cut rates pre-emptively, or made an ‘insurance’ cut.

Coming amid a huge shift in expectations for Federal Reserve interest rate cuts, economists say a big miss either way in Friday morning’s May employment report could have a profound impact on markets and help decide the timing of the first Fed interest rate cut in more than 10 years.

The economy was expected to have added a solid 180,000 jobs in May, but if the payroll number is much stronger or weaker than forecast, that could be a game changer for the markets and any consumers or businesses looking for a loan.

Big ADP miss raises stakes

On Wednesday, ADP’s May payroll report, a kind of warm-up act for the government report, came in with a stunningly low 27,000 private sector payrolls added in May. However, that report was seen as an anomaly and in general is considered an inconsistent barometer for the monthly Bureau of Labor Statistics report.

“What makes this report really, really interesting is the possibility that an ADP-like number actually could panic the Fed into a rate cut this month,” said LaVorgna. “If you look at the fed funds market, it’s pricing roughly a 20% chance of a June cut…The reason it’s not higher is because the bond market knows that ADP is at best a very inconsistent predictor of employment. Having said that, if the number turns out much weaker than expected I have to think the fixed income market would price a 50/50 chance of a June cut.”

A number of economists changed their forecasts in the past week to two rate cuts for this year, after President Donald Trump last Thursday threatened to put tariffs on all Mexican goods. The economy is already slowing, and more uncertainty could provoke a bigger downturn. In the week since then, the stock market has been volatile in both directions, and the bond market moved to price in a lower interest rate world.

Yields, or interest rates in the Treasury market have been moving lower in tandem with expectations for the Fed’s benchmark fed funds target rate. Bond yields move inversely to prices.

The 2-year Treasury note was yielding 1.84% Thursday, well off the 2.25% it reached in late May. That yield closely reflects Fed policy. The 10-year yield, which is the bench mark rate influencing mortgages and other loans, was at 2.10% Thursday, below the 2.40% level it was at last month.

Barclays chief U.S. economist Michael Gapen was one of those who went from expecting no rate cuts to now two, with the first a half percentage point cut in September. He expects 175,000 jobs were added in May and said a much better or worse jobs report could cause turbulence in the bond market and influence the discussion at the Fed.

“It might take a very large number 275,000, or better to have the front end [of the bond market] sell-off. If the number comes in 150,000 or below, it would reinforce expectations that the Fed could move as early as July,” said Gapen.

Citigroup economists wrote, in a note, that a “substantial surprise to May jobs in either direction would likely elicit a significant market reaction, with a downside surprise [less than 100,000] causing markets to further pull-forward rate cut expectations, but an upside surprise [greater than 200,000] pricing out near-term cuts.”

This week, the fed funds futures market has been pricing in more than two 25-basis point rate cuts for this year, but economists, for the most part, do not expect the first one before September.

“If it’s a bad number, it gets [the Fed] talking more concretely at the June meeting about what they’re going to do. i think they can still do an insurance cut, even on a good number,” Gapen said.

There are two Fed policy meetings before the September meeting, one on June 18 and 19, and the other July 30 and 31.

Economists said if the jobs report is as strong as expected, the Fed could still cut rates, but the Fed will be looking at other data, including inflation.

“Most of the comments I’ve heard from Fed officials, in interviews in the halls outside their Chicago meeting, most of that is about uncertainty from trade policy slowing growth, business spending, plus softness in inflation. If that’s what they’re relying on for an insurance cut, that’s still going to be there,” Gapen said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, number, bond, economists, fed, jobs, rates, coming, important, dont, rate, cut, economic, reports, report, market


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