Why you should still invest in a 401(k) even if retirement seems impossible

Nearly 30% of millennials believe they will never retire, according to TD Ameritrade’s 2018 Millennials and Money Survey. While saving for a retirement you’re not sure will happen might seem pointless, Erin Lowry, author of “Broke Millennial Takes on Investing,” says it can actually provide younger generations with the stability and financial confidence they crave. Millennials have reason to be worried about retirement. To make up for that shortfall, millennials may have to push retirement back


Nearly 30% of millennials believe they will never retire, according to TD Ameritrade’s 2018 Millennials and Money Survey.
While saving for a retirement you’re not sure will happen might seem pointless, Erin Lowry, author of “Broke Millennial Takes on Investing,” says it can actually provide younger generations with the stability and financial confidence they crave.
Millennials have reason to be worried about retirement.
To make up for that shortfall, millennials may have to push retirement back
Why you should still invest in a 401(k) even if retirement seems impossible Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investing, important, invest, millennials, impossible, lowry, 401k, vanguard, retirement, sure, coming, youre, saving


Why you should still invest in a 401(k) even if retirement seems impossible

Nearly 30% of millennials believe they will never retire, according to TD Ameritrade’s 2018 Millennials and Money Survey. With stagnant wages and the soaring costs of education, health care and housing that they’ve experienced in their lifetimes — not to mention coming of age in one of the worst economic recessions in U.S. history — many are putting off saving for a time they’re not sure will come as they struggle to make ends meet in their current daily lives.

While saving for a retirement you’re not sure will happen might seem pointless, Erin Lowry, author of “Broke Millennial Takes on Investing,” says it can actually provide younger generations with the stability and financial confidence they crave.

“It’s important to prepare as if the world isn’t coming to an end,” says Lowry. “I can promise you that if you don’t, you are guaranteeing yourself an apocalyptic fate, financially at least.”

Millennials have reason to be worried about retirement. Economists at Vanguard and Morningstar Investment Management predict that real stock market returns will be lower in the future than they have been in the past: around 3% to 5%, on average per Vanguard, compared to 10% historically. To make up for that shortfall, millennials may have to push retirement back a few years and delay claiming their Social Security benefits.

Still, saving and investing now is important. To set yourself up for success down the road, start investing in a 401(k) or, if you do not have access to one at work, an IRA, says Lowry.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investing, important, invest, millennials, impossible, lowry, 401k, vanguard, retirement, sure, coming, youre, saving


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DOJ’s antitrust chief said he talks to Trump but not about important mergers

DealBook 2019: Makan Delrahim, Assistant Attorney General for the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice 191106The Justice Department’s antitrust chief, Makan Delrahim, confirmed that he has spoken with President Donald Trump, but said the president doesn’t call him up directly to discuss topics like the department’s controversial effort to block AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner. Delrahim, the assistant attorney general for the DOJ’s antitrust division, discussed his relationship


DealBook 2019: Makan Delrahim, Assistant Attorney General for the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice 191106The Justice Department’s antitrust chief, Makan Delrahim, confirmed that he has spoken with President Donald Trump, but said the president doesn’t call him up directly to discuss topics like the department’s controversial effort to block AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner.
Delrahim, the assistant attorney general for the DOJ’s antitrust division, discussed his relationship
DOJ’s antitrust chief said he talks to Trump but not about important mergers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mergers, review, tech, delrahim, antitrust, division, makan, talks, chief, president, justice, general, dojs, trump, important


DOJ's antitrust chief said he talks to Trump but not about important mergers

DealBook 2019: Makan Delrahim, Assistant Attorney General for the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice 191106

The Justice Department’s antitrust chief, Makan Delrahim, confirmed that he has spoken with President Donald Trump, but said the president doesn’t call him up directly to discuss topics like the department’s controversial effort to block AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner.

Delrahim, the assistant attorney general for the DOJ’s antitrust division, discussed his relationship with Trump at The New York Times DealBook Conference on Wednesday. Delrahim’s office is reportedly leading several antitrust investigations in the tech industry and earlier this year announced a broad review of tech power.

In an on-stage interview with CNBC “Squawk Box” anchor Andrew Ross Sorkin, Delrahim was asked if his life would be easier if the president stayed quiet on cases his division is tasked with assessing.

“The president of the United States has the right just like any other citizen,” to speak his mind, Delrahim said, noting that several Democratic senators wrote to him about the AT&T case while it was ongoing.

The DOJ’s decision to try to block the merger incited concerns on the left that the move might have been motivated by the president’s animus toward CNN, which Time Warner owns. The DOJ has denied that claim.

Delharim was asked about other conflicts involving Trump. In March, Reuters reported that T-Mobile’s CEO and other executives spent $195,000 at the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., as the company’s attempted $26 billion acquisition of Sprint was under review.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mergers, review, tech, delrahim, antitrust, division, makan, talks, chief, president, justice, general, dojs, trump, important


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What dividends are and why they’re important

Dividends might seem small: In mid-2019, the average dividend payment for U.S. stocks was 1.87% of your investment, according to Siblis Research. What a dividend is, and why companies pay themDividends are the little extra regular profit you earn by investing. Companies pay out dividends to encourage people like you to invest with them. How often companies pay dividends, and who’s eligibleMost U.S. companies or fund managers pay out dividends quarterly, or four times a year. However, there’s an


Dividends might seem small: In mid-2019, the average dividend payment for U.S. stocks was 1.87% of your investment, according to Siblis Research.
What a dividend is, and why companies pay themDividends are the little extra regular profit you earn by investing.
Companies pay out dividends to encourage people like you to invest with them.
How often companies pay dividends, and who’s eligibleMost U.S. companies or fund managers pay out dividends quarterly, or four times a year.
However, there’s an
What dividends are and why they’re important Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: john schmidt, david bach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, returns, dividends, dividend, stocks, investment, funds, pay, important, companies, stock, investing, theyre


What dividends are and why they're important

A dividend is a periodic payout of earnings that some companies and funds share with investors just for being a shareholder. Think of it as a little bonus on top of your regular returns, like the 13th bagel you might get for free as part of a baker’s dozen. If you’ve been investing for a while, you may have seen a dividend amount listed on your statement — or you may have even received a dividend check. Dividends might seem small: In mid-2019, the average dividend payment for U.S. stocks was 1.87% of your investment, according to Siblis Research. But they can drastically impact your long-term investment performance. Here’s what you need to know.

What a dividend is, and why companies pay them

Dividends are the little extra regular profit you earn by investing. And because so many companies pay a dividend — more than 80% of the members of the S&P 500 currently do, according to data from FactSet — you can actually earn money even when the market is down. For example, if you had $1,000 invested in a fund that pays out the average 1.87% dividend, you’d earn $18.70, regardless of how the market had performed that year. Sounds nice, right? Companies don’t cut you in on the action purely out of the goodness of their hearts. Companies pay out dividends to encourage people like you to invest with them. The same holds true with exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and mutual funds.

Video by Courtney Stith Investing comes with risks. Even when you buy shares of well-established companies or funds, there’s no guarantee you’ll see positive returns during your specific investing time horizon. That’s because a rate of return is not promised and you could hypothetically lose money — although historically, the stock market has never fallen to zero and, despite bumps, has grown significantly over time. Dividend payments help make stocks more attractive by ensuring you can receive some payment for staying invested. Dividend-paying companies tend to be more established than many of the so-called growth stocks, so they’re in a position to offer this sliver of their profits. And providing a dividend in and of itself may make a stock more desirable, driving up demand, and therefore the price, of a stock.

How often companies pay dividends, and who’s eligible

Most U.S. companies or fund managers pay out dividends quarterly, or four times a year. There’s no set rule, though, and individual companies may choose to give dividends once a year, twice a year, or at no set schedule, only offering payments when they’ve had a particularly good year or quarter. You generally don’t have to do anything — other than own the stock by what’s known as the date of record — to get a dividend. These payments are the participation trophies of investing: You get them just for owning a stock. They also aren’t usually prorated, meaning you get the same amount if you’ve been invested the whole quarter as you do if you invested the day before the quarter closed.

Video by Courtney Stith

Adding dividend-paying stocks to your portfolio

It may be tempting to invest all of your money in dividend stocks, but doing so may not provide the necessary diversification for your portfolio. Here’s why: Returns. Companies that pay a higher-than-average portion of their profits back to shareholders are typically more established, so their years of rapid growth are probably behind them. That means you may not get the same returns as the younger, faster-growing companies.

Companies that pay a higher-than-average portion of their profits back to shareholders are typically more established, so their years of rapid growth are probably behind them. That means you may not get the same returns as the younger, faster-growing companies. Industry reputation. Dividend payouts are also more common in certain industries, like utilities and telecommunications. Focusing on those companies may lead you to allocate too much of your portfolio to the same industry, and experts recommend buying stocks across a variety of industries or investing in index funds. To balance out the risk in your investment portfolio, experts recommend a mix of dividend and nondividend stocks and funds. That way you benefit from the steady performance of more established companies, which may be less likely to fold unexpectedly, and the potential growth of newer, smaller companies. While they may be riskier than their time-tested counterparts, their value may multiply faster.

Why you should reinvest your dividends

When you open an investment account, you’re usually given the option of taking any dividend payments as cash or reinvesting them, meaning you pay tiny fractions of stock with that money. Dividend payments are expressed as a quarterly amount — say, $1 a share — and that may seem trivial. However, there’s an important reason to consider reinvesting those dividends: Small dividends can have a big impact. Since 1960, a whopping 82% of returns for the S&P 500 have been from the growth of reinvested dividends, according to analysis by Hartford Funds. It calculated that if you started with an investment of $1,000 in 1960 and reinvested your dividends, you would have $200,000 more at the end of 2018 than you would by receiving dividends as cash every year. And that’s even without contributing another dollar.

Video by Jason Armesto In the last decade, people who reinvested dividends into S&P 500 funds saw more than 2% higher returns than those who opted for payment, according to a calculator from DQYDJ.com. Dividends are the only way to increase the number of shares you own without investing more money. Reinvested dividends let you increase your account value by purchasing more stock (or shares of funds). Because you’re investing on a regular schedule (like once every quarter or so), you’re able to take advantage of what’s known as dollar-cost averaging — buying shares at a variety of prices. And the opportunity to invest when prices fluctuate will allow you to boost your long-term returns. That’s why experts recommend you reinvest dividends along the way. Historically, the market has trended upwards — and by using dividends to buy more shares, that allows your investment account to grow even more.

How to find dividend stocks and funds


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: john schmidt, david bach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, returns, dividends, dividend, stocks, investment, funds, pay, important, companies, stock, investing, theyre


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This workplace trend explains why McDonald’s CEO firing was swift

Former McDonald’s CEO Stephen Easterbrook unveiling the company’s new corporate headquarters during a grand opening ceremony on June 4, 2018, in ChicagoFormer McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook was responsible for some big successes. But whatever value his decisions and acquisitions bring to the company in the future, they couldn’t save him. Values increasingly matter to workers across the nation, and in a tight labor market with intense competition for talent, values should matter to employers. O


Former McDonald’s CEO Stephen Easterbrook unveiling the company’s new corporate headquarters during a grand opening ceremony on June 4, 2018, in ChicagoFormer McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook was responsible for some big successes.
But whatever value his decisions and acquisitions bring to the company in the future, they couldn’t save him.
Values increasingly matter to workers across the nation, and in a tight labor market with intense competition for talent, values should matter to employers.
O
This workplace trend explains why McDonald’s CEO firing was swift Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: eric rosenbaum, danny govberg, co-founder, ceo of watchbox, an e-commerce platform to buy, sell, trade luxury preowned watches
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, workplace, stated, workers, work, swift, matter, trend, mcdonalds, company, easterbrook, values, important, explains, say, firing


This workplace trend explains why McDonald's CEO firing was swift

Former McDonald’s CEO Stephen Easterbrook unveiling the company’s new corporate headquarters during a grand opening ceremony on June 4, 2018, in Chicago

Former McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook was responsible for some big successes. But whatever value his decisions and acquisitions bring to the company in the future, they couldn’t save him.

Even though Easterbrook oversaw several key technology acquisitions for McDonald’s at a time when the rise of mobile order and delivery are pressuring the restaurant sector, and even though he was widely seen as helping to shore up investor confidence in the fast-food giant, he was axed over the weekend by the board after it was revealed he had a romantic relationship with a colleague.

“Given the values of the company, I agree with the board that it is time for me to move on,” Easterbrook wrote in an email to employees.

The key word in that sentence: values.

Values increasingly matter to workers across the nation, and in a tight labor market with intense competition for talent, values should matter to employers. On Monday morning McDonald’s announced its chief people officer was also leaving the company, though it provided no reason.

Sixty-nine percent of workers say it’s very important to work for a company with clearly stated values, while another 22% say it’s somewhat important, according to the latest CNBC/SurveyMonkey Workplace Happiness survey.

More than 9 in 10 employed people say it is both important to them to work for a company with clearly stated values (92%), as well as for a company whose values are aligned with their own personal values (91%). These results vary little by age, race, gender, salary, full- or part-time status or job level.

What’s more, a third of younger workers (ages 18–34) say they have left a job in the past five years because their company did something that was “morally unacceptable” to them, according to the survey.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: eric rosenbaum, danny govberg, co-founder, ceo of watchbox, an e-commerce platform to buy, sell, trade luxury preowned watches
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, workplace, stated, workers, work, swift, matter, trend, mcdonalds, company, easterbrook, values, important, explains, say, firing


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As Uber tumbles on earnings, these could be the most important levels to watch

Uber is skidding after falling short on several key metrics in its most recent quarter. Matt Maley, chief market strategist at Miller Tabak, says there are a few critical levels Uber investors need to watch for when the stock opens for trading on Tuesday. I think it’s very difficult to imagine a strong fundamental case for Uber,” Schlossberg said during the same segment. Lyft actually did better, the lockup destroyed the stock and there’s a lot of supply coming out of Uber,” he said. Uber’s post


Uber is skidding after falling short on several key metrics in its most recent quarter.
Matt Maley, chief market strategist at Miller Tabak, says there are a few critical levels Uber investors need to watch for when the stock opens for trading on Tuesday.
I think it’s very difficult to imagine a strong fundamental case for Uber,” Schlossberg said during the same segment.
Lyft actually did better, the lockup destroyed the stock and there’s a lot of supply coming out of Uber,” he said.
Uber’s post
As Uber tumbles on earnings, these could be the most important levels to watch Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thats, recent, think, watch, tumbles, important, lockup, stock, uber, levels, earnings, investors, trading, period, lot


As Uber tumbles on earnings, these could be the most important levels to watch

Uber is skidding after falling short on several key metrics in its most recent quarter.

The stock fell nearly 7% in after-hours trading Monday after posting a $1.16 billion net loss for the quarter, wider than the $986 million loss in the same period a year earlier. Gross bookings of $16.47 billion also fell short of $16.7 billion consensus.

Matt Maley, chief market strategist at Miller Tabak, says there are a few critical levels Uber investors need to watch for when the stock opens for trading on Tuesday.

“There are some definitive lines I think that we could keep an eye on and that’s the recent high and the recent low,” Maley said on CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Monday. “On the resistance side, if you get above $35 which is its recent high, and the earnings can be a catalyst for that, that’s certainly going to be positive. It’s going to give investors a lot more confidence in the name, and probably squeeze a few shorts.”

Uber briefly traded above $35 in early September. It has not traded firmly above this level since August.

“On the negative side, however, if [Uber] rolls back over and the earnings are a catalyst for a dive in the stock and it drops below $28.50, its recent lows, basically its lows since it went public, that’s going to be a big problem because I think it leaves a lot of people just throwing the towel on the name,” said Maley.

The company has more than its fair share of difficulties on the fundamental side, according to Boris Schlossberg, managing director of FX strategy at BK Asset Management.

“It’s basically an unsustainable economic model as it’s run right now and the great hope of self-driving cars is pretty much a pipe dream at this point. Technology and the compliance liability issues are still very far away. I think it’s very difficult to imagine a strong fundamental case for Uber,” Schlossberg said during the same segment.

There could be an even more crucial catalyst beyond earnings in the next few days, he adds.

“The one thing that investors should really remember is that you have a lockup period coming up in two days … Look at the history of the recent stocks – Beyond beat its number, the lockup destroyed the stock. Lyft actually did better, the lockup destroyed the stock and there’s a lot of supply coming out of Uber,” he said.

Uber’s post-float lockup period expires on Wednesday, November 6. Once this happens, initial investors can unload approximately 763 million shares.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thats, recent, think, watch, tumbles, important, lockup, stock, uber, levels, earnings, investors, trading, period, lot


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The jobs numbers are out on Friday, but there’s another report that could be much more important

ISM manufacturing data is expected to show a contraction in activity in October, for a third month in a row. ISM Manufacturing data is due at 10 a.m. The manufacturing sector is dwarfed by the services sector, but economists have been monitoring services to make yjr weakness is not spreading. ISM services data is released on Tuesday. Negative 55,000 manufacturing jobs is a pretty stark number, even if it’s heavily distorted by the GM stroke.


ISM manufacturing data is expected to show a contraction in activity in October, for a third month in a row.
ISM Manufacturing data is due at 10 a.m.
The manufacturing sector is dwarfed by the services sector, but economists have been monitoring services to make yjr weakness is not spreading.
ISM services data is released on Tuesday.
Negative 55,000 manufacturing jobs is a pretty stark number, even if it’s heavily distorted by the GM stroke.
The jobs numbers are out on Friday, but there’s another report that could be much more important Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, numbers, services, economy, theres, sector, jobs, data, expected, ism, hill, important, manufacturing


The jobs numbers are out on Friday, but there's another report that could be much more important

Jobs, on the other hand, have been strong, as has the consumer, the biggest driver of the economy. Economists expect that just 75,000 jobs were created in October, and the unemployment rate is expected to tick up slightly to 3.6% from 3.5%, according to Dow Jones. Hourly earnings are expected to rise by 0.3%, or 3% year over year. The 8:30 a.m. ET report follows September’s surprisingly weak 136,000 payrolls.

ISM manufacturing data is expected to show a contraction in activity in October, for a third month in a row. Manufacturing has been at the heart of the economy’s sluggishness, with a drop in business investment a big reason for the third quarter’s sluggish 1.9% growth pace.

An update on manufacturing activity Friday could provide a much more useful picture of the economy than the October employment report, which is expected to be unusually weak due to the General Motors strike.

“We already know the manufacturing sector is in recession for three reasons—trade tensions, the Boeing MAX, and the GM strike,” said Ward McCarthy, chief financial economist at Jefferies. The end of the GM strike “will take one of the nails out of the coffin.”

ISM Manufacturing data is due at 10 a.m. ET, and economists expect a reading of 49.1, better than the 47.8 in September. Any number below 50 represents declining activity, and ISM will also be muddied by slower activity due to the GM strike.

Jon Hill, BMO fixed income strategist, said regional Fed surveys have not been nearly as negative as ISM. “But of course we got Chicago PMI which was the weakest in three-and-a-half years,” Hill said. “We’re getting a lot of mixed messages on the manufacturing front. It’s not a question of whether it’s slowing. It’s just a question of how deeply it’s slowing.”

McCarthy said he expects ISM data to pick up next month with the end of the GM stroke. “That should help the manufacturing over the next two or three months look better than the prior three months. Manufacturing won’t come out of recession until they start making the MAX again,” he said.

Some strategists say the market would respond if the ISM surprises to the upside.

“The jobs number will be big, but the ISM could be bigger. If that turns up, like Markit [PMI] suggested, that could be a big deal,” said Leuthold Group Chief Investment Strategist James Paulsen.

The manufacturing sector is dwarfed by the services sector, but economists have been monitoring services to make yjr weakness is not spreading. .

“At the end of the day, nonmanufacturing is way more important. It reflects the vast majority of the U.S. economy,” said Hill. ISM services data is released on Tuesday. “We’re a services economy. Until we see broad-based spillover on the servcies side, it makes sense for the Fed to stay on hold.”

As for the employment report, the government has reported that 46,000 GM workers were off the payrolls in October due to the strike, which has now ended. On top of that, workers at GM suppliers could also have been affected, and Refinitiv estimates a decline of 50,000 in manufacturing jobs alone.

“There will be a lot of focus on the payrolls. Negative 55,000 manufacturing jobs is a pretty stark number, even if it’s heavily distorted by the GM stroke. The question is do you see spillover in the private sector side,” said Hill. “It depends where you see private sector services hiring.”

McCarthy said he expects to see 90,000 jobs. “There’s going to be some consequences along the supply chain as well,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, numbers, services, economy, theres, sector, jobs, data, expected, ism, hill, important, manufacturing


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Apple is gearing up for massive shipments of 5G iPhones in 2020, Nikkei reports

Apple plans to ship 80 million or more new 5G iPhones, Nikkei Asian Review reported Tuesday, citing a source familiar with the plans. The 5G iPhone lineup will be made up of three different models, sources told Nikkei, which will carry a 5G modem chip from Qualcomm. Analysts say 5G iPhones could add a boost to Apple’s iPhone sales, which have sagged in recent years as customers hold onto their own versions longer. Of the 1,050 current iPhone owners surveyed, the firm found 23% would upgrade to a


Apple plans to ship 80 million or more new 5G iPhones, Nikkei Asian Review reported Tuesday, citing a source familiar with the plans.
The 5G iPhone lineup will be made up of three different models, sources told Nikkei, which will carry a 5G modem chip from Qualcomm.
Analysts say 5G iPhones could add a boost to Apple’s iPhone sales, which have sagged in recent years as customers hold onto their own versions longer.
Of the 1,050 current iPhone owners surveyed, the firm found 23% would upgrade to a
Apple is gearing up for massive shipments of 5G iPhones in 2020, Nikkei reports Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2020, customers, important, sales, apple, iphone, iphones, wireless, shipments, unit, nikkei, gearing, massive, reports, recent


Apple is gearing up for massive shipments of 5G iPhones in 2020, Nikkei reports

Customers look at the Apple’s new iPhone 11 series smartphones in an Apple retail store on East Nanjing Road in Shanghai.

Apple plans to ship 80 million or more new 5G iPhones, Nikkei Asian Review reported Tuesday, citing a source familiar with the plans.

The shipment, which would be on the higher end for Apple, would represent the company’s first major play in the next generation wireless network. 5G technology is capable of faster wireless internet connection and expected to play an important role in providing a foundation for a multitude of new technologies across a variety of industries.

The 5G iPhone lineup will be made up of three different models, sources told Nikkei, which will carry a 5G modem chip from Qualcomm. Apple and Qualcomm settled their patent dispute that spanned several countries in April, which was an important move for Apple to accelerate into 5G hardware.

Analysts say 5G iPhones could add a boost to Apple’s iPhone sales, which have sagged in recent years as customers hold onto their own versions longer. A recent Piper Jaffray survey found that current U.S. iPhone users may be holding out on the newly-released iPhone 11 series, anticipating an upcoming 5G phone. Of the 1,050 current iPhone owners surveyed, the firm found 23% would upgrade to a $1,200 5G iPhone, up from 18% of respondents a few months earlier.

Apple lags behind rivals like Samsung, which has already released 5G phones. But 5G networks in the U.S. are still extremely limited, providing few use cases for the technology just yet.

In recent years, Apple has been trying to shift investors’ focus from its iPhone unit sales to services revenue, knowing that customers are hanging onto their iPhones longer. The company stopped breaking out unit sales for the iPhone earlier this year and sang the praises of recurring subscription revenue. But the iPhone is still quite important to investors.

“We underscore that (like last year) near-term investor sentiment is likely to be shaped by iPhone revenues,” Bernstein analyst Toni Sacconaghi wrote in a note last week.

Apple is set to report its fourth quarter 2019 earnings after the bell on Wednesday.

Read the full report at Nikkei.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

WATCH: Is 5G safe? Here’s what science says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2020, customers, important, sales, apple, iphone, iphones, wireless, shipments, unit, nikkei, gearing, massive, reports, recent


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Spotify CFO says podcasts will be as important to the company as streaming is for Netflix

Podcasts will be as critical to Spotify’s business as the streaming of original shows and movies are for Netflix, CFO Barry McCarthy told CNBC on Monday. “I used to get this question about streaming,” McCarthy, who was Netflix’s finance chief at the time of the company’s IPO, said on “Squawk on the Street,” in response to David Faber’s question about the significance of podcasts. Spotify also announced that McCarthy, who architected the Swedish company’s direct public listing last year, will ret


Podcasts will be as critical to Spotify’s business as the streaming of original shows and movies are for Netflix, CFO Barry McCarthy told CNBC on Monday.
“I used to get this question about streaming,” McCarthy, who was Netflix’s finance chief at the time of the company’s IPO, said on “Squawk on the Street,” in response to David Faber’s question about the significance of podcasts.
Spotify also announced that McCarthy, who architected the Swedish company’s direct public listing last year, will ret
Spotify CFO says podcasts will be as important to the company as streaming is for Netflix Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cfo, important, netflix, company, spotify, streaming, used, shows, spotifys, mccarthy, original, podcasts, question, podcast


Spotify CFO says podcasts will be as important to the company as streaming is for Netflix

Podcasts will be as critical to Spotify’s business as the streaming of original shows and movies are for Netflix, CFO Barry McCarthy told CNBC on Monday.

“I used to get this question about streaming,” McCarthy, who was Netflix’s finance chief at the time of the company’s IPO, said on “Squawk on the Street,” in response to David Faber’s question about the significance of podcasts. “It’s a different value proposition and a different use occasion, but people listen to a lot of music, a lot of radio.”

McCarthy’s appearance followed Spotify’s earnings report, in which the company announced a surprise profit, sending shares up as much as 19% to $143.15. Spotify also announced that McCarthy, who architected the Swedish company’s direct public listing last year, will retire in January.

While Spotify rose to prominence as a music streaming platform, it has significantly expanded into podcasting — building not just a large library of third-party shows, but offering original content exclusively for its users. For Netflix, before there was streaming available, the company used to send DVDs by mail.

Earlier this year, Spotify acquired podcast companies Gimlet Media and Anchor, and said it would spend $400 million to $500 million in podcast acquisitions in 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cfo, important, netflix, company, spotify, streaming, used, shows, spotifys, mccarthy, original, podcasts, question, podcast


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Tesla did not talk about three important things on its triumphant Q3 earnings call

SpaceX owner and Tesla CEO Elon Musk gestures during a conversation at the E3 gaming convention in Los Angeles, June 13, 2019. But Tesla was silent or vague on three important matters: service, its Panasonic partnership, and precisely how the company improved its gross margins. ServiceOn the last earnings call of 2018, CEO Elon Musk said that customer service would be a personal priority in 2019. Panasonic relationshipTension between Tesla and its biggest partner, Panasonic, has ratcheted up in


SpaceX owner and Tesla CEO Elon Musk gestures during a conversation at the E3 gaming convention in Los Angeles, June 13, 2019.
But Tesla was silent or vague on three important matters: service, its Panasonic partnership, and precisely how the company improved its gross margins.
ServiceOn the last earnings call of 2018, CEO Elon Musk said that customer service would be a personal priority in 2019.
Panasonic relationshipTension between Tesla and its biggest partner, Panasonic, has ratcheted up in
Tesla did not talk about three important things on its triumphant Q3 earnings call Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-26  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, important, model, panasonic, vehicles, production, things, triumphant, earnings, service, battery, musk, talk, teslas, customers


Tesla did not talk about three important things on its triumphant Q3 earnings call

SpaceX owner and Tesla CEO Elon Musk gestures during a conversation at the E3 gaming convention in Los Angeles, June 13, 2019. Mike Blake | Reuters

It improved production on the Model 3 from last year while cutting operating expenses, and turned a profit that surprised investors. It said it’s ahead of schedule on its Shanghai factory and production of its Model Y crossover. The news sent its stock up almost 30% for the week. But Tesla was silent or vague on three important matters: service, its Panasonic partnership, and precisely how the company improved its gross margins.

Service

On the last earnings call of 2018, CEO Elon Musk said that customer service would be a personal priority in 2019. But Tesla has not ramped up service locations to deal with the higher volume of cars it has been selling, and higher number of its cars that are aging in the field. Last year, Tesla delivered 245,240 vehicles to customers. The year before it delivered just over 100,000 vehicles. The company is promising to deliver more than that — at least 360,000 vehicles — in 2019, and has already delivered around 255,000. But Tesla stores and service centers now number 413, according to this week’s quarterly update, a paltry 18% increase from a year ago. Instead, Tesla has opted to invest in its mobile service fleet — technicians who come to the customer’s car to fix what they can, wherever it is parked. Its mobile service fleet has increased from 373 to 719 over the past year, a 93% bump, according to the Q3 update. Those Tesla “rangers,” as they were originally called, can’t fix everything. Each mobile service technician needs to spend a good portion of their time in transit to the customer’s car, as well. That means they can’t complete as many jobs in a day as a team of technicians in a shop. Many customers already have to wait days, if not weeks, to get their vehicles repaired by Tesla, according to numerous CNBC interviews with customers and widespread reports. And while they wait, only some get loaner Teslas — others get rental car or ridesharing credits with services like Uber. Failure to improve service could hurt Tesla’s reputation, which suffered after Consumer Reports downgraded the reliability of the Model 3 in February. Customers willing to pay more than $40,000 for a compact SUV, like Tesla’s forthcoming Model Y, will expect service to be readily available, without long drives or wait times.

Panasonic relationship

Tension between Tesla and its biggest partner, Panasonic, has ratcheted up in recent quarters. Earlier this year, Musk blamed the Japanese battery cell supplier for missed goals and production woes, saying “It was physically impossible to make more Model 3’s in Q1 due to cell constraints.” Soon thereafter, Panasonic and Tesla announced they would freeze their plans to expand battery-making capacity at their massive Gigafactory plant in Sparks, Nevada. In press interviews, Panasonic executives expressed hesitation about working with Tesla in any similar arrangement for their new Gigafactory in Shanghai. Last quarter, Tesla acquired a battery tech firm called Maxwell. Then, Musk announced plans for a “battery day” to show investors how much of an edge his car company has on electric vehicle battery tech (it has not yet happened). Tesla’s ambitions to make its own battery cells were revealed, along with a secret battery R&D lab, in June. And recently, Tesla acquired a Canadian battery manufacturing firm called Hibar. By failing to discuss the Panasonic relationship on the Q3 call, Tesla left shareholders with very little visibility into whether or not it has secured the long-term supply of battery cells it expects to need to ramp up Model 3 production in Shanghai.

How it improved margins


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-26  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, important, model, panasonic, vehicles, production, things, triumphant, earnings, service, battery, musk, talk, teslas, customers


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Data is a ‘really important part’ of ResMed’s business: CEO

Data is a ‘really important part’ of ResMed’s business: CEO4 Hours AgoMick Farrell of ResMed says the company’s medical data on sleep apnea has been able to lower the costs of its distributors by more than 50%. He says using big data has resulted in lower costs and better outcomes.


Data is a ‘really important part’ of ResMed’s business: CEO4 Hours AgoMick Farrell of ResMed says the company’s medical data on sleep apnea has been able to lower the costs of its distributors by more than 50%.
He says using big data has resulted in lower costs and better outcomes.
Data is a ‘really important part’ of ResMed’s business: CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, important, ceo, business, lower, resulted, resmeds, data, outcomes, costs, using, sleep, really, resmed


Data is a 'really important part' of ResMed's business: CEO

Data is a ‘really important part’ of ResMed’s business: CEO

4 Hours Ago

Mick Farrell of ResMed says the company’s medical data on sleep apnea has been able to lower the costs of its distributors by more than 50%. He says using big data has resulted in lower costs and better outcomes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, important, ceo, business, lower, resulted, resmeds, data, outcomes, costs, using, sleep, really, resmed


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