Networking is pointless — unless you follow this important rule, relationship expert says

Networking. In fact, according to relationship strategist Zvi Band, those initial networking events are a pointless exercise if you don’t see them as part of a longer, more strategic relationship building process. “People going to networking events are seeking the same outcome as you — to meet people,” Band told CNBC Make It. However, as technology disrupts the workplace, those human relationship will become more important than ever, said Band. Sites like LinkedIn and Twitter can be useful tools


Networking. In fact, according to relationship strategist Zvi Band, those initial networking events are a pointless exercise if you don’t see them as part of a longer, more strategic relationship building process. “People going to networking events are seeking the same outcome as you — to meet people,” Band told CNBC Make It. However, as technology disrupts the workplace, those human relationship will become more important than ever, said Band. Sites like LinkedIn and Twitter can be useful tools
Networking is pointless — unless you follow this important rule, relationship expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, building, pointless, band, contacts, process, relationships, dont, networking, important, rule, follow, unless, network, expert, relationship


Networking is pointless — unless you follow this important rule, relationship expert says

Networking. For some it’s a pleasure, for others it’s a chore, but for the vast majority it’s a total waste of time. That’s because far too many of us ignore the most important part — the follow-up. In fact, according to relationship strategist Zvi Band, those initial networking events are a pointless exercise if you don’t see them as part of a longer, more strategic relationship building process. “People going to networking events are seeking the same outcome as you — to meet people,” Band told CNBC Make It. “But remember, the hard work is not in the initial meeting or LinkedIn connection. It’s recording your notes, following through on any action items, and keeping that relationship warm.”

Klaus Vedfelt | Taxi | Getty Images

Relationships are our most important asset, including in achieving our career goals, Band argues in his new book “Success Is in Your Sphere: Leverage the Power of Relationships to Achieve Your Business Goals.” But too few of us pay the necessary attention to building and maintaining those relationships in our professional lives, he said. Band is far from the first person to highlight the value of strong relationships in business success. Ever since Dale Carnegie published his seminal self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People” in 1936, business legends like Warren Buffett have espoused the role of relationships and reputation in their careers. However, as technology disrupts the workplace, those human relationship will become more important than ever, said Band. That’s especially true for young professionals, who may not know where their careers are going and would benefit from a network of contacts, he said.

The overwhelming majority of professionals … attribute their relationships to be their best asset Zvi Band CEO, Contactually

It’s therefore important to follow a strategy for building and maintaining professional relationships long after the first meeting. Band said that can be broken down into a seven-step process that views relationships as “capital.” “The overwhelming majority of professionals who have reached the zenith of their potential often attribute their relationships to be their best asset,” said Band, who is CEO and founder of relationship building software platform Contactually. “Just like the dollars in your bank account, the more you pay attention to retain and grow that asset early on, the more you will be able to reap the rewards later on in your career.” Here are the seven steps to building relationship capital:

Consistent execution

The first step in building meaningful professional relationships is to make it a consistent part of your work routine, said Band. That could be as a simple as blocking out an hour each day or week to touch base with contacts, send them an email or comment on their post. As with any other process, it may take time to stick, Band noted. But there are plenty of hacks to cement the habit, such as setting an alarm, associating the task with something else you do — like checking your emails in the morning — and rewarding yourself once the task is done.

Aggregate

Compiling all your contacts into one, clean database will help speed up that process, said Band. Networking sites like LinkedIn are useful for connecting with people initially, but something as basic as an Excel spreadsheet may be the right tool for keeping everything in one place. Ensure that the database is relevant by updating it every month or so, said Band. However, don’t be tempted to write contacts off, he warned — you never know when they may become relevant again. Instead, archive those you have a high confidence you won’t work with again.

Prioritize

Some of the contacts in your database will be more important than others. Based on your overall career goals, group them into buckets that reflect those aims and prioritize them according to their urgency. Don’t overshoot though, said Band. The average person can manage a network of 15 close friends and family, followed by 50 casual friends and a further 150 acquaintances. Your list should mirror that — highlighting, for instance, 10 high priority contacts and 20 secondary level ones — and set out reasonable time frames to follow up with each.

Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury | Caiaimage | Getty Images

Investigate

Building relationships is all about knowing — and caring — about the other person, noted Band. Take the time to take notes about your contacts, such as where you met, their skills and their interests, and add these to your database to help jog your memory next time you interact. Sites like LinkedIn and Twitter can be useful tools for building that knowledge bank and keeping up with your contacts’ important milestones, he said.

Timely engagement

There are no set rules for how frequently you should engage with your network. Rather, you should think about the time you have available and the relative return on investment of each interaction, said Band. However, being thoughtful about how and when you engage with others — and showing consideration for both their time and your own — will pay dividends, he added.

Adding value

When you do follow-up with your contacts, make sure you add value by sharing information, contacts and ideas that may be useful to them, said Band. Few things will irritate your network more quickly than a stream of empty “hello” messages — or, worse still, continuous requests.

Leverage

Finally, use technology, templates and other easily replicable methods wherever you can to ease your workload and make interacting with your network as pain free, and even enjoyable, as possible, said Band. Don’t miss: The jobs market is changing — and so should your resume Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, building, pointless, band, contacts, process, relationships, dont, networking, important, rule, follow, unless, network, expert, relationship


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Despite Facebook’s struggles, one important contingent remains loyal

But one thing has remained constant: the percentage of small businesses that buy Facebook advertisements. A disastrous earnings report and weak guidance from July 2018 sent Facebook shares over a cliff, from which the company has now rebounded. But nothing has changed the minds of Main Street business owners as to the benefits of spending on Facebook to reach consumers. The Q2 survey found that 26% of small business owners have advertised on Facebook within the past few months. The CNBC|SurveyMo


But one thing has remained constant: the percentage of small businesses that buy Facebook advertisements. A disastrous earnings report and weak guidance from July 2018 sent Facebook shares over a cliff, from which the company has now rebounded. But nothing has changed the minds of Main Street business owners as to the benefits of spending on Facebook to reach consumers. The Q2 survey found that 26% of small business owners have advertised on Facebook within the past few months. The CNBC|SurveyMo
Despite Facebook’s struggles, one important contingent remains loyal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: donovan russo, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, q2, important, shares, businesses, despite, remains, owners, contingent, facebooks, business, small, say, facebook, street, loyal, survey, struggles


Despite Facebook's struggles, one important contingent remains loyal

Facebook shares have whipsawed in the past year, falling from close to $220 last summer to a low around $125 in early 2019 before climbing back to near-$190. But one thing has remained constant: the percentage of small businesses that buy Facebook advertisements.

As Facebook rolls out a series of new tools in the attempt to bring more small businesses into its advertising mix, it is a minority of Main Street businesses that say they advertise on Facebook, and at a level that is not showing growth or retreat, according to the CNBC|SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey for the second quarter.

A disastrous earnings report and weak guidance from July 2018 sent Facebook shares over a cliff, from which the company has now rebounded. Ongoing scrutiny of its approach to consumer privacy and threat of increased regulation continue to embed uncertainty in the social media giant’s future. But nothing has changed the minds of Main Street business owners as to the benefits of spending on Facebook to reach consumers.

The Q2 survey found that 26% of small business owners have advertised on Facebook within the past few months. The last time the survey asked small business owners about Facebook ads, in Q2 of 2018, 25% indicated they had recently advertised on it. Sixty percent of business owners say they have not purchased ads on Facebook, compared to 62% who said that about Facebook ad-buying a year ago.

The CNBC|SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey for Q2 included responses from 2,100 small business owners across the country collected between April 15 and April 22.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: donovan russo, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, q2, important, shares, businesses, despite, remains, owners, contingent, facebooks, business, small, say, facebook, street, loyal, survey, struggles


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‘The center of the political universe’ — Iowa is even more important than usual in the 2020 election

The president won Iowa by about 10 percentage points in 2016 after President Barack Obama carried the state twice. Iowa Soybean Association President Lindsay Greiner Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean AssociationLindsay Greiner, president of the Iowa Soybean Association, said “there’s really bean a lack of any good news.” The majority House Democrats are in no hurry to bring the deal to a vote in the chamber. With the issues facing Iowa, Democrats have looked for ways to gain an edge in 2020. “We d


The president won Iowa by about 10 percentage points in 2016 after President Barack Obama carried the state twice. Iowa Soybean Association President Lindsay Greiner Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean AssociationLindsay Greiner, president of the Iowa Soybean Association, said “there’s really bean a lack of any good news.” The majority House Democrats are in no hurry to bring the deal to a vote in the chamber. With the issues facing Iowa, Democrats have looked for ways to gain an edge in 2020. “We d
‘The center of the political universe’ — Iowa is even more important than usual in the 2020 election Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, democratic, democrats, state, trade, iowa, vote, important, universe, trump, usual, political, 2020, election, president, center, states


'The center of the political universe' — Iowa is even more important than usual in the 2020 election

Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks during a rally at the Fairfield Arts and Convention Center on April 06, 2019 in Fairfield, Iowa. Scott Olson | Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidates swarm. A nine-term U.S. House incumbent faces a primary challenge. Farmers watch to see whether President Donald Trump can end his trade conflicts — and ease their financial pain. That’s only the start of the intrigue in Iowa ahead of the 2020 elections. Even for a presidential campaign staging ground and White House swing state, the Hawkeye State will play a massive role next year. “Iowa is always important, but it really will be the center of the political universe for much of 2020,” said Alex Conant, a Republican strategist who worked on first-term Sen. Joni Ernst’s 2014 campaign victory. All four of the state’s House districts have a chance to change hands as Democrats try to hold a majority they won last year in part through a strong showing in Iowa. Meanwhile, Republicans may need Ernst to hold her seat to keep their Senate majority. Trump looms above it all. The president won Iowa by about 10 percentage points in 2016 after President Barack Obama carried the state twice. But frustrations have started to boil in a state heavily reliant on exports to Canada and Mexico. The president’s tariff policy and struggle to ratify updates to the North American Free Trade Agreement have created uncertainty for farms and other businesses. Of course, most of the focus on Iowa relates to its February caucuses, the first nominating contest in the Democratic presidential primary. The more than 20 candidates in the primary field have descended on the state in recent months, standing on counters, eating ice cream and serving beer as they court the state’s voters. A strong showing there can help Democrats establish an early foothold in the race to challenge Trump for the White House.

There’s more than a presidential race in Iowa

But much more will happen in Iowa to shape the battle for control of the White House and Congress in 2020. Along with states such as Pennsylvania and Michigan, Iowa voted for Trump after backing Obama twice. All of those states swung toward Democrats in last year’s midterms: in Iowa, Reps. Abby Finkenauer and Cindy Axne flipped GOP-held seats, while Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds won reelection by only about 2.5 percentage points. Iowa will play a major role in House elections again next year. Republicans have their eyes on taking back both Finkenauer’s 1st District and Axne’s 3rd District. The GOP will also target the state’s 2nd District, which despite its blue tilt has entered the 2020 battlefield due to Democratic Rep. Dave Loebsack’s retirement. Meanwhile, Republican Rep. Steve King in Iowa’s 4th District will have to fight off primary and general election challenges next year after surviving a close call in 2018. King, who has served for more than 15 years, lost party support and was stripped of committee assignments because of racist comments. His leading GOP rival for the seat is state Sen. Randy Feenstra, who easily raised more money than King in the first quarter. King’s district is “so heavily Republican that it really hasn’t been competitive for quite a while,” said Tim Hagle, an associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa. He said it has a better chance of flipping to Democratic control if King wins the nomination over one of his Republican challengers. Combined with Loebsack’s retirement and the freshman Democrats’ defense of their seats, the state has more congressional ballot intrigue than it has in years. At the statewide level, Ernst has an early advantage in the race to keep her seat. She won by nearly 10 percentage points in 2014. Democrats have struggled to find a top-tier challenger to take her on — both former Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack and Axne declined to run for Senate. Still, the factors that could make Trump’s reelection close in Iowa will also affect Ernst. Iowa sits at the center of two national issues that will test voters’ patience not only for the president but also other incumbents. Farmers damaged by lower prices caused in part by Trump’s trade war with China want to see the conflict end and hope Congress will approve the new United States Mexico Canada Agreement.

Iowa Soybean Association President Lindsay Greiner Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean Association

Lindsay Greiner, president of the Iowa Soybean Association, said “there’s really bean a lack of any good news.” The organization advocates for soybean farmers in Iowa, the largest U.S. producer of the crop. Prices have plunged since the U.S. started a tit-for-tat tariff battle with China. The Trump administration has pushed Beijing to purchase more soybeans as part of any agreement. “Politicians are dragging their feet on approving USMCA. Progress has been made on a deal with China but it’s been slow,” Greiner said, referring to the updated NAFTA, which Trump has dubbed the United States Mexico Canada Agreement. He added that politicians appear “more concerned about whether Russia meddled in an election when there’s real economic hardship going on in farm country.” Greiner grows about 800 acres of corn and 700 acres of soybeans near Keota, Iowa. He said he has looked for ways to cut costs as the revenue for his farm has dropped by about $80,000 in the last year. The prospects look grim for USMCA approval soon. The majority House Democrats are in no hurry to bring the deal to a vote in the chamber. Republicans, led by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley-R-Iowa, and Ernst, have pushed Trump to drop tariffs and steel and aluminum imports from Canada and Mexico before moving forward with the agreement. Iowa relies on America’s northern and southern neighbors. It sent $4.2 billion in goods, or about 30 percent of its exports, to Canada in 2018, according to the U.S. Trade Representative. It exported $2.3 billion in goods to Mexico. With about 18 months until the election and a Democratic nominee to be determined, it will take a while before we know whether the trade conflicts hurt Trump’s reelection. Greiner has voted for candidates from both major parties and supported both Trump and Loebsack in 2016. He said it is “too soon to tell” whether he will vote for a second term for the president. Trade has implications for Iowa’s House races, too. All four of Iowa’s congressional districts are among the 36 that have soybean plantings of more than half a million acres. Both Finkenauer and Axne criticized Trump’s tariffs on China on the way to winning their seats. While King acknowledged the damage the trade war caused to Iowa farmers, he, along with Trump, has stressed patience.

The disaster relief problem

Ryan Lincoln maneuvers his boat through flood water at the intersection of Pershing Ave and E 2nd St. Thursday, May 2, 2019. Kevin E. Schmidt | Quad City Times via AP

Farmers in western Iowa already ravaged by trade conflict took another devastating blow earlier this year. The worst flooding in years hit the state, along with Nebraska and Missouri. It put a focus not only on climate change but also the integrity of U.S. infrastructure. With the issues facing Iowa, Democrats have looked for ways to gain an edge in 2020. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., proposed appointing “trustbusters” to review and reverse “anti-competitive mergers” in the agriculture industry. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat used to campaigning in farm country, has put an emphasis on overhauling infrastructure and connecting rural Americans to the internet. Multiple Democratic candidates have toured the flooded areas of Iowa. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee — who has run primarily on a pledge to combat climate change — used the moment to accuse Trump of making natural disasters worse by failing to address a warming planet. In only the last few days, the eastern part of Iowa took a hit. Flood waters swept into Davenport, Iowa, on Tuesday temporary structures holding back a swollen Mississippi River gave way. Warren cited Davenport on Thursday in saying “climate change is here, and it’s up to us to act.” But Iowa carries its pitfalls for Democrats. The Senate has failed to pass a bill to send natural disaster relief funds to states such as Iowa, Florida, Texas and California. Democrats have pushed for a package to include more aid for hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico — spending Trump does not support. All six senators running for president as Democrats either voted not to advance, or missed the vote on, a GOP-backed bill that they said lacked enough relief money for the island commonwealth. When the vote took place last month, Grassley warned his colleagues about political backlash in Iowa. “To my colleagues across the aisle who have been spending a lot of time in Iowa lately as presidential candidates, if you vote against moving forward with the [relief money for Midwestern states], how are you going to look Iowans in the eye and justify a vote against moving this disaster relief bill ahead?” he asked at the time. Trade poses another issue for parts of the Democratic field in Iowa. Leading candidates whose trade views overlap with Trump’s — such as Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Warren — will have to defend their opposition to trade deals such as NAFTA that have shaped the Iowa economy.

“We do want to have an end in sight”

Soybean harvesting in Iowa Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean Association


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, democratic, democrats, state, trade, iowa, vote, important, universe, trump, usual, political, 2020, election, president, center, states


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BlackRock’s Rieder says Fed shouldn’t be too concerned about low inflation

BlackRock’s Rick Rieder said Wednesday the Fed is unnecessarily concerned about low inflation and is more likely to raise interest rates before it cuts them. Rieder, BlackRock’s global CIO of fixed income, said the way the Fed discusses weaker inflation Wednesday afternoon following its two-day meeting could impact markets. “They should target nominal GDP,” he said, noting that first-quarter real GDP was 3.2% and core inflation was 1.6%. “If you’re running at a nominal GDP that is above trend wi


BlackRock’s Rick Rieder said Wednesday the Fed is unnecessarily concerned about low inflation and is more likely to raise interest rates before it cuts them. Rieder, BlackRock’s global CIO of fixed income, said the way the Fed discusses weaker inflation Wednesday afternoon following its two-day meeting could impact markets. “They should target nominal GDP,” he said, noting that first-quarter real GDP was 3.2% and core inflation was 1.6%. “If you’re running at a nominal GDP that is above trend wi
BlackRock’s Rieder says Fed shouldn’t be too concerned about low inflation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, blackrocks, rate, rieder, inflation, concerned, global, low, shouldnt, gdp, rates, interest, think, fed, important


BlackRock's Rieder says Fed shouldn't be too concerned about low inflation

BlackRock’s Rick Rieder said Wednesday the Fed is unnecessarily concerned about low inflation and is more likely to raise interest rates before it cuts them.

Rieder, BlackRock’s global CIO of fixed income, said the way the Fed discusses weaker inflation Wednesday afternoon following its two-day meeting could impact markets. The futures market is pricing in a partial rate hike for 2019, and some investors believe the Fed could have an “insurance” interest rate cut later in the year to make sure the economy doesn’t lose traction.

“I don’t agree,” said Rieder. “I still think there’s a possibility they get one more rate hike in. But I just think they’re not going to do anything for an extended period of time, and I don’t think they need to.”

“I think this is Goldilocks for the Fed. I think they can go away,” he said.

The Fed releases its statement at 2 p.m. ET, just ahead of Fed Chairman Jerome Powell’s press briefing at 2:30 p.m. ET.

“I think the key is how much they downgrade inflation. I think the press conference is important. I think the statement is important. I also think this event on Friday is important in terms of how they’re thinking about where inflation is relative to growth,” said Rieder, referring to a Hoover Institution conference Friday, where Fed policy will be discussed.

Some market pros are hoping to hear more details from Powell on how worried the Fed is about the lack of inflation and at what point it would consider cutting interest rates.

Rieder said he does not believe inflation measures have the same meaning they once did. “We live in an environment where core goods are going to deflate, just because of where technology and globalization have moved to,” he said.

Instead, he believes the Fed should track GDP.

“They should target nominal GDP,” he said, noting that first-quarter real GDP was 3.2% and core inflation was 1.6%. “If you’re running at a nominal GDP that is above trend with inflation staying low, it’s terrific for the population at large. The whole concept of you having to drive inflation higher, why? As long as GDP is buoyant and it is.”

As for the rates outlook, Rieder said he believes the 10-year Treasury yield will be locked in a range for a longer period of time.

“I could see the 10-year moving back to 2.65, 2.70,” he said. But with the easy policy of other global central banks, like the European Central Bank and Bank of Japan, long-end rates should not move much higher.

“I don’t think you’ll see 3% 10-year this year. One of the things that would have to drive it is global growth would have to pick up more,” he said.

Rieder, who is also lead portfolio manager for BlackRock’s Global Allocation Fund, the firm’s largest mutual fund, sees a good environment now for stocks.

“I think equities are going to [be] higher. I think you have a dynamic now if you keep the discount rate on hold, the Fed has functionally given global guidance. With growth picking up and the equity buybacks are still high, what people are beginning to realize is there aren’t enough financial assets in the world relative to demand,” he said. As long as rates stay stable, he said stocks should go higher.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, blackrocks, rate, rieder, inflation, concerned, global, low, shouldnt, gdp, rates, interest, think, fed, important


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America is in a financial literacy crisis, and advisors can fix the problem

Talking about money is one of the most important skills to being a fiscally responsible and literate person. And it is the missing link in financial literacy training. More from FA Playbook:Advisory firms turn to new AI advisory technology5 critical questions advisors should be able to answerMore financial advisors moving beyond just money mattersThe failure of these programs to solve the crisis proves that technical training is not enough. It really requires busting through the money talk taboo


Talking about money is one of the most important skills to being a fiscally responsible and literate person. And it is the missing link in financial literacy training. More from FA Playbook:Advisory firms turn to new AI advisory technology5 critical questions advisors should be able to answerMore financial advisors moving beyond just money mattersThe failure of these programs to solve the crisis proves that technical training is not enough. It really requires busting through the money talk taboo
America is in a financial literacy crisis, and advisors can fix the problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: kathleen burns kingsbury, paul smith, president ceo of cfa institute, ava diamond, mental fitness, nutritional psychology coach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, literacy, fear, advisors, financial, talk, problem, crisis, important, fix, taboo, skills, america, questions, money


America is in a financial literacy crisis, and advisors can fix the problem

Talking about money is one of the most important skills to being a fiscally responsible and literate person. However, 44% of Americans surveyed would rather discuss death, religion or politics than talk about personal finance with a loved one.

Why? Two major reasons are embarrassment and fear of conflict, even though the consequences can be grave: 50% of first marriages end in divorce, and financial conflict is often a key contributor. Additionally, in our society it is considered rude to discuss money and wealth.

This longstanding taboo also contributes to the gender wage gap, as women are more harshly judged when they speak up and negotiate their salaries. And it is the missing link in financial literacy training.

More from FA Playbook:

Advisory firms turn to new AI advisory technology

5 critical questions advisors should be able to answer

More financial advisors moving beyond just money matters

The failure of these programs to solve the crisis proves that technical training is not enough. It really requires busting through the money talk taboo and empowering parents, teachers and the next generation to openly and honestly share their thoughts and feelings about spending, saving and investing money.

Financial advisors are uniquely positioned to change the conversation around literacy and address the elephant in the room: the money talk taboo. For advisors, teaching financial communication skills and helping clients understand how their emotions influence their money decisions is just as important as showing them how to calculate compound interest.

By breaking through money silence, advisors grant clients permission to ask questions and seek answers without shame or fear of judgment. As the saying goes, You are as sick as your secrets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: kathleen burns kingsbury, paul smith, president ceo of cfa institute, ava diamond, mental fitness, nutritional psychology coach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, literacy, fear, advisors, financial, talk, problem, crisis, important, fix, taboo, skills, america, questions, money


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Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor


“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor
Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much.”

“Was that the right decision at the time? Probably not,” said Dorsey, who is also founder of fintech company Square.

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much,” he continued.

Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all.

“It doesn’t actually push what we believe now to be the most important thing,” he said, “which is healthy contribution back to the network and conversation to the network.”

Dorsey has been at pains to rebuild Twitter’s status — and share price — following a series of scandals over its treatment of user data, hate speech, political campaigning and mental health issues. Twitter’s shares rose over 17% Tuesday after the firm reported a rising number of users and higher revenues.

Going forward, the CEO said the company would be reconsidering how the site displays likes, followers and retweets.

“Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted.

“(We have to) ask the deep question: Is this really the number that we want people to drive up? … I don’t believe that’s the case right now,” he said.

Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice baths

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


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Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor


“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor
Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much.”

“Was that the right decision at the time? Probably not,” said Dorsey, who is also founder of fintech company Square.

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much,” he continued.

Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all.

“It doesn’t actually push what we believe now to be the most important thing,” he said, “which is healthy contribution back to the network and conversation to the network.”

Dorsey has been at pains to rebuild Twitter’s status — and share price — following a series of scandals over its treatment of user data, hate speech, political campaigning and mental health issues. Twitter’s shares rose over 17% Tuesday after the firm reported a rising number of users and higher revenues.

Going forward, the CEO said the company would be reconsidering how the site displays likes, followers and retweets.

“Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted.

“(We have to) ask the deep question: Is this really the number that we want people to drive up? … I don’t believe that’s the case right now,” he said.

Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice baths

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


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Britain starts search for ‘highest caliber’ Bank of England governor

Mark Carney, a Canadian, twice extended his term in charge of the British central bank as the country heads for an exit from the European Union. As we leave the European Union it’s very important that the UK continues to play an important role in global fora,” Hammond told a parliamentary committee. He said he hoped to make an appointment in October, with the new governor starting in February 2020. The Treasury has appointed a recruitment firm, Sapphire Partners, to help in the search – the firs


Mark Carney, a Canadian, twice extended his term in charge of the British central bank as the country heads for an exit from the European Union. As we leave the European Union it’s very important that the UK continues to play an important role in global fora,” Hammond told a parliamentary committee. He said he hoped to make an appointment in October, with the new governor starting in February 2020. The Treasury has appointed a recruitment firm, Sapphire Partners, to help in the search – the firs
Britain starts search for ‘highest caliber’ Bank of England governor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: huw jones, william schomberg, simon dawson, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bank, starts, caliber, job, important, treasury, ensure, hammond, chief, england, boe, britain, highest, search, governor, role, help


Britain starts search for 'highest caliber' Bank of England governor

Britain’s finance minister Philip Hammond began the search for a new governor of the Bank of England on Wednesday, seeking someone to help steer the world’s fifth-biggest economy, and its global financial center, through the upheaval of Brexit.

Mark Carney, a Canadian, twice extended his term in charge of the British central bank as the country heads for an exit from the European Union. But he has ruled out a further delay even though Brexit remains up in the air.

“We are looking, obviously, for a candidate of the highest caliber. As we leave the European Union it’s very important that the UK continues to play an important role in global fora,” Hammond told a parliamentary committee.

He said he hoped to make an appointment in October, with the new governor starting in February 2020. He said his preference was to hire someone for an eight-year term, although he would consider deviating from this for an exceptional candidate.

Carney took up his role on July 1, 2013, and will step down on Jan. 31, 2020.

Hammond thanked Carney for helping to lead the U.K. economy through “a challenging period and we are now seeing stable, low inflation and the fastest wage growth in over a decade”.

Hammond said earlier this month he hoped that concerns about Brexit would not deter potential applicants for a role with an annual salary of £480,000 ($620,000).

“We know from the experience of the previous crisis that it is through cooperation between central banks that we ensure stability … therefore it’s very important that as well as having someone who can do a first-class job at home, we have someone who commands respect in the international arena,” Hammond said on Wednesday.

The recruitment process has been designed to ensure that the most qualified candidate is appointed from the broadest possible pool of applicants, the finance ministry said.

Potential candidates include former BOE deputy governor Andrew Bailey who is now chief executive of the Financial Conduct Authority, a markets regulator, and current top officials at the BOE including deputy governor Ben Broadbent and chief economist Andy Haldane.

Raghuram Rajan, who was governor of the Reserve Bank of India from 2013 to 2016, and chief economist at the International Monetary Fund between 2003 and 2006, declined to comment when he was asked this month whether he would consider a return to active policymaking.

The Treasury has appointed a recruitment firm, Sapphire Partners, to help in the search – the first time it has sought external help to find a BOE governor.

A Treasury official said the appointment of recruiters would help ensure the widest pool of candidates for the job. The Treasury was aiming to conduct interviews for the job over the summer.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: huw jones, william schomberg, simon dawson, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bank, starts, caliber, job, important, treasury, ensure, hammond, chief, england, boe, britain, highest, search, governor, role, help


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Earnings and data could be proof that slowdown fears were overblown

The outlook for first-quarter growth has suddenly shifted upward, after a series of better data releases later in the quarter. This past week, China reported first-quarter GDPat 6.4%, slightly better than the 6.3% expected by economists. I think investors have kind of gotten past this notion of global downturn. I do think next week is going to be important for earnings. Dan Suzuki, portfolio strategist at Richard Bernstein Advisors, said he still sees deteriorating fundamentals for both earnings


The outlook for first-quarter growth has suddenly shifted upward, after a series of better data releases later in the quarter. This past week, China reported first-quarter GDPat 6.4%, slightly better than the 6.3% expected by economists. I think investors have kind of gotten past this notion of global downturn. I do think next week is going to be important for earnings. Dan Suzuki, portfolio strategist at Richard Bernstein Advisors, said he still sees deteriorating fundamentals for both earnings
Earnings and data could be proof that slowdown fears were overblown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-19  Authors: patti domm, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, important, slowdown, quarter, investors, proof, china, market, overblown, fears, earnings, data, going, think, week


Earnings and data could be proof that slowdown fears were overblown

Earnings season shifts into a higher gear in the week ahead, as investors also watch for fresh economic data that could show that the economy is pulling out of a temporary rut.

Amazon, Boeing, Microsoft and ExxonMobil are among more than 140 S&P 500 companies reporting quarterly results. According to Refinitiv, 74% of the companies reporting so far have beaten expectations. Based on forecasts and actual reports, earnings for the S&P 500 as a whole are expected to decline 1.7%, the first negative quarter in three years. Some forecasters had projected an earnings decline of 4% or more.

The equivalent of the economy’s first-quarter report card will be released Friday, with the first reading of GDP. The outlook for first-quarter growth has suddenly shifted upward, after a series of better data releases later in the quarter. CNBC/Moody’s Analytics Rapid Update survey shows economists’ median forecast is now tracking at 2.4%, way above the 1% expected earlier in the quarter, when severe winter weather and the government shutdown were stifling the economy.

At the same time, investors are feeling better about global growth and far less fearful of a recession in the near term. One reason is that China’s data has also been picking up. This past week, China reported first-quarter GDPat 6.4%, slightly better than the 6.3% expected by economists.

“I think a lot of this is leveraged on economic activity. I think investors have kind of gotten past this notion of global downturn. The China number was pretty good earlier in the week. I do think next week is going to be important for earnings. We’re going to get a great cross section of industries,” said Jack Ablin, CIO at Cresset Wealth Advisors. On Wednesday, China’s first quarter GDP

U.S. trade talks with China could be also important in the week ahead, with negotiations continuing and investors awaiting news of a summit between President Donald Trump and China President Xi Jinping.

Dan Suzuki, portfolio strategist at Richard Bernstein Advisors, said he still sees deteriorating fundamentals for both earnings and the economy, even though data appears to be improving.

“I think it’s a function of expectations were probably dropping too quickly, and I think recent data is telling you that growth isn’t collapsing but it’s slowing,” he said. “I think that’s very important. That’s probably going to be the most important dynamic. That’s probably going to continue.”

That could make for a choppier market at some point, he said. Suzuki said he could see stocks ending the year higher than current levels but he expects to see the market pull back first.

The market shrugged off Thursday’s release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the Trump campaign and Russian election interference.

“This type of thing firmly falls into the category of it can move the needle for the market on a daily or weekly performance basis, but it’s not going to be a longer term story for the market,” Suzuki said. Analysts have said the economy’s performance is more important for Trump’s reelection than the report at this point.

What to Watch

Monday

Earnings: Halliburton, Kimberly-Clark, Whirlpool, Celanese, Allison Transmission, Range Resources, WW Grainger, Zions Bancorp, Cadence Designs

10:00 a.m. Existing home sales

Tuesday

Earnings: Coca-Cola, Lockheed Martin, Procter and Gamble, Verizon, Twitter, NextEra Energy, Northern Trust, Teradyne, Carlisle Cos, United Technologies, Fifth Third, JetBlue, Harley Davidson, PulteGroup, State Street, eBay, Six Flags, Stryker, Snap, Texas Instruments, Canadian Pacific Railway, Kaiser aluminum

9:00 a.m. FHFA home prices

9:45 a.m. Manufacturing PMI 9:45 a.m. Services PMI 10:00 a.m. New home sales

Wednesday

Earnings: AT&T, Caterpillar, Boeing, Facebook, Microsoft, Visa, Tesla, PayPal, General Dynamics, Northrop Grumman, Chipotle Mexican Grill, F5 Networks, Boston Beer, Churchill Downs, Netgear, Sirius XM, Moody’s, T.Rowe Price, Spirit Airlines, Graco, Biogen, Domino’s Pizza, Nasdaq OMX, Anthem, Boston Scientific

Thursday

Earnings: Amazon, 3M, Comcast, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Freeport-McMoRan, Hershey, Alexion Pharma, Altria, Barclays, UBS, Starbucks, Intel, Ford, Discover Financial, Eastman Chemical, Alaska Air, American Electric, Illinois Tool Works, Nintendo, UPS, DR Horton, Capitol One, Valero Energy, Southwest Air, Nokia, Tractor Supply, Brunswick

8:30 a.m. Initial claims

8:30 a.m. Durable goods 10:00 a.m. Housing vacancies

Friday

Earnings: Exxon Mobil, Chevron; Archer Daniels Midland, AstraZeneca, Colgate-Palmolive, Daimler, Cabot Oil and Gas, AutoNation, Autoliv, Bloomin’ Brands, Deutsche Bank, Sanofi, Sony,

8:30 a .m. Real GDP (Q1 advance)

8:30 a.m. Advance economic indicators

10:00 a.m. Consumer sentiment


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-19  Authors: patti domm, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, important, slowdown, quarter, investors, proof, china, market, overblown, fears, earnings, data, going, think, week


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Fed’s Clarida: US slowing, but expansion will ‘almost certainly’ break record

The U.S. is economy likely slowing from its strong rate of growth in 2018, with “important international risks” clouding the outlook, Federal Reserve vice chairman Richard Clarida said on Thursday. This summer, 10 years after the U.S. emerged from a punishing recession, “the current economic expansion almost certainly will become the longest on record,” said Clarida, vouching for the economy’s continued ability to grow. “That said, the incoming data have revealed signs that U.S. economic growth


The U.S. is economy likely slowing from its strong rate of growth in 2018, with “important international risks” clouding the outlook, Federal Reserve vice chairman Richard Clarida said on Thursday. This summer, 10 years after the U.S. emerged from a punishing recession, “the current economic expansion almost certainly will become the longest on record,” said Clarida, vouching for the economy’s continued ability to grow. “That said, the incoming data have revealed signs that U.S. economic growth
Fed’s Clarida: US slowing, but expansion will ‘almost certainly’ break record Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policy, break, economic, growth, clarida, risks, outlook, slowing, international, record, certainly, important, expansion, feds, rate


Fed's Clarida: US slowing, but expansion will 'almost certainly' break record

The U.S. is economy likely slowing from its strong rate of growth in 2018, with “important international risks” clouding the outlook, Federal Reserve vice chairman Richard Clarida said on Thursday.

This summer, 10 years after the U.S. emerged from a punishing recession, “the current economic expansion almost certainly will become the longest on record,” said Clarida, vouching for the economy’s continued ability to grow.

“That said, the incoming data have revealed signs that U.S. economic growth is slowing somewhat from 2018s robust pace,” Clarida said in remarks prepared for delivery at the Institute of International Finance policy summit.

“Prospects for foreign economic growth have been marked down, and important international risks, such as Brexit, remain,” Clarida said, referring to Britain’s presumed departure at some point from the European Union.

Coupled with “muted” inflation, Clarida said that outlook justified the Fed’s current policy stance, with rates roughly at a level that neither encourages nor discourages investment and spending, and a “patient” approach to any further rate moves.

The Fed has put further rate moves on hold as it assesses the degree to which economic growth is slowing, and how major overseas economies fare in coming months.

Tune in: Fed’s Clarida will be on CNBC at 3 p.m. ET on Thursday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policy, break, economic, growth, clarida, risks, outlook, slowing, international, record, certainly, important, expansion, feds, rate


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